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Agenda

 

OF Scheduled
COUNCIL MEETING

HELD ON

Monday 8 November 2021

AT 6.30pm

summons

 

You are advised that a Meeting of Council has been called by the Chief Executive Officer on Monday, 8 November 2021 at 6.30pm for the transaction of the following business.

 

In accordance with section 394 of the Local Government Act 2020 this meeting will be held remotely by electronic means and will be livestreamed via Council’s website. 

 

C LLOYD

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

 

 

ADMINISTRATORS

 

LYDIA WILSON                            CHAIR OF COUNCIL

PEITA DUNCAN                           ADMINISTRATOR

On 19 June 2020 the Acting Minister for Local Government appointed the Panel of Administrators for the City of Whittlesea and appointed Ms Lydia Wilson as Chair of the Panel.  The Panel of Administrators comprises of Ms Lydia Wilson, Ms Peita Duncan and Mr Chris Eddy who will undertake the duties of the Council of the City of Whittlesea until the October 2024 Local Government Election.

CHRIS EDDY                               ADMINISTRATOR

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

 

 

SENIOR OFFICERS

 

 

CRAIG LLOYD                             CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

FRANK JOYCE                            EXECUTIVE MANAGER GOVERNANCE & STRATEGY

KATE MCCAUGHEY                   DIRECTOR COMMUNITY WELLBEING

AMY MONTALTI                          DIRECTOR CORPORATE SERVICES

JANINE MORGAN                       EXECUTIVE MANAGER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

JUSTIN O’MEARA                       DIRECTOR PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

DEBBIE WOOD                            DIRECTOR INFRASTRUCTURE & ENVIRONMENT

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                           Monday 8 November 2021

 

 

ORDER OF BUSINESS

 

The Chief Executive Officer submits the following business:

1.            Opening.. 9

1.1         MEETING OPENING AND INTRODUCTIONS.. 9

1.2         ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT. 9

1.3         Present.. 9

2.            Apologies.. 9

3.            Declarations of Interest. 9

4.            Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting.. 9

5.            Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters.. 11

5.1         public Question Time. 11

5.2         Petitions.. 11

Nil Reports.. 11

5.3         Joint Letters.. 11

Nil Reports.. 11

6.            Officer's Reports.. 13

6.1         Connected Communities. 13

6.1.1       Community Leadership Program Framework. 13

6.1.2       Joint Letter Requesting Council to Amend Parking Restrictions in Brahman Walk Laneway.. 21

6.2         Liveable Neighbourhoods.. 31

6.2.1       Petition Request for indented parking spaces in Honeyeater Terrace, South Morang.. 31

6.2.2       Joint Letter - Sealed Path Construction in Tasman Park Bundoora.. 47

6.2.3       Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025. 53

6.2.4       Proposed declaration of road - Cameron Street, Donnybrook.. 99

6.3         Strong Local Economy.. 111

Nil Reports.. 111

6.4         Sustainable Environment. 113

6.4.1       Road Closure - Bindts Road, Wollert. 113

6.4.2       Petition – Removal of Eucalyptus Trees in Woodstock Drive and Shetland Way Doreen.. 131

6.5         High Performing Organisation.. 137

6.5.1       Contract 2021-100 Fuel Cards and Associated Products  137

6.5.2       Update on the current COVID-19 Pandemic response actions.. 143

6.5.3       Quarterly Corporate Performance Report (quarter ended 30 September 2021) 157

7.            Notices of Motion.. 199

Nil Reports.. 199

8.            Questions to Officers.. 199

9.            Urgent BusineSS.. 199

10.         Reports from Council representatives and ceo update.. 200

10.1       Administrator Peita Duncan Report. 200

10.2       Administrator Chris Eddy Report. 200

10.3       Chair of Council Lydia Wilson Report. 200

10.4       CEO Update – 8 November 2021. 200

11.         Confidential Business. 201

11.1       Connected Communities. 201

Nil Reports.. 201

11.2       Liveable Neighbourhoods.. 201

Nil Reports.. 201

11.3       Strong Local Economy.. 201

Nil Reports.. 201

11.4       Sustainable Environment. 201

Nil Reports.. 201

11.5       High Performing Organisation.. 201

Nil Reports.. 201

11.6       Notices of Motion.. 201

Nil Reports.. 201

12.         Closure.. 201

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

 

Note:

At the Chair of Council’s discretion, the meeting may be closed to the public in accordance with Section 66(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 2020.  The provision which is likely to be relied upon to enable closure is set out in each item. These reports are not available for public distribution.

 

 

Question Time:

During the meeting, the Chief Executive Officer will answer questions from residents and ratepayers. Questions are required to be submitted in writing prior to the advertised commencement time of a Scheduled Council Meeting.  It is preferred to receive any questions by 3.30pm unless this unreasonably prevents or hinders you from participating.  A Question Time form can be downloaded from Council’s website and copies of the form are available at the meeting. Refer: https://www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au/about-us/council/council-meetings/

 

Council will hold public question time for up to 30 minutes at each Scheduled Council Meeting to allow members of the public to present the questions they have submitted to Council.  With the exception of when Council Meetings are held remotely by electronic means in accordance with section 394 of the Local Government Act 2020.  Members of the public will not be able to present their questions; however, the Chief Executive Officer will read out and answer questions from residents and ratepayers.

 

Council is committed to ensuring that all residents and ratepayers of the municipality may contribute to Council’s democratic process and therefore, if you have special requirements, please telephone the Governance Team prior to any Council Meeting on 9217 2294.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

1.         Opening

1.1       MEETING OPENING AND INTRODUCTIONS

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson will open the meeting and introduce the Administrators and Chief Executive Officer:

 

Administrator, Ms Peita Duncan;

Administrator, Mr Chris Eddy; and

Chief Executive Officer, Mr Craig Lloyd.

 

The Chief Executive Officer, Craig Lloyd will introduce members of the Executive Leadership Team:

 

Executive Manager Governance and Strategy, Mr Frank Joyce;

Director Community Wellbeing, Ms Kate McCaughey;

Director Corporate Services, Ms Amy Montalti;

Director Planning and Development, Mr Justin O’Meara; and

Director Infrastructure and Environment, Ms Debbie Wood.

 

Following the Introductions, the Chief Executive Officer, Craig Lloyd will then read the following prayer:

 

Almighty God, we ask for your blessing upon this council to make informed and good decisions to benefit the people of the City of Whittlesea. 

 

Our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive them that trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever.

 

Amen

 

1.2       ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson will read the following Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners Statement.

 

On behalf of the City of Whittlesea I recognise the rich Aboriginal heritage of this country and acknowledge the Wurundjeri Willum Clan as the Traditional Owners of this place.

 

I would also like to personally acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

 

1.3       Present

2.         Apologies

3.         Declarations of Interest

4.         Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

5.         Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters

5.1       public Question Time

5.2       Petitions

Nil Reports

5.3       Joint Letters

Nil Reports   


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

6.         Officer's Reports

6.1       Connected Communities

ITEM 6.1.1      Community Leadership Program Framework

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Wellbeing 

Also in attendance:              Manager Equity & Inclusion 

Attachments:                        1        Civic Event Outline     

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council endorse the City of Whittlesea Community Leadership Program Framework as described in Table 2 of this report.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

This report provides an overview of the new City of Whittlesea Community Leadership Program (the Leadership Program) that:

·                     Creates a coordinated, inclusive and accessible program for both civic and local community leadership development.

·                     Increases community participation and engagement in Council planning and decision-making processes.

·                     Pursues opportunities to work closely with external stakeholders delivering leadership programs.

·                     Supports Council’s compliance with the Local Government Act 2020.

 

Introduction
The development of the Community Leadership Program responds to the need for capacity building in:

·    Civic leadership and participation; and

·    General governance and leadership of community-led projects.

The program aims to:

·    Increase participants’ awareness, knowledge and practical application of civic leadership;

·    Enhance community members’ engagement in Council’s consultation processes; and

·    Increase community members’ capacity to lead their own projects.

The Community Leadership Program has been informed by:

·    Background research and benchmarking across local government and non-government leadership programs;

·    Community engagement; and

·    Consultation with other Councils, peak bodies and stakeholders involved with leadership training.

Council documents informing the Leadership Program are also summarised in Table 1 below.

Community Engagement Policy

The Community Leadership Program forms a key component of Council’s wider community engagement program underpinned by ‘A Voice for All’ Community Engagement Policy 2021.

The policy identifies the role of leadership as contributing to ‘greater transparency in Council’s decision-making; more genuine and meaningful conversations between Council and the community; and building community resilience, capacity and empowerment for local citizens’ (page 12).

Community Activate Toolkit

The Community Activate Toolkit (whittlesea.vic.gov.au/activate-your-community) is a collection of 18 resources (available on Council’s website), including templates and worksheets for community to assist with planning and implementing projects, events, advocacy campaigns and community group governance. A series of webinars was delivered to familiarise community members with this resource in 2021. The Community Leadership Program will utilise the Toolkit and build on the community feedback and evaluation of the webinars.

Table 1: Key Council documents informing the Leadership Program

Proposal

The City of Whittlesea Community Leadership Program brings together the learnings from the above inputs to develop a best practice approach for Whittlesea. The program is designed to:

·    Strengthen our community development approach for community leadership holistically and build capacity for community to engage in civic opportunities.

 

·    Deliver training opportunities that meet the needs of the whole community while retaining specialised training ‘streams’ as required, including for culturally and linguistically diverse communities, young people, women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and also for issue-based leadership e.g. environmental groups.

 

·    Allow for a sustained and coordinated approach over the next 4 years. As a Community Plan 2021-2024 initiative, the program proposes cross-organisational coordination, planning and delivery with an allocated budget over four years.

 

·    Develop a monitoring and evaluation framework to measure effectiveness of the program and to apply continuous improvement over the course of its delivery.

 


 

The City of Whittlesea Community Leadership Program Framework

The City of Whittlesea Community Leadership Program involves a number of key elements. Combined these elements form a framework for the current leadership program, and are summarised in Table 2 below

Element

Description

1.   CENTRALISED DIGITAL RESOURCE

A digital hub for community members interested in expanding their leadership skills and becoming more involved to make a positive difference. The hub will provide easy access to information about the Community Leadership Program and other City of Whittlesea leadership opportunities, as well as course details and how to take part.

2.   INTEREST BUILDER EVENTS

These ‘taster’ events are an opportunity for a wide range of community members to explore the possibility of leadership through a local government lens. It may encourage attendees to explore further leadership training opportunities.

Please see Attachment 1 for detail about the first Civic Event taking place in November 2021.

3.   ESSENTIALS FOR COMMUNITY LEADERS

 

Explores the essentials of leadership and provides participants with the insights, skills and confidence to make greater good happen. For aspiring and established community leaders, these workshops are designed to upskill or fill a skills gap before the participant commences Civic or Local Leader training.

4.   CIVIC LEADERSHIP

PATHWAYS

The Civic leadership pathway promotes participant’s ability to explore and engage in civic opportunities, including as candidates for local government election, advisory committees, etc. A suite of civic training opportunities works to build a ‘toolkit’ of skills, knowledge and theory, reinforced by hands-on learning.

5.   LOCAL LEADERSHIP

PATHWAYS

 

Participants build capacity in community leadership and participation so they can become even stronger and more effective leaders for local community-led positive change. A suite of local leader training opportunities works to build a local leader skills and opportunities.

Table 2: City of Whittlesea Community Leadership Framework

Community Plan 2021-2025

An inclusive Community Leadership Program is an initiative of the Community Plan 2021-25. The implementation of the Community Plan will be an integrated process in which Council seeks to leverage co-benefits across multiple, complementary initiatives. This concept is described in Figure 2 and illustrates how an inclusive Leadership Program will assist and enhance the implementation of other significant Community Plan initiatives.

 

Figure 2: Inter-connecting Community Plan 2021-2025 initiatives

 

Consultation

The development of the Community Leadership Program has been informed by Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey 2021; community feedback from the W2040 consultation, and more recent Community Plan 2012-25, internal and external stakeholders as well as staff consultation (such as the Place-based Approach Project, 2019). In addition, community participants of the webinar workshop series for the Community Activate Toolkit have also provided feedback.

Using Council’s A Voice for All’ Community Engagement Policy 2021, a comprehensive communication and engagement plan will be developed to ensure the program is promoted broadly across the municipality and is inclusive of the diversity of our community.

Critical Dates

The Leadership Program has been designed to run for a four year period from 2021 to 2024.

The inaugural event for the Leadership program will be held on 11 November 2021 (details in Attachment 1).

Planning for the civic leadership element of the Leadership Program has been informed by the Council elections in late 2024.

Financial Implications

The Community Leadership Program has been allocated $50,000 from the 2021-22 operating budget for the delivery of the first year of the Program.

Policy strategy and legislation

The Community Leadership Program:

·    Aligns with the W2040 vision to create ‘a place for all’ including the goal of Connected Community, key direction ‘a participating community’.

·    Responds directly to the Local Government Act 2020 requirement to facilitate stronger local democracy and to conduct deliberative community consultation and engagement. A coordinated leadership program can enhance communities’ ability to be more involved in Council’s engagement activities thereby strengthen local democracy. 

·    Aligns with the Community Building Strategy, and A Voice for All Community Engagement Policy.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

Failure to provide capacity building and leadership opportunities for community members has a detrimental impact on their ability to understand the operations of local government and how to become involved in decision making processes.

Strategic Risk Fraud and Corruption - Failure to prevent and/or detect fraudulent activity and corruption which may result in serious financial or reputational damage

Appropriate planning and programs can ensure there is ample opportunity for community members to be well informed, prepared, competent and ready to nominate as candidates for the 2024 Council election.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A participating community

 

Comprehensive community engagement undertaken as part of W2040 revealed that community want to become more involved in decision-making processes and have a desire to strengthen connection in their local community.  As part of the W2040 vision, Council acknowledges that a connected community is one that participates and is socially cohesive.  For this to occur across the municipality and at a localised place level, commitment and resources are required to strengthen the community’s capacity as leaders and active citizens.  This project will build on resourcing the community with practical training and ongoing leadership opportunities. 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The inclusive Community Leadership Program will be designed to ensure that Council has a coordinated program of leadership training opportunities for all.  The planned model will offer the community varied options to become involved in both holistic leadership training as well as targeted civic leadership training. An overarching aim is to build the capacity of community members to become involved in Council’s decision-making processes as well as to lead community projects of their own.  This will ensure that Council has a strategic approach to creating a stronger, healthier and more connected place for all to live.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council endorse the City of Whittlesea Community Leadership Program Framework as described in Table 2 of this report including a centralised digital resource, interest builder events, essential for community leaders training, civic leadership pathways and local leadership pathways.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                         Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

ITEM 6.1.2      Joint Letter Requesting Council to Amend Parking Restrictions in Brahman Walk Laneway

Responsible Officer:           Director Infrastructure & Environment 

Also in attendance:              Traffic Transport Engineering Officer 

Attachments:                        1        Map of Petitioners

2        Estate Sign and Line Marking Plan

3        Results of Parking Survey     

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Maintain the existing ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions in Brahman Walk laneway to ensure that the safety and accessibility for residents is not compromised; and

2.       Advise the head petitioner and petitioners of the outcome of the Council resolution.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

Residents abutting Brahman Walk are concerned with available car parking in the vicinity of the town houses abutting the Brahman Walk.

·    Residents identify that parking is inadequate with the parking restrictions that are in place in the laneway;

·    Residents feel that safety in their street is at risk; and

·    Request Council to reclassify and change existing parking restrictions in the laneway;

Introduction

Brahman Walk is a laneway located between Painted Hills Road and Overland Drive in Doreen that provides vehicular access to residents of Brahman Walk and residents of 117 to 133 Painted Hills Road.

A joint letter from 16 residents residing in 13 properties abutting Brahman Walk was tabled at Council’s meeting on 6 September 2021 (attachment 1). Concerns were raised of limited parking opportunities in the vicinity of the residential area and requested Council remove the existing ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions in Brahman Walk to allow additional parking for residents.

Background

Brahman Walk was constructed as part of the Mitchells Run Stage 5 subdivision in Doreen and was residentially established by 2011. The laneway is located between Painted Hills Road and Overland Drive with a length of 105 metres and width of nine metres between property boundaries.

The laneway is comprised of a five and a half metres wide asphalted road pavement, with mountable concreted areas on the east and west sides to cater for street lighting, signage and drainage.

Brahman Walk is designed to function as a common access laneway and provide vehicular manoeuvrability to and from the abutting 18 town house garages.

The laneway was not intended for pedestrian access or car parking. To ensure that access to private properties and safety was not compromised, the endorsed ‘As Constructed’ Sign and Line marking plan (Attachment 2) indicates the use of ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions.

The town houses have frontages on Painted Hills Road and Brahman Walk with footpath links to on-street car parking provided along Painted Hills Road and Overland Drive.

Parking Provisions

Townhouses abutting the Brahman Walk include two off-street parking spaces either a single garage with a front tandem space or a double garage with a short three metre front manoeuvring space (not for car parking). Off-street parking provision is in accordance with Planning Scheme requirements.

There are 21 on-street car parking spaces, comprising six indented spaces along Painted Hills Road, seven indented spaces along Overland Drive located west of Brahman Walk and eight spaces along Overland Drive located east of Brahman Walk. These are within a short accessible distance from Braham Walk properties (Attachment 3).

On-street parking provision exceeds the minimum Planning Scheme requirement for 4 visitor parking spaces for the 18 townhouses.

Safety Conditions

Council officers have reviewed the existing safety conditions along Brahman Walk. It is noted the laneway is designed in accordance with the approved subdivision and functions by providing vehicular access and allowing property ingress/egress.

The existing parking restrictions enhance safety by providing adequate sight lines and space for property ingress/egress vehicle manoeuvres.

Existing Parking Conditions

Council officers undertook seven (7) various onsite observations between 11 September 2021 and 15 September 2021 to determine the current parking demand in the immediate area of the town houses. The survey areas and results are shown in Attachment 3.

On-street parking observations indicate an average on-street parking demand of 29% (approx. 6 parking spaces) of the overall 21 indented on-street spaces supplied indicating a low demand for on-street parking in the immediate area. The parking occupancy surveys identify that there is ample parking in the vicinity for residents and visitors to the street.

It is noted with the easing of the COVID-19 state lockdown restrictions, residents would receive their freedom to leave their homes (such as attend work, visit friends and family) which would likely lower parking demand in the immediate area and increase parking opportunities for residents and visitors to the street.

Council officers also observed that there are some residents that are using their garages for general storage and not for parking the vehicles.

Proposal

No changes are proposed to existing parking infrastructure as there is ample car parking available on street in Painted Hills Road and Overland Drive.

Retention of existing parking management in the form of ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions in Brahman Walk is proposed.

Consultation

The head petitioner will be contacted to discuss the outcome. A letter will also be sent to inform petitioners of Council’s resolution on this matter.

 

Critical Dates

There are no critical dates proposed.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications to report.

Policy strategy and legislation

City of Whittlesea Road Safety Strategy (2017):

Address safety of all road users and path users,

Address driver behaviour and attitude towards vulnerable road users: pedestrians, cyclists and motorists.

City of Whittlesea Integrated Transport Strategy (2004)

Action RF 2.2: Manage local roads to improve amenity and safety for users.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Not linked to the risks within the Strategic Risk Register.

As no changes are proposed, it is not linked to the Risks within the Strategic Risk Register.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A healthy and safe community

 

Road and parking management contributes to a healthy and safe connected community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Parking occupancy surveys indicate that there are adequate parking spaces in Painted Hills Road and Overland Drive that are in close walking distance of the residences. As such there are no proposed changes to existing parking conditions in the immediate vicinity of the town houses and no changes required to the existing ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions in the Brahman Walk.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council:

1.   Maintain the existing ‘No Stopping’ parking restrictions in Brahman Walk laneway to ensure that safety and accessibility for residents is not compromised; and

2.   Advise the head petitioner and petitioners of the outcome of the Council resolution.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                         Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

6.2       Liveable Neighbourhoods

ITEM 6.2.1      Petition Request for indented parking spaces in Honeyeater Terrace, South Morang 

Attachments:                        1        Location of petitioners

2        Area Map

3        On-street parking in Honeyeater Terrace

4        On-street parking in Wattlebird Walk and Silvereye Place   

Responsible Officer:           Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Senior Traffic & Transport Engineer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Note that there is ample safe on-street parking available and the streets are accessible for delivery and garbage collection vehicles.

2.       Maintain the existing parking conditions, as there are no safety or operational benefits and installation of indented parking bays would have a detrimental impact on street trees and services.

3.       Advise the head petitioner and petitioners of the outcome of the Council’s resolution to maintain existing parking conditions.

Brief overview

A petition containing forty-seven signatures from residents in Honeyeater Terrace, Wattlebird Walk and Silvereye Place in South Morang was tabled at the Council meeting on 6 September 2021.  The petitioners advised that:

·    The residents are requesting indented parking spaces be provided

·    The road is narrow and unsuitable for parking on both sides

·    Delivery and garbage collection issues are experienced.

rationale for recommendation

The investigations indicate that the current on-street parking demand is low, with ample available on-street parking spaces directly in front of, or in close proximity to the residential properties.

The construction of indented parking bays would not result in an increase of on-street parking availability and would detrimentally impact street trees and other services in this area.

There is adequate road width to facilitate delivery and Council’s waste collection vehicle access.

impacts of recommendation

There will be no impact on the current traffic and parking conditions in the area.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

All petitioners will be informed via mail out of Council’s resolution on this matter.

 

Report

Introduction

A petition containing forty-seven signatures from twenty properties in Honeyeater Terrace, eight properties in Wattlebird Walk and one property in Silvereye Place in South Morang (Attachment 1) was tabled at the Council meeting on 6 September 2021.  The petition stated “We are requesting for Indented Car Spaces to be placed in the street, so that we can park our cars without causing issues to the road, potential accidents, and disruption to Australia Post and Garbage Removals”.

Further to the petitioners’ request, the head petitioner submitted an email advising of the following:

·    Residents in the area were advised that nature strip parking is illegal.

·    The road is narrow and unsuitable for parking on both sides.

·    There were many near misses in the street when cars were parked on the road.

·    Delivery and garbage collection issues were experienced.

Background

Land Use

The streets where petitioners reside are part of Riverside Estate, which was developed in the late 1990’s. The estate is located south of Gorge Road in South Morang and is surrounded by Plenty Gorge Parklands. The area is largely residential, with the exception of Morang South Primary School and Riverside Community and Activity Centre, both of which are located at the northern side of Riverside Estate.  

Honeyeater Terrace, Silvereye Place and Wattletree Walk are local residential streets located in the southern-most pocket of the estate, accessed only by local residents and their visitors (Attachment 2).

Road Network and Traffic conditions

Honeyeater Terrace is a curvilinear local residential street approximately 360m long and provides carriageway that is approximately 7.2m wide with unrestricted parking on both sides of the street.  The width of the road, the number of the driveways and the distance between the driveways are adequate for parking on both sides of the road, and provide opportunity for safe one-way traffic movement (at a time) where vehicles are parked on both sides of the road.

Honeyeater Terrace runs in a north-south direction from Stanley Jones Drive and changes direction to east-west at the 90-degree bend in front of 13 Honeyeater Terrace.  There is a small crest along the street located west of Silvereye Place, and a 1.5m wide footpath is provided on one side of the street.

All traffic enters and leaves via Stanley Jones Drive at the northern end.

Wattlebird Walk is a short curvilinear local residential cul-de-sac south of Honeyeater Terrace running in a north-south direction with a change of direction to east-west in front of 17 Wattlebird Walk. It provides access to thirteen residential properties, predominantly on both sides of the east-west section of the street. Seven of the properties have access via the two common driveway areas at the end of the street. There is no footpath provided along this street.

Wattlebird Walk is approximately 135m in length with a carriageway width of approximately 5.2 metres. The width of the road is:

•           Adequate for two-way traffic, if there is no parking on either side; or

•           Adequate for one-way traffic (at a time), and parking on one side of the road; and

•           Not adequate for parking simultaneously on both sides of the road.

Silvereye Place is a relatively straight local cul-de-sac south of Honeyeater Terrace that provides access to 8 residential properties located on the western side of the street. Plenty Gorge Parklands area is located on the eastern side of the street. Three properties at the end of the street share a common driveway area. There is no footpath provision along the street.

Silvereye Place is approximately 155m in length with a carriageway width of approximately 5.2m. The width of the road is:

•           Adequate for two-way traffic, if there is no parking on either side; or

•           Adequate for one-way traffic (at a time), and parking on one side of the road; and

•           Not adequate for parking simultaneously on both sides of the road.

Residential Access and Parking

Most properties in this area have their own driveway access, with the exception of some properties at the end of the streets that share a common driveway area.

All properties have double garages and many of the properties have long internal driveways where additional parking can be accommodated on site.

On-street Parking Provision

Honeyeater Terrace

There are approximately 50 legal on-street parking spaces available along Honeyeater Terrace; comprised of 37 spaces along the east-west section of the street and 13 spaces along the north-south section of the street (Attachment 3).

Wattlebird Terrace

The maximum legal parking provision along Wattlebird Walk is 11 parking spaces (Attachment 4). Given the curvilinear nature of the street most of these spaces are located along the north-south section of the street within walking distance of residences.

Silvereye Place

There are approximately 15 parking spaces available in Silvereye Place along the residential side of the street. This is adequate to provide safe on-street parking for the number of properties along this street (Attachment 4).

discussion

Traffic Operation and Safety

Honeyeater Terrace, Wattlebird Walk and Silvereye Place are local residential streets at the southern end of the Riverside Estate and their function is to provide residential property access. In this context, traffic volumes and speeds are considered at the lower end of that expected for local residential streets.

The streets have good road safety records with no recorded crashes in the past 5 years.

There is no tangible road safety or traffic operational benefit to convert the on-street parking spaces into indented parking spaces. The provision of indented parking bays would allow traffic to flow more freely and would therefore be more likely to encourage higher traffic speeds in the area.

There is adequate road width to facilitate delivery vehicle access and the Council’s waste collection contractors reported that no access or garbage collection issues are experienced in this area.

Parking Conditions and Management

Three site inspections conducted between 14 September and 20 September 2021 and aerial photographs from different periods indicate that the current on-street parking demand is low. There were ample available on-street parking spaces directly in front of or near the residential properties. All properties in this area have capacity to garage at least 2 vehicles, and most properties have setback distance between the garage and the vehicle crossing (driveway) to provide for additional on-site parking. This is above the minimum planning parking requirements stipulated in the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

A summary of the parking observations and map showing the legal on-street parking areas in Honeyeater Terrace is provided in Attachment 3 and in Wattlebird Walk and Silvereye Place in Attachment 4.

Indented Parking Bays

The installation of indented parking bays in established areas are generally considered in situations where there is either insufficient space within a property to meet normal parking needs, or where there are no existing legal on-street parking opportunities available in close proximity to a property.

The construction of indented parking bays in Honeyeater Terrace, Wattlebird Walk and Silvereye Place would not result in an increase of the parking availability in this area, and in some cases will reduce the number of available parking spaces.

There are several underground services, street lighting poles and street trees within the road reserve that restrict the practical opportunities for installation of indented parking bays.

As existing parking demand is low and indented parking bay construction would detrimentally impact street trees and other services in this area, indented parking bay construction is not recommended.

Illegal (Nature strip) Parking

Council records indicate community road safety concerns due to nature strip parking, creating reduced visibility issues in this area especially around the bend in Honeyeater Terrace. From the site inspections and the aerial photographs from different periods, it was evident that some residents choose to park on the nature strip, rather than on the road.

Under Victorian Road Safety Road Rule 197 it is illegal to park any part of a vehicle on a nature strip. Vehicles parked on nature strips obstruct the view of drivers and pedestrians entering and exiting driveways. They can cause damage to utility connections and tree roots under the nature strip, prevent access to utilities, and can negatively impact the aesthetic of the neighbourhood.

Proposal

No changes are proposed to the existing parking infrastructure as there is ample car parking available on street in Honeyeater Terrace and adjoining streets.

Consultation

All petitioners will be informed of Council’s resolution on this matter via a mail out.


 

Financial Implications

No financial implications to report.

Policy strategy and legislation

City of Whittlesea, Road Safety Strategy (2017):

            Address safety of all road users and path users

Address driver behaviour and attitude toward vulnerable road users: pedestrians, cyclist and motorists.

City of Whittlesea, Integrated Transport Strategy (2014):

Action RF 2.2. Manage local roads to improve amenity and safety of users and ensure consistency with SmartRoads principle.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Not linked to the risks within the Strategic Risk Register.

As no changes are proposed, it is not linked to the risks within the Strategic Risk Register.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Smart, connected transport network

 

The management of on-street parking is a critical component of a smart, connected transport network that is accepted by community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Council officer observations indicate that the current on-street parking demand is low. There are ample available on-street parking spaces directly in front of or near the residential properties.

The construction of indented parking bays in Honeyeater Terrace, Wattlebird Walk and Silvereye Place would not result in an increase in parking availability in this area, and in some cases would reduce the number of available parking spaces. 

As existing parking demand is low and indented parking bay construction would detrimentally impact street trees and other services in this area, indented parking bay construction is not recommended.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council, in regards to the petition regarding Honeyeater Terrace, South Morang, resolve to:

1.   Note that there is ample safe on-street parking available and the streets are accessible for delivery and garbage collection vehicles.

2.   Maintain the existing parking conditions, as there are no safety or operational benefits and installation of indented parking bays would have a detrimental impact on street trees and services.

3.   Advise the head petitioner and petitioners of the outcome of the Council’s resolution to maintain existing parking conditions.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                         Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

ITEM 6.2.2      Joint Letter - Sealed Path Construction in Tasman Park Bundoora    

Responsible Officer:           Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Team Leader Public Realm Development   

 

Brief overview

·    A joint letter from 22 residents was received requesting the granitic sand path in Tasman Park be replaced with a ‘properly sealed surface path’ such as concrete.

·    The joint letter was tabled at the 6 September 2021 Council Meeting and Council resolved: 

THAT Council receive the Joint Letter from 22 residents, relating to sealing of the path in Tasman Park and request that Officers present a final report on this matter and recommendations at the 8 November 2021 Council Meeting.

·    Council Officers have spoken to the joint letter lead to discuss their concerns and proposals.

·    The whole park is scheduled for renewal in the 2024/25 financial year.  The existing walking track would be upgraded to concrete as part of the scheduled upgrade.

rationale for recommendation

The granitic sand path through Tasman Drive Park has become a thoroughfare for visitors accessing surrounding precinct services.   Bringing forward the construction of the path will service the boarder precinct needs, not just improving access to the park and playground

impacts of recommendation

Bringing forward the consultation, design and delivery of the project will add to the proposed scope of the Park and Playground Renewal Program already planned for 2022/23.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

The Park and Playground Renewal Program budget in the 2022/23 New Works Program is proposed to be increased by $155,000 to account for the additional project and not impact the delivery of the proposed 2022/23 Park and Playground Renewal Program works. 

 

 

Report

Background

A joint letter was received from 22 residents, relating to sealing of the path in Tasman Park, Bundoora as the path becomes muddy and slippery when it rains.

Tasman Drive park and playground is a 2,000m2 Neighbourhood Park located between Tasman Drive and Alto Close in Bundoora.  The existing playground is currently 15 years old and is scheduled to be upgraded as part of a whole park and playground renewal for the site in the 2024/25 financial year.  The existing walking track surface material is granitic sand and would be upgraded to concrete as part of the scheduled upgrade.

There are four mature canopy trees located in the centre of the park which are to be retained and protected.

Fig 1 – existing conditions

Proposal

Three options were proposed for consideration:

Option 1 – Maintain.

·    Top up the existing granitic sand path and continue to maintain until 2024/25 when the whole park and playground is upgraded.

Option 2 – Construct a section of concrete path in 2021/22

·    Construct a 79m long, 1.5m wide concrete path in the same alignment of the southern granitic sand walking track to connect Alto Close and Tasman Drive.  This alignment is outside the mature tree’s structural root zone, will not impact on the future redevelopment of the playground area and provides an all-weather thoroughfare between Alto Close and Tasman Drive.

·    Works can be scheduled in Q3 of the 2021/22 financial year and be funded from the existing Footpath Reconstruction / Renewal Program in the 2021/22 New Works Program.

·    The balance of the park and playground works including consultation and engagement to be carried out in the 2024/25 financial year.

 

Fig 2 – Option 2

 

Option 3 – Construct Park and Playground upgrade including concrete path in 2022/23

·    Top up the existing granitic sand path and continue to maintain.

·    Bring forward the park and playground renewal scheduled for 2024/25 to 2022/23 financial year including the construction of the sealed concrete path and consultation and engagement with local community.

·    Increase the proposed Park and Playground Renewal budget in the 2022/23 New Works Program by $155,000 to account for the additional project.

·    This is the preferred option as the granitic sand path through Tasman Drive Park has become a thoroughfare for visitors accessing surrounding precinct services.   Bringing forward the construction of the path will service the boarder precinct needs, not just improving access to the park and playground.

Consultation

Council Officers have discussed the concerns raised in the joint letter with the joint letter lead.  Consultation and engagement with the broader residential community will be carried out prior to the whole of park and playground upgrade to determine how community are currently using the park and how they would like to see it improved.

Financial Implications

Option 1 – Maintain

·    Minor works and ongoing maintenance would be carried out under Council’s existing maintenance contracts.

 

Option 2 – Construct a section of concrete path in 2021/22

·    The estimated cost of construction is $15,000 excluding GST and can be funded from the existing Footpath Reconstruction / Renewal Program (CW-10771) in the approved 2021/22 New Works Program without impacting on the current annual scope of works. 

 

Option 3 – Construct Park and Playground upgrade including concrete path in 2022/23

·    The opinion of probable cost for the upgrade of the park and playground is $155,000 and is currently budgeted in the 2024/25 FY (CW-10792: Park and Playground Renewal Program).

Policy strategy and legislation

Open Space Strategy (2016)

Active Whittlesea Strategy (2019-2028)

Greening Whittlesea Strategy (2020-2040)

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Life Cycle Asset Management - Failure to effectively plan for the construction, on-going maintenance and renewal of Council’s assets

The current public open space assets in Tasman Drive park are aged. Many of the assets within the park will shortly reach the end of their useful life expectancy and no longer meet Council’s requirements for safety, amenity and play value.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Well-designed neighbourhoods and vibrant town centres

 

Redevelopment of the park and playground at Tasman Drive park will result in an upgrade of the existing facilities for the community, providing additional opportunities to the local neighbourhood for social interaction and play.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

By proceeding with option three, the pedestrian thoroughfare between Alto Close and Tasman Drive becomes an all-weather path, reduces ongoing top up and maintenance and enables the delivery of the park and playground upgrades as a combined project in the 2022/23 financial year.

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council in regards to the joint letter, to seal the path in Tasman Park, resolve to:

1.       Top up the existing granitic sand path in Tasman Park and continue to maintain until planned Tasman Park and Playground renewal is undertaken.

2.       Bring forward the Tasman Park and Playground renewal, scheduled for 2024/25 to the 2022/23 financial year, including the construction of the sealed concrete path and consultation and engagement with the local community.

3.       Refer the additional $155,000 budget increase of the Park and Playground Renewal Program in the 2022/23 New Works Program for the Tasman Park and Playground renewal, to the 2022/23 Council Budget process.

4.       Inform the Joint Letter lead of the Council resolution for the Tasman Park and Playground renewal.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

ITEM 6.2.3      Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 

Attachments:                        1        Domestic Animal Management Plan   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Development

Author:                                  Manager Compliance & Environmental Health   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

1.   Adopt the Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025;

2.   Submit a copy of the Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 to the Secretary of the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions for approval by 4 December 2021;

3.   Publish the approved Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 on Council’s website once approved;

4.   Inform key stakeholders of the approved Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025;

5.   Write to people who provided feedback on the draft Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025, thanking them for their submission, advising of Council’s response to their feedback and informing where to view the approved Plan on Council’s website; and

6.   Advocate to the State Government to establish consistent registration fees across all 79 Victorian councils.

Brief overview

Victorian councils are required to prepare and implement a Domestic Animal Management Plan (the Plan) every four years.

The Plan outlines Council’s proposed activities that will enhance management of dogs and cats, including responsible pet ownership; nuisance complaints; overpopulation; reduction of euthanasia rates; animal registration and microchipping; managing dangerous, menacing and restricted breed dogs; and monitoring domestic animal businesses.

The draft Plan was placed on public exhibition from 8 to 30 September 2021. There were 110 submissions received (summarised in the consultation section of this report) and amendments have been made to the Plan to reflect the community’s feedback.

rationale for recommendation

The Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 has been developed using community input obtained through community engagement activities held between March and May 2021 and a public exhibition period in September 2021.

Adopting the plan will enable Council to meet its legislative obligations under the Domestic Animals Act 1994.

impacts of recommendation

Council will enhance its animal management services by implementing the actions outlined in this Plan over the next four years.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Key messages, communications plans and engagement with the community and key stakeholders about implementation of key actions.

 

Report

Background

The Domestic Animals Act 1994 requires Victorian councils to prepare and implement a Domestic Animal Management Plan (the Plan) every four years.

Domestic Animal Management Plans outline Council’s proposed activities that enhance management of dogs and cats, including responsible pet ownership; nuisance complaints such as noise, trespassing and faeces; overpopulation; reduction of euthanasia rates; animal registration and microchipping; managing dangerous, menacing and restricted breed dogs; and monitoring domestic animal businesses.

The Plan has been developed alongside our Epping Animal Welfare Facility partners, the City of Darebin and Moreland City Council.

Community and stakeholder feedback was sought from March to May 2021 which informed the actions in the Plan. The draft Plan was placed on public exhibition in September 2021 and 110 submissions were received.

Further consultation with the community is planned to be undertaken in March/April 2022 about two key proposed actions – the proposed cat curfew and proposed mandatory cat desexing. It is important to note that this report does not endorse proceeding with these proposed actions as further community engagement is required before any further consideration by Council.

The existing Domestic Animal Management Plan 2017-2021 expires in December 2021.

Proposal

The Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 (see Attachment A) is being presented to Council for adoption following community engagement in April and May 2021 and a formal public exhibition period from 8 September to 30 September 2021.

The City of Whittlesea is home to 18,321 registered dogs and 6,798 registered cats, although the actual number of dogs and cats is predicted to be much higher when unregistered and unowned animals are taken into account.

The benefits of pet ownership are wide-reaching, including having proven benefits on people’s health and wellbeing by encouraging physical activity and providing companionship.

These benefits must be balanced with ensuring animals and humans can live together in our community safely and harmoniously. Council has a crucial (and legislated) role to play to support our community to maintain this balance.

Planned Activities

The Plan outlines how Council proposes to achieve this and includes planned activities that are designed to:

·    Encourage responsible dog and cat ownership;

·    Improve outcomes for impounded animals, including reuniting pets with their owners and rehoming suitable unclaimed animals;

·    Address overpopulation and high euthanasia rates, with a particular focus on the high proportion of unowned cats living in the municipality;

·    Reduce public nuisance and environmental issues caused by dogs and cats such as excessive barking, harming wildlife, roaming and faeces in public places;

·    Ensure Animal Management Officers are trained in contemporary animal management practices;

·    Effectively manage dangerous, menacing and restricted breed dogs to minimise danger to the community;

·    Minimise the risk of dog attacks on people and animals; and

·    Ensure that all Domestic Animal Businesses maintain the highest standards of animal welfare and are compliant with legislative requirements.

Education Initiatives

Council recognises that education and information is critical to encouraging responsible pet ownership.

Whilst Council currently undertakes a series of educational initiatives, we plan to increase our focus on education over the next four years, including:

·    Providing opportunities for the public to meet our Animal Management Officers and find out about local animal services, including at dog parks and community markets and events;

·    Presenting an annual pet expo in partnership with Moreland City Council and the City of Darebin;

·    Hosting online information webinars;

·    Partnering with registered dog trainers to present demonstrations;

·    Conducting a responsible pet ownership in schools program;

·    Microchipping events; and

·    Using social media to run campaigns about responsible pet ownership.

Registration Fees

Pet registration fees partially cover the cost of councils delivering animal management services and responsible pet ownership education programs.

Council received 13 submissions regarding pet registration fees, many of which commented that the City of Whittlesea’s fees are higher than other councils’ fees.

Further benchmarking was undertaken to assess the City of Whittlesea’s fees with adjoining councils, which showed that the City of Whittlesea’s pet registration fees are lower than those of neighbouring municipalities.

It was also noted that there are significant discrepancies in pet registration fees across different councils in Victoria with no set standard. Pet registration fees assist in resourcing important pet education programs and animal management activities outlined in Domestic Animal Management Plans.  It is therefore important fees are set an appropriate level to ensure these important activities can be performed by local councils.

As a result, an additional action has been included in the Plan to advocate to the State Government to standardise fees across all 79 Victorian councils.

Amendments Arising from Community Feedback

Community feedback received through the public exhibition period has been considered and amendments have been made to include additional actions. Amendments have been highlighted in yellow in the attached Plan and are outlined below:

·    Explore partnerships with real estate agents to advise Council when a new pet moves into the City of Whittlesea to help Council to increase pet registration;

·    Partner with vets to share information about responsible pet ownership;

·    Explore the installation of CCTV at dog parks;

·    Advocate to the Victorian Government to set consistent pet registration fees across all 79 Victorian councils;

·    Provide opportunities for the community to meet and learn from their Animal Management Officers, such as at dog parks and community markets;

·    Work with neighbouring councils, Parks Victoria and other key stakeholders to review signage in parks, ensuring consistent messaging about dog owners’ responsibilities;

·    Review the Domestic Animal Welfare Support Policy which relates to temporary care of pets that belong to family violence victim survivors; and

·    The officer training section has been updated to reflect the family violence training that Animal Management Officers undertake.

Consultation

There have been three opportunities for community members to provide their input into the Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025.

The first two stages of community engagement were conducted between March and May 2021, which included an online community survey, nine community place-based pop-ups in the City of Whittlesea and 10 phone interviews with key stakeholders.

Additional community pop-ups were conducted in the Darebin and Moreland municipalities.

A total of 3,049 contributions were received across the three Council areas from approximately 1,624 people who live, work or visit the Cities of Whittlesea, Darebin and Moreland.

There were:

·    1,255 surveys completed (486 from the City of Whittlesea)

·    Approximately 369 participants engaged at pop-ups (281 from the City of Whittlesea)

·    10 key stakeholder interviews conducted.

This feedback was used to create the draft Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025.


 

A formal public exhibition period was held from 8 to 30 September 2021. Council received 110 submissions on the draft Plan which related to the following topics:

·    Proposed cat curfew and mandatory cat desexing (53 submissions)

·    Pet registration (13 submissions)

·    Dog waste (12 submissions)

·    Dogs off leash (11 submissions)

·    Dog parks and walking paths (8 submissions)

·    Dangerous dogs and dog attacks (5 submissions)

·    Barking dogs (4 submissions)

·    Education initiatives (2 submissions)

·    Animal Management Officer training (1 submission)

·    Excess animal permits (1 submission).

The public exhibition period included:

·    An online presentation and question and answer session held on 23 September 2021. 35 people registered for the event and officers responded to 32 questions received from the public;

·    An e-newsletter sent to 12,000 recipients to advise that the draft Plan was available for feedback and inviting residents to attend the online presentation;

·    Information and polls on Council’s engagement platform; and

·    A media release, web and social media content (Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn) to promote the public exhibition period.

Critical Dates

·    March to May 2021 – two stages of community engagement were undertaken.

·    June to August 2021 – a draft Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 was developed.

·    8 September 2021 to 30 September 2021 – a public exhibition period to seek final community feedback on the draft Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 was held.

·    October 2021 – community feedback was considered and used to update the draft Plan.

·    November 2021 – Council will consider the Domestic Animal Management Plan
2021-2025 for adoption.

·    December 2021 – Council provides the Secretary with a copy of the final Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025.

Financial Implications

The City of Whittlesea contributed $22,000 towards community engagement to inform the Plan. This represents one third of the total project cost of $66,000, with the remainder being shared amongst Moreland and Darebin Councils.

Various initiatives within the Plan will require a budget allocation. These will be determined during the annual budget development process.

Policy strategy and legislation

Section 68A of the Domestic Animals Act 1994 requires all Victorian councils to prepare and deliver a Domestic Animal Management Plan every four years.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

The Domestic Animals Act 1994 requires Victorian councils to prepare a Domestic Animal Management Plan every four years.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A healthy and safe community

 

The Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 supports Whittlesea 2040 and the Community Plan goals of ‘Connected Community’ and ‘A Healthy and Safe Community’. It is through effective management of nuisance and safety issues that community safety is maintained at home and in public places.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 establishes the key priorities and actions relating to animal management over the next four years.

By working in partnership with the City of Darebin and Moreland City Council, the City of Whittlesea has produced a quality, industry-leading and well-informed Plan that will benefit our community and the animals who call the City of Whittlesea home.

This final phase of community consultation has been completed to ensure that Council can adequately respond to animal management issues that are important to our community.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Adopt the Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025;

2.   Submit a copy of the Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 to the Secretary of the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions for approval by 4 December 2021;

3.   Publish the approved Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025 on the Council’s website once approved;

4.   Inform key stakeholders of the approved Domestic Animal Management Plan
2021-2025;

5.   Write to people who provided feedback on the draft Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-2025, thanking them for their submission, advising of Council’s response to their feedback and informing where to view the approved Plan on Council’s website; and

6.   Advocate to the State Government to set consistent registration fees across all 79 Victorian councils.

 

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                         Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

ITEM 6.2.4      Proposed declaration of road - Cameron Street, Donnybrook 

Attachments:                        1        Declaration Plan

2        Site Plan

3        Title Plan   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Senior Property Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council, pursuant to section 204(1) of the Local Government Act 1989 (Vic) (“Act”) resolve to:

1.       Commence statutory procedures to consider declaring the whole of the land contained in certificate of title volume 12260 folio 394 (“Council land”) to be a public highway for the purposes of the Act

2.       Give public notice of the proposal, under section 223 of the Act, in the “Whittlesea Review” newspaper

3.       Establish an Advisory Committee of Council (the ‘Committee’) comprising of Administrator_________________ and Administrator ______________ (although one Administrator can be appointed) to consider written submissions and to hear those persons requesting to be heard in relation to their submission by the Committee at a format, time and date to be determined by the Committee

4.       Receive a further report on the proposed road declaration of the Council land, following the receipt of any submissions received pursuant to section 223 of the Act.

Brief overview

Council is currently governed by both the Local Government Act 1989 (Vic) and the Local Government Act 2020 (Vic). For the purposes of this report & to declare a road to be a public highway the Local Government Act 1989 (Vic) continues to apply.

This report seeks Council’s approval to commence the statutory procedures pursuant to section 204(1) of the Local Government Act 1989 (Vic) (the Act) to consider declaring the land shown on the road declaration plan attached to this Report at Attachment 1 (Declaration Plan), being the whole of the land contained in certificate of title volume 12260 folio 394 (Council land) to be a public highway for the purposes of the Act.

rationale for recommendation

For the reasons set out in the Report, the Council land is a ‘road’ for the purposes of the Act and capable of being declared a public highway.

Mirvac Pty Ltd has agreed with Council to construct the road on the Council land, at its cost, if Council acquires title to the Council land and declares the Council land as a public highway.

impacts of recommendation

Prior to Council considering the proposal to declare the Council land to be a public highway it must give public notice of the proposal in accordance with section 223 of the Act. 

If Council declares the Council land to be a public highway, it must record the Council land on its Register of Public Roads and it will then be responsible for the future inspection and maintenance of the Council land in accordance with its Road Management Plan.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

A further report will be presented to Council after giving public notice of Council’s proposal to declare the Council land to be a public highway.

 

Report

Background

Mirvac Pty Ltd (Mirvac) has acquired, or is in the process of acquiring, the parcels of land coloured pink on the plan attached to this report at Attachment 2 (Site Plan) to facilitate its development of the Olivine Estate (Development).

Part of the Council land, shown coloured grey on the Site Plan, abuts part of the land comprising the development.

As part of its Development, Mirvac designated the Council land as the location for a future municipal road to provide access to its development. Mirvac has agreed with Council to construct the road, at its cost, if Council acquired title to the Council land and is able to declare the Council land as a public highway. The title for this land was transferred into Councils name for nil consideration pursuant to the Road Management Act 2004 (Vic).

On 22 September 2020, Council acquired title to the Council land by the registration of an application pursuant to section 59(1) of the Transfer of Land Act 1958 with nil consideration.

Proposal

This report seeks Council’s approval to commence the statutory process required to consider  declaring the Council land to be a public highway for the purposes of the Act. The Council land must be a ‘road’ for the purposes of the Act for Council to consider the Proposal. The Council land is denoted as a ‘road’ on registered title plan no. TP939166Q, a copy of which is attached to this report at Attachment 3.

Council acquired title to the Council land under the Application on the basis that the Council land had vested in Council pursuant to clause 1(4) of Schedule 5 of the Road Management Act 2004 (Vic).

Council may consider the Proposal on the basis that the Council land is a ‘road’ for the purposes of the Act.

Consultation

Before considering the Proposal, Council must give public notice of the Proposal in accordance with Section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989. The Act provides that a person may, within the date specified in the public notice (being a date that is not less than 28 days after the date of publication of the public notice) lodge a written submission regarding the Proposal.

Where a person has made a written submission to Council requesting that he or she be heard in support of the written submission, Council must permit that person to be heard before a meeting of Council, or the Committee that has delegated authority to hear those submissions, giving reasonable notice of the date, time and place of the meeting.

After hearing any submissions made, Council must determine whether it should declare the Council land to be a public highway for the purposes of the Act.

All details on the declaration of the public highway will be advertised on Council’s website (Hive) via an engagement page as well as advertised in the Whittlesea review.  The engagement page and advertisement will include contact details for a Council Officer who can respond to community enquiries on this project.

Critical Dates

No critical dates exist in relation to this proposal or project, other than ensuring road access to the Olivine Estate and its surrounds.

Financial Implications

If Council declares the Council land to be a public highway, Council must record the Council land on its Register of Public Roads pursuant to section 17(2) of the RM Act. Council will then be responsible for the future inspection and maintenance of the Council land in accordance with its Road Management Plan.

Policy strategy and legislation

Before considering the Proposal, Council must give public notice of the Proposal in accordance with section 223 of the Act.

• Whittlesea 2040: a sustainable environment, a strong local economy

Local Government Act 1989 (Vic)

Local Government Act 2020 (Vic)

Road Management Act 2004 (Vic)

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk

Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Traffic congestion issues will be created with a corresponding impact on the liveability of the surrounding neighbourhoods if this road declaration is not made.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Smart, connected transport network

 

Declaration of the identified Council land as a public highway will provide access to the Olivine Estate and improve the liveability of the surrounding neighbourhoods.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

As the Council land is a road for the purposes of the Act, it is reasonable for Council to commence the required statutory procedures to consider declaring the Council land to be a public highway for the purposes of this Act.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council, pursuant to section 204(1) of the Local Government Act 1989 (Vic) (“Act”) resolve to:

1.   Commence statutory procedures to consider declaring the whole of the land contained in certificate of title volume 12260 folio 394 (“Council land”) to be a public highway for the purposes of the Act.

2.   Give public notice of the proposal, under section 223 of the Act, in the “Whittlesea Review” newspaper.

3.   Establish an Advisory Committee of Council (the ‘Committee’) comprising of Administrator_________________ and Administrator ______________ to consider written submissions and to hear those persons requesting to be heard in relation to their submission by the Committee at a format, time and date to be determined by the Committee.

4.   Receive a further report on the proposed road declaration of the Council land, following the receipt of any submissions received pursuant to section 223 of the Act.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                         Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                         Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

6.3       Strong Local Economy

Nil Reports


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

6.4       Sustainable Environment

ITEM 6.4.1      Road Closure - Bindts Road, Wollert 

Attachments:                        1        Locality Plan

2        Ownership Plan

3        Crash Data

4        Traffic Conditions

5        Quarry Hills Precinct Structure Plan Road Plan   

Responsible Officer:           Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Project Manager   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Endorse the proposed discontinuance of Bindts Road, Wollert to traffic between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road;

2.       Commence community consultation on the proposed discontinuance in accordance with Section 12 of the Road Management Act 2004 and Council’s Community Engagement policy;

3.       Give public notice of Council’s intention to discontinue and close Bindts Road, Wollert in the Government Gazette, Whittlesea Review and the Northern Star Weekly, including additional consultation and engagement to occur with the municipal community;

4.       Provide an opportunity for any person who has made a written submission in relation to the proposal and requested to be heard in support of their submission, to appear in person or by a person acting on behalf of that person at a meeting of the Council;

5.       Take into consideration all the submissions made on the proposal; and

6.       Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to make the necessary administrative arrangements for any submitters to be heard by Council.

Brief overview

This report considers the closure of Bindts Road, Wollert between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road (Attachment 1). This proposal is consistent with the development and road network (Attachment 5) as per Council’s strategic planning for the Quarry Hills Precinct Structure Plan (PSP) and meets the requirements of the future E6 strategy

rationale for recommendation

The section of Bindts Road between Lehmanns Road and Harvest Home Road provides no direct access to any local properties and as such is no longer required as an access road. This discontinuance is identified in Council’s Quarry Hills PSP and future E6 strategy.

The road closure has significant potential to reduce the road safety risks along the road, and maintenance obligations of Council. The road closure will not significantly impact local traffic accessing the residential properties on Bindts Road.

Bindts Road between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road is currently closed due to development in the Quarry Hills Precinct. Council officers have extended the road closure to allow the formal permanent closure to take place.

impacts of recommendation

Bindts Road between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road will remain closed to through traffic.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Signage and public notices of the closure.

 

Report

Introduction

This report considers the closure of Bindts Road, Wollert between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road (Attachment 1). This proposal is consistent with the development and road network (Attachment 5) as per Council’s strategic planning for the Quarry Hills Precinct Structure Plan (PSP) and meets the requirements of the future E6 strategy.

Background

Bindts Road runs north-south between Bridge Inn Road and Harvest Home Road, Wollert. Bindts Road is constructed to a rural standard, with gravel surface between Bridge Inn Road and Lehmanns Road, and light sealed sections between Lehmanns Road and Harvest Home Road. It provides local farm access. The local PSP’s and long-term strategy call for Bindts Road to be decommissioned as a local road once all accesses to it have been altered by the construction of the E6 Freeway or other localised urban development. Bindts Road between Lehmanns Road and Harvest Home Road will eventually be subsumed by the E6 Freeway road reservation.

Road Network and Land Use

Bindts Road in Wollert runs north-south for 3.2 km between Harvest Home Road in the south and Bridge Inn Road in the north. The western side of Bindts Road between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road has been developed into a residential area with access via the local road network, with no direct access from Bindts Road for either properties or local roads. The eastern side of this section is mostly rural and is undergoing development as part of the Quarry Hills PSP.

Bindts Road, between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road, is temporarily closed to through traffic due to the construction of the abutting residential estates to the east of the road. This section of road is no longer used for property access as all land to the east has been acquired by the developer, and land to the west has been subdivided without access to Bindts Road.

The Quarry Hills PSP identifies that Bindts Road is not required as a local access road and will eventually be subsumed as part of the E6 Freeway road reserve.

In addition, Quarry Hills PSP identifies the eastern extension of Whitebark Street, proposing a secondary access point to the new development. Extending Whitebark Street would create a crossroad intersection with Bindts Road creating both safety and operational challenges. 

Saltlake Boulevard is a north-south collector road that runs parallel to Bindts Road, between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road, and will provide alternative access to the traffic that currently uses Bindts Road.

The only section of Bindts Road that needs to be maintained at this time is the length between Bridge Inn Road and Lehmanns Road as there are residential properties along this section.

Road Safety

Bindts Road has had ongoing safety and operational challenges, recording two separate fatal crashes in 2018 and 2020.

In addition to these fatal crashes, VicRoads’ Road Crash Information System (RCIS) indicates that there have been three serious and four casualty crashes on Bindts Road since 2014. A summary of circumstances and details of crashes is listed in Attachment 4.

The pattern of crashes on Bindts Road indicates that the crashes are related to vehicles leaving the carriageway and impacting roadside hazards. It can be concluded that speed, volume and surface conditions are contributing factors for crashes along Bindts Road.

The proposed closure of the identified section of Bindts Road may reduce traffic and improve overall safety of the northern section of Bindts Road.

Current Traffic Conditions

Traffic surveys have been conducted on Bindts Road, with a summary of traffic conditions contained in Attachment 4. The majority of traffic using Bindts Road is travelling between Mernda/Doreen and Epping Road, one of the two-key north-south arterial roads of the city, as an alternative to, and to avoid road congestion at the Epping Road & Bridge Inn Road intersection near the quarry.

 These results indicate that:

·    About 700 vehicles per day use Bindts Road;

·    The majority of drivers travel at speeds in excess of the 50km/h speed limit regardless of the road surface (sealed or unsealed).

·    The highest speeds have been recorded was 120 km/h; and

Traffic volumes on the gravel section have more than doubled since 2014 and are around ten times greater than what would be expected for a local rural road.

At present the section of Bindts Road between harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road is closed under the Traffic Management Plan for the construction of residential estates in the Quarry Hills Precinct Structure Plan on a temporary basis, this proposal seeks to make that closure permanent.

Proposal

It is proposed to close Bindts Road, Wollert for the 1.6 km length between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road.

In accordance with the Road Management Act, Council Officers must:

1.   Prepare a report to Council recommending the closure of the road;

2.   Advertise the proposed road closure by consulting with relevant stakeholders, i.e. local residents, emergency services, and bus operators. This will include formal letters and the placement of a public notice in the local newspapers, allowing 28 days for public submission;

3.   Submit a report to Department of Transport with comments on the proposed road closure;

4.   Prepare a report and make recommendations to Council based on feedback from the proposal, including the Department of Transport report;

5.   Notify community and emergency services of the imminent road closure; and

6.   Implement the closure.

 

Consultation

In accordance with the Road Management Act 2004, Council must seek feedback from emergency services (i.e. Ambulance Victoria, Country Fire Authority and Victoria Police), bus operators, Utility Service authorities and Department of Transport during the formal consultation period.

A public notice advising of the proposed road closure is required to be placed in the Whittlesea Review, Northern Star Weekly and the Victorian Government Gazette calling for submissions from the general public over a 28-day period from the date of advertisement.

Council will undertake the following community engagement actions inviting submissions from the general public, road users and landowners on the proposed road closure:

·    A formal letter to owners and occupiers of properties abutting Bindts Road;

·    Social media posts on Councils Social Media accounts advising of the proposal and that Council is seeking feedback from the general public on the matter;

·    Use of the Have Your Say section on Council’s website; and

·    Signage on Bindts Road advising road users of the proposal to close Bindts Road.

Submissions will be considered by Council Officers and administrators with those making a formal submission able to speak in support of their submission at the Council meeting to determine the final closure, and the proposal amended if appropriate.

Critical Dates

It is proposed to commence consultation on 9 November 2021. This will involve the process described above and requirements under the Road Management Act.

It is proposed that the report with the final recommendation will be tabled at the Council meeting in February or March 2022.

Financial Implications

Road maintenance costs on Bindts Road are approximately $52,000 per annum for the full length of Bindts Road. By closing the southern section the potential reduction will be from $52,000 to under $30,000.

The cost to administer the road closure is estimated around $10,000.

Policy strategy and legislation

Road Management Act (2004)

City of Whittlesea Road Safety Strategy (2017):

Address safety of all road and path users.

Address driver behaviour and attitude towards vulnerable road users: pedestrian, cyclists and cyclists and motorcyclists.

City of Whittlesea Integrated Transport Strategy (2014):

Action RF 2.2: Manage local roads to improve amenity and safety for users.

Quarry Hills Precinct Structure Plan (2016)

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Life Cycle Asset Management - Failure to effectively plan for the construction, on-going maintenance and renewal of Council’s assets

Ongoing maintenance of road that is not considered to be of any strategic importance or required for access to local properties.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Smart, connected transport network

 

As per the reasons outlined in the discussion above, Bindts Road is no longer required as an access road. This discontinuance is identified in Council’s Quarry Hills PSP and E6 strategy. Due to ongoing maintenance expenses, development in the area and most importantly road safety it is recommended to commence the discontinuance of Bindts Road in the section described above.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Bindts Road runs north-south between Bridge Inn Road and Harvest Home Road, Wollert. Bindts Road is constructed to a rural standard, with a gravel surface between Bridge Inn Road and Lehmanns Road, and light sealed sections between Lehmanns Road and Harvest Home Road. It provides local farm access.

Section of Bindts Road between Lehmanns Road and Harvest Home Road provides no direct access to any of the local properties and as such is no longer required as an access road. This discontinuance is identified in Council’s Quarry Hills PSP and future E6 strategy.

The road closure has significant potential to reduce the road safety risks along the road, and maintenance obligations of Council. The road closure will not significantly impact local traffic accessing the residential properties on Bindts Road.

Due to the rapid pace of development in the area and potential road safety benefits, it is recommended to commence the discontinuance of Bindts Road in the section described above.

The timeframe to formally close Bindts Road could extend beyond twelve months.

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Endorse the proposed discontinuance of Bindts Road, Wollert to traffic between Harvest Home Road and Lehmanns Road;

2.   Commence community consultation on the proposed discontinuance in accordance with Section 12 of the Road Management Act 2004 and Council’s Community Engagement policy;

3.   Give public notice of Council’s intention to discontinue and close Bindts Road, Wollert in the Government Gazette, Whittlesea Review and the Northern Star Weekly, including additional consultation and engagement to occur with the municipal community;

4.   Provide an opportunity for any person who has made a written submission in relation to the proposal and requested to be heard in support of their submission, to appear in person or by a person acting on behalf of that person at a meeting of the Council;

5.   Take into consideration all the submissions made on the proposal; and

6.   Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to make the necessary administrative arrangements for any submitters to be heard by Council.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                         Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

ITEM 6.4.2      Petition – Removal of Eucalyptus Trees in Woodstock Drive and Shetland Way Doreen   

Responsible Officer:           Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Senior Arborist Planning & Risk   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council:

·     In response to a petition received on 1 September, 2021, endorses the removal and replacement of the 42 trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen, to be carried out as part of the capital project ‘Main Roads and High Profile Streetscape Planting Program FY21/22’.

·     Endorse that Council’s arborist will undertake a further assessment, to determine whether any of the 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen, require more urgent removal, due to health or structural concerns, and undertake these works as a priority.

·     Advise the head petitioner of the resolution and advise that Council will remove and replace the 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen as requested in the petition.

 

Brief overview

·    Council was handed a petition on 1 September 2021 containing 12 signatories requesting the removal and replacement of all existing (42) street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen.

·    The head petitioner has advised that issues from the trees’ roots have been ongoing since 2016 for himself and the other signatories of the petition.

·    A visual tree assessment of the trees was subsequently undertaken and several trees were noted to be in ill health, and some fungus was observed.

·    Following an assessment of the trees, the Senior Arborist Planning and Risk has recommended the removal and replacement of the 42 street trees as part of Council’s Main Roads and High Profile Streetscape Planting Program.

rationale for recommendation

The recommendations are proposed in line with the Council’s endorsed Greening Whittlesea Strategy and Street Tree Management Plan for the management of mature trees within a streetscape.

impacts of recommendation

Council’s existing tree assets continue to be managed in a sustainable way consistent with the Council-adopted Street Tree Management Plan (2019), whilst ensuring key concerns of residents are addressed where possible.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

The 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen will be removed and replaced as part of Council’s Main Roads and High Profile Streetscape Planting Program.

A small proportion of the trees identified in the petition are displaying signs of ill-health. These trees will be further inspected to determine whether they should be removed as a priority, ahead of the program’s renewal process timeframe.

 

Report

Introduction

Council received a petition with 12 signatories from residents of Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen requesting the removal and replacement of all existing (42) nature strip trees.

Council places a significant value on established street trees for the multitude of environmental, social and economic benefits that they bring to the local Community. This philosophy was recently reinforced by Council through the adoption of the Greening Whittlesea – City Forest Strategy which aims to increase tree canopy cover across the municipality by 20 per cent by the year 2040. For these reasons, Council only removes established trees in the most extreme circumstances. 

Council’s Senior Planning and Risk Arborist met with the head petitioner on site to discuss the issues raised in the petition. A visual tree assessment of the trees was completed to evaluate the status of the trees. The issue raised has been an ongoing concern with regard to foundation damage caused by adventitious roots from the street trees.

Background

Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen is a streetscape dominated by mature Eucalyptus scoparia (Wallangarra white gum or willow gum). Eucalyptus trees are an evergreen tree listed on Council’s approved street tree species list. E. scoparia is classified as a medium to large tree. The species planted in this streetscape is the most common street tree in the City of Whittlesea, making up 6% of the total tree population across the municipality. These trees are all currently managed and maintained proactively by Council on a biannual program.

A petition was received on 1 September 2021 signed by 12 residents requesting that Council remove and replace the existing (42) nature strip trees. The grounds on which the signatories believe that the current trees are unsuitable include:

·    Adventitious tree roots causing damage to foundations of houses.

·    Adventitious tree roots causing movement of foundations and causing internal damage (non-structural).

·    Large trees that have been over-planted, with 2-3 outside most residences.

·    A number of trees are in decline, showing signs of senescence, with fungal brackets visible in some trees.

A visual tree assessment (VTA) is the method used by trained arborists to inspect and assess trees in order to identify any defects or problems that may lead to structural instability or failure. The VTA system is based on the theory of tree biology, physiology and tree architecture and structure and is a method used by arborists to identify visible signs on trees that indicate good health or potential problems. Symptoms of decay, growth patterns and defects are identified and assessed as to their potential to cause failure.

A visual tree assessment was completed by Council’s Senior Planning and Risk Arborist on the street trees located in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen. The assessment confirmed that many of the trees were in ill-health, with significant deadwood and dieback throughout their canopies. Fungal brackets were confirmed on two separate trees at this time.

The Street Tree Management Plan defines the levels of service provided for Council’s street trees and the criteria by which Council does and does not remove trees. The specific details noted in the petition request along with previous history/interactions with the residents of Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Av) and Shetland Way, Doreen have been considered in the proposed response.

Proposal

The social, environmental and economic benefits of street trees make them an inherently valuable asset. Council has a current street tree stock of approximately 100,000 trees, the management of which is supported by the Street Tree Management Plan 2019.

The street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen have been assessed and provide a high level of amenity to the neighbourhood. However, many of the trees were in ill-health, with significant deadwood and dieback throughout their canopies. Fungal brackets were confirmed on two separate trees at the time of the assessment.

Council’s Planning and Risk Arborist has reviewed the request by petitioners for the removal of 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen and the following actions are proposed:

·    Include the removal and replacement of the 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen as part of the 21/22 Main Roads and High Profile Streetscape Planting Program.

·    Arrange for Council’s Arborist to undertake another assessment to determine whether any of the 42 trees require more urgent removal due to health or structural concerns and undertake these works as a priority.

Consultation

Council officers have consulted with the head petitioner which has included both verbal updates and electronic correspondence. Council officers have also responded to further correspondence from individual signatories.

A mail out will be arranged to advise of the proposed works to the 12 signatories.

Further consultation with all residents of Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen will be undertaken as part of the Main Roads and High Profile Streetscape Planting Program where residents will be able to guide the direction of the streets future treescape. Through this process, the residents will be consulted and given the opportunity provide input on the species selection (from a provided short-list), as well as being given the option to deny a replanting opportunity for their property.

Critical Dates

There are no critical dates associated with this report.

Financial Implications

The cost of removal and replacement of the 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen is estimated to be $49,140 (ex. GST).

The total amount includes the cost for removal and the supply and installation of appropriate replacement specimens, as well as the establishment and maintenance for the first 12 months after planting.

This estimation is based on recent works in Laurimar 1c, and their associated costs.

No new funding is required for the proposed works.

Policy strategy and legislation

The proposal to remove and renew the street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Av) and Shetland Way, Doreen is consistent with the following Council strategies and policies:

·    Whittlesea 2040 – A Place for All Community Plan (2018)

·    Greening Whittlesea City Forest Strategy 2020

·    Greening Our Streets Street Tree Management Plan (2019).

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

The City of Whittlesea Street Tree Management Plan 2019 outlines how Council will respond to requests for tree removal from the community. It communicates the criteria and information requirements whereby Council will support tree removals.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Sustainable environment

Key Direction                        Valued natural landscapes and biodiversity

 

The proposal acknowledges the value of streetscapes in our local community and the contribution of these trees to local amenity, biodiversity and urban shading/cooling. In recommending removal and renewal of the existing treescape the proposal hopes to help to improve the local amenity by committing to a more appropriate tree species for the local conditions.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The petition listing 12 signatories requesting the removal and replacement of the existing (42) street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen has been reviewed and Council’s Senior Planning and Risk Arborist recommendations are presented. As a result, the following actions are proposed:

·    Include the removal and replacement of the 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen as part of the 21/22 Main Roads and High Profile Streetscape Planting Program.

·    Undertake a further arboricultural assessment to determine whether any of the 42 street trees require more urgent removal due to health or structural concerns, then and undertake these works as a priority.

·    Consult with the residents concerned, via the head petitioner, as to the replacement species, and timing of works proposed.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council:

1.   In response to a petition received on 1 September, 2021, endorse the removal and replacement of the 42 trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen, to be carried out as part of the capital project ‘Main Roads and High Profile Streetscape Planting Program FY21/22’.

2.   Endorse that Council’s arborist will undertake a further assessment, to determine whether any of the 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen require more urgent removal, due to health or structural concerns and undertake these works as a priority.

3.   Advise the head petitioner of the resolution and advise that Council will remove and replace the 42 street trees in Woodstock Drive (east of Brookwood Avenue) and Shetland Way, Doreen as requested in the petition.

  


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

6.5       High Performing Organisation

ITEM 6.5.1      Contract 2021-100 Fuel Cards and Associated Products 

Attachments:                        1        2021-100 Contract Tender Evaluation Report - Confidential attachment - Confidential

This attachment has been designated as confidential by the Director Infrastructure & Environment, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Rule 53 of the Governance Rules 2021 and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that—  (i) relates to trade secrets; or (ii) if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. The attachment contains tender amounts submitted by tenderers and tender evaluation scoring prepared by Council officers.  It also contains details of credit and reference checks about the tenderers provided to Council in confidence. The release of this information could reasonably be expected to prejudice the commercial position of the persons who supplied the information or to confer a commercial advantage on a third party.    

Responsible Officer:           Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Procurement Specialist   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

It is recommended that contract number 2021-100 for Fuel Cards and Associated Products:

·    is awarded via the State Purchasing Contract to Ampol Limited as the primary supplier and Viva Energy Australia as the secondary supplier

·    for the tendered schedule of rates with total expenditure limited to $1,162,500 (excl. GST)

·    for a term from 1 December 2021 to 30 June 2024 with extension options to 30 June 2026.

Brief overview

The tender evaluation panel advises that:

·    Thirteen offers are available to Council under arrangements established by the Victorian State Government, the Municipal Association of Victoria and Procurement Australasia.  These were evaluated to determine the best value solution that meets Council’s needs.

·    Engagement of the recommended tenders under the Victorian State Purchasing Contract was considered best value after an objective scoring system was applied.

rationale for recommendation

The recommendation of engaging Ampol Limited as the primary supplier and Viva Energy Australia as the secondary supplier via the State Purchasing Contract, is based on an objective evaluation that considered the price (including fees, discounts and value added benefits) as well as the number of fuel outlets in the municipality and the proximity of these fuel outlets to Council’s Civic Centre and key depots.


 

impacts of recommendation

Appointing Ampol Limited as the primary supplier via the State Purchasing Contract will deliver the greatest savings to Council and convenience to users of both the light fleet passenger vehicles and light and heavy plant. Due to retailer locality, the reliance on a single retailer’s card may adversely impact some of the vehicle custodians who pay for private use of a Council vehicle.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

The State Purchasing Contract has available options from additional retailers. The appointment of Viva Energy Australia as a secondary supplier should adequately cater for the needs of staff with private use of a Council vehicle, who do not live within close proximity of an Ampol outlet.

 

 

Report

Background

The purpose of this contract is to replace the existing fuel card contract 2017-137 which expires on 31 January 2022. The existing contract was awarded to Caltex Australia Pty Ltd (now Ampol Limited) as part of a collaborative tender conducted by the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV). There are several collaborative contract options available to Council, which has prompted a contract review.

Analysis of the tendered prices and a summary of the evaluation are detailed in the confidential attachment.

Consultation

Extensive consultation was conducted with the Council’s fleet management team to determine organisational needs and impact on staff with private use of a Council vehicle.

EVALUATION

No member of the Tender Evaluation Panel declared any conflict of interest in relation to this tender evaluation.

Due to the variety of available offers to assess, a customised and highly objective evaluation process was adopted during this evaluation in accordance with item 13j of the Procurement Procedures. An evaluation plan was designed specifically for this tender process and all tenders were evaluated in accordance with that plan. The evaluation involved scoring of conforming and competitive tenders according to these pre-determined criteria and weightings.

Criteria

Weighting

Price

80%

Availability

10%

Proximity

10%

The weightings reflect the relative importance of each element to this particular contract.  They were determined as being most appropriate after considering numerous factors including (but not restricted to) price, prevalence of retailer and ease of access to sites which were likely to have the most impact on the achievement of best value.

Only tenders that were conforming and competitive were fully scored.  Tender submissions that were evaluated as non-conforming or not sufficiently competitive were set aside from further evaluation.  In cases where this occurred the reasons for that outcome are detailed in the confidential attachment.

The evaluation outcome was as follows:

TENDERER

CONFORMING

COMPETITIVE

SCORE

RANK

Tenderer A: Ampol Limited

Yes

Yes

98.3

1

Tenderer B: Viva Energy Australia

Yes

Yes

95.2

2

Tenderer C

Yes

Yes

94.7

3

Tenderer D

Yes

Yes

94.3

4

Tenderer E

Yes

Yes

93.8

5

Tenderer F

Yes

Yes

93.1

6

Tenderer G

Yes

Yes

91.5

7

Tenderer H

Yes

Yes

89.2

8

Tenderer I

Yes

Yes

86.5

9

Tenderer J

Yes

Yes

86.2

10

Tenderer K

Yes

No

N/A

N/A

Tenderer L

Yes

No

N/A

N/A

Tenderer M

Yes

No

N/A

N/A

Refer to the confidential attachment for further details of the evaluation of all tenders.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Sufficient funding for this contract is available in the budget for Operations: Fuel and Oil.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Accessing fuel to operate plant and fleet is critical in enabling Council to deliver its services to the community.

Links to WHITTLESEA 2040 AND the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              High-performing organisation

Key Direction              More cost-effective investment through better return on investment, efficiency and an engaged workforce

The award of this contract will achieve a reduction on current costs while continuing to meet Councils fuel requirements vital for the delivery of services to the community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

The tenders from Ampol Limited and Viva Energy Australia via the State Purchasing Contract were determined to be best value based on the objective evaluation scoring method applied and it is considered that these suppliers can perform the contract to the required standards. 

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to:

1.         Accept the tender submitted by Ampol Limited (Primary Supplier) and Viva Energy Australia (Secondary Supplier) for the schedule of rates detailed in the confidential attachment for the following contract:

Number:    2021-100

Title:          Supply of Fuel Cards and Associated Products

Term:         1 December 2021 to 30 June 2024

Options:    Term extension up to 30 June 2026 (only to be exercised if separately approved by Council)

Value:        Total expenditure is limited to a maximum of $1,162,500 (excluding GST) unless otherwise approved by Council

subject to the following conditions:

a)    Price variations to be in accordance with the provisions as set out in the tender documents.

2.         Approve the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

ITEM 6.5.2      Update on the current COVID-19 Pandemic response actions

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Development 

Also in attendance:              Manager Emergency Management & Regulatory Programs     

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council:

a.   Waive the 2021-22 registration renewal fees by 50% of 1,276 local businesses registered under the Food Act 1984 and the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 that have been impacted by the State Government COVID-19 restrictions during 2020 (Table 1), including 50% of staff fees associated to registration renewals (Table 2). The total expected income to be waived from Food and PHW renewals is $370,934.50.

b.   Waive the 2021-22 fees for the Inspection of Aquatic Facilities, as scheduled under the Environment Protection Act 2018. The total expected income to be waived from Aquatic Facilities fees is $4,315.

c.   Waive the 2021-22 registration fees of sporting clubs. The total expected income to be waived is $74,135.

d.   Waive the 2021-22 fees for outdoor dining and footpath trade permits, as scheduled in Councils current fees and charges. The total expected income to be waived from Municipal Local Law renewals is $14,510.

e.   Extend outdoor dining to neighbouring properties footpaths to 30 June 2022, pending neighbouring business owner’s permission, and waive any Local Law fee associated with an extension of trade.

f.    Cover the cost of public liability insurance for businesses expanding their trade onto the footpath and extension of trade to neighbouring properties footpath.

g.   Engage with and support privately owned shopping centres to temporarily expand footpath trading and/or outdoor dining in communal spaces or car parks.

h.   Extend the temporary structure (currently taking up 1.5 car spaces) in Oleander Drive, Mill Park until 30 June 2022.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

Every department and team across Council has greatly contributed to the support of our local residents and businesses. Council has responded actively to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

·    Council introduced a series of early relief actions throughout 2020 and into 2021 in order to support the community.

·    Actions have continued throughout 2021 and will continue into 2022 and have become more complex in nature as the community moves into recovery phase, albeit still in a response and relief phase.

·    Hospitality and beauty services industry have been amongst the most impacted sectors, and many remained closed throughout each lockdown period.

·    To further support local business Council Officers recommend additional financial concessions and waive the 2021-22 registration renewal fees of most Food and Public Health businesses by 50% and waive the 2021-22 inspection fees for Aquatic Facilities.

Introduction

Melbournians have endured and lived through an extended period of lockdown restrictions. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact both globally and locally on the social, economic and the built and natural environments. While reoccurring themes focused on mental health, financial stress and social isolation.

Since March 2020, COVID-19 has deeply affected many businesses with the demand for goods and services and cash flow considerably reduced. Consequently, the effects on business, reduction of staff and staff hours have directly impacted individuals and families in our community.

The role of local government in emergencies is to coordinate local relief and recovery. Council engaged with the community in early 2021 and developed a set of pandemic recovery actions that the community highlighted as important to their recovery. These actions were adopted by Council in July as part of a $2 million Community Recovery Action Plan.

In addition to the $2 million Community Recovery Action Plan, Council is continuing to respond to the recovery of our community, with the delivery of many other projects and initiatives. Through collaboration, successful grant submissions and support across all areas of Council, a range of initiatives and projects are being delivered to support individuals, families and business.

Background

2020 was a year of unprecedented emergencies in Victoria. Significant bushfires in the Gippsland and Hume regions of the state and the global COVID-19 Pandemic challenged existing emergency management arrangements.

Council has responded actively from the beginning and introduced a series of early relief actions throughout 2020 and into 2021 to support the community. 

Initial actions included:

·         Supporting vulnerable individuals, groups, local non-government community service organisations and family violence service system by establishing a $500,000 Emergency Relief Fund.

·         Transitioning from face-to-face to online platforms for community and youth groups activities, ageing well services and arts and cultural events.

·         Implementing a rapid $450,000 Business Assistance and Resilience Grants Program for 103 businesses experiencing financial hardship and providing support that contributes to local business viability and resilience.

·         Assisting with mental health and wellbeing of the community members by providing materials to increase resilience during social and physical distancing restrictions.

·         Looking after public areas by implementing a higher level of cleaning and disinfection of the most utilised public outdoor spaces.

·         Amending services delivered by Council to comply with Victorian Government restrictions to support the community.

·         Facilitating intergenerational connections with over 1000 students writing letters for elderly residents letting them know that they were thinking about them.

·         Participating in the Working for Victoria program - recruited over 200 temporary staff that included roles to deliver meals to local community members and community development activities.


 

Waiving of business fees and charges

Councils initial response included waiving of various fees and charges applicable to business, to directly support business to continue to trade where appropriate, such as the expansion of outdoor dining and footpath trade.

Food and Health and Wellbeing businesses:

In November 2020 Council waived the renewal of registration fees for Food Act and Public Health and Wellbeing Act registered businesses, affected by the State Government COVID-19 restrictions. This directly supported 1,180 registered businesses in the municipality.

This resulted in a $506,958 reduction in registration fees in the 2020/21 financial year.

Outdoor Dining / Footpath Trade:

Council has an important role in issuing outdoor dining permits for businesses to support trade as part of pandemic recovery efforts. Council elected to waive fees for outdoor dining and footpath trade for the 2020/21 financial year.

Estimated revenue reduction was:

§ 70 outdoor dining premises’ registered and each permit fee is $170

§ 30 A-Frames registered and each permit fee is $87

Total revenue reduction estimated to be $14,510.

Sporting Club fees

Sports clubs within the city are allocated and charged according the type of tenure agreement they have with Council. Over the course of 2020 sporting club operations were significantly disrupted, and seasons aborted for some codes.

In 2020 Council provided fee discounts as follows:

§ Winter seasonal clubs, received a 100% fee subsidy (a 50% fee discount after lockdown 1, and this increased to 100% fee discount following lockdown 2)

§ Summer season clubs, received a 50% fee discount

§ Tennis clubs, received a 50% fee discount

Total revenue reduction estimated to be $101,614.

Proposal

This report provides an overview of current projects and initiatives and recommends that Council waives certain fees and charges as part of the pandemic recovery effort.

Further waiving of fees and charges

Council annually registers food businesses under the State Government Food Act 1984 as well as beauty therapy, skin penetration (i.e. tattooist, body piercing) and prescribed accommodation (i.e. hotels/motels, rooming houses) businesses under the Public Health and Wellbeing (PHW) Act 2008.  Income from these fees helps offset some of the costs of Council’s Environmental Health inspection and surveillance programs.

Due to the impact on businesses from continuing restrictions, it is recommended that Council waive 50% of registration renewal fees as per the tables on the next page.


 

Table 1: Food and PHW renewals 2021/22

Renewal Types

Premises as of 25.08.21

Premises charged a fee*

Base fee

Total

No. of premises to have fees waived

50% of Base fee

Food Class 1

80

79

$832

$65,728

62

$25,792

Food Class 2

833

794

$568

$450,992

766

$217,544

Food Class 3

271

266

$352

$93,632

255

$44,880

PHW (General)

190

190

$226

$42,940

190

$21,470

PHW (Accommodation)

36

36

$404

$14,544

3

$606

Total

1,410

1,365

 

$667,836

1,276

$310,292

The base renewal fee includes up to five full time staff (including owners and proprietors). Businesses that employ more than five employees must pay a staff fee, which is calculated on the number of part time and full time staff employed. It is recommended that Council  waive 50% of the staff fee.

Table 2: Staff fees

Description of fee

Fee charge

Total staff no.

Total Cost

Total Fee to be waived at 50%

Staff fee for food premises for each staff member greater than 5

 

$25.40

 

4,775

 

$121,285

 

$60,642.50

The total expected income to be waived from Food and PHW renewals is $370,934.50

Outdoor Dining / Footpath Trade Permit Fees

In the initial COVID response phase in last financial year 2020/21 Council waived permit fees for outdoor dining and footpath trading.  It is recommended that fees continue to be waived this financial year and estimated revenue reduction is:

·         70 outdoor dining premises’ registered and each permit fee is $170

·         30 A-Frames registered and each permit fee is $85

Total revenue reduction estimated to be $14,450.

Health Inspections of Pools Fees & Charges

Health inspection fees under the State Government Environment Protection Act for publicly accessible pools is a new fee that took effect on 1 July 2021. There is a base fee for a one pool facility and a variable additional pool fee for each additional pool for a larger facility.  

·    Base Aquatic Facility Fee (includes one pool) - $220

·    Additional Pool Fee (each pool greater than 1 pool) - $65

It is recommended that Council waives registration fees for Aquatic Facilities.

Summary of Aquatic Facilities:

·         Funfields with 8 pools = $675

·         TRAC & Mill Park Leisure with 5 pools = $480 each

·         Whittlesea Swim Centre with 3 pools = $350

·         2 private Aquatic Facilities with 2 pools = $285 each

·         8 private Aquatic Facilities with 1 pool = $220 each

The total expected income to be waived from Aquatic Facilities fees is $4,315.

COVID-19 budget impacts for Sport and Recreation – 2021-22

Sports clubs operating within the city are charged an annual fee for use of Council owned sporting facilities. Over the course of 2021 sporting club operations have been significantly disrupted, and seasons aborted, as a result of COVID-19 lockdowns and restrictions. Many clubs with impacted sporting seasons are currently seeking information on the status of their fees, and how Council intends to support sport through the pandemic effects of 2021.

Due to the impacts on clubs from lockdowns and reopening restrictions, it is recommended that Council provides a 50% discount on fees for sporting clubs in 2021-22. Fee relief will assist clubs to manage their operations through COVID-19, to ensure they are able to reopen and continue to provide community benefit when restrictions allow, as well as to recognise restricted access to facilities this year, arising from government restrictions.

Sporting Club fees

Sports clubs within the city are allocated and charged as per the type of tenure agreement they have with Council. The three tenure types, and when they are typically invoiced, are:

§ Winter seasonal sports clubs, such as soccer or AFL (charged in May annually)

§ Summer seasonal sports clubs, such as cricket (charged in November annually)

§ Lease clubs – tennis (charged in July annually)

A 50% discount is recommended due to approximately half of the sporting season being affected for each of the above tenure types. See below table.

 

Club / facility type

Fee description

# clubs

Total value of fees

Value of fees 21/22 at 50% discount

Summer seasonal sports clubs

Ground & Pavilion rental

22

$54,959

$27,480

Winter seasonal sports clubs

Ground & Pavilion rental

19

$74,558

$37,278.93

Lease clubs - tennis

Court & pavilion rental

9

$18,752

$9,376.13

TOTAL IF 50% FEE DISCOUNT APPLIED

$148,270

$74,135

The total expected income to be waived is $74,135.

Sporting Facilities

Council manages a number of casual use sporting facilities, which can be hired out by community members. The forecast loss of income for the period July – December 2021 is summarised in the table below:

 

CASUAL HIRE FACILITIES - BUDGET IMPLICATIONS EXPECTED TO INCOME

Period – July to December 2021

Epping Soccer Stadium

Rental hire fee

$9,315

Whittlesea Secondary College

Rental hire fee

$17,730

Meadowglen Athletic Track

Rental hire fee

$33,218

All other sporting facilities

Rental hire fee

$17,842

LOSS OF INCOME TOTAL

$78,105

Estimated loss in rental fees forecast for the period July to December 2021 is based on income from same period in previous years.

Total COVID-19 budget impacts – Sport and Recreation

The total budget impacts of the above items relating to lost income and fee reductions as a result of COVID-19 for the 21/22 year is $152,239.89. If COVID effects continue after December 2021, further consideration to waive fees may be undertaken. 

Projects

MAC-19

The Whittlesea Multi-Agency COVID-19 Consultative Group (MAC-19), operates to support agencies to collaborate during the response, relief and recovery phases of the COVID 19 Pandemic.  

MAC-19 is designed to be a platform for sharing of information across council and multi-agency groups.  Council is committed to continuing pandemic response and recovery activities and has invited all Municipal Emergency Management Planning Committee (MEMPC) agencies and organisations to be involved in this group. Membership continues to change depending on what is occurring in the phases of response, relief and recovery.

As Class 2 emergencies do not have local or regional control, this group will serve the function of local coordination, facilitated by Council’s Pandemic Recovery Coordinator.  This group feeds into the Regional Coordination Group via the Unit Manager Resilience and Emergency Management.

It is envisaged that when the time is appropriate the MAC-19 CG will review membership and merge with the Pandemic Recovery Committee, and terms of reference will be developed.

IRS Program

The IRS (Isolation, Relocation Support) Program, is a COVID-19 relief program that supports COVID-19 positive residents who are in isolation and do not have financial ability or capacity to support their own basic needs, such as food and essentials like nappies and baby formula.

The State Government Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (DFFH) has made funding available for each council to support coordination of local COVID-19 relief. City of Whittlesea has received $65,000 to support this program, which is expected to conclude 31 December 2021. Funding is administered by Local Government Victoria and the Department of Jobs Precincts and Regions (DJPR).

Funding covers both individual/household and community relief. This process has been incorporated into the current referral structure via the State COVID Hotline.

Funding focuses on relief services that can be provided, when

·         an outbreak occurs in the municipality;

·         individuals/households required to self-isolate/quarantine in the municipality and need relief support; and/or

·         there is a significant risk of an outbreak in the municipality (e.g. border closures, existence of exposure sites)

·         requested by DFFH.

Councils are also expected to coordinate immediate relief support within 24 hours of a request, and for more urgent matters Council responds within a few hours.

The table below outlines items that meet relief requests:

COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund

The COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund is a Council funded grant established in 2020 at the beginning of the pandemic. The fund was established to support vulnerable individuals, groups, local non-government community service organisations and family violence services. The initial Emergency Relief Fund established in 2020 was $500,000 with the current 2021-22 fund being $400,000.

On the next page is the current balance and funds allocated from July 2021 to September 2021.


 

 

Allocations from Pandemic Recovery Fund:  July 2021 – September 2021

Organisation

21/22 FY allocations

Total provided each organisation

Total 21/22 FY

Heavenly Feast Revival Church

$4,000

$22,000

$4,000.00

ADRA Crisis

$3,000

$8,000

$3,000.00

Countrywide Mission

$2,000

$31,000

$2,000.00

Hope Centre

$4,260

$17,794.50

$4,260.00

Big Group Hug

$6,535

$52,657.18

$6,535.00

Thomastown Neighbourhood House

 

$10,000

$10,000

Whittlesea Community House

 

$9,900

$9,900

 

 

 

 

Total allocated

 

 

$39,695

Total Pandemic Recovery Fund budget

 

 

$400,000

Remaining funds

 

 

$360,305

 

Economic Development initiatives

Economic Development initiatives have been central to the relief and recovery of local business. To keep local businesses on track, the Economic Development team continues to deliver measures that support business in the creation of jobs and provide economic support.

Outdoor dining Project

·    In September 2020, the State Government launched its Outdoor Eating and Entertainment Package supporting councils to expand outdoor dining as part of the roadmap to reopening. The purpose of the funding was to help councils implement swift and streamlined permit, enforcement and monitoring processes to support expanded outdoor dining.

·    Council received $500,000 to support food and hospitality businesses (Round 1). The funding contributed to a variety of activities including additional seating infrastructure, materials to support businesses operating in a COVID-safe manner.

·    In January 2021, the State Government announced an additional funding pool of $5million for Round 2 of the 2020-21 Local Councils Outdoor Eating and Entertainment Package. Councils had the opportunity to apply for up to $500,000 to support additional projects. Council was successful in receiving $70,000 from this round of funding.

Installation of additional seating

·    Custom designed chair/table structures have been installed in Church Street, Whittlesea; Hazel Glen drive, Doreen; Oleander Drive, Mill Park and Gorge Road, South Morang.

·    All of the structures are branded with Council’s visitor economy branding and include table signs including a QR code that directs the visitor to the Visit Whittlesea website.

·    Additional furniture has been sourced from eco-friendly businesses, where the table and chairs are made from recyclable materials.

·    Items have been specifically chosen to create vibrancy in spaces and support activation to encourage visitors to stay within the precinct longer.

·    Chosen locations for these pieces are the corner of High and Tramoo Streets and Lorne Street Park in Lalor, Alexander Avenue, Thomastown, Breadalbane Avenue Mernda, High Street Village Epping, Blamey Avenue and Mill Park Drive, Mill Park and Reid Street Park, South Morang where the areas fall within Council’s property.

·    The infrastructure has received positive support and feedback from the businesses and community. The owners/operators are very supportive of the program and appreciate the assistance of Council.

Supporting COVID-safe practices

·    The Economic Development Team have collectively handed more than 400 COVID safe goodie bags to food-based businesses across the municipality.

·    Contents of these bags include:

Bottles of hand sanitizer.

Reusable masks hand designed, and hand sewn by social enterprise Assemble Threads. A City of Whittlesea resident was specifically chosen for this.

State Government posters highlighting COVID safe messages. One of those posters provided was multilingual.

Think Local, Buy Local, Create Local Jobs window decal and

Information highlighting the support services and contact details of the Economic Development team.

·    All content items were locally sourced.

·    Additional support activities included offering to cover the cost of public liability insurance for businesses looking to expand their trading onto the footpath.

Precinct activation with mini concert series

·    The first phase of Round 1 funding was focused on infrastructure. Precinct activation has more of a community development/events focus to attract customers to the centres and create vibrancy.

·    The Community Cultural Development Team have been engaged to deliver a mini concert series.

·    Intention of the miniseries is to host 4 x mini concerts in locations where new infrastructure has been installed.

·    Events have taken place in Church Street Whittlesea and Hazel Glen Drive Doreen. Future locations for events include High Street Epping and Reid Street Park in South Morang.

Round 2 Funding – Intensive Marketing campaign

·    The recently awarded $70,000 from the Round 2 funding has been combined with $30,000 remaining from the Round 1 funding to provide for a $100,000 intensive marketing campaign titled ‘Dine (outside) in the City of Whittlesea’ for our dining precincts.

·    The campaign focuses on:

Highlighting the retail precincts where Council has installed additional tables and chairs, as well as promote the upcoming mini concert series that will be rolled out at a number of these precincts throughout the municipality.

The activities of the campaign includes, but not limited to social media activities, print media and transport advertising.

The campaign is delivered in partnership with a marketing consultancy firm.

·    This campaign is a great opportunity for Council to promote the smaller retail centres that are not supported by Centre Management or special rates, to drive new and existing customers to the local centres and activates these spaces.

·    We see this as a wonderful opportunity to support and promote our visitor economy sector particularly in the COVID recovery phase.

·    The campaign is on track to go live in October, pending the ease of restrictions.

Business Assistance Grants

·    The Business Assistance Grants Program (BAGP) formed part of Council’s Business Relief and Resilience Program endorsed at the Council meeting held on Tuesday 1 September 2020.  The BAGP was designed in response to COVID-19 to provide relief to local businesses to support their resilience now and into the future.

·    Applications could be submitted on projects that fell within the one or more of the following categories of:

Business adaption – Personal protective equipment (PPE); transitioning to an online platform to sell products and/or services or website design and development, e-commerce platforms, or online content development (i.e. mobile apps).

Revitalising spaces - Improvements to window displays and façades, signage of furniture to activate their footpath trading area

Business continuity - Seeking professional business and legal advisory services. This could include advice on managing risk, business diversity or marketing strategy development.

·    Applications opened on Friday 11 September and closed on 4 October 2020

·    103 applications were supported with approved total funding pool of approximately $450,000.

·    Almost half of the successful applications were for projects relating to Business Adaption. These included projects relating to online transition and enhancing their spaces and practices to be COVID safe.

·    Followed closely by business continuity (30 per cent) and revitalising spaces (22 per cent). Applications under these categories were to support seeking professional advice (i.e. marketing or accounting) and to enhance their shop fronts (i.e. signage).

Local Government Business Concierge and Hospitality Support Program

·    The COVIDSafe Business Fund allocated $7.08 million to establish the Local Government Business Concierge and Hospitality Support Program.

·    The program specifically targets COVIDSafe practice awareness within the business and wider communities through direct funding to local governments of $120,000 to ensure they can actively engage on COVIDSafe practices with community venues, hospitality businesses and services such as hairdressing

·    Council has employed four COVID Business Support Officers for from 5 July to 30 November 2021

·    The Officers support Councils Compliance and Environmental Health Officer to patrol business precincts providing information and education to ensure businesses are operating in a COVID safe manner.

COVIDSafe Outdoor Activation Fund

·    The newly released (October 2021) State Government COVIDSafe Outdoor Activation Fund 2021 supports Victorian councils in assisting businesses to operate in outdoor settings in a COVIDSafe manner.

·    The Victorian Government has committed $40 million to the Fund 2021 which builds on Round 1 and Round 2 of the Local Councils Outdoor Eating and Entertainment Package.

·    In addition to supporting hospitality businesses, the funding will support a broad range of industries that have been severely impacted by COVID restrictions (such as gyms, creative businesses, personal/beauty services, and non-essential retail).

·    Funding to the value of $575,000 will be provided to Council for works, services and promotion of outdoor activation through two components:

Part A - Works, services and promotion of outdoor activation, to immediately extend the life of existing outdoor eating and entertainment facilities and provide new facilities for other businesses to also operate outdoors, and

Part B - To establish semi-permanent and permanent outdoor precincts that support industries impacted by COVID restrictions and will be of lasting benefit to local communities

COVID safe compliance patrols

In response to the continuation of lockdowns and an escalation of COVID positives cases in the City of Whittlesea, the Compliance and Environmental Health Department commenced an extensive proactive inspection program across the City in order to inspect every business, ensuring they are operating in a COVID safe manner.

The program has continued to be active during the periods of lockdown and has included support from all teams across Council. The COVID safe compliance patrols have occurred after hours, weekdays and on weekends.

COVID Safe Compliance Inspections:

·         Currently compliance in the Municipality is high. The team will continue to review the COVID situation as restrictions ease and will make changes to the program as required.

·         Afterhours inspections have been incorporated into the program to ensure that the team visit takeaway shops and restaurants who don’t open until after 4 or 5pm.

·         The team continues to work with the Department of Health enforcement teams and have worked together on a number of Joint Operations. 

·         The Police have attended numerous businesses escalated by Council.

·         The team has also worked with the Department of Health engagement team at Pacific Epping with the objective to push the message to be tested and vaccinated.

To date in excess of 10,000 COVID safe compliance patrols have occurred across the City of Whittlesea.

Plenty Ranges Arts and Convention Centre (PRACC)

On 11 June 2021, PRACC ceased regular operations and the building was handed over to Northern Health to operate a state-run COVID vaccination hub. The hub operated in conjunction with COVID vaccinations services at the Northern Hospital for the first two weeks until all services were transferred to PRACC.  The service has grown steadily over the past 3 months as vaccine supplies have become available. Daily vaccination numbers have grown steadily from around 1200 (12-15 chairs) to over 2000 (28-30 chairs).

City of Whittlesea has maintained an on-site staff presence to assist Northern Health with building operations, maintenance and cleaning issues. This staff support, together with utility costs and basic maintenance (to assist Hub operations) will cost Council approximately $160,000 over the 6 month period.

Loss of revenue due to closure of PRACC will most likely be minimal as extended COVID lockdowns in Melbourne would have prevented most usage of the facility as an arts and event space over the period.

Multicultural Awareness of COVID Immunisation (MACI) program

Through a State initiative, Priority Response to Multicultural Communities (PRMC) program, Council successfully applied for $350,000 in funding from the Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (DFFH), to establish a Local Partnerships Model in Whittlesea, providing targeted engagement and support for local priority culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The program commenced on 13 September and supports improved access to accurate information about COVID-19 health information and directions, with a focus on the COVID-19 vaccination roll-out in out. The program leverages existing Council initiatives and networks that support vulnerable multicultural communities.

Consultation

The Economic Development Team has been extensively consulting with businesses during the pandemic regarding the effects of the COVID-19 restrictions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the hospitality and beauty services industry have been amongst the most impacted sectors, and many have remained closed throughout each lockdown period.

The level of enquiries to the Environmental Health Team has also risen as businesses are aware that 2022 renewal notices will be sent out in November 2021. Many businesses both in hospitality and beauty services industry have also raised enquiries with the Environmental Health Team.

As mentioned earlier in the report, Council Sport and Recreation teams have also received enquiries from local sporting clubs impacted by restrictions.

This report and associated recommendations responds to feedback received by businesses and community members to the Economic Development, Environmental Health, Sport and Recreation teams.

Financial Implications

Waiving the 2021-22 registration renewal fees by 50% of 1,276 local businesses registered under the Food Act 1984 and the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 will significantly impact the income of the Food and Public Health surveillance programs with a combined reduction of revenue of approximately $370,934.50. 

Waiving the pool inspection fees 2021-22 fees, as scheduled under the Environment Protection Act 2018 will result in a loss of revenue of $4,315.

Waiving the 2021-22 fees for outdoor dining and footpath trade permits will result in a loss of revenue of $14,510.

Waiving the 2021-22 registration fees of sporting clubs, is expected income result in a loss of revenue $74,135.

Policy strategy and legislation

The Food Act 1984 and Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 authorises Council to approve, register and renew the registration of designated business types. The annual renewal of registration fees helps subsidise some of the operating costs of the inspection and surveillance programs. 

Council has a Food Safety Management Policy which takes a risk-based approach to surveillance of food premises. Fees for the various types of food businesses are based on risk classifications which inform the frequency of annual surveillance.   

Aquatic Inspection fees are a new fee that took effect on 1 July 2021. These fees were set as a result of the enactment of the new State Government Environment Protection Act 2017. These fees are set by Council and reflect operational costs to undertake the required legislative functions. Council does have the discretion to waive fees.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Financial Sustainability - Inability to meet current and future expenditure

Waiving the 2021-22 registration renewal fees by 50% of 1,276 local businesses registered under the Food Act 1984 and the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 will significantly impact the income of the Food and Public Health surveillance programs with a combined reduction of approximately $370,934.50. 

Waiving the 2021-22 fees for Aquatic Facilities, as scheduled under the Environment Protection Act 2018 will result in a loss of revenue of $4,315.

Waiving the 2021-22 fees for outdoor dining and footpath trade permits will result in a loss of revenue of $14,510.

Waiving the 2021-22 registration fees of sporting clubs, is expected income result in a loss of revenue $74,135.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A healthy and safe community

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Every department and team across Council is actively contributed to the support of local residents and businesses.  This report outlines a number of initiatives Council is leading to support the local community, sporting clubs and businesses in the COVID response and recovery phases.

To provide further support local business and sporting clubs it is recommended Council waive and discount a number of fees and charges as outlined in this report.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council:

1.       Waive the 2021-22 registration renewal fees by 50% of 1,276 local businesses registered under the Food Act 1984 and the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 that have been impacted by the State Government COVID-19 restrictions during 2020 (Table 1), including 50% of staff fees associated to registration renewals (Table 2). The total expected income to be waived from Food and PHW renewals is $370,934.50.

2.       Waive the 2021-22 fees for the Inspection of Aquatic Facilities, as scheduled under the Environment Protection Act 2018. The total expected income to be waived from Aquatic Facilities fees is $4,315.

3.       Waive the 2021-22 registration fees of sporting clubs. The total expected income to be waived is $74,135.

4.       Waive the 2021-22 fees for outdoor dining and footpath trade permits, as scheduled in Councils current fees and charges. The total expected income to be waived from Municipal Local Law renewals is $14,510.

5.       Extend outdoor dining to neighbouring properties footpaths to 30 June 2022, pending neighbouring business owner’s permission, and waive any Local Law fee associated with an extension of trade.

6.       Cover the cost of public liability insurance for businesses expanding their trade onto the footpath and extension of trade to neighbouring properties footpath.

7.       Engage with and support privately owned shopping centres to temporarily expand footpath trading and/or outdoor dining in communal spaces or car parks.

8.       Extend the temporary structure (currently taking up 1.5 car spaces) in Oleander Drive, Mill Park until 30 June 2022.

 

 

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

ITEM 6.5.3      Quarterly Corporate Performance Report (quarter ended 30 September 2021) 

Attachments:                        1        Quarterly Corporate Performance Report

2        Project Progress Report

3        Grants Status Update

4        Proposed Capital Budget Adjustments (Q1)

5        Reserves Detail   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Chief Financial Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

·        Note the Quarterly Corporate Performance report for September 2021 (Attachment 1).

·        Note that the 2021-25 Community Plan was adopted in October 2021 and as such reporting on 2021-22 Community Plan Action progress will commence in quarter 2.

·        Note the Capital Works Program Performance for the period ended 30 September 2021 and progress of projects as outlined in Project Progress Report (Attachment 2).

·        Note that it is expected that delivery of the 2021/22 Capital Works Program will be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Further detail on such impacts will be included in future reports to Council when they become known.

·        Note the status of the infrastructure grants as at the end of September 2021 as outlined in Grants Status Update (Attachment 3).

·        Approve the proposed capital budget adjustments as listed in the Proposed Capital Budget Adjustments (Q1) (Attachment 4).

·        Note the Financial Performance for the period ended 30 September 2021.

Brief overview

Community Plan

·        The Community Plan 2021-2025 including the Community Plan 2021-2022 Action Plan was adopted at a special Council meeting held on 25 October 2021. As such, key initiative reporting will resume for the quarter 2 reporting period.

·        Key quarter 1 achievements under the five goals of Council’s strategic planning framework have been included in this report instead.

Capital Works

·        As at 30 September 2021, year to date Capital Works expenditure of $11.02 million is $0.9 million more than budget. The proposed revised budget (pending approval of proposed adjustments in this report) for the year ending 30 June 2021 will be $89.55 million. This will be $3.565 million more than the original adopted capital budget following proposed adjustments for external grant funded projects. 

·        It is anticipated that the COVID-19 pandemic will impact the ability of Council to deliver on projects throughout the year. This will continue to be monitored and further update provided in future reports to Council.

Financial Performance

·        For the three months ended 30 September 2021, Council recorded an operating surplus of $137.6 million, which is ($1.5 million) unfavourable to the year to date budget.

·        This surplus is reported based on the Australian Accounting Standards and includes all revenue recognised in the financial period, including gifted subdivisional assets (non-monetary), developer contributions and grants towards capital works projects. It is important to note that the operating surplus is not a cash surplus; therefore, it does not convert to immediately available cash for Council. Significant amounts of the surplus are restricted by legislation and must be used for future infrastructure investment.

·        For the three months ended 30 September 2021 Council incurred direct COVID-19 related expenditure of $0.27 million. In addition, Council incurred reduced income of $0.61 million largely due to forced facility closures during the State Government imposed COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. The combined impact of additional expenditure and revenue losses totalled ($0.88 million) for the three-month period.

rationale for recommendation

The recommendation is in accordance with the requirement of Section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020 that as soon as practicable after the end of each quarter of the financial year, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a quarterly financial report is presented to the Council at a Council meeting which is open to the public.

impacts of recommendation

Council has been presented with a Quarterly Corporate Performance report in accordance with the Local Government Act 2020 that shows Council’s financial performance against the Annual Budget 2021-22 and update of the Community Plan.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Financial performance against budget is monitored closely and presented to the Executive Leadership Team and Council on a regular basis. 

Council closely monitors progress against key initiatives in the Community Plan. As a result of the 2021-2025 Community Plan being adopted in October 2021, reporting on the progress of key initiatives will be included in the quarter 2 report.

 

Report

Introduction

Council is required by the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act) to prepare a Council Plan containing the strategic objectives of Council, strategies for achieving those objectives, and indicators to monitor the achievement of those objectives. The City of Whittlesea’s Council Plan is incorporated in the Community Plan 2021-2025 alongside the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan, the Disability Action Plan and pandemic recovery actions. This Plan was adopted at a special Council meeting held on 25 October 2021.

The attached report provides a comprehensive summary of:

·    Key achievements under the five goals of Council’s strategic planning framework (comprehensive reporting against key Community Plan initiatives will commence in quarter 2 following adoption of the 2021-2025 Community Plan)

·    Progress of 2021-22 Capital Works Program to 30 September 2021

·    Council’s financial performance to 30 September 2021.

To comply with the Act, the report includes the following comparisons for the three months ended 30 September 2021:

·    Actual and budgeted operating revenues and expenses

·    Actual and budgeted capital revenues and expenses

·    Actual movements in the balance sheet

·    Actual movements in the cash flow statement.

It is highlighted that the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Council’s services and financial circumstances is expected to continue and this has been the subject of a number of previous Council reports.

Background

Community Plan

Council developed its 2021-2025 Community Plan, including the Community Plan 2021-2022 Action Plan which was adopted in October 2021. The Community Plan is the key strategic document providing direction over the Council term. Community Plan Action Plans are developed annually as an accompaniment to the Community Plan. They include the key initiatives and projects to be achieved each year.

Reporting against key initiatives will resume for the quarter 2 reporting period. For quarter 1, key achievements under the five goals of Council’s strategic planning framework have been provided as a means of progress update.

Capital Program

Council adopted the 2021-22 Capital Works Program on 1 June 2021 with a budget of $68.39 million plus $17.34 carry forward, providing a total budget of $85.98 million. 


 

The financial expenditure performance of the Capital Works Program to 30 September 2021 is detailed below.

YTD
Actual
$'000

YTD
Budget
$'000

YTD
Variance
$'000

Adopted Budget
$'000

Annual Budget
$'000

Forecast
$'000

Property

2,456

3,298

842

23,281

24,344

24,344

Plant and equipment

347

445

98

2,515

2,515

2,515

Infrastructure

8,220

6,350

(1,870)

50,622

59,126

62,691

11,022

10,093

(930)

76,418

85,985

89,550

Represented by:

 

 

 

 

 

 

New assets

4,214

4,568

354

25,146

29,823

33,103

Asset renewal

5,272

3,420

(1,851)

34,215

35,947

36,183

Asset expansion

43

85

42

550

550

550

Asset upgrade

1,494

2,020

526

16,507

19,664

19,714

Total Capital Works

11,022

10,093

(930)

76,418

85,985

89,550

COVID-19 Impact Analysis

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on some projects as a result of general work disruptions in the normal planning, tendering and construction activities and even more so with the recent two week shut down of the construction industry.  At this stage, it is too early to ascertain the impact of the restrictions on the capital works projects.  Given the COVID impact in the first half of the financial year, it is anticipated that the easing of restrictions in the coming weeks will provide an opportunity for any delays to projects to be addressed to bring the project completion dates back within the targeted completion timelines.  A further update to project impacts will be provided as part of the mid-year review when the timing of the easing of restrictions is known.

Project Budget Adjustments

A number of minor changes to the Capital Works Program are proposed in the first quarter.  These adjustments are a direct result of external Grant applications that have been successful since the adoption of the 2021/22 budget and where unbudgeted.

The proposed project adjustments result in an increase to the adopted expenditure budget of $3.57 million, giving a revised total Capital Works Program budget following the first quarter of $89.55 million.  The proposed budget adjustments are listed in (Attachment 4).

Infrastructure Grants

A summary of recent infrastructure grants outcomes is included in the Grants Status Report (Attachment 3).  Grant programs in the first quarter of the financial year have been limited however the annual Program of Grant opportunities will increase in the second half of the financial year.  Growing Suburbs Fund applications were submitted in October 2021 following approval from Council, with announcements expected in December 2021.  Any successful Grant applications will enable future projects to be brought forward in the Capital Works Program. Applications to the value of $2.3 million are still awaiting outcomes / announcements.

 

 

Financial Performance

The Financial Performance Report for the period ended 30 September 2021 includes the following financial statements included in Quarterly Corporate Performance Report (Attachment 1):

·        Comprehensive Income Statement

·        Balance Sheet

·        Statement of Cash Flows

·        Statement of Capital Works

·        Summary of Reserves

Operating performance

 

YTD
Actual
$'000

YTD
Budget
$'000

YTD
Variance
$'000

Adopted

Budget
$'000

Forecast
$'000

Operating

 

 

 

 

 

Income

194,198

196,533

(2,335)

375,786

  380,302

Expenditure

56,600

57,438

839

229,335

231,280

Surplus (deficit)

137,598

139,095

(1,496)

146,451

149,022

Capital and other revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Share of other comprehensive income of associate

-

-

-

-

-

Capital non-recurrent grants

(1,594)

(1,770)

176

(16,260)

(21,728)

Developer contributions

(2,434)

(4,161)

1,727

(121,418)

(120,651)

Adjusted underlying surplus

133,571

133,164

407

8,773

6,643

For the quarter ended 30 September 2021, Council has recorded an operating surplus of $137.6 million, which is ($1.5 million) unfavourable to the year to date budget.

Council is forecasting a $149.02 million full year operating surplus, which is $2.57 million favourable to the Adopted Budget.

This surplus is reported based on the Australian Accounting Standards and includes all revenue recognised in the financial period, including gifted subdivisional assets (non-monetary), developer contributions and grants towards capital works projects. It is important to note that the operating surplus is not a cash surplus; therefore it does not convert to immediately available cash for Council. Significant amounts of the surplus are restricted by legislation and must be used for future infrastructure investment.

The operating result is a key figure to assess Council’s financial performance. Although Council is a not-for-profit organisation, it should still generate a surplus to ensure future financial sustainability.

COVID-19 Impact Analysis

A comprehensive review of Council’s budgeted revenue and expenditure for the remainder of the financial year has been undertaken to quantify the impacts of the pandemic on service delivery and financial performance.

As at the end of September, the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic to date is as follows:

·    Direct COVID-19 expenditure to the end of September is ($0.27 million)

·    Income impact of ($0.61 million), which relates to community and leisure facilities from forced facility closures during state government lockdown restrictions. Further analysis on the impact of COVID-19 on this income will continue to be undertaken.

Proposal

That Council notes the Quarterly Corporate Report for the period ended 30 September 2021 (Attachment 1), which is presented for consideration by Council in accordance with the Local Government Act 2020.

Consultation

Reported information has been sourced and discussed with line management and project managers across the organisation. Consultation has also been undertaken with the Executive Leadership Team.

Critical Dates

Select information from this report will be presented to the:

·        Council meeting on Monday 8 November 2021

·          Audit and Risk Committee on Thursday 25 November 2021.

Financial Implications

All matters raised in this report, which have a financial implication, have been reflected in the Quarterly Corporate Performance Report for the quarter ended 30 September 2021 (Attachment 1).

Policy strategy and legislation

Section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020 provides that as soon as practicable after the end of each quarter of the financial year, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a quarterly budget report is presented to the Council at a Council meeting which is open to the public. The quarterly budget report must include a comparison of the actual and budgeted results to date and an explanation of any material variations.

Further, periodic progress reporting against the Council Action Plan increases transparency and contributes to discharging Council’s reporting duties.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

Performance reporting is an effective existing treatment enhancing governance of Council’s operations.

Strategic Risk Financial Sustainability - Inability to meet current and future expenditure

This report provides Council with an oversight of the City of Whittlesea’s key financial information and performance obligations to enable monitoring and to ensure City of Whittlesea’s financial position is sustainable.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More cost-effective investment through better return on investment, efficiency and an engaged workforce

 

This report provides Council with oversight of Council’s key financial information to enable regular monitoring and to ensure that Council aligned to its strategic direction, cost-effectiveness and efficient delivery of services.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Rule 47 of the Governance Rules 2021, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

For the quarter ended 30 September 2021, Council’s operating surplus showed an unfavourable year to date variance of ($1.5 million) against budget. Council’s Capital Works program was ($0.93 million) ahead of budget.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the Quarterly Corporate Performance report for September 2021.

2.       Note that the 2021-25 Community Plan was adopted in October 2021 and as such reporting on 2021-22 Community Plan Action Item progress will commence in quarter 2.

3.       Note the Capital Works Program Performance for the period ended 30 September 2021 and progress of projects as outlined in Project Progress Report.

4.       Note that it is expected that delivery of the 2021/22 Capital Works Program will be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Further detail on such impacts will be included in future reports to Council when they become known.

5.       Note the status of the infrastructure grants as at the end of September 2021.

6.       Approve the proposed capital budget adjustments (outlined in Attachment 4).

7.       Note the Financial Performance for the period ended 30 September 2021.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                         Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                                                      Monday 8 November 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

7.         Notices of Motion

Nil Reports 

8.         Questions to Officers

9.         Urgent BusineSS


10.       Reports from Council representatives and ceo update

10.1     Administrator Peita Duncan Report

10.2     Administrator Chris Eddy Report

10.3     Chair of Council Lydia Wilson Report

10.4     CEO Update – 8 November 2021

The CEO Update will be provided verbally by the Chief Executive Officer at the Scheduled Council Meeting.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                                            Monday 8 November 2021

 

11.       Confidential Business

11.1     Connected Communities

Nil Reports

11.2     Liveable Neighbourhoods

Nil Reports

11.3     Strong Local Economy

Nil Reports

11.4     Sustainable Environment

Nil Reports

11.5     High Performing Organisation

Nil Reports

11.6     Notices of Motion

Nil Reports

 

12.       Closure