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Minutes

 

OF Scheduled
COUNCIL MEETING

HELD ON

Tuesday 1 June 2021

AT 6.30pm

 

meeting held remotely
via zoom



UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

 

 

ADMINISTRATORS

 

LYDIA WILSON                            CHAIR OF COUNCIL

PEITA DUNCAN                          ADMINISTRATOR

On 19 June 2020 the Acting Minister for Local Government, Daniel Andrews appointed the Panel of Administrators for the City of Whittlesea and appointed Lydia Wilson as Chair of the Panel.  The Panel of Administrators comprises of Ms Lydia Wilson, the Honourable Bruce Billson and Ms Peita Duncan.  On 3 March 2021, the Hon. Bruce Billson resigned from his position as Administrator with the City of Whittlesea.  Effective from 12 May 2021, the Minister for Local Government appointed Mr Chris Eddy as the third Panel Member.  Ms Lydia Wilson, Ms Peita Duncan and Mr Chris Eddy will undertake the duties of the Council of the City of Whittlesea until the October 2024 Local Government Election.CHRIS EDDY                               ADMINISTRATOR

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

 

 

SENIOR OFFICERS

 

 

CRAIG LLOYD                             CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

KRISTI HIGH                                EXECUTIVE MANAGER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

FRANK JOYCE                            EXECUTIVE MANAGER GOVERNANCE

NICK MAZZARELLA                    ACTING DIRECTOR INFRASTRUCTURE & ENVIRONMENT

KATE MCCAUGHEY                   DIRECTOR COMMUNITY WELLBEING

AMY MONTALTI                          DIRECTOR CORPORATE SERVICES

JUSTIN O’MEARA                       DIRECTOR PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

 

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                   Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

 

ORDER OF BUSINESS

 

The Chief Executive Officer submitted the following business:

 

1.            Opening.. 11

1.1         MEETING OPENING & INTRODUCTIONS.. 11

1.2         oath of office.. 12

1.3         PRAYER BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER.. 14

1.4         ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT.. 14

1.5         Present.. 14

1.6       acknowledgements.. 15

2.            Apologies.. 16

3.            Declarations of Interest.. 16

4.            Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting.. 16

5.            Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters.. 16

5.1         Questions To ADMINISTRATORS.. 16

Nil Reports.. 16

5.2         Petitions.. 16

Nil Reports.. 16

5.3         Joint Letters.. 16

Nil Reports.. 16

6.            Officers’ Reports.. 17

6.1         Connected Communities.. 19

6.1.1       For Decision - Adoption of Amended Governance Rules   19

6.1.2       For decision -  Appointment of Council Representation on Organisations and Committees.. 87

6.1.3       For Decision - Update to Scheduled Council Meetings for 2021  127

6.1.4       For Decision - Patterson Drive Community Centre, Donnybrook.. 131

6.2         Liveable Neighbourhoods.. 271

6.2.1       For Decision - Adoption of the Road Management Plan (2021) 271

6.2.2       For Decision - Amendment C255 - Application of the Public Acquisition Overlay to two properties.. 381

6.2.3       For Feedback - Whittlesea Township Strategy - consideration of Submissions and Adoption.. 401

6.2.4       For Decision - 20 Romeo Court MILL PARK.. 519

6.2.5       For Noting - 16 Woodruff Road, South Morang - Construction Compliance.. 549

6.3         Strong Local Economy.. 553

6.3.1       For Decision - Proposed Business Advisory Panel. 553

6.4         Sustainable Environment.. 561

6.4.1       For Decision - Adoption of the City of Whittlesea Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030. 561

6.4.2       For Decision - Contract 2019-119 - Recycling Receipt and Sorting - Contract Variation Report. 623

6.4.3       For Noting - Response to Petition for Replacement of Trees Along Fielding Drive, Mernda.. 629

6.5         High Performing Organisation.. 633

6.5.1       For Decision - Declaration of Rates and Adoption of Annual Budget 2021-22. 633

6.5.2       For Noting - Confirmation of minutes and associated actions of CEMAC meeting held 13 May 2021. 845

7.            Notices of Motion.. 849

8.            Questions to Officers.. 849

9.            Urgent Business.. 849

10.         Reports from Delegates Appointed by Council to Other Bodies.. 851

10.1        For Noting - Informal Meetings of Administrators and Delegate Meetings - 1 June 2021. 851

10.2        For Noting - CEO Update - 1 June 2021. 859

11.         Confidential Business.. 861

11.1       Connected Communities.. 861

Nil Reports.. 861

11.2       Liveable Neighbourhoods.. 861

Nil Reports.. 861

11.3       Strong Local Economy.. 861

Nil Reports.. 861

11.4       Sustainable Environment.. 861

Nil Reports.. 861

11.5       High Performing Organisation.. 861

11.5.1    For Decision - Insurance Portfolio.. 861

11.6       Notices of Motion.. 861

Nil Reports.. 861

12.         Closure.. 862

 

 

Note:

In these Minutes, Resolutions adopted by Council are indicated in bold text.

 

 

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

1.         Opening

1.1       MEETING OPENING & INTRODUCTIONS

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson opened the meeting at 6.30PM.

“Welcome to this Council Meeting of 1 June which is being livestreamed.  The meeting is being held on line in accordance with State Government lockdown requirements in response to the recent COVID19 outbreak.

If technical problems are encountered that prevent the meeting from being broadcast to the public, the meeting will be adjourned until the technical problems are resolved or the meeting will be postponed to another time and date in accordance with Council’s Governance Rules.

I am Lydia Wilson, Chair of the Panel of Administrators and I would also like to introduce my Panel colleagues

Ms Peita Duncan

I am delighted to also introduce our new Administrator, Mr Chris Eddy. Mr Eddy was appointed as our third Panel Member, by the Minister for Local Government effective from 12 May 2021.  Mr Eddy was sworn into office as an Administrator of the City of Whittlesea on 13 May 2021.

Mr Eddy has a distinguished career in Local Government including former Chief Executive Officer of Hobsons Bay and a number of key directorships including membership of a number of Audit and Risk Committees, interim Chief Executive Officer roles and public speaking and presenter assignments.

I would also like to introduce our Chief Executive Officer, Mr Craig Lloyd and ask that he in turn introduce the Council Officers in attendance today.”

“Good evening everyone, we also have with us:

Executive Manager Public Affairs, Ms Kristi High;

Executive Manager Governance, Mr Frank Joyce;

Director Community Wellbeing, Ms Kate McCaughey;

Director Corporate Services, Ms Amy Montalti;

Director Planning & Development, Mr Justin O’Meara; and

Acting Director Infrastructure & Environment, Mr Nick Mazzarella

These members of the Executive Leadership Team will join us during the meeting.”


 

1.2       oath of office

 

oath of office

On 19 June 2020, the Acting Minister for Local Government, Daniel Andrews appointed the Panel of Administrators for the City of Whittlesea and appointed Lydia Wilson as Chair of the Panel. 

The Panel of Administrators comprises of Ms Lydia Wilson, the Honourable Bruce Billson and Ms Peita Duncan.  On 3 March 2021, the Hon. Bruce Billson resigned from his position as Administrator with the City of Whittlesea. 

Effective from 12 May 2021, the Minister for Local Government appointed Mr Chris Eddy as the third Panel Member.

On 13 May the Administrator, Chris Eddy, was sworn into office as Administrator of the City of Whittlesea. A copy of the Administrator’s Oath of Office has been incorporated into these minutes.


 

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1.3       PRAYER BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Following the Introductions, the Chief Executive Officer read the following prayer:

Almighty God, we ask for your blessing upon this council to make informed and good decisions to benefit the people of the City of Whittlesea. 

Our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive them that trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever.

Amen

1.4       ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson read the following statement:

“On behalf of the City of Whittlesea I recognise the rich Aboriginal heritage of this country and acknowledge the Wurundjeri Willum Clan as the Traditional Owners of this place.

I would also like to personally acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.”

1.5       Present

Members:

Ms Lydia Wilson                  Chair of Council

Ms Peita Duncan                 Administrator

Mr Chris Eddy                     Administrator

Officers:

Mr Craig Lloyd                     Chief Executive Officer

Ms Kristi High                      Executive Manager Public Affairs

Mr Frank Joyce                   Executive Manager Governance

Ms Kate McCaughey          Director Community Wellbeing

Ms Amy Montalti                 Director Corporate Services

Mr Justin O’Meara               Director Planning & Development

Mr Nick Mazzarella             Acting Director Infrastructure & Environment

Mr Nick Robinson                Strategic Planner

Mr Justin Fox                       Planning Officer

Ms Sarah Rowe                   Acting Manager Economic Development

Mr Julian Edwards               Manager Building & Planning

Mr Mark Montague              Chief Financial Officer

 


 

1.6       acknowledgements

RECONCILIATION WEEK

Administrator Peita Duncan read the following statement:

“Tonight we would like to acknowledge that in light of the recent pandemic outbreak and the State of Victoria being in lockdown, this is right in the middle of our Reconciliation Week which runs from 27 May till 3 June.

This year’s theme is ‘More than a word. Reconciliation takes action’. The City of Whittlesea has a rich history of supporting Reconciliation through tangible actions including having one of the highest numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff in Victorian local government.

Unfortunately due to the Covid outbreak, our Reconciliation Week events have been cancelled or postponed. But tonight we acknowledge that Reconciliation is a journey for all Australians – as individuals, families, communities, organisations and importantly as a nation. And that at the heart of this journey are relationships between the broader Australian community and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.  This is the 20th anniversary of the Whittlesea Reconciliation Group and I am very, very proud as are my fellow administrators and the Council are, that we are one of the oldest Reconciliation Groups across Australia that is something for us to be proud of as a municipality.

Thank you Chair.”

COVID-19 PANDEMIC

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson read the following statement:

Thank you, Administrator Duncan. I completely echo your comments, I am also looking forward to the Reconciliation Events occurring sometime hopefully in the near future.

We also felt it important to make a few comments regarding the current situation in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic and the 7 day lockdown that was announced last Thursday.

It is clear to me that the thought of Covid being prevalent again in our community, must be raising feelings of uncertainty, concern and anxiety for many people.

Immediately since news of Covid cases in the City of Whittlesea the Victorian Department of Health commenced rapid testing, tracking and tracing.

Council Officers have worked tirelessly to support these efforts and I sincerely thank them and health workers on behalf of our community for their efforts - establishing pop up testing sites, sharing information with our community and providing our Plenty Ranges Arts & Convention Centre for a mass walk-up vaccination site.

This situation, as the case has always been with Covid, is constantly evolving. We implore everyone to stay up to date with the latest exposure sites, and to follow health advice and instructions that will help us to get the spread of Covid within the community under control as quickly as possible.

We have two constant local testing sites at Northern Health and in Mernda, and Council is providing venues for Department of Health pop up testing sites as needed. We list these on our social and digital channels and they are also included on the Department of Health website.

Please get tested if you are unwell or have visited an exposure site as this is key to stopping Covid from spreading further.

One of the most effective preventative measure to protect yourself from Covid is to be vaccinated.

If you are eligible for the vaccination,  I would encourage you to do so. As the Minister for Health noted “It is the only ticket out of this”

It is important to also remember that, if 2020 taught us anything, it is that we are a resilient and supportive community.

There is a lot of information on Council’s website including details of relevant support services so please, if you or someone you know is in need, get in touch with one of them.

Stay safe, stay healthy and let’s work together to get through this as soon as possible.

2.         Apologies

Nil

 

3.         Declarations of Interest

NIL

 

4.         Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:               Chair of Council Wilson

 

That the following Minutes of the preceding meeting as circulated, be confirmed:

Scheduled Meeting of Council held 4 May 2021

Carried

 

5.         Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters

5.1       Questions To ADMINISTRATORS

Nil Reports   

 

5.2       Petitions

Nil Reports

 

5.3       Joint Letters

Nil Reports 


 

6.         Officers’ Reports

 

Chief Executive Officer Explanatory Note

Under the Governance Rules 2020, Administrators are to be provided an opportunity to speak regarding each of the reports contained within the Agenda, without the need to indicate opposition for the purpose of debate.

 

 

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

6.1       Connected Communities

ITEM 6.1.1 For Decision - Adoption of Amended Governance Rules 

Attachments:                        1        Assessment of Community Feedback

2        Governance Rules 2021   

Responsible Officer:           Executive Manager Governance

Author:                                  Principal Governance Advisor   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

The report recommends that Council adopt the amended Governance Rules as contained in Attachment 2 having invited and considered community input on the proposed amendments.

Brief overview

The Governance Rules were adopted on 1 September 2020 and are a requirement under the Local Government Act 2020. The Rules regulate proceedings at Council Meetings and may be amended by Council at any time as required.

rationale for recommendation

Council has had an opportunity to assess the effectiveness of the Rules and has identified amendments aimed at improving the operation of Council meetings and improving access to meetings by the community.

impacts of recommendation

The amended Rules will facilitate Council meetings and improve access to Council meetings by the community.  Members of the community will be able to ask questions at a Council meeting and persons who submit petitions or joint letters will be able to speak to their petition or joint letter at the Council meeting.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

The Governance Rules will be reviewed on an ongoing basis to provide Council with an opportunity to assess the effectiveness of the Rules and make further amendments as required.

 

Report

Background

Council resolved to adopt the Governance Rules on 1 September 2020 and the Rules have been in operation for several Council meetings.

The Rules partly replaced the Procedural Matters Local Law (No 1 of 2018) and address many of the areas regulated by the former Local Law including the conduct of Council Meetings and processes related to the preparation of business papers for Council meetings.

At its meeting on 6 April 2021, Council resolved to:

1.       Endorse proposed amendments to the Governance Rules;

2.       Consult with the community on the amended Rules and consider any community input received at the close of the consultation period; and

3.       Receive a further report at the 1 June 2021 Council meeting considering any public submissions received before resolving on whether to adopt the amended Governance Rules and to rescind the existing Public Question Time Policy and Procedural Guidelines.

Proposal

At the close of the community consultation period, four (4) survey responses were received from the community which are summarised in the table together with officer comments and proposed action. (See Attachment 1). 

All survey respondents agreed that the proposed changes to the Rules will improve the operation of Council meetings and the community's ability to understand and participate in Council decision making. Written comments were provided by three of the survey respondents and the feedback provided can be addressed under existing provisions.

Having considered community feedback, it is recommended that the amended Governance Rules be adopted.  A copy of the amended Rules is attached. (See Attachment 2).

The following is a summary of the amendments.

·    Changed wording to be more focussed on purpose and community engagement.

·    Reference has been included in the Rules that Council’s deliberations will be guided by the overarching governance principles in the Local Government Act 2020; (Governance context)

·    Discretion for Council to record in the minutes whether a prayer, good governance pledge or affirmation is stated at the commencement of the meeting; (Rule 11.2)

·    Provide for Officers to present reports and speak for up to the 5 minutes and a further 2 minutes by extension; (Rule 12.5)

·    Included the Public Questions Time process and capacity for public to ask questions at Council meetings into the Governance Rules instead of a separate Public Question Time Policy and Procedural Guidelines;  (Rule 17)

·    Amended the section on petitions and joint letters to provide the option for a lead petitioner or one of the signatories to speak to the petition/joint letter for up to 2 minutes at the meeting at which it is tabled; (Rule 18)

·    Confirming assistance will be available to any community member seeking or requiring support to submit a question or to present to Council. (Rules 17.4, 17.7 and 18.10)

·    Changed wording relating to records of Meetings and administrator attendance records with register of attendance being published on Council’s website quarterly. (Rules 51 and 52)

·    Minor drafting changes to amend obsolete or incorrect legislative references and consequential amendments to ensure the Rules are legally consistent including an amendment to rule 12.4 to require the Chief Executive Officer to consult the chairperson on the business to be listed for consideration at a Council Meeting.

Consultation

Community input was invited on the amended Governance Rules on Council’s website for a four-week period in line with Council’s Community Engagement Policy. 

The consultation included general and targeted promotion to inform of the Rules and proposed changes with a variety of opportunities for feedback including using the new ‘hive’ platform with a survey.  This included a summary sheet with the key elements of change and seeking feedback on whether the changes are supported and if there is any other feedback on the Governance Rules.

Critical Dates

It is proposed that the Rules will be adopted at the 1 June 2021 Council meeting and come into operation from 2 June 2021.

Financial Implications

Any costs associated with the amending the Governance Rules including the cost of legal advice and advertising are covered in existing Council budgets.

Policy strategy and legislation

The Governance Rules are linked to the following legislation, Council policies and Council Guidelines:

Legislation

Local Government Act 2020

The Local Government Act 2020 requires Council to adopt Governance Rules and prescribes what must be included.  The Act also requires Council to ensure that a process of community engagement is followed in adopting or amending its Governance Rules.

The Rules include discretionary matters not prescribed by the Act such as public question time which provides the community with the opportunity to submit questions at Council meetings.

City of Whittlesea policies and guidelines

Election Period Policy

The Election Period Policy is incorporated in the Governance Rules as required by the Local Government Act 2020.


 

Public Question Time Policy and Procedural Guidelines

The Public Question Time Policy and Procedural Guidelines are being revoked.  Public Questions are governed under revised Rule 17 of the amended Governance Rules. 

Procedural Guidelines containing detailed procedures relating to the asking of public questions at Council Meetings will support the administration of Rule 17.

Community Engagement Policy

Consultation on the Governance Rules is required in accordance with the Council’s Community Engagement Policy and has occur as outlined under ‘consultation’ section of this report.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

The efficiency of Council meetings would be affected if Council fails to regularly review the Governance Rules.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council adopt the amended Governance Rules as contained in Attachment 2. The amended Rules aim to facilitate the operation of Council meetings and improve access to Council meetings by the community.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Note the feedback received from the community in relation to proposed amendments to the Governance Rules and Council’s response to the feedback contained in Attachment 1 of this report;

2.   Adopt the amended Governance Rules contained in Attachment 2 of this report to commence operation from 2 June 2021;

3.   Revoke the Governance Rules made on 1 September 2020 upon the amended Governance Rules coming into operation; and

4.   Revoke Council’s Public Question Time Policy and Procedural Guidelines dated 1 October 2020.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Chair of Council Wilson

Seconded:               Administrator Eddy

 

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the feedback received from the community in relation to proposed amendments to the Governance Rules and Council’s response to the feedback contained in Attachment 1 of this report;

2.       Adopt the amended Governance Rules contained in Attachment 2 of this report to commence operation from 2 June 2021;

3.       Revoke the Governance Rules made on 1 September 2020 upon the amended Governance Rules coming into operation;

4.       Revoke Council’s Public Question Time Policy and Procedural Guidelines dated 1 October 2020; and

5.       Conduct a review of the Governance Rules by July 2022 to further assess the effectiveness of the new Rules.

Carried unanimously

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

ITEM 6.1.2 For decision -  Appointment of Council Representation on Organisations and Committees 

Attachments:                        1        2021 Representation on Organisations and Committees   

Responsible Officer:           Executive Manager Governance

Author:                                  Team Leader Governance Administration   

 

previous council resolutions

On 7 July 2020, Council resolved to:

1. Nominate Administrator delegates to the organisations and committees that have been identified to be of strategic significance listed as follows:

·      Audit & Risk Committee (Internal)

·      CEO Employment Matters Advisory Committee (Internal Advisory Committee)

·      City of Whittlesea Australia Day Awards Committee (Internal Advisory Committee)

·      Interface Councils Group (External)

·      Municipal Association of Victoria (External)

·      Metropolitan Local Government’s Waste Forum (MLGWF) (External)

·      Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC) (Internal)

·      Northern Council’s Alliance (External)

·      Whittlesea Community Connections (External)

·      Whittlesea Community Futures Partnership (External)

·      Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) (External)

·      Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

·      City of Whittlesea Youth Advisory Committee (Internal)

·      Yarra Plenty Regional Library Board (External)

2.   Nominate Officers only to the organisations and committees listed as follows (as unshaded in attachment 1):

·      Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) (External)

·      Bundoora Indoor Netball & Sport Centre Board (External)

·      Darebin Creek Management Committee Incorporated (External)

·      Friends of South Morang (External)

·      Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan 2017-2021 Steering Committee (Internal)

·      Merri Creek Management Committee Incorporate (External)

·      Metropolitan Transport Forum Inc. (External)

·      Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action Executive (NAGA) (External)

·      Westgarthtown Pioneer Precinct Advisory Committee (External)

·      Whittlesea Courthouse Association (External)

·      Whittlesea Multicultural Communities Council (WMCC) (External)

·      Whittlesea Secondary College Chaplaincy Committee (External)

·      Whittlesea Showground and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management (External)

·      Whittlesea Youth Commitment Strategic Advisory Group (WYC) (External)

3.   Not appoint representatives to the Visual Art and Civic History Collections Acquisitions Advisory Group (AAG) (Internal) for the 2020-2021 period.

4.   Continue membership with the Victorian Local Governance Association (VLGA) (External) for the 2020-2021 period.

5.   No longer nominate representatives to the following organisations and committees:

·      City of Whittlesea Arts Cultural and Sporting Grants Program for Young People (Internal Advisory Committee)

·      Friends of Farm Vigano

·      Whittlesea Country Music Festival Association Incorporated (External).

 

On 6 April 2021 Council resolved to:

1.   Adopt the 2021 Youth Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.

The terms of reference confirmed that no Administrators would be part of the Committee.

 

On 4 May 2021 Council resolved to:

1.       Adopt the terms of reference of the Community Awards Committee;

2.       Nominate one Administrator Representative to the Committee, Administrator Duncan;

 

 

 


 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council review appointments to organisations and committees.

Brief overview

On 7 July 2020 Council resolved to appoint delegates to organisations and committee for the period 7 July 2020 to 31 December 2022 with the intent of periodically reviewing the appointments.  In the interim period, Administrator delegate appointments have been made to the following Committees:  City of Whittlesea Youth Advisory Committee and City of Whittlesea Community Awards Committee on 6 April and 4 May 2021 respectively and do not require a further appointment at this time.

rationale for recommendation

This report provides an opportunity to review Council representation on organisations and Committees based on the organisation’s strategic significance and its alignment with the achievement of Council’s goals.

impacts of recommendation

The Council’s key focus is to appoint Administrators to organisations and committees that have been identified to be of strategic significance.  This will enable Administrators to represent Council and engage with key stakeholders and community through formal meetings and partnerships.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Relevant organisations and committees will be advised of any changes to appointments.

 

Report

Introduction

Council is committed to engaging with the community, supporting partnerships and participating on appropriate committees and organisations. Council recognises the valuable contribution committees and networks make to the local community and appreciate the volunteering and civic participation involved. There is great value in supporting and participating in local, regional and state-wide committees and organisations.

This report sets out the details of the groups recommended for Council representation for the period 2 June 2021 to 31 December 2022.

It is proposed that Administrators be nominated to organisations and committees that have been identified to be of strategic significance (as highlighted in yellow in Attachment 1).  This will enable Administrators to represent Council and engage with key stakeholders and community members through formal meetings and partnerships.

A further review of appointments will take place before 31 December 2022.

Background

The Panel of Administrators, comprising Chair Lydia Wilson, Ms Peita Duncan and the Hon. Bruce Billson were appointed on 19 June 2020 to work as Council. At the 7 July 2020 Council Meeting, Administrators were appointed to organisations and committees that were identified to be of strategic significance for the period 7 July 2020 to 31 December 2022.  Officers were also appointed. 

On 6 April and 4 May 2021 respectively, appointments were made to the City of Whittlesea Youth Advisory Committee and City of Whittlesea Community Awards Committee. 

The Hon Bruce Billson resigned from position as Administrator in March 2021. 

Mr Chris Eddy was appointed and commenced as an Administrator on 12 May 2021.

This is the first periodic review to take place since these appointments.

Proposal

That Council reviews its participation on organisations and committees to ensure effective involvement and participation in local and strategic organisations.  This is timely with the appointment of Administrator Chris Eddy and in considering the Organisations and Committees that former Administrator Billson was previously appointed to.

Administrator representation

It is proposed that Administrators provide representation on the following internal and external organisations and committees (as highlighted in yellow in Attachment 1):

·   Audit & Risk Committee (Internal Advisory)

·   Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) (External)

·   CEO Employment Matters Advisory Committee (CEMAC) (Internal)

·   Interface Councils Group (External)

·   Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) (External)

·   Metropolitan Local Government’s Waste Forum (MLGWF) (External)

·   Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action Executive (NAGA) (External)

·   Northern Council’s Alliance (External)

·   Victorian Local Governance Association (External)

·   Whittlesea Community Connections (External)

·   Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) (External) 

·   Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

·   Yarra Plenty Regional Library Board (External)

Officer representation

It is proposed that officers continue provide representation on the following internal and external organisations and committees:

·   Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) (External)

·   Bundoora Indoor Netball & Sport Centre Board (External)

·   Darebin Creek Management Committee Incorporated (External)

·   Friends of South Morang (External)

·   Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan 2017-2021 Steering Committee (Internal)

·   Interface Councils Group (External)

·   Merri Creek Management Committee Incorporate (External)

·   Metropolitan Local Government’s Waste Forum (MLGWF) (External)

·   Metropolitan Transport Forum Inc. (External)

·   Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC) (Internal)

·   Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action Executive (NAGA) (External)

·   Northern Councils Alliance (External)

·   Westgarthtown Pioneer Precinct Advisory Committee (External)

·   Whittlesea Community Futures Partnership (External)

·   Whittlesea Courthouse Association (External)

·   Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) (External) 

·   Whittlesea Multicultural Communities Council (WMCC) (External)

·   Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

·   Whittlesea Showground and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management (External)

·   City of Whittlesea Youth Advisory Committee (Internal)

·   Whittlesea Youth Commitment Strategic Advisory Group (WYC) (External)

·   Yarra Plenty Regional Library Board (External)

Further details relating to the nature of the Administrator and Officer representations are set out in attachment 1 of this report.

Proposed changes to former appointments are outlined below.


 

Proposed changes to increase Administrator representatives.

The following committees and organisations do not have current Administrator representation.  They are seen as strategic and important opportunities for advocacy and partnership and as such it is recommended for an Administrators to be a representative.

·    Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA)

ALGWA is the peak body representing the interests of women in local government across Australia.  The Association seeks to assist in furthering women's knowledge, understanding and participation in the function of Local Government.  Due to the strategic nature of this Association it is recommended that an Administrator be appointed to this Association.

·    Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action Executive (NAGA) (External)

Due to the strategic nature of this Executive an Administrator delegate will be appointed to the Executive.  The Officer delegate is an observer when the Administrator delegate attends a meeting and may act as the Administrator’s substitute in the Administrator delegate’s absence at a meeting.

Proposed change from two to one Administrator representatives.

For the following organisations and committees, a lesser number of Administrator delegates per Committee is proposed than previously when Councillor delegates were appointed.  This is due to the nature of the Administrator representation being of a more strategic focus and it also acknowledges one of three Administrators being available to represent the City and report back to all Council through the monthly delegation reports. There is also a commitment to invite these groups and networks to present to Council on an annual basis to provide increased access to Council.

·    Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) (External) 

The terms of reference do not currently include an Administrator as having voting rights.  The appointment of one Administrator delegate meets the requirements of the Terms of Reference of this Committee.

·    Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

The Terms of Reference of the Group will require amendment in accordance with appointments made.

·    Yarra Plenty Regional Library Board (External)

The appointment of one Administrator delegate and Officer to the Board meets the requirements of the Yarra Plenty Regional Library Service Agreement.

Proposed change to officer representatives only.

The following Committees are proposed to no longer have Administrative representative and to continue with Officer representatives. There is also a commitment to invite these committees to present to Council on an annual basis to provide increased access to Council and for Administrators to be invited as guests to meetings as appropriate. 

·    Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC) (Internal)

The Committee’s focus is mainly on operational matters and there is no legislative requirement for an Administrator/Councillor delegate to be appointed to the MFMPC.  Officer representation on this committee will continue. The terms of reference were updated by this committee on 17 March 2021 to reflect the change to Officer representation only.

 

 

 

·    Whittlesea Community Futures Partnership (External)

The terms of reference do not currently include an Administrator as having voting rights.  This committee is chaired by a Council officer and is deemed to be suitable for officer involvement at this time with reporting through to Council as appropriate. 

Proposed change for no representation at this time

It is proposed that the following Committee does not require representation from 2 June 2021:

·    Whittlesea Secondary College Chaplaincy Committee (External) This committee does not require a Council representation under the Committee’s constitution.

Consultation

Administrators have been participating in meetings of organisations and committees for the past 12 months.  In that time, they have gained knowledge and experience of Organisations and Committees identified to be of strategic significance (as highlighted in yellow in Attachment 1).  Officers have continued to provide representation to the remainder of the organisations and Committees listed.

Financial Implications

The costs associated with participation of Administrators and officers in internal and external organisations and committees, as set out in this report, is included in the recurrent budget.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A participating community

 

Council representation on a range of internal and external organisations and committees provides an opportunity for Council to input into the decision-making processes of those organisations and committees and ensures the interests of the Council are represented.  It also provides an opportunity for Council to be informed of the activities and priorities of key community organisations and committees.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It recommended that Council determine appointments to organisations and committees for the period 2 June 2020 to 31 December 2022.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1. Nominate Administrator delegates to the organisations and committees that have been identified to be of strategic significance listed as follows (as highlighted in yellow in Attachment 1):

·    Audit & Risk Committee (Internal Advisory)

·    Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) (External)

·    CEO Employment Matters Advisory Committee (CEMAC) (Internal)

·    Interface Councils Group (External)

·    Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) (External)

·    Metropolitan Local Government’s Waste Forum (MLGWF) (External)

·    Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action Executive (NAGA) (External)

·    Northern Council’s Alliance (External)

·    Victorian Local Governance Association (External)

·    Whittlesea Community Connections (External)

·    Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) (External) 

·    Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

·    Yarra Plenty Regional Library Board (External)

2.    Nominate Officers to the organisations and committees listed as follows (as unshaded in attachment 1):

·    Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) (External)

·    Bundoora Indoor Netball & Sport Centre Board (External)

·    Darebin Creek Management Committee Incorporated (External)

·    Friends of South Morang (External)

·    Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan 2017-2021 Steering Committee (Internal)

·    Interface Councils Group (External)

·    Merri Creek Management Committee Incorporate (External)

·    Metropolitan Local Government’s Waste Forum (MLGWF) (External)

·    Metropolitan Transport Forum Inc. (External)

·    Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC) (Internal)

·    Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action Executive (NAGA) (External)

·    Northern Councils Alliance (External)

·    Westgarthtown Pioneer Precinct Advisory Committee (External)

·    Whittlesea Community Futures Partnership (External)

·    Whittlesea Courthouse Association (External)

·    Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) (External) 

·    Whittlesea Multicultural Communities Council (WMCC) (External)

·    Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

·    Whittlesea Showground and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management (External)

·    City of Whittlesea Youth Advisory Committee (Internal)

·    Whittlesea Youth Commitment Strategic Advisory Group (WYC) (External)

·    Yarra Plenty Regional Library Board (External)

3.       Note the Terms of Reference of the following group requires amendment in accordance with the appointments made:

·    Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

4.       No longer nominate representatives to the Whittlesea Secondary College Chaplaincy Committee (External).

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Chair of Council Wilson

Seconded:               Administrator Eddy

 

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Nominate Administrator delegates to the organisations and committees that have been identified to be of strategic significance listed as follows (as highlighted in yellow in Attachment 1):

•        Audit & Risk Committee (Internal Advisory)

•        Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) (External) – Appoint Administrator Duncan as delegate to this committee

•        CEO Employment Matters Advisory Committee (CEMAC) (Internal)

•        Interface Councils Group (External)

•        Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) (External)

•        Metropolitan Local Government’s Waste Forum (MLGWF) (External)

•        Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action Executive (NAGA) (External)

•        Northern Council’s Alliance (External)

•        Victorian Local Governance Association (External)

•        Whittlesea Community Connections (External)

•        Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) (External) 

•        Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

•        Yarra Plenty Regional Library Board (External)

2.       Nominate Officers to the organisations and committees listed as follows (as unshaded in attachment 1):

•        Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) (External)

•        Bundoora Indoor Netball & Sport Centre Board (External)

•        Darebin Creek Management Committee Incorporated (External)

•        Friends of South Morang (External)

•        Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan 2017-2021 Steering Committee (Internal)

•        Interface Councils Group (External)

•        Merri Creek Management Committee Incorporate (External)

•        Metropolitan Local Government’s Waste Forum (MLGWF) (External)

•        Metropolitan Transport Forum Inc. (External)

•        Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC) (Internal)

•        Northern Alliance for Greenhouse Action Executive (NAGA) (External)

•        Northern Councils Alliance (External)

•        Westgarthtown Pioneer Precinct Advisory Committee (External)

•        Whittlesea Community Futures Partnership (External)

•        Whittlesea Courthouse Association (External)

•        Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) (External) 

•        Whittlesea Multicultural Communities Council (WMCC) (External)

•        Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

•        Whittlesea Showground and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management (External)

•        City of Whittlesea Youth Advisory Committee (Internal)

•        Whittlesea Youth Commitment Strategic Advisory Group (WYC) (External)

•        Yarra Plenty Regional Library Board (External)

3.       Note the Terms of Reference of the following group requires amendment in accordance with the appointments made:

•        Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (Internal)

4.       No longer nominate representatives to the Whittlesea Secondary College Chaplaincy Committee (External).

Carried

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

6.1.3      For Decision - Update to Scheduled Council Meetings for 2021  

Responsible Officer:           Executive Manager Governance

Author:                                  Team Leader Governance Administration   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to adopt the updated proposed Council Meeting schedule for 2021.

Brief overview

The schedule of Council Meeting dates for 2021 was adopted by Council on 7 December 2020 with amendments to the schedule made on 2 February 2021.  Further amendments are proposed to the schedule for the remainder of the year.  This includes to hold the monthly scheduled Council Meetings on the first Monday of the month from July to December with the exception of November which will be held on the second Monday of the month.  It is also proposed for two meetings to be held in community venues outside the Civic Centre.

rationale for recommendation

In accordance with the Local Government Act 2020 and section 9 of Council’s Governance Rules the date, time and place of scheduled Council Meetings are to be determined, and may be altered, by resolution of the Council with reasonable notice to be provided to the public.

impacts of recommendation

Council will comply with the Governance Rules by adopting and advertising an updated schedule of Council Meetings for 2021.

Conducting Council Meetings throughout the year enables Council to undertake its decision making role and as the meetings are open to the public (unless there is a specific reason to close the meeting to the public) they also give the community an opportunity to become involved in Council’s decision-making process on issues that affect the community.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Scheduled Council Meeting dates for 2021 will be published on Council’s website and promoted through Council’s social media to encourage members of the community to watch Council meetings by live-stream or recording.  In addition, members of the public will be encouraged to attend Council meetings in person, in line with the physical distancing restrictions in place at the time of each meeting due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Report

Introduction

To adopt an updated schedule of Council Meetings for 2021.

Background

Council Meetings are generally held in the Council Chamber at the Civic Centre.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic section 394 of the Local Government Act 2020 allows Council Meetings to be held remotely by electronic means of communication up until 26 April 2022.

All Council Meetings are live-streamed, and a recording is publicly available, therefore can be viewed by residents at their convenience.

At the 2 February 2021 Council Meeting, Council adopted a proposal to hold two of the scheduled Council Meetings at community venues in March 2021 and September 2021.

In March 2021 Council held its scheduled Council Meeting at a community venue, the Whittlesea Community Activity Centre.  Prior to the Council Meeting a community engagement forum was held.

Proposal

Council proposes all meetings are to be held on the first Monday of the month with the exception of the November meeting which is proposed to be held on the second Monday of the month due to the Melbourne Cup Day Public Holiday. It is also proposed to hold the scheduled Council Meeting in December 2021 at a community venue, in addition to the upcoming September Council Meeting.

It is proposed that Council:

1.    Adopt the updated Council Meeting schedule for the remainder of 2021 as follows:

Date

Venue

Commencement Time

5 July 2021

Council Chamber, Council Offices,

25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

6.30pm

2 August 2021

Council Chamber, Council Offices,

25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

6.30pm

6 September 2021

Galada Community Centre,

10A Forum Way, Epping

7:30pm (community forum to be held prior to meeting)

4 October 2021

Council Chamber, Council Offices,

25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

6.30pm

8 November 2021

Council Chamber, Council Offices,

25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

6.30pm

6 December 2021

Barry Road Community Activity Centre, 36 Barry Road, Thomastown

7:30pm (community forum to be held prior to meeting)

2.    Give public notice of the updated Council Meeting schedule for 2021.

community council meetings

In March 2021 Council held its scheduled Council Meeting at a community venue, the Whittlesea Community Activity Centre. Prior to the Council Meeting a community engagement forum was held.

It is proposed the format of Council Meetings held at a community venue include the following:

Community Engagement Forum – 6.15pm to 7.15pm

To discuss local issues and topical matters and to gain general feedback from members of the community.

 

Refreshments – 7.15pm to 7.30pm

Light refreshment will be provided in a COVID safe manner.

 

Scheduled Council Meeting - 7.30pm- 8.30pm

The Scheduled Council meeting will run as usual.  It is expected that the Scheduled Council Meeting would close at 8.30pm and that the event would conclude by 9pm.

Critical Dates

The dates for Council meetings proposed for the remainder of 2021 take into account public holidays and other sector specific events such as major conferences.

Financial Implications

Costs associated with holding Community and Council meetings are covered in existing budgets.

Given that Community Centres are not set up for the conduct of a Community Engagement Forums/Council Meetings, it is necessary to hire a sound system to ensure that debate and discussion can be heard throughout the room and for the purpose of livestreaming.  Projectors and monitors are also required.  Catering, staff attendance and other incidental costs are also involved.

Additional costs of hired equipment and catering is ~$3,500 per Community Council Meeting which is within Council’s budget.  Catering is sourced locally.

Policy strategy and legislation

In accordance with the Local Government Act 2020 and Council’s Governance Rules 2020 Council is required to set the date, time and place of Scheduled Council Meetings and that reasonable notice be provided to the public. In accordance with Council’s Public Transparency Policy 2020 Scheduled Council Meetings promote openness and transparency in Council decision-making processes and promotes greater understanding and awareness by the community of how Council’s decisions are made.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

Regular Council meetings promote open and transparent decision making and civic engagement.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              High-performing organisation

Key Direction              More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

 

Council will work to build a stronger sense of community within neighbourhoods and across the municipality and create new opportunities for social networks and civic engagement.

Conducting Council meetings throughout the year gives the community an opportunity to become involved in Council’s decision-making process on issues that affect the community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that the updated schedule of Council Meetings for 2021 be adopted and advertised to the public.  The schedule of meeting dates will facilitate Council's decision-making processes by ensuring that regular meetings are held and that Council meetings are promoted to the public.

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Adopt the updated Council Meeting schedule for the remainder of 2021 as follows:

Date

Venue

Commencement Time

5 July 2021

Council Chamber, Council Offices,

25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

6.30pm

2 August 2021

Council Chamber, Council Offices,

25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

6.30pm

6 September 2021

Galada Community Centre,

10A Forum Way Epping

7:30pm (community forum to be held prior to meeting)

4 October 2021

Council Chamber, Council Offices,

25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

6.30pm

8 November 2021

Council Chamber, Council Offices,

25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

6.30pm

6 December 2021

Barry Road Community Activity Centre, 36 Barry Road Thomastown

7:30pm (community forum to be held prior to meeting)

2.    Give public notice of the updated Council Meeting schedule for 2021.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Chair of Council Wilson

Seconded:               Administrator Eddy

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried unanimously

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

ITEM 6.1.4 For Decision - Patterson Drive Community Centre, Donnybrook 

Attachments:                        1        Business Case Patterson Drive

2        Social Return On Investment and Operating Costs

3        Jobs and Commuting in the Outer Suburbs NGAA 2020 report.

4        SGS Economics COVID Impact on Whittlesea   

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Wellbeing

Author:                                  Community Infrastructure Project Coordinator   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council proceed with the design and delivery of Patterson Drive Community Centre Option 3 Business case. This will deliver a Community Centre to the Donnybrook region, consisting of a 3 room kindergarten, large community hall, 4 Maternal and Child Health (MCH) consult suites, program room, waiting room, community kitchen and 3 multi-purpose training/social support/meeting rooms and associated external carparking and landscaping.

Other early years facility planning within this precinct was part of a separate Council report on Three Year Old Kindergarten Reform presented to Council on 4 May 2021.

Brief overview

This report provides an overview of the proposed Patterson Drive Community Centre business case (Attachment One) and the recommended option (Option 3).

Option 3 recommends an increased scope through additional floor space to maximise opportunities for social cohesion and connectedness; as well as generate employment and economic participation.

This will be the third community facility delivered in the Olivine Neighbourhood Activity Centre, and the only community centre north of Donnybrook Road for the next 10 years. Other community facilities within the precinct include the smaller Olivine Place (existing neighbourhood facility), the Olivine Sports Pavilion (under development) and other early years and education facilities (under development). The Centre will:

·    Service a projected 12,000 residents by 2025 (ID forecast) – this includes both the local neighbourhood and residents within the larger community catchment;

·    Alleviate the current lack of adequate community infrastructure;

·    Significantly improve access to services in this growth precinct.

A social return on investment analysis identified Option 3 as providing the highest social benefit against identified needs for the Donnybrook region.  The additional cost of $1,780,581 may be funded though Council’s New Works program or external grants such as the Growing Suburbs Fund or a combination of these funding sources.

It is anticipated the services gap will worsen on a district level due to the projected lack of access to suitable serviced land caused by out of sequence and disjointed development fronts. Residents moving into the growth corridor are often disadvantaged in being able to access services within their local area.  During the design phase a place-based approach will explore opportunities and costs associated with providing other services at the site such as an expanded library, Council Customer Service and community health.

rationale for recommendation

Option 3 will deliver the best social return on investment (see Attachment Two) and reduce future capital costs associated with the delivery of MCH consult rooms and social support program spaces. Through designing the facility for multiple cohorts it is anticipated the Community Centre will deliver much needed services not only to young families through the provision of kindergarten and maternal child health, but will also service the broader community through a multi-purpose designed facility that can support ‘ageing well’ programs, youth, arts and accredited training.

The Infrastructure Contributions Plan (ICP) calculations framework does not provide sufficient funds for the infrastructure required to accommodate the delivery of all anticipated local services that residents are expected to need. The calculations framework is determined by the Victorian Government and creates a structural shortfall and perennial challenge for Council in the development of community facilities within growth areas. This issue is exacerbated by building cost escalation and regulatory change that ICP calculations do not consider. Given the existing mode and range of services delivered, Council will be required to contribute funds beyond the value of the ICP. This additional need for funds may be offset by grants such as the non-competitive Building Blocks grants and the Growing Suburbs Funds (competitive).

impacts of recommendation

Council’s capital contribution to the Community Centre will be approximately $1.8 million (excluding the $6.7 million provided through the ICP). It is anticipated this will be offset through external grants such as the Growing Suburbs and/ or Building Blocks Funds.

Benefits for undertaking this project include:

·    More efficient built form with economies of scale to support environmentally sustainable development.

·    Increased service provision across all ages and cohorts of community.

·    Increased local employment opportunities.

·    Increased opportunities for cultural and artistic programs/events.

·    Enhanced developmental outcomes for children due to access to services.

·    Stronger sense of place attachment, resulting in psychological benefits including reduced isolation.

·    There is a view that post COVID, the ‘localisation movement’ will increase. This will lead to an upsurge in people working and shopping within their local area. This in turn increases the level of community engagement within the precinct and demands on the community centre.

·    Inclusions such as co-working will assist the growth of small businesses in the outer suburbs. This will have the additional benefit of supporting the female workforce that requires a space that is flexible, affordable and is close to home and schools.

·    Invest in a neighbourhood hub operational management model to support place-based initiatives. This will be achieved through ensuring the operational model for the Community Centre, Olivine Place and the Olivine Pavilion is integrated in its programming/activation.


 

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

A high-level risk assessment was undertaken during the project scoping and analysis for the business case which details physical and reputational risks to Council for each delivery option. The recommended project scope reflects the minimal perceived risk to Council and greatest benefit to be received by the community.

Report

Background

This project addresses demand for adequate community infrastructure in the Donnybrook area through the provision of a Community Centre.

The requirement for Council to build community infrastructure in Donnybrook was established as part of the social needs assessment of the Donnybrook-Woodstock Precinct Structure Plan (DWPSP) and was approved by the Minister for Planning and gazetted in November 2017. The associated ICP was approved and gazetted in December 2020.

The ICP allows for the delivery of 3 kindergarten rooms, 2 MCH consulting suites with a program room and a large multipurpose space. However, demographic research and consultation with key service areas and project stakeholders has required this original project scope to be expanded, to ensure the needs of this isolated community are met and that service delivery and operational requirements can be accommodated in the proposed facility.

A summary of needs, issues and opportunities to be addressed through this project are summarised in Table 1 below.

Table 1 – Issues, Opportunities and Needs

Issue

Description

1.  Out of sequence and disjointed development fronts

Out of sequence and disjointed development fronts, together with a current and projected lack of access to serviced and titled land, has impacted the delivery timeline of future community centres in the Donnybrook region. This in turn has impacted the service delivery requirements for this rapidly growing population. Due to these trends, this facility is likely to be the only such facility servicing Donnybrook for the next 10 years. This means increased service delivery capacity that can evolve over time is critical. Some key trends include:

·    By 2023:

47.2% of households will be made up of couples with dependants (many intergenerational).

It is predicted to have 662 children that are 4 years and under.

·    By 2025:

Kindergarten demand forecast indicates 1 room will be required by 2021, increasing to 4.5 rooms by 2025.

There will be 1533 youth (and by 2036 there will be 6250, ID Forecast).

·    By 2041:

Current Donnybrook population is 232 people (2019). This will increase to 52,664 by 2041.

Inward-migration in 2023 is projected to be 1,979 people annually. This will increase to 5,806 people annually moving into Donnybrook by 2041.

Note – population figures are based on pre-COVID19 projections.

 

2.  MCH service provision model

The need for Council to provide an alternative model for the provision of MCH services. The standard provision of 2 MCH suites within each future community centre equates to 14 MCH suites in the Donnybrook precinct at full build-out, which is currently estimated to be beyond 2050.

Modelling suggests by 2032, only 4 MCH suites will be required. Donnybrook Farmhouse and Darebin Creek Community Centres are within a 3km radius from Patterson Drive Community Centre (refer Figure 1). If Option 3 was not supported and the standard Option 1 was provided, there would need to be 2 additional suites delivered by 2026, given the current disjointed development and lack of access to the allocated land, this would not be possible and there would be a significant impact on councils ability to deliver MCH services.

Currently the data available does not support the need for 14 MCH offices long-term, potentially leaving these spaces under-utilised and with a significant cost in a climate where services are competing for space. This proposal is an opportunity for MCH to establish a hub of suites in this venue and reduce the need for the MCH suites at surrounding community centres. This provides the additional benefit of having an MCH team based within this site, rather than a single MCH Nurse, which brings with it the requirements for operational and safety improvements.

Parents in the Donnybrook area currently receive the MCH service from Whittlesea. For staff to provide a home visit in this area requires a 40-minute travel turn-around time, or alternatively an 18 km commute for clients. To reduce the pressure on Donnybrook residents, the MCH service have commenced investigations to provide some outreach service based at Olivine Place.

 

3.  COVID19 impacts

The effects of COVID19 are not yet fully known, however house and land sales in Donnybrook remain strong and triggers for provision of a community centre will be exceeded by 2023. COVID19 is likely to lead to an increase in community localisation and remote working, reinforcing the need for local experiences and remote worker supports. These trends were identified in a Council commissioned report by SGS Economics (Attachment Four).

The National Growth Area Alliance, July 2020 identified that the working from home shift has been more notable among people living in Australia’s outer growth suburbs. The outcomes of people working from home allows more time at home as commuting was reduced (Attachment Three).

 

4.  Urban fringe living and vulnerability

The stress of urban fringe living is creating vulnerability within this community, with population increases generating unmet local demand for equitable and inclusive services not generally included in ICP provision, notably Aged Services (Social Support Programs), co-working, arts, youth spaces and training spaces for education. (Donnybrook- Woodstock PSP and ID forecast).

 

 

5.  Meeting the immediate service needs of the local community

Residents moving into the growth corridor are often disadvantaged in being able to access services within their local area.

Using a place-based approach Council will explore opportunities and costs associated with providing other services at the site such as an expanded library, Council Customer Service and community health.

Figure 1 – Area map

A detailed business case has been developed providing an analysis of all project scope options. Table 2 provides a high-level overview of the business case options. Refer to Attachment One for further information on the options.

Table 2. Options for Service Delivery Patterson Drive Community Centre

 

Patterson Drive Community Centre business case options

Option 1

Option 1 Description: Delivers a standard facility based on the ICP. This equates to a 3-room kindergarten, 2 room consult suite housing MCH/other services and community spaces.

Benefits: Delivers kindergarten and MCH services to the area. Consult suites and a hall will be available for services and community bookings.

Weaknesses: Too small to address the additional needs for this community.

Social Return on Investment

Ongoing Operational Cost*

Capital Cost

Social Return on Investment $1.79

$369,940

$9,351,191

 

 

Option 2

Option 2 Description: Delivers a facility with an expanded MCH service model based on the hub and spoke approach. This option will include 4 consult suites housing MCH and other services, separate program/waiting rooms, 3 room kindergarten and community spaces.

Benefits: Delivers option 1 plus the expanded MCH service provision. Advantages of such a model include opportunities to:

·    Increase service options for parents and carers (and models of care such as larger team around the family to care for them)

·    Provide flexible service options e.g. groups

·    Services can support each other with secondary consultation,

·    Support student placements

·    Partner with other service providers and collaborate on the provision of programs,

·    Improve efficiencies in staffing model, including safety for staff minimising the need for lone worker situations,

·    Provide place-based services to meet community needs,

·    Reduce the MCH footprint and improve MCH service sustainability with less duplication of MCH services.

Weaknesses: Will not meet the service needs for young people, older people, carers, support for working from home and having local access to workspace.

Social Return on Investment

Ongoing Operational Cost*

Capital Cost

Social Return on Investment $1.99

$521,359

$10,195,949

 

 

 

 

Option 3

Option 3 Description: Delivers option 2, plus 3 multi-purpose activity rooms. This will allow delivery of a Social Support program, youth, training, arts and co-working spaces.

Benefits: Delivers option 2, plus increased service provision for youth, training rooms, social support program and co-working. The facility will enable:

·    Delivery of a Social Support Program. This will result in aged service provision when it is needed and will reduce financial costs associated with delivering a facility later.

·    As the economy rebuilds post-pandemic, people are showing interest in a hybrid model of working from home and having local access to workspace (Jobs and Commuting in Outer Growth Suburbs: NGAA refer Attachment Three).

·    A safe and connected hub where community members can work from their local area. The multi-purpose design of activity rooms will also allow training, youth activities and the arts community a space to thrive and be programmed simultaneously.

·    An adaptable community facility that provides community with a multi-purpose destination and a ‘place to be’ to reduce negative social impacts caused, or exacerbated by, social isolation within new growth communities.

·    An integrated and highly programmable community facility to meet demand for essential services, such as Kindergarten and MCH, Social Support Programs and Youth Services.

·    Optimisation of precinct-wide and community building outcomes, as well as partnership opportunities resulting from recently and soon to be completed nearby community infrastructure, including Olivine Pavilion Active Open Space, Olivine Place, the local primary school, Hume Anglican Grammar and the neighbourhood town centre.

Weaknesses: Greater capital cost.

 

Social Return on Investment

Ongoing Operational Cost*

Capital Cost

Social Return on Investment $2.09

$509,101

$11,305,624

*Operational costs include full salary, maintenance, utilities and corporate overheads. Excludes building depreciation.


 

Proposal

This report proposes that Council proceed with Option 3 as described in Table 2 above and Attachment One.

Figure 2 – Site map of Olivine estate

Demographic evidence and consultation with service providers identified the need for a hub approach to:

·    Meet the service needs for this community and enable essential services to be delivered in the Donnybrook area.

·    Alleviate the current lack of adequate community infrastructure in this growth precinct.

·    Complement the existing early activation space at Olivine Place (which is providing a connection point for community but is limited in the services it can provide due to size).

Social Outcomes

Key outcomes to be realised through this project include:

·    The provision of multi-purpose spaces will provide avenues for youth to connect and potentially enrol in training programs to gain employment.

·    Safe and accessible space which will enable small business and residents an alternative place that they are able to work from.

·    Studies indicate that working from home/locally presented opportunities for women to (re-)enter the workforce, including those that faced barriers of owning a car or having young children.

·    Social Support Programs run from the multi-purpose spaces will reduce social isolation by providing older people that are frail, living with disability, memory loss (dementia) and limited mobility the opportunity to try new activities, meet others, establish links in the community, and improve their overall sense of health and wellbeing.

·    Expanded social services will be delivered to community through the additional consult suites provided in the MCH model. This will increase opportunities for families to have access to services such as Orange Door and specialist therapists, which would traditionally require commuting to Epping.

·    Early childhood developmental outcomes due to access to early years services.

·    Greater social and community cohesion, resulting from community being able to access spaces where art, cultural and creative practices are facilitated.

·    A place-based community centre that is responsive to a growth community’s needs.

Governance

The Patterson Drive Community Centre is within the Olivine residential development. The developer, Mirvac, and Council have established an MOU for Olivine to be a pilot site for the Growth Areas Social Planning Tool (GASPT). The GASPT outlines governance and processes that facilitate a more integrated approach to the planning and delivery of services and infrastructure in new communities. To this end an internal Council Olivine Coordination Group, that includes representatives from all disciplines and projects involved in planning for Olivine, has been established. The governance body of the Community Centre will link in with the broader Olivine Coordination Group.

The combined operational management of Olivine Place, Patterson Drive Community Centre and Olivine Sports Pavilion, will be developed in the coming year. Community centres throughout Whittlesea provide a space for community to connect; and governance arrangements will explore opportunities to maximise community utilisation, activation and partnerships.

Financial Implications

The estimated capital project cost for Option 3 is estimated as $11,305,624.

Funding sources are identified in Table 3. The ICP provision is $6,775,043. Option 3 is eligible for the Growing Suburbs Fund (GSF) and has the potential to reduce the contribution required by the New Works Program (Council Capital); for which there is currently a shortfall of $1,780,581 in Council’s current forecast 4/15 capital program.

It is important to note that bringing forward the delivery of 2 additional MCH spaces will result in a future saving of approximately $742,190. This is based on the removal of 4 suites and associated waiting/program room space from future nearby community centres. This equates to 181m2 (181 x $4,100m2 existing build rate, but does not factor CPI or increased build rates).

The delivery of multi-purpose spaces within Option 3, will allow for the delay and potentially remove the requirement to source future capital that would be needed for the provision of social support program space.

The provision of multi-purpose spaces as supported in Option 3 indicates that the requirement for a facility specific for Social Support Programs can be deferred until at least 2032 and may not be required dependent upon future service delivery models (ID Forecast).

As part of the feasibility and design other services at this site such as an expanded library, Council Customer Service and community health will be explored and costed.  A project update including any revisions to the project scope will return to Council as part of the mid-year budget review in December 2021.

Table 3 – Funding arrangements

Year

Proposed budget

Status

ICP

New Works

(Council Capital)

External (tbc)

2021/2022

$648,000

 

 

 

2022/2023

$1,132,581

 

 

 

2023/2024

$3,387,521

 

$1,375,000

 

Building Blocks Grant (BBG) is non-competitive

2024/2025

$1,606,941

$1,780,581

$1,375,000

 

Council Capital can be sourced though the New Works program. Option 3 is eligible for the Growing Suburbs Fund (GSF) and will reduce the contribution required by the New Works Program (Council Capital).

Total

$11,305,624

 

As flagged in the table above, Option 3 includes an additional cost of $1,780,581 not currently forecast in Council’s 4/15 capital program. Additional funding may be available through the:

·    Council’s New Works program;

·    Building Blocks Program $2.75 million (non- competitive);

·    Growing Suburbs Fund (competitive).

Note: this report does not identify the $1,780,581 of capital projects which would need to be re-scheduled/ pushed back if an enhanced scope of Option 3 were to proceed via use of Council’s New Works program (and Council was unsuccessful in securing external grants).

ICP funds

Under the ICP system, the community and recreation funds can be allocated to the community and recreation projects identified in the PSP at Council’s discretion. As a base case, Council has allocated an apportioned amount to each project. However, Council could resolve to allocate additional ICP funds of $1,780,581 to this project. Council’s current cashflow analysis suggests we will have sufficient funds in our reserve to cover the additional amount. This will obviously reduce the amount of ICP funds in the reserve available for future community and recreation projects in the precinct.

It is important to note that additional ICP has already been allocated to the nearby Olivine Sports Pavilion. Not all community assets that are to be delivered in the Donnybrook Precinct are eligible for the Growing Suburbs Fund. Given this Community Centre is eligible, the necessity to draw down on future ICP funds is not imperative to the delivery of this project; and Council would be better served to seek Growing Suburbs Funds for this eligible project, rather than drawing down on ICP. To achieve this the additional funds of $1,780,581 should be sourced though Council’s New Works Program allowing this project to be eligible for the Growing Suburbs Fund which if successful would reduce the contribution required by the New Works Program (Council Capital).

Operational costs

Operational costs include full salary, maintenance, utilities and corporate overheads but excludes building depreciation and are described in Attachment Two. The operational costs over a 15 year period are estimated in Table 4 below. Council’s existing long-term financial plan does not take into account the operational costs of facilities that are not yet constructed.

Table 4 – Operational costs

Option

Est operational cost pa (NPV)

Est total operational costs over 15 years (NPV)

Option 1

$369,940

$6,924,690

Option 2

$521,359

$5,213,590

Option 3

$509,101

$5,091,010

Social Return on Investment

The Social Return on Investment tool utilised for Patterson Drive, calculates the amount of benefit, which is generated within our community, for each dollar that is invested. For the three options, the greatest return on investment was Option 3. Generating $2.09 for each $1 that is spent. This is a result of the multi-purposed design of the facility which will enable a broader reach of activities and services that the community can access.

Providing a cost benefit analysis of Social Return on Investment (SROI) has been calculated utilising the formula developed in-house based on social research indicators and categorised using the Whittlesea 2040 framework. The tool is currently being developed with a view to ensuring that moving forward, every major business case investment can be assessed equally under the same SROI parameters.

Consultation

Council officers have been working collaboratively over the past year to ensure relevant service areas have been consulted, inclusive of Early Years, Maternal and Child Health, Ageing Well, Youth, Leisure and Community Facilities, Community Inclusion, Traffic Engineering, Parks and Urban Design, Major Projects, Economic Development, Pandemic Recovery, Project Control Group and the  Business Case Review Panel. Additional consultation with external bodies such as Yarra Plenty Regional Library Corporation, Hume Anglican Grammar, Department of Education and Training and Mirvac have contributed to the options developed in the business case.

Critical Dates

The project timeframe is from July 2020 to December 2025.

The project proposes a completion date by the end of 2024, with the facility operational at the start of 2025. The 2025 operational start date will help to address and mitigate stresses and vulnerabilities associated with urban fringe living for Donnybrook residents. Enrolment timelines for kindergarten are particularly time dependent.

To meet these timelines, business case approval is required by mid 2021, to allow design to commence in late 2021.

Following commencement of the design phase, Council will apply for external grants such as the Growing Suburbs and Building Blocks Capacity Program funding.


 

Policy strategy and legislation

This project directly links to:

·    Whittlesea 2040: A place for all

·    City of Whittlesea’s Early Years Policy 2017

·    Education and Care Services National Law and the Education and Care Services National Regulations 2011

·    The Victorian Government policy related to community infrastructure and the co-location of facilities and integrated services, community hubs and encouraging shared use

·    The Growth Area Social Planning Tool.

link to strategic risks

Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeingIf Council is not able to deliver the Community Centre by January 2025, local demand for 3 and 4-year-old kindergarten will not be met.  Donnybrook will be home for over 12,000 residents which will require adequate access to MCH, youth spaces and social support programs. The delay in provision of this facility will exacerbate the social issues already present throughout the growth areas of Whittlesea.

If Council is unsuccessful in securing external funding for Option 3 then some capital projects may need to be re-scheduled.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Well-designed neighbourhoods and vibrant town centres

 

Our community’s access to services and facilities is an adopted measure by which Council assesses its achievement of delivering well-designed neighbourhoods and vibrant town centres.

Through the delivery of the Patterson Drive Community Centre, Council will be able to facilitate a socially cohesive community, that is connected and able to access services that will enable opportunities for all. 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

This project addresses the demand for adequate community infrastructure in the Donnybrook area through the provision of a Community Centre.

 

 

Option 3 in the business case (Attachment One) will deliver a Community Centre to the Donnybrook region, consisting of a 3 room kindergarten, large community hall, 4 MCH consult suites, program room, waiting room, community kitchen and 3 multi-purpose training/social support/meeting rooms and associated external carparking and landscaping. There are significant external funding opportunities to address the additional capital cost of Option 3.  To address residents immediate service needs opportunities and costs associated with providing other services at the site such as an expanded library, Council Customer Service and community health will be explored as part of the design phase.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.    Support the Patterson Drive Community Centre Option 3 Business Case (Attachment One) which includes an additional project cost of $1,780,581.

2.    Note the additional cost for the Patterson Drive Community Centre Option 3 may be funded though Council’s New Works program or external grants such as the Growing Suburbs Fund (or a combination of these funding sources).

3.    Note the Patterson Drive Community Centre Option 3 Business Case will reduce the demand for Maternal Child Health suites at surrounding community centres and that Council’s long term infrastructure planning will identify this in future planning and provision.

4.    Note future feasibility and design will explore opportunities and costs associated with providing other services at the site such as an expanded library, Council Customer Service and community health.

5.    Note Council will receive a project update (including any revisions to project scope as part of the mid year budget review in December 2021).

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:               Chair of Council Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried unanimously

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

6.2       Liveable Neighbourhoods

ITEM 6.2.1 For Decision - Adoption of the Road Management Plan (2021) 

Attachments:                        1        Road Management Plan (2021)

2        Road Management Plan (2021) - Tracked Changes

3        Intervention Levels and Inspection Frequency - Tracked Changes   

Responsible Officer:           Acting Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Senior Infrastructure Engineer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

1.   Adopt the Road Management Plan (2021).

2.   Advertise Council’s adoption of the Road Management Plan (2021) in the Victorian Government Gazette, The Age, the Whittlesea Review and the Northern Star Weekly.

3.   Provide a copy of the Road Management Plan (2021) on the City of Whittlesea website – www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au.

Brief overview

Council is required to update its Road Management Plan (the Plan) in accordance with the Road Management Act 2004. The current review of the plan commenced in August 2020 and concluded with the public exhibition of the Plan.

rationale for recommendation

The Road Management Plan sets the maintenance frequency for local roads and identifies when Council is required to undertake repairs to address faults in our footpath and road network.

The current Road Management Plan was prepared in accordance with guidance provided in the Code of Practice for Road Management Plans. Its contents have been reviewed and updated where required to match current industrial trends and standards.

impacts of recommendation

Should Council adopt the Road Management Plan (2021), Council will be obliged to meet the standards of operations detailed within the Plan.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

A strategic review of Council’s operations is in progress which will identify the resources necessary to deliver the maintenance and operations services and ensure ongoing compliance with the new Plan.

 

Report

Background

The Road Management Act 2004 (the Act) has established a statutory framework for the management of public roads. The Act applies to road authorities including the City of Whittlesea. The Road Management Plan (the Plan) is made in accordance with the Act and its purpose is:

(a)  To establish a management system for the road management functions of a road authority which is based on policy and operational objectives and available resources, and

(b)  To set the relevant standard in relation to the discharge of duties in the performance of those road management functions.

The Plan sets the maintenance frequency for local roads and identifies when Council is required to undertake repairs to address faults in our footpath and road network. The maintenance of a safe road and footpath network and availability of resources are the primary considerations for setting the hazard and defect intervention levels.

Council at its meeting dated 4 November 2020 endorsed the draft Road Management Plan (2021) for the purposes of allowing public exhibition and consultation in accordance with the Local Government Act 1989.

Road Management Plan (2021)

The Road Management Plan (2021) was prepared in accordance with the Code of Practice for Road Management Plans. Its contents are arranged in six sections and one appendix, as detailed below:

·        Introduction

Outlines the purpose, objectives, key stakeholders, duty of road users, and how it relates with the Community Plan and Asset Management Policy.

·        Road Asset Description

Provides descriptions of the types of road infrastructure.

·        Road Infrastructure Hierarchy

Provides hierarchy classification of road infrastructure relevant to setting performance standards.

·        Performance Standards

Specifies the performance standards to ‘inspect, maintain and repair’ public roads. This is the core part of the plan which defines the timelines of Council tasks. This section is often considered in any civil liability claims against Council relating to road or footpath conditions.

·        Management System

Outlines the current management system and what is required to be established to help discharge Council’s duty to ‘inspect, maintain and repair’ public roads.

·        Review of Road Management Plan

Schedules the next review.

A copy of the Plan is provided (Attachment 1) along with a tracked changes Plan (Attachment 2) which shows the changes between the 2017 and 2021 versions.

Proposal

Amendments to the Force Majeure

Section 1.7: Force Majeure has been revised following a recent legal review. The intent of the revised Section 1.7: Suspension of Road Management Plan importantly remains the same, however minor terminology and wording changes were required to meet the latest legal mandates and precedents.

Proposed Changes to Performance Standards

A suite of amendments were made to the performance standards and intervention levels in the Road Management Plan (2021). Some of these changes propose to extend timeframes and expand levels of intervention in alignment with similar, northern metropolitan municipalities, however most changes propose to tighten timeframes and reduce defect tolerances (Attachment 3).

All the proposed changes consider current trends and industry benchmarks. The City of Whittlesea’s performance standards were reviewed against northern metropolitan municipalities and differences were evaluated by Council Officers to determine Council’s exposure to risk.

Importantly, all proposed changes incorporate feedback from the Municipal Association of Victoria and Council’s Insurer, who undertook their own independent benchmarking exercise across the State.

Schedule the Next Review

The Plan dictates that the next Road Management Plan review must commence by 1 August 2024 and be completed by 30 June 2025 unless otherwise directed by the relevant Road Minister or directed by the Council and Chief Executive Officer.

Consultation

All Victorian councils are required by the Local Government Act 1989 to place their Road Management Plan on public exhibition for feedback for a period of no less than 28 days. Given the impacts of COVID-19, this consultation period was extended to 42 days to ensure all interested community members had an opportunity to provide comment on the proposed Plan.

Committee of Council

Public notices advising of the review of the Plan were placed in the Government Gazette, The Age, the Whittlesea Review and the Northern Star Weekly in the week commencing 11 January 2021. As no submissions were received during this process, the appointed Committee of Council were advised that there was no requirement for the Committee to meet.

Public Advertisement on Revised Plan

A public notice advising of the adoption of the new Plan is required to be placed in a daily circulating newspaper and the Government Gazette. It is proposed to advertise the adopted Plan in the Government Gazette, The Age, the Whittlesea Review and the Northern Star Weekly in the week commencing 14 June 2021.

Critical Dates

The Road Management Plan review process must be completed by 30 June 2021.

Financial Implications

It is anticipated that there will be financial implications associated with the proposed changes to inspection frequencies, intervention levels and response times and it is forecast that the current level of resourcing (plant, equipment, and labour) will need to increase to align with the obligations set out in the Plan.

A strategic review of Council’s operations is in progress which will identify the resources necessary to deliver the maintenance and operations services and ensure ongoing compliance with the new Plan.

Policy strategy and legislation

The review of the Road Management Plan aligns with the following policy, strategy and legislation:

·    Road Management Act 2004

Division 5 regarding development of a Road Management Plan

·    Local Government Act 2020

Section 55 regarding community engagement

·    Whittlesea 2040

Connected Community: a healthy and safe community

Liveable Neighbourhoods: smart, connected transport network

·    Road Management Plan 2017

Section 6 regarding review of the Plan

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Life Cycle Asset Management - Failure to effectively plan for the construction, on-going maintenance and renewal of Council’s assets

The Road Management Plan (2021) is an essential document that sets the inspection frequency, intervention levels and maintenance response timeframes for Council’s local road and footpath network.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Smart, connected transport network

 

The Plan sets out the maintenance frequency for local roads and identifies when Council is required to undertake repairs to address faults in its footpath and road network. These repairs are required to preserve the asset in a state of utility to facility a smart, connected transport network.

Updating the Plan will improve the infrastructure maintenance regime to align with current industrial trends and standards.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The draft Road Management Plan (2021) has been reviewed and updated where required to match current industrial trends and standards. The review incorporates feedback from the Municipal Association of Victoria and Council’s Insurer and considers legal advice to meet the latest legal mandates and precedents.

The finalised plan is proposed for adoption by Council and will subsequently be advertised in the Government Gazette, The Age, the Whittlesea Review and the Northern Star Weekly in the week commencing 14 June 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the Road Management Plan (2021).

2.       Advertise Council’s adoption of the Road Management Plan (2021) in the Victorian Government Gazette, The Age, the Whittlesea Review and the Northern Star Weekly.

3.       Provide a copy of the Road Management Plan (2021) on the City of Whittlesea website – www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Eddy

Seconded:               Chair of Council Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

ITEM 6.2.2 For Decision - Amendment C255 - Application of the Public Acquisition Overlay to two properties 

Attachments:                        1        Attachment 1 - Amendment C255 PAO Map Adoption

2        Attachment 2 - Amendment C255 Clause 45.01s Adoption

3        Attachment 3 - Subject Site and Land Ownership

4        Attachment 4 - Everton Drive & Plenty Road Intersection Plan

5        Attachment 5 - Amendment C255 PAO Map Exhibition   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Development

Author:                                  Strategic Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt Amendment C255 in accordance with the documents contained in Attachments 1 and 2 of this report.

2.       Submit Amendment C255 to the Minister for Planning for approval.

3.       Notify the submitters of Council’s resolution.

Brief overview

·    Amendment C255 will apply a Public Acquisition Overlay (PAO) to part of land at 1455a Plenty Road and 1470 Plenty Road, Mernda.

·    The application of the PAO is required to facilitate the future acquisition of land for two significant infrastructure projects – the construction of the intersection of Plenty Road and Everton Drive and assembly of land for the ultimate construction of facilities on the Mernda Regional Recreation Reserve.

·    One supportive submission was received to the amendment exhibition process and no other submissions were received.

·    It is recommended that Amendment C255 be adopted by Council and forwarded to the Minister for Planning for approval.

·    Upon gazettal of Amendment C255 Council will be able to acquire the land in accordance with the Land Acquisition and Compensation Act, 1986.

ratiONale for recommendation

The Amendment facilitates the delivery of projects (intersection and active recreation reserve) which have been strategically identified in the Mernda Strategy Plan.

As a result of the exhibition of the Amendment no submissions have been received which either object or request any change to the Amendment.

Therefore, it is recommended that the Amendment be adopted to enable the timely acquisition of land required to deliver these important projects for the Mernda community.

impacts of recommendation

Should this Amendment be approved by the Minister for Planning, then Council is able to commence the land acquisition process in accordance with the process defined by the Land Acquisition and Compensation Act, 1986.

The acquisition of the land will enable the timely delivery of the Plenty Road and Everton Drive intersection and the future delivery of the Mernda Sports Hub project at the Mernda Regional Recreation Reserve.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Submitters will be notified of the outcome of the Amendment. All landowners impacted by the Amendment will also be kept informed as the acquisition process proceeds in accordance with the Land Acquisition and Compensation Act, 1986.

 

 

Report

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the outcomes of the exhibition of Amendment C255 and recommend Council adopt the Amendment and submit it to the Minister for Planning for approval.

Amendment C255 seeks to apply a Public Acquisition Overlay (PAO) to the additional land required for upgrade of the Plenty Road and Everton Drive intersection to provide access to the Mernda Regional Recreation Reserve (MRRR), as well as acquiring the final portion of land required for the MRRR. This will facilitate the delivery of the Mernda Sports Hub project which is important to service to the growing Mernda community.

Amendment C255 was exhibited from 10 March 2021 to 16 April 2021. One submission was received during the statutory exhibition, indicating support for the Amendment.

PLANNING ASSESSMENT

The subject sites are affected by the following zones and overlays.

The land subject to the proposed PAO is partly affected by the following zoning controls:

·    Comprehensive Development Zone – Schedule 1;

·    General Residential Zone – Schedule 1; and,

·    Road Zone, Category 1.

The land subject to the proposed PAO is partly affected by the following overlay controls:

·    Incorporated Plan Overlay – Schedule 1;

·    Development Plan Overlay – Schedule 15;

·    Vegetation Protection Overlay – Schedule 1; and,

·    Development Contributions Plan Overlay – Schedule 7.

Schedule 1 to the Incorporated Plan Overlay incorporates the Mernda Strategy Plan (MSP). The Mernda Strategy Plan is the primary strategic plan guiding the development in the Mernda precinct. The Mernda Strategy Plan strategically identifies the land required for the MRRR and the proposed construction and signalisation of the intersection at Plenty Road and Everton Drive.

The Mernda Strategy Plan Development Contributions Plan (MSPDCP) also identifies both the intersection and MRRR as projects where Council is the delivery agency.

Accordingly, the facilitation of these projects has strong strategic justification and is critical to the implementation of the Mernda Strategy Plan and for servicing the precinct.

The Amendment has been prepared in accordance with the relevant guidelines and ministerial directions which are detailed in the Explanatory Report prepared in support of the Amendment.

THE SUBJECT SITE

The subject land is shown in Attachment 3.

The additional land required for the new intersection at Plenty Road and Everton Drive and MRRR will affect the following properties:

·    1455a Plenty Road, Mernda (51.8sqm), and, 

·    1470 Plenty Road, Mernda (1687.9sqm).

1470 Plenty Road, Mernda is a large rural residential lot which straddles both sides of Plenty Road. The land to which the PAO is to be applied to the west of Plenty Road is vacant.

The land east of Plenty Road contains a single dwelling. The proposed PAO will apply partly to this section of the parcel to facilitate the future delivery of the fourth leg of the intersection into Station Lane. It will not affect the existing dwelling.

The land at 1455a Plenty Road, Mernda is a future commercial development site which has an approved Development Plan. The owner of this lot is currently seeking to amend this Development Plan. The land subject to the PAO is currently vacant and immediately adjoins the western side of Plenty Road.

Amendment Proposal

The Public Acquisition Overlay (PAO) is the planning tool which is used to identify land which is proposed to be acquired for a public purpose. This Amendment seeks to apply a PAO to:

·    Land at 1455a Plenty Road and 1470 Plenty Road, Mernda for road purposes to facilitate the delivery of the Everton Drive / Plenty Road intersection;

·    Land at 1470 Plenty Road, Mernda for open spaces purposes as part of the MRRR to facilitate the delivery of the Mernda Sports Hub project; and, 

·    Amend the Schedule to the Public Acquisition Overlay to include a new “PAO15”. This new section allows “Acquisition by Whittlesea City Council for the purpose of a road.”

The proposed Amendment documents are included at Attachments 1 and 2.

Once the PAO has been applied, the land can be compulsory acquired in accordance with Land Acquisition and Compensation Act 1986. It is important to note that the application of the PAO obligates Council to acquire to which the PAO is applied at a suitable time and compensate the landowners for the land. This is a separate process and which will commence subsequent to the approval of the Amendment. 

NOTIFICATION

The Amendment was exhibited between 10 March 2021 and 16 April 2021, in accordance with Section 19 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, as follows:

·    Written notices were sent to the directly affected landowners and occupiers and to prescribed Ministers.

·    A written notice was sent to the Department of Transport. 

·    An advertisement was placed in The Age newspaper.

·    A notice was placed in the Government Gazette.

·    The Amendment documentation was placed on the City of Whittlesea website.

As a result of the exhibition, one submission was received in support of the Amendment. In addition, enquiries were made to Council via email by a representative of the owners at 1470 Plenty Road. The submission and the nature of the enquiries are discussed in the next section of this report.

DISCUSSION

As noted above, one submission to the Amendment was received from the owners of 1455a Plenty Road. This submission supported the intent of the PAO15 in facilitating the Plenty Road and Everton Drive intersection. The submission further states that the intersection is needed to provide access to the submitters’ site and would facilitate its development.

It should be noted that Council currently has an application from the relevant landowner to amend the approved Development Plan for the subject site. Initial officer feedback has identified a number of issues with the submitted amended Development Plan.

This process is separate to the Amendment and officers will continue to work with the proponent in respect to the Development Plan application.

It is noted that the owners of 1470 Plenty Road, Mernda did not make a formal submission to the Amendment however they did make contact with Council officers via email to clarify their understanding of the Amendment and subsequent land acquisition process. Noting that the email correspondence were in the form of general questions of clarification they are not considered to be a formal submission to the Amendment. No further correspondence has been received from the landowner upon the initial clarification of questions.

Therefore, there have been no submissions received which either object or request a change to the Amendment.

POST EXHIBITION FINAL REVIEW OF PLAN

As noted above, no changes to the exhibited plan are proposed in response to submissions. However, two minor changes to the mapping are proposed as result of a minor error in the PAO map which was identified by Council officers post exhibition (refer to Attachment 5 for exhibited map).

There are two sections of land covered by exhibited PAO15 which are already owned by Council. These are identified in Attachment 4 (refer to pink area). The land sections are approximately 35.8sqm and 41.9sqm in size respectively. Given, this land is already in Council ownership, it is proposed to delete this land from the final Amendment documents to be adopted by Council (refer to updated Map at Attachment 1).

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The subsequent land acquisition post the application of the PAOs in relation to the specific land parcels will be funded through a combination of Development Contributions collected within the Mernda Strategy Plan area and additional Council funds. The project has the necessary funding allocated in Councils draft budget.

CRITICAL DATES

Critical dates are listed as follows:

Item

Critical date

Authorisation received from Council

6 October 2020

Government Gazettal of Amendment C250

18 December 2020

Authorisation received from the Minister of Planning

15 February 2021

Commencement of Exhibition

10 March 2021

Conclusion of Exhibition

16 April 2021

ELT

12 May 2021

Council Briefing

17 May 2021

Council Meeting

1 June 2021

Policy strategy and legislation

The relevant sections of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme have been outlined below.

Whittlesea 2040

Implements the following goals:

·    Goal 1: Connected community; and

·    Goal 2: Liveable neighbourhoods.

The projects facilitated by the Amendment will assist in the implementation of Whittlesea 2040 by enhancing transport network and facilitating the development active recreation facilities in Mernda. This will ultimately improve the liveability of the precinct for residents.

Planning Policy Framework

The Amendment is consistent with the implements the following planning policy:

·    Clause 11.02 – Managing Growth;

·    Clause 18.01-1L – Land use and transport planning;

·    Clause 18.02 – Movement networks;

·    Clause 18.02-1L – Sustainable personal transport;

·    Clause 19.03 – Development infrastructure;

·    Clause 19.02-4L – Social and cultural infrastructure;

·    Clause 19.03-1L – Development and infrastructure contributions

Strategies and Plans

The Amendment is consistent with and implements the following strategies and plans:

·    Whittlesea Open Space Strategy 2016

·    Mernda Strategy Plan (2004, amended 2008 and 2016);

·    Mernda Strategy Plan Development Contributions Plan (2004 & amended 2008);

·    Plan Melbourne 2017 – 2050 (2017).

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Smart, connected transport network

 

The proposed Amendment will assist in facilitating the construction of an intersection and access to the Mernda Regional Recreation Reserve. This implements Whittlesea 2040 through improvements to the regional transport network and active recreation facilities which will ultimately improve the liveability of the precinct for residents.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The subject land is required to facilitate the access and land required for the Mernda Sports Hub project. This will provide the Mernda community with the transport and recreation infrastructure envisioned by the Mernda Strategy Plan.

The subject Amendment will apply a PAO to the land required for these projects. Council has undertaken the exhibition process in accordance with the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act, 1987. One submission was received which sought no change to the Amendment, as outlined above. Consequently, it is recommended that the proposed Amendment be adopted by Council and submitted to the Minister for Planning for approval.

Once the Amendment has been gazetted and the PAOs apply to the relevant portion of the sites, the land is able to be compulsory acquired in accordance with the Land Acquisition and Compensation Act, 1986 and the projects will be able to proceed.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt Amendment C255 in accordance with the documents contained in Attachments 1 and 2 of this report.

2.       Submit Amendment C255 to the Minister for Planning for approval.

3.       Notify the submitters of Council’s resolution.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Eddy

Seconded:               Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

ITEM 6.2.3 For Feedback - Whittlesea Township Strategy - consideration of Submissions and Adoption 

Attachments:                        1        Whittlesea Township Plan 2021

2        Summary of Submissions and Officer Response   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Development

Author:                                  Senior Strategic Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

1.   Adopt the updated Whittlesea Township Plan (refer Attachment 1).

2.   Notify submitters of Council’s decision in 1. above.

Brief overview

The Whittlesea Township Plan (the Plan) establishes a long-term vision and provides direction for the future planning and development of the Whittlesea Township over the next 15-20 years. The Plan includes an Action Plan with key actions designed to improve the liveability of the Township in line with the Goals and key directions of Whittlesea 2040: A place for all. The actions are related to land use, built environment, public realm and align with other existing Council strategies.

The purpose of this report is to consider the feedback received from the public exhibition of the draft Strategy (now referred to as the Whittlesea Township Plan) conducted in late 2020. In total forty-eight submissions (including twenty-one signed pro-forma letters consisting of the identical wording) were received from community members and key stakeholders which has now been reviewed. As a result, a number of updates to the draft Whittlesea Township Strategy (refer to Attachment 1) are recommended prior to adoption. A summary of the submissions and an officer response to these issues is included in Attachment 2.

rationale for recommendation

The Whittlesea Township Plan has been developed having regard to the community’s aspirations for the Township and details how this vision might be achieved. At its core, the Plan is about setting Council’s key policy directions in respect to the future of the Township, to provide certainty for the community and stakeholders. It also reflects the opportunity, in the one document, to identify and provide detail on a broad range of issues and Council activities other than just land use planning related activities. Issues such as council service planning or matters included in the City of Whittlesea community plan are beyond the scope of the document.

Consultation for the Plan has now concluded with forty-eight submissions received (including twenty-one signed pro-forma letters). A number of changes have been made in response to the review and assessment of the submissions and to ensure consistency with the current State Planning Policy Framework.

 

impacts of recommendation

The Whittlesea Township Plan will be used to guide and manage future planning and decision making over the next 15-20 years. Adoption of the Plan is required in order to progress the implementation of the Action Plan, which forms part of the Plan. The Plan clearly articulates the need to protect the character of the Township.

A key direction and driver of the Plan is to establish a clear township boundary which will contain growth generally within the existing extent of the Township. Whilst a number of submissions were received in support of expanding the boundaries, officers do not consider that allowing further expansion of the boundaries is warranted or necessary. The adoption of the Plan will enable the City of Whittlesea to advocate to the State Government to apply a more permanent boundary which will provide greater certainty to the broader community and ideally remove the ongoing pressure to convert non-urban land to urban use at the periphery of the Township.

It is important to note that the Plan represents a statement of policy intent and strategic direction and is not proposed to be incorporated into the planning scheme

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

·    A number of the actions contained within the Action Plan will be the subject of separate reports to Council for endorsement at the implementation stage and may also require further community engagement.

·    The implementation and evaluation framework indicate that a report will be prepared on a biennial basis to measure progress and to ensure adequate resources are allocated.

·    The Plan is proposed to be reviewed in ten years to ensure it remains relevant and is consistent with Council’s plans and policies and to respond to emerging trends, policies or changing circumstances.

 

Report

Introduction

The Whittlesea Township Plan (the Plan) establishes a long-term vision for the Whittlesea Township. The Plan will be used to provide direction for the future planning and development of the Township over the next 15-20 years.

Public exhibition of the draft Strategy (Whittlesea Township Plan) has now concluded. A total of forty-eight submissions (including twenty-one late submissions comprising a signed identical letter) were received during the exhibition period. Feedback from the community and key stakeholders has been reviewed and where appropriate incorporated into the Whittlesea Township Plan. A summary of the submissions and an officer response to these issues is included in Attachment 2.

This report outlines the key changes to the Plan as a result of the feedback.

Background

The project to prepare a Strategic Plan for the Whittlesea Township (the Township) has been driven primarily by the need to provide greater strategic direction in respect to the future development of the Township and ongoing pressure for additional development on the fringes of the Township. It also responds to the following issues:

·    The current Whittlesea Township Local Structure Plan, prepared in 1994, is outdated and required review;

·    The City of Whittlesea’s Green Wedge Management Plan 2011-2021 includes an action to review the Whittlesea Township Local Structure Plan with an emphasis on defining the boundary and addressing interface issues between urban and rural areas; and

·    The lack of a defined Township Boundary has led to ongoing development pressure on the outskirts of the Township, resulting in land speculation and a level of uncertainty within the farming and broader community regarding the long-term use of the land.

The Plan has been informed by, and responds to, community feedback about the Township. The Plan is the result of extensive community engagement with several phases of community consultation undertaken throughout the course of the project. Public consultation, undertaken at the inception of the project, sought to inform the community about the project and capture the key issues and aspirations of the local community. Further consultation undertaken as part of Whittlesea 2040 identified the broader community’s vision, aspirations and priorities for the City of Whittlesea. From the assessment of the community feedback from these projects, there is a strong connection between the issues / challenges identified for the municipality more broadly and the key priorities identified by the Whittlesea Township community.

Development of the Plan was also guided by a Project Working Group (PWG) consisting of internal staff across a number of Council Departments, which convened on a regular basis to inform the strategic plan and to refine the priority actions. The Plan has been developed to align with all four of the overarching goals of Whittlesea 2040: A place for all (W2040). It establishes a community vision, which has been developed having regard to the community’s aspirations for the Township and details how this vision might be achieved through the six focus areas sourced from W2040 as follows:

·    Goal 1 Connected community;

·    Goal 2 Liveable Neighbourhoods - Smart, connected transport;

·    Goal 2 Liveable Neighbourhoods - Well designed neighbourhoods;

·    Goal 2 Liveable Neighbourhoods - Housing for diverse needs;

·    Goal 3 Strong local economy; and

·    Goal 4 Sustainable environment.

Each focus area details the desired vision to be achieved, provides a discussion of the key issues and relevant policy considerations and highlights what the community told us, It also  provides an outlines of Council’s future direction and priority actions we will undertake in response to the context and evidence presented. The Plan includes a Strategic Framework Plan outlining key opportunities and constraints. The priority actions have been translated into an Action Plan, which nominates the responsible Council department(s) and associated timeframes for implementation ranging from short (1-3 years), medium (4-7 years) and long-term (8-10 years).

The Plan is a place-based strategy that seeks to consolidate key actions into one document to address those issues specific to the Whittlesea community. Whilst acknowledging that the Whittlesea Township sits within a rural context, it is important to note that those issues that are specific to the green wedge agricultural land areas are considered outside the scope of this Strategy and will be addressed as part of the current review of the Green Wedge Management Plan. Matters relating to accommodation, agri-business and agricultural activity in the green wedge will also be considered as part of the upcoming Strong Local Economy Strategy and Destination Plan projects.

For its final stage of consultation, the draft Strategy (now Plan) was placed on exhibition for a period of seven weeks between 28 October and 18 December 2020. A total of forty-eight submissions (including 21 signed pro-forma letters) were received during the exhibition period. A summary of the consultation undertaken, and submissions received is included in the sections below.

SUMMARY OF SUBMISSIONS

Three of the forty-eight submissions received following exhibition were from public agencies (Country Fire Authority, Yarra Valley Water and Environment Protection Authority). Submissions were also received on behalf of the Whittlesea Agricultural Society, Whittlesea Showgrounds and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management Inc (CoM), Friends of Toorourrong and Whittlesea Trailblazers. The remaining submissions were generally from or made on behalf of local businesses, residents and property owners in addition to some addressed from outside the municipality. It is noted that twenty-one of the submissions were received on 10 May 2021 comprising an identical signed letter.

For the most part submitters were generally supportive of the Plan, with few submissions raising objection to the vision or key outcomes as contained in the Plan. Whilst some submitters wrote in support of particular aspects of the Plan (e.g. retention of the township character, support for the Mernda Whittlesea rail trail), many of the submitters have sought to build on the identified vision by identifying additional opportunities to achieve the desired outcomes for consideration and inclusion in the Plan. Such opportunities include improvements to facilities and infrastructure in Whittlesea Park, improved landscaping of the public realm; Township gateway treatments; improved eating options and better services and facilities including public transport.

There were, however, a number of submissions which objected to the recommendation to restrict future development within the Whittlesea Township to the existing General Residential and Low Density Residential Zones. Five submissions were made in support of allowing some expansion of the Township boundary for residential or other more intensive urban uses. A further submission was made in support of relaxing the planning controls applying to the Eden Hills areas, however this issue is considered outside the scope of the Whittlesea Township Plan.

Nine of the submissions relate to specific land parcels and address the impact / effects of the Strategy in relation to each of these sites / areas. Five of the submissions relate to land within the Township (including three submissions seeking in-principle support to rezone land to achieve site specific outcomes). The remaining four submissions seek in-principle support to rezone properties currently zoned for rural purposes (Rural Conservation Zone Schedule 1, Green Wedge Zone) in order to facilitate residential development or other urban uses.

A further twenty-one submissions were received on 10 May 2021, comprising an identical signed letter. This submission primarily seeks to defer consideration of the Plan requesting a land supply and economic analysis be undertaken to inform the recommendations regarding the management of population growth in the Township.

A detailed summary of all submissions received including the officers response is included at Attachment 2. The following section provides a summary of the main issues raised in the written submissions in response to the draft Strategy and the officer’s response, including any proposed recommended changes to the Strategy:

Public Open Space Improvements

A number of submissions, including the submission from Friends of Toorourrong, identified the need for additional community infrastructure and other improvements to Whittlesea Park and adjoining public open space facilities. Suggestions include provision of a larger / regional playground; provision of exercise stations; extending the pond to create a safer haven for wildlife and the potential to stock fish for recreational fishing; provision of adequate parking; amenity facilities; and improved landscaping and seating.

Officer response:

Whilst it is not the intent of the Whittlesea Township Plan to delve into detailed level open space infrastructure provision, the draft Whittlesea Township Plan includes an action to develop a Master Plan for the Lions Club Park. Council officers have identified an opportunity to extend the scope of the Master Plan to incorporate the broader Whittlesea Park open space area. Funding for the Whittlesea Park Master Plan is included in the Capital works program of the City of Whittlesea’s draft 2021/22 Council Budget (which is currently on exhibition). The Master Plan process provides an opportunity to better understand how the community currently use Whittlesea Park and how they would like to see it improved in the future. This could include discussion about the need for a suitably sized playspace for the Township which connects to other key active and passive recreation opportunities in Whittlesea Park; landscaping and path improvements. In the event that the Whittlesea Park Master Plan does not proceed in the 2021/22 financial year it is proposed to modify Action 5 to include reference to the preparation of a Master Plan for Whittlesea Park.

Plan amendment recommendation:

·    In Section 1 of the Strategy – Connected Community, under Open Spaces in Whittlesea, additional commentary has been included about the opportunity to undertake a Master Plan for the broader Whittlesea Park area to help identify future improvements.

·    Priority Action 5 has been amended to include reference to the preparation of a Master Plan for Whittlesea Park.

Township entrances / Streetscape improvements

Enhancing the entrance(s) to the Whittlesea Township to provide a greater sense of arrival to the Township and enhancing the appearance of local streetscapes was raised in several submissions. Opportunities identified included planting fast growing trees to beautify the entrances and improve the overall appearance of local streetscapes; welcome / Township signage; and wayfinding signage and/or a Township navigation board to help direct visitors to the Township, to key points of interest.


 

Officer response:

The draft Strategy highlights the unique rural character and sense of place of the Township and it is acknowledged that the gateway or entrance to a town plays an important role in creating positive and welcoming first impressions and can help reflect part of the character and/or attractions of the area. It is considered that there is an opportunity to create a better sense of place by improving the entrances / gateways to the Township through landscaped gateway treatments or other treatments such as artwork and wayfinding signage.

Plan amendment recommendation:

·    Part 3 of the Strategy - Liveable neighbourhoods – Well designed neighbourhoods & vibrant town centres, has been amended to include appropriate commentary about gateway treatments.

·    Action 13 has been amended to incorporate reference to investigation of gateway treatments as appropriate.

Walkability

The need to improve the accessibility of existing paths and improve connectivity between paths was also raised in several submissions.  It was noted that some of the paths in Whittlesea Park are low lying and are weather affected which impacts their use in winter. One submitter indicated that the existing gravel paths are difficult to walk on and suggested more pedestrian friendly paths. Extension of the existing path that adjoins the Plenty River Views Estate was also supported.

Officer response:

Some of the comments specifically referred to pathways within the Whittlesea Park area which could be addressed through the proposed development of the Master Plan for the broader Whittlesea Park open space area. Funding for a shared path along Bruces Creek reserve from Kinglake Views to Year Road is included in the draft 2021/22 Council Budget. Other Identified issues in respect to the quality of pavement and missing links within the pedestrian/shared path network need to be assessed and prioritised for future funding. Such funding is available through Council’s ‘missing links’ program or can be sourced through future capital works funding undertaken as part of Council’s annual budgetary process.

Plan amendment recommendation

No changes proposed to the Plan.

Expansion of Township boundaries

Five submissions were made in support of extending the Township boundary to provide for further residential development. Of these, four were made by or on behalf of landowners seeking to have their property rezoned. Whilst each of the submissions is generally supportive of the vision and key outcomes contained within the draft Strategy, all of the submissions consider that expanding the Township boundary to allow some population growth is necessary and can be achieved whilst retaining the township character. In general, it was submitted that some expansion of the township boundary is needed to accommodate projected population growth and to maintain economic growth in the Township. A number of the submissions also indicated that further residential growth is needed to ensure ongoing improvements to community services and facilities and other public infrastructure.

Officer response:

The need to prepare a strategic plan for the Whittlesea Township has been primarily driven by the need to provide greater strategic and planning direction in respect to the future development of the Township and to respond to the continued development pressure on its fringes. The significant landscape and topographic features of the Township including the Whittlesea Hills, Eastern Hills, Plenty Valley and Plenty River together with environmental risks including bushfire and flooding have contributed to the current form of the Township and will continue to constrain future expansion of the Township.

Planning for the Township needs to ensure that the unique rural character of the Township is retained, which is highly valued by the community, and also provide for the long-term protection of identified environmental and landscape values and agricultural land in the green wedge.

The following matters have been considered in determining the officers’ recommendation not to support any further expansion of the existing urban area for residential development:

·    Council is able to meet its obligations for accommodating residential growth at a municipal level the next 20 plus years as required by State Planning Policy. As such it is not considered necessary for additional land on the periphery of the Township to be rezoned to facilitate further residential growth.

·    Council’s Housing Diversity Strategy 2013-2033 (HDS) seeks to direct the highest levels of housing change to areas that are well serviced by public transport, services and employment. The Whittlesea Township is identified in the HDS as an area with minimal capacity for change.

·    Land proposed for rezoning in submissions is located more than 800m from the town centre (800 metres is a ten minute walk and is considered a reasonable walking distance but is at the outer limit of access to services. Locating additional residential development significant distances from the town centre would further reduce accessibility and connectivity for the Township.

·    Development of these sites would result in increased car usage for small, local trips due to proximity from existing services and facilities, which is inconsistent with the principles of a 20 minute neighbourhood and to ensure optimal health and wellbeing outcomes.

·    Development would result in further encroachment of residential development into agricultural green wedge land, which not only has the effect of residential development being further removed from services and facilities but also results in the loss of land for agricultural purposes.

·    Council has an obligation to make planning decisions to direct population growth and development to low risk locations. Whittlesea Township continues to be at risk from bushfire/grass fires and development of land also shifts urban development closer to areas of high bushfire risk particularly to the north and east of the Township.

·    Allowing more development on the periphery of the Township, will simply shift the boundary issue further out.

It is considered that the lack of a defined Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) has contributed to the ongoing pressure to rezone land on the periphery of the Township. It is anticipated that a more clearly defined urban growth boundary will significantly reduce this pressure and provide greater certainty in respect to future decision making.

Having considered each of the submissions in detail, however, officers do consider that there is some merit in further investigating the property at 48 Beech Street, currently zoned Rural Conservation Zone Schedule 1 (RCZ1) with a view to rezoning part of the land to allow some form of commercial development and potentially additional public open space. This site is not located on the Township periphery, but rather is on the eastern side of the Plenty River between existing residential land and the Whittlesea Showground. There have been a number of proposals for the site dating back to 1988, although no significant development has occurred on the site (a dwelling was recently constructed in the north east corner). The site, if it were developed, occupies an important ‘gateway position into Township. It is well located, proximate to the Showgrounds, public open space and the town centre. It is noted, however that the site would be a complex site to develop with the site subject to flooding (although Melbourne Water has previously indicated that the site may have some development potential). Any development of the site would need to respond to the site context (including Whittlesea Showground), enhance the character of the area and achieve a net community benefit.

A permit for the use and development of the land for a motel, conference centre, restaurant, reception/function centre, caretakers house and associated carparking was issued for the site in 2005. Whilst the issue of a previous planning permit for the site (which has since lapsed) is not a guarantee that Council will support a more intensive development of the site, the request to include the site in Appendix 2 – as being a site requiring further investigation is supported. As part of this investigation, Council officers will work with the land owners(s) to explore what planning tools would best be applied to the site to achieve the orderly and proper planning of the site, if some development of the site is supported including opportunities for broader community benefits such as land for public open space/drainage/environmental values given the proximity to the Plenty River and its encumbrances.

Plan amendment recommendation:

The land at 48 Beech Street, Whittlesea has been included in Appendix 2 of the Strategy – Whittlesea Township – Sites requiring further investigation.

Land supply and economic analysis

Twenty-one submissions were received on 10 May, 2021 in support of deferring consideration of the Plan by Council to enable a land supply and economic analysis to be undertaken in order to better inform the recommendations regarding the management of population growth in the Whittlesea Township. The submission contends that some level of natural population growth is required to support the economic prosperity of the Township and that further detailed analysis is needed to confirm whether the current policy direction will meet the forecast housing need. Further concern has been raised in respect to the policy direction of ‘containing growth within the existing residential area’ and the impact of infill development on the character of the area having regard to the level of change expected to manage natural population growth.

Officer response:

Whilst noting that that some level of growth is required to support the economic viability of the centre, this needs to be balanced against measures which support the protection of the rural character which is highly valued by the community. The Plan proposes a policy of containment which seeks to support some moderate growth within the Township and which also protects green wedge land from urban encroachment resulting in loss of agricultural activity. Irrespective of the modelling used to inform the strategic policy for this Plan, it is not expected, or considered necessary, for Whittlesea Township to play a significant role in accommodating the municipality’s housing growth. The Township and surrounds is expected to experience only very moderate growth over the next 20 years and further work will be undertaken as part of further work over time to guide how this growth should occur within the Township. Considerations will include built form and landscape outcomes to ensure that new development respects the character of the Township. It is expected that further analysis will be undertaken in this regard to guide future changes to the planning scheme and/or development of design guidelines to ensure that infill housing respects the character of the area (this would include an economic analysis as necessary to support the work).

It is noted that substantial Precinct Structure Plans to the west including Donnybrook and Wollert will accommodate the demand in major residential growth for the next thirty years. It is likely that this increase in population will provide positive opportunities for business growth in the Township over time. Further, future work on the City of Whittlesea Destination Plan will look at opportunities to increase economic opportunities for the Township in conjunction with the recent capital investment and grant funding as part of the Covid-19 recovery.

Council has a strong focus on economic development and supporting business through the implementation of a range of business initiatives. This is a high priority within the current COVID environment in particular, but also on an ongoing basis to ensure a strong local economy. The development of Council’s overarching Strong Local Economy Strategy will focus on business development and job creation. A number of plans are also proposed to be developed to underpin this Strategy including the Investment Attraction Plan and Destination Plan. These Plans will focus on more specific aspects of the local economy, tourism and business attraction that will support further economic growth opportunities for existing and new businesses in the Township. The Economic Development Department will also have a key focus on developing a strong local economy by attracting and supporting new and existing business and working proactively in a collaborative manner to attract new jobs and increased local employment and investment.

Plan amendment recommendation:

No change is proposed to the Plan in response to these submissions.

Mernda-Whittlesea Rail Trail

Several submissions, including that from the Whittlesea Trail Blazers group, were made in support of the development of the Mernda to Whittlesea Rail Trail. Submitters identified a number of opportunities and benefits in support of the Rail Trail including encouragement of more active travel; the opportunity to provide better connectivity and safe pedestrian access between the Rail Trail and existing services and facilities in and around the Township; and increased tourism and associated economic benefits. Some site specific benefits were also identified, with the potential for any future development at 2388 Plenty Road to better integrate with the proposed rail trail by providing passive surveillance of the Trail, whilst benefitting from direct pedestrian access into the Town centre. The submission from the Whittlesea Trail Blazers also identified key opportunities and considerations for the future development of the project and potential interest groups.

Officer Response

The Plan recognises that Council is committed to increasing cycling participation for residents and visitors to the City of Whittlesea. The Whittlesea Rail Trail is identified in the Northern Regional Trails Strategy (NRTS) 2016. It is noted that Council was successful in advocating for a rail trail along the rail corridor from South Morang Station to Mernda Station as part of the Mernda Rail Extension project that was completed by the State Government in 2018. The section of the project still remaining is between Mernda Station and Whittlesea Township. Priority Action 4.4.1 of the current Tourism Strategy supports continued advocacy for a shared user path/ trail between Mernda and Whittlesea. The NRTS is currently being updated to examine priority regional trails in the northern metropolitan area which is expected to be completed in the 2021/22 financial year. The updated NRTS will include more detailed cost analysis benefit of all projects in the region and a ranking of each project’s importance. It is expected that the update will consider options for a shared user path/trail between Mernda and Whittlesea. This will assist Council in advocating for this project to State Government. No further changes to the Plan are proposed as there is sufficient commentary within the Plan and an ongoing commitment from Council in respect to this project and continued advocacy to the State Government.

Plan amendment recommendation:

No change is proposed to the Plan in response to these submissions.

Municipal / Town Name

A number of submissions along with more general community feedback raised the issue of the Township and Municipality sharing the same name. There was a sense that this created confusion and ambiguity.

Officer response:

As this matter is primarily an administrative/statutory issue, it is considered outside the scope of this Strategy. There are separate administrative processes for changing either the name of the Township or of the Council (City of Whittlesea). In both cases, State Government approval is required in some form. Whilst it is possible to request either a name change to a place or to the municipal council name, both council and significant community support for a change to either the township or municipal name would be needed.

Plan amendment recommendation:

No change is proposed to the Plan in response to these submissions.

Other changes in response to submissions:

Whittlesea Showgrounds and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management (CoM)

Two submissions were received indicating that the references in the draft Strategy to the Whittlesea Agricultural Society are incorrect and should instead refer to the Whittlesea Showgrounds and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management (CoM). The CoM is responsible for the management of Crown Land incorporating the Whittlesea Showgrounds (30 Yea Road), Whittlesea Park (south side of Yea Road – including the Whittlesea Lions Park) and Scrubby Creek Reserve. This includes responsibility for the management and maintenance of parkland and specific infrastructure with support of the CoW.

Plan amendment recommendation:

Existing references in the Plan to the Whittlesea Agricultural Society have been updated in to correctly reference the Whittlesea Showgrounds and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management Inc (CoM) as appropriate.

Whittlesea Agricultural Society (WAS)

The WAS owns two parcels of land at 28 McPhees Road and 19-39 Pings Road. These lots are separate to the Showgrounds at 30 Yea Road which is managed by The Whittlesea Showgrounds and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management (CoM). The submission indicates that all 3 parcels are utilised for the Whittlesea Show – with the submission detailing the activities undertaken on each parcel and the important contribution the sites on McPhees Road and Pings Road have in conducting the annual event. The WAS has requested that the land at 19-39 Pings Road be rezoned to Special Use - Schedule 1 – Whittlesea Showgrounds (SUZ1) consistent with zoning of the site at 28 McPhees Road to enable use for the operation of an Agricultural Show and related activities.

Further investigation is required to clarify the proposed activities on the subject land with a view to identifying any unintended implications of rezoning the land to a SUZ1, noting that the land is subject to flooding. It is further noted that a small section of land in the south-west corner of 28 McPhees Road is also included in a Green Wedge Zone which could also be investigated as part of any proposal to rezone the land at 19-39 Pings Road. It is therefore considered appropriate to include the site in Appendix 2 of the Plan as a site requiring ‘further investigation’ to determine whether there is sufficient merit to rezone the site. Council officers are willing to work with the Whittlesea Agricultural Society (in conjunction with the CoM as appropriate) to explore what planning tools would best be applied to the site to achieve the orderly and proper planning of the site together with the other land forming part of the Whittlesea Showgrounds,

Plan amendment recommendation:

The land at 19-39 Pings Road, Whittlesea has been included in Appendix 2 of the Strategy – Whittlesea Township – Sites requiring further investigation.

Other changes:

Internal consultation

Relevant internal units have been involved through the process in the development of the Plan. As part of the final draft exhibition phase additional comments were received from Council’s Ageing Well Department suggesting some changes to the Plan to better reflect the Township being a place where people can age across the life-stages and be able to live in their preferred neighbourhood. As a result of these comments additional statements / wording in the Vision and in the Plan more broadly, have been incorporated to outline how the Plan can better support residents to age-well. No additional changes were required from other internal units as part of this phase of consultation.

Plan amendment recommendation:

The Vision, section 1 Connected Community, section 2 Liveable neighbourhoods – Smart, connected transport and section 4 Liveable neighbourhoods – Housing for diverse needs have been modified to better detail how the Plan can better support people to age well.

Appendix 3 of the Strategy - State and Local Planning Policy Context has also been amended to ensure consistency with the Planning Policy Framework, which was introduced into the Whittlesea Planning Scheme as part of Amendment C250wsea on 18 December 2020.

Consultation

The Plan has been prepared on the back of extensive engagement with the community. The first phase of public consultation at the inception of the project sought to inform the community about the project and for Council officers to gain a better understanding of the key issues within the community and as a visioning exercise to understand the community’s ideas and visions for the Township’s future.

The feedback sought was structured around seven key themes, including an overall vision, housing character and change; leisure and community facilities; transport; parks and open space; shopping and business; and physical infrastructure and environment.

As part of this initial phase, a mail out to all owners and occupiers of land in the Township was undertaken to inform people about the commencement of the project and to provide information on how they could get involved. In addition, letters were sent to all community groups and other key stakeholders and a shopfront was established within the main street. Over 640 people were involved in this first stage of engagement which included speaking to over 290 people in the Church Street shopfront and by engaging community groups, primary schools, and kindergartens. Over 350 completed surveys were received.

Consultation undertaken as part of the Whittlesea 2040 project has also informed the project. It is significant that the responses provided as part of this phase of the community engagement, were generally reflective of the more targeted consultation previously undertaken for the Whittlesea Township as part of the inception phase.

For its final phase of consultation, the draft Plan was placed on exhibition for a period of seven weeks between 28 October and 18 December 2020. The primary purpose of the consultation was to inform the community and key stakeholders about the Plan, including the vision and priority actions, which have been informed and developed from the previous consultations.

The following actions were undertaken as part of this final phase of community engagement:

·    over 400 Fact Sheets emailed / posted to key stakeholders (incorporating all parties who have previously asked to be kept informed about this project as part of previous consultations), community groups and relevant statutory agencies seeking feedback;

·    Information posted on the City of Whittlesea’s Have Your Say webpage providing access to key documents (Fact Sheet, draft Strategy (PDF and accessible), FAQs).

·    information on Council’s website with links to the Have Your Say page;

·    media release to promote the release of the draft strategy;

·    two virtual information sessions (attended by 13 people);

·    a pop-up stall in Church Street, Whittlesea at which the community also had opportunity to find out more about the project and provide feedback (with officers speaking to in excess of 30 people);

·    copies of the Fact Sheet were also provided to three local businesses and the Whittlesea Community Activity Centre for distribution.

·    information about the Strategy was also distributed via Social media via Council’s Facebook page and other local community pages.

·    Council officers also took a number of phone calls in relation to the project.

·    On 1 March 2021 a Community Forum was conducted prior to the Council Meeting at the Whittlesea Community Activity Centre (CAC). Officers were available to discuss the Whittlesea Township Strategy and answer questions about the Strategy, with the Administrators in attendance also.

Forty-eight submissions (including twenty-one signed pro-forma letters) were received in response to exhibition of the Draft Strategy. All submitters and any other parties who have requested to be kept informed will be notified of Council’s decision.

Critical Dates

It is proposed that a report on the Plan, including consideration of submissions, will be presented to Council at its meeting on 1 June 2021 recommending adoption of the final Strategy.

Financial Implications

Following adoption of the Strategy, Council officers will commence implementing high priority actions. It is noted that a number of actions within the Action Plan relate to the continued implementation of other Council plans or strategies that have specific actions for the Whittlesea Township. These can be undertaken within existing resources, be included in annual Department Business Plans, or are projects that have been committed to and included in Council budgetary processes.

It is noted that a number of the actions contained within the Action Plan, will require further Council consideration and resolution, particularly those requiring an amendment to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. Funding for those actions resulting in a planning scheme amendment will generally be covered within the operational budget of the responsible lead unit.

Policy strategy and legislation

·    The Whittlesea Township Local Structure Plan (1994) is the key strategic document guiding development within the Township. Development within the Whittlesea Township has largely been occurring in line with the current Local Structure Plan and associated Outline Development Plans which are incorporated documents within the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. The Local Structure Plan is outdated and much of the land identified for future residential housing is now largely developed. It is within this context that the Whittlesea Township Strategy has been developed in order to set the direction for the future development of the Township over the next fifteen to twenty years.

·    The Whittlesea Green Wedge Management Plan (GWMP) (2011) includes an action for Council to undertake a review of the Whittlesea Township Local Structure Plan (1994) with an emphasis on defining the township boundary and interface issues between urban and rural areas. It is noted that a review of the current GWMP has commenced

·    The Plan has been prepared within the context established by State Planning Policy including Plan Melbourne 2017-2050, Melbourne’s Growth Corridor Plans, the Whittlesea Planning Scheme and Whittlesea 2040: A place for all.

There are a number of other Council plans and strategies (listed below), which have specific and related actions for the Whittlesea Township that are currently being implemented or which are proposed to be implemented. This Plan has been informed by, and responds to, these strategic documents. Where these documents contain specific recommendation(s) that have direct implications for this Strategy, they have been included as a priority action.

·    Community Building Strategy – better together

·    Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan 2017-2021

·    Community Safety and Crime Prevention Strategy 2016-2020

·    A Positive Ageing Strategy for the Whittlesea Community 2016-2025

·    Disability Action Plan 2017-2021

·    Active Whittlesea 2019

·    Integrated Transport Strategy 2014

·    Northern Regional Trails Strategy 2016

·    City of Whittlesea Bicycle Plan 2016-2020

·    City of Whittlesea Open Space Strategy (2016)

·    Housing Diversity Strategy 2013-2033

·    Social and Affordable Housing – Policy and Strategy 2012-2016

·    Economic Development Strategy – Growing our Economy Together

·    Tourism Strategy 2014-2019

·    Environmental Sustainability Strategy 2012-2022

·    Climate Ready Whittlesea

·    Stormwater Management Plan 2012-2017

·    Biodiversity Strategy 2019-2029

·    Green Wedge Management Plan 2011-2021

·    Cultural Heritage Strategy 2019-2025

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Not linked to the risks within the Strategic Risk Register.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Well-designed neighbourhoods and vibrant town centres

 

The Whittlesea Township Plan seeks to deliver on the outcomes of Whittlesea 2040: A place for all at a local level by directly responding to those issues raised by the community and producing a plan that provides solutions to meet the specific needs of the community and support the Township’s unique character through a collaborative whole of Council approach to the implementation and delivery of the Plan. The Plan will be achieved through a framework of strategic objectives and actions across the four priority goals of Whittlesea 2040: A place for all.

The Plan provides a framework for the future planning and development of the Township. The Action Plan includes a number of high priority tasks that are required to be implemented in a timely manner, including a review of the planning policy framework and implementation of planning and built form design controls, to ensure that future development respects the character of the Township.

At its meeting on 1 March 2021, Council resolved to adopt a new integrated planning framework. The aim is to consolidate all of our community-facing policies, strategies and plans within five major strategies aligned to the key theses of Whittlesea 2040: A place for all. It is proposed to transition the content of this Plan into the new framework once the framework parameters have been worked through. To assist with streamlining this process the title off the document has been changed to Whittlesea Township Plan (previously Whittlesea Township Strategy).

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Whittlesea Township Plan has been developed for the purpose of establishing a long term vision for the Whittlesea Township and will be used to guide and manage future planning and decision making over the next 15-20 years.

The draft Whittlesea Township Strategy (now Plan) was placed on public exhibition for a period of seven weeks between 28 October and 18 December 2020. A total of forty-eight submissions (including twenty-one late submissions in the form of a signed identical letter) were received during the exhibition period.

Submissions were generally supportive of the vision and key outcomes, however, a variety of issues were raised for consideration and inclusion in the Strategy. These include:

·    the need for improvements to infrastructure within open space;

·    Township gateway treatments and streetscape enhancement;

·    traffic management improvements;

·    infrastructure improvements to improve walkability and connectivity around the Township;

·    expansion of the Township boundary; and

·    the need for more detailed land supply and economic analysis.

Feedback from the community and key stakeholders has now been reviewed and where appropriate is proposed to be incorporated into the Whittlesea Township Plan. Key changes made to the Plan in response to submissions include:

·    undertaking a Master Plan for the broader Whittlesea Park area to help identify future improvements;

·    investigation of gateway treatments as appropriate; within the proposed public realm plan;

·    inclusion of two additional sites within Appendix 2 of the Strategy – Whittlesea Township – Sites requiring further investigation (48 Beech Street and 19-39 Pings Road)

Additional changes to the Plan have also been made to outline how the Strategy can better support people to age well and update Appendix 3 to ensure consistency with the new State Planning Policy Framework.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the Whittlesea Township Plan at Attachment 1, which incorporates those changes detailed within the ‘Summary of Submissions’ section of this Report and responses to submissions contained in Attachment 2 of this report.

2.       Notify submitters of Council’s decision in 1. above.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Chair of Council Wilson

Seconded:               Administrator Eddy

 

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note that the Whittlesea Township Plan is not a static document and will be subject to ongoing review taking into account any outcomes from other relevant Council strategies such as the Green Wedge Management Plan, Investment Attraction Plan, Tourism Destination Plan, Strong Local Economy Strategy, Open Space Strategy, Housing Diversity Strategy and any relevant changes in State Government policy or strategy.

2.       Amend relevant sections of the Whittlesea Township Plan to note that implementation of any proposed future Township boundary will need to take into account relevant Council and State Government strategies given the State Government is the responsible authority for applying and amending Green Wedge Zones and Urban Growth Boundaries.

3.       Adopt the Whittlesea Township Plan at Attachment 1, which incorporates those changes detailed within the ‘Summary of Submissions’ section of this Report and responses to submissions contained in Attachment 2 of this report, subject to amendments outlined in 2. above.

4.       Notify submitters of Council’s decision above.

Carried

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

ITEM 6.2.4 For Decision - 20 Romeo Court MILL PARK 

Attachments:                        1        Locality Map

2        Architectural Plans   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Development

Author:                                  Planning Officer   

 

APPLICANT:                        Planning & Design P/L

COUNCIL POLICY:              16.01-1L Housing Supply in Established Areas

ZONING:                               General Residential Zone (Schedule 4)

OVERLAY:                            Development Contributions Plan Overlay (Schedule 3)

REFERRAL:                          None

OBJECTIONS:                      Seven objections and one anonymous objection

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to refuse the Planning Application No. 719054 and issue a Refusal for the construction of four dwellings at 20 Romeo Court, Mill Park as the development is inappropriate for this site.

Brief overview

This proposal seeks approval for the construction of four dwellings at 20 Romeo Court, Mill Park. The proposed dwellings will be two-storey and would all comprise of three bedrooms.

Notification of the proposal was undertaken and seven formal objections and one anonymous objection were received. 

rationale for recommendation

The proposal has not demonstrated a satisfactory response to the requirements of the General Residential Zone (Schedule 4) and does not achieve an acceptable level of compliance with Clause 55 (ResCode) of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

impacts of recommendation

The refusal of the application will ensure the existing and preferred neighbourhood character of the immediate area is protected from an unacceptable medium density proposal.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

In light of the proposal’s recommendation for refusal, Council will be ensuring that development is appropriate and responsive to the existing and preferred neighbourhood character.

All parties to the application will retain review rights through the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT).  Council will need to defend any decision made should the matter proceed to VCAT.

 

Report

SITE AND SURROUNDING AREA

The site is a residential property located on the north side of Romeo Court, between Luke Court to the north-east and Silverbeach Rise to the south-west (see Attachment 1). The subject site is a regular shaped allotment with a frontage to Romeo Court of 16.9m and an overall site area of 901.44m2. The subject site is currently vacant and void of any significant vegetation. The site falls approximately 3.3m towards the south-east (front) elevation of the site. The land to the rear of the site is undeveloped and is located within the Public Use Zone 1 which recognizes land for the purposes of public services and utilities. 

The character of the surrounding area is residential, with developments largely comprising of both single and double storey single dwelling developments, two dwellings on a lot and multi-unit developments.

Examples of medium density development are found frequently throughout Romeo Court. Notably, the subject site abuts two single dwellings on a lot at 19 and 21 Romeo Court.

The site is located in proximities to the following sites, services and infrastructure:

·    Meadow Glen Primary School (215m north-east);

·    Winchester Park- Walkway and Reserves (430m west);

·    Meadow Glen Athletics Centre Reserve (450m east);

·    Westfield Shopping Centre (480m north);

·    South Morang Train Station (750m north);

·    Mill Park Secondary College and Community Sporting Grounds (785m east).

restrictions and easements

The site is formally described as Lot 196 on Plan of Subdivision 218489P.

The site is not encumbered by any restrictive covenants or Section 173 Agreements.

The site is not encumbered by any easements.

Proposal

The application seeks approval for the construction of four dwellings (see Attachment 2).

Details of the proposed development are outlined in the following table:

 

Height/Scale

Number of Bedrooms

Setbacks

Private Open Space

Car Parking

Maximum Height

Dwelling No. 1

Two Storey

Three Bedrooms

North: 1.24m

East: Approx. 6.9m

South: 5m

West: 1.5m

33.2m2

 Two spaces

(single garage and tandem car space)

7.39m

Dwelling No. 2

Two Storey

Three Bedrooms

North: 0m

East: 1.5m

South: 5.45m

West: 0m

44.8m2

Two spaces

(single garage and tandem car space)

7.56m

Dwelling No. 3

Two Storey

Three Bedrooms

North: 0m

East: 0m

South: 5.45m

West: 1.5m

43.4m2

Two spaces

(single garage and tandem car space)

6.93m

Dwelling No. 4

Two Storey

Three Bedrooms

North: 0m

East: 1.5m

South: 0m

West: Approx. 1.1m

53.8m2

Two spaces

(single garage and tandem car space)

6.73m

Public Notification

Advertising of the application has resulted in seven objections and one anonymous objection being received.  The grounds of objection can be summarised as follows:

·    The proposal is an overdevelopment of the site.

·    The development is visually bulky and inconsistent with the character of the area.

·    Proposal will result in overlooking and loss of privacy to adjoining dwellings.

·    The proposal provides insufficient on-site car parking.

·    The proposal will cause congestion of local streets and loss of on street car parking.

·    Increased noise in street associated with the development.

·    The development will adversely affect the property value of surrounding properties.

·    The development will cause waste pollution.

·    The development will overshadow adjoining properties.

·    Overcrowding/Overpopulation of the Street.

A response to the grounds of objection will be provided later in this report.

HOUSING DIVERSITY STRATEGY

The Housing Diversity Strategy (HDS) was introduced into the Whittlesea Planning Scheme by Planning Scheme Amendment C181, gazetted on 22 October 2015.  The HDS provides a strategic framework for future residential development in the established areas of the municipality for the next 20 years.  It aims to guide the future location and diversity of housing stock and identifies areas of housing growth and change, including areas where future housing growth will not be supported.  In general, it aims to encourage higher residential densities and a diversity of housing types and sizes into areas within convenient walking distance to public transport and activity centres.

The HDS is a reference documents in the Planning Scheme.

The site is within a Neighbourhood Interface change area, which recognises areas typically a 10-15 minute walk to public transport and activity centres. The preferred housing typologies are identified as detached dwellings, duplexes, dual occupancies, townhouses and multi unit developments. The Neighbourhood Interface change area has a number of key design principals, including:-

·    A range of low to medium building heights that support some housing diversity;

·    Building heights that integrate well with the existing housing stock;

·    Moderate front setback to provide sufficient space for landscaping and a medium canopy tree;

·    Sufficient side and rear setbacks to allow for some landscaping and external access to the rear;

·    Medium site coverage to facilitate a balance between increased densities and landscape opportunities;

·    Usable private open space;

·    Landscaping to complement medium density built form;

·    Medium sized canopy tree in the front setback;

·    Large canopy tree in rear setback.

A response to Council’s Housing Diversity Strategy is provided in the table below.

ASSESSMENT AGAINST CLAUSE 55 OF THE WHITTLESEA PLANNING SCHEME

The following table provides details on whether the proposal complies with the requirements of Clause 55 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.  Under these provisions a development:

·    Must meet all of the objectives

·    Should meet all of the standards

If Council is satisfied that an application for an alternative design solution meets the objective, the alternative design solution may be considered.

 

√- Compliance
X - Non compliance

Objectives

Standards

COMMENTS

B1

Neighbourhood
Character

X

X

The existing neighbourhood character contains a combination of single and double storey dwellings. The surrounding dwellings are consistently constructed from brick, with hipped or gabled roof forms and moderate landscaping within the front setback.

Medium density is found consistently within the streetscape. Where medium density developments are found, a sense of openness is provided by way of separation between built form.

Medium density developments within the streetscape are largely provided with single crossovers to each site; however there are some notable examples of sites being serviced by two crossovers, including 7 Romeo Court opposite the subject site.

In addition to consideration of the above context, Schedule 4 to the General Residential Zone contains the following neighbourhood character objectives:

·      To support a preferred neighbourhood character that balances the scale of development with landscaping and ensures sensitive transitions in height from existing dwellings;

 

·      To encourage contemporary building designs with variation and breaks in building form to soften the visual bulk of development through elements such as eaves, hipped or gabled roof forms and setbacks at upper floors;

 

·      To improve landscape character by providing generous landscaping including canopy trees in front and rear setbacks to soften the visual impact of development;

 

·      To encourage functional secluded private open space at the rear of the dwelling through its orientation and design.

 

The proposed development would incorporate elements of the surrounding housing stock including pitched roof forms and some landscaping within the front setback. However, the proposal does not go far enough in responding Standard B1- Neighbourhood Character.

Whilst double storey built form is not uncommon in the immediate area the concern with this proposal relates to the amount of double storey built form which expands across the site to the rear and the lack of meaningful separation at both ground and first floor levels.  Of particular concern is the cantilevering of the first floor level of Dwellings Two and Three which adds to the bulk and limited separation of these dwellings. In addition the double storey built form of Dwelling Four is setback 1.8 metres from the western boundary which is not considered to be a sensitive transition in height when compared against neighbouring properties which have generous secluded private open spaces or more modest single storey buildings. 

In addition to the above it is also considred that the proposal lacks a sufficient amount of articulation to soften the visual bulk of the proposal. The proposed dwellings have not been appropriately recessed which is particularly evident for Dwelling Two and Three which have more living/ floor area at the first floor level compared to their associated ground floor level.  The limited first floor recession adds to the bulk of the proposal when viewed from Romeo Court and surrounding secluded private open spaces.

Furthermore, vehicle access to the site is provided by way of two crossovers from Romeo Court. This reduces the area within the front setback to provide meaningful landscaping that is appropriate to the scale of the development. The increased area of hardstand within the front setback diminishes opportunities to provide further landscaping that could mitigate the bulk of the four double storey dwellings which is contrary to the neighbourhood character objectives of the zone which encourage outcomes that improve the landscaping character and result in generous landscaping opportunities.

In summary, the proposal does not go far enough in responding to the neighbourhood character objectives and the proposal is not considered to respect the existing and preferred neighbourhood character.

 

B2

Residential
Policy

X

X

The site is located within a General Residential Zone (Schedule 4) and is within a Neighbourhood Interface change area as identified in the Housing Diversity Strategy 2013-2033 (HDS).

The HDS sets out key design principles for residential development in Neighbourhood Interface change areas. Whilst the proposal is consistent with the preferred housing typology identified within the HDS, the proposal does not achieve a building height that integrates well with the existing housing stock. As discussed above, whilst two storey built form is generally acceptable within a Neighbourhood Interface area, the lack of articulation to all dwellings does not achieve a building height and massing that integrates well with the existing housing stock as sought by the HDS.

Further inconsistencies with the HDS include:

·      The inclusion of a second crossover reduces the ability to provide sufficient space for landscaping;

·      The boundary-to-boundary build associated with Dwelling 4 does not provide side setbacks that allow for access to the rear or any landscaping along the north or south elevations;

·      The combination of the additional crossover and boundary-to-boundary build limits the provision of landscaping which is appropriate to the scale of the development, noting that additional landscaping is required to offset the bulk of the proposal due to the absence of first floor setbacks to provide articulation.

Clause 16.01-1L (Housing Supply in Established Areas) applies to the development of two or more dwellings in the established areas of the municipality. This Clause contains strategies for achieving development that contributes positively to the neighbourhood character of the area whilst achieving a high level of amenity. Strategies for achieving this include to encourage development that:

·      Provides an articulated building form to avoid visual bulk

·      Minimises vehicle crossovers, to maximise landscaping opportunities in the front setback and to maintain on-street parking provision.

·      Provides landscaping along driveways that is not impacted by vehicle manoeuvres.

The proposal does not achieve an acceptable level of compliance with Clause 16.01-1L.

Regarding the built form, the proposal is not considered to be sufficiently articulated which is evident by the minimal first floor setback.

The proposals reliance on two vehicle crossovers to provide vehicle access to the site is contrary to Clause 16.01-1L, which seeks to minimise the number of vehicle crossovers provided to a development.

The vehicle swept paths provided indicate that the proposed landscaping along the shared accessway would be impacted by vehicles entering and exiting the site. Vehicles entering and exiting the garages of Dwellings Two, Three and Four would encroach into the landscaped areas, compromising the ability for meaningful landscaping to establish along the accessways. Providing meaningful landscaping along the accessway would assist in alleviating the bulk of the proposals presentation to Romeo Court.

B3

Dwelling
Diversity

N/A

N/A

Only applicable to developments of ten or more dwellings

B4

Infrastructure

P

P

Complies.

B5

Integration with
the street

P

P

Complies.

B6

Street setback

P

P

Complies.

B7

Building height

P

P

Complies.

B8

Site coverage

P

P

38.4%.

Complies.

B9

Permeability

P

P

35.9%.

Complies.

B10

Energy
efficiency

P

P

Complies.

B11

Open space

N/A

N/A

Only applicable if public or communal open space is to be provided on site or adjacent to the development.

B12

Safety

P

P

Complies.

B13

Landscaping

X

X

The subject site is located within a General Residential Zone (Schedule 4). Schedule 4 to this zone requires a development to provide one canopy tree in both the front and rear setbacks.

Each canopy tree must achieve a minimum six metres mature height and be accommodated in a pervious area of at least 5 metres by 5 metres, that does not contain driveways or car parking. This area is to be provided in addition to secluded private open space.

Whilst a canopy tree has been provided within the front and rear setbacks of the site, compliance with the Schedule has not been achieved. The 5m x 5m area for the canopy tree has not been provided in the rear setback in addition to the secluded private open space. Therefore, the development does not comply with Standard B13 Landscaping and an additional area of landscaping or SPOS is required.

 

B14

Access

X

X

The development proposals vehicle access to the site by way of two vehicle crossovers.

Standard B14 Access states that the location of crossovers should maximise the retention of on-street car parking spaces. Further, Standard B14 seeks to ensure that the number and design of vehicle crossovers respects the neighbourhood character.

The proposed additional crossover would result in the loss of an on street car parking space on the north side of Romeo Court. Additionally, the provision of a second crossover is inconsistent with the existing and preferred neighbourhood character of Romeo Court, whereby multi unit developments are predominantly serviced by a single crossover providing access to a shared driveway.

 

B15

Parking location

P

P

Complies.

B17

Side and rear
setbacks

P

P

Complies.

B18

Walls on
boundaries

P

P

Complies.

B19

Daylight to
existing
windows

P

P

Complies.

B20

North-facing
windows

P

P

Complies.

B21

Overshadowing
open space

P

P

Complies.

B22

Overlooking

P

P

Complies,

B23

Internal views

P

P

Complies.

B24

Noise impacts

P

P

Complies.

B25

Accessibility

P

P

Complies.

B26

Dwelling entry

P

P

Complies.

B27

Daylight to new
windows

P

P

Complies.

B28

Private open
space

X

X

As discussed above, the subject site is located within a General Residential Zone Schedule 4. This schedule contains additional landscaping requirements, namely, the provision on a canopy tree within the front and rear setbacks of the site with an area of 5m x 5m.

This area is to be provided in addition to the required area of secluded private open space.

The proposed canopy tree within the rear setback of the site has not been provided in addition to the secluded private open space. Therefore, Dwelling Four does not achieve the requirement to provide 40m2 of Private Open Space. This cannot be easily addressed via permit conditions as the proposed development would need to undertake significant alterations to comply with Standard B28.

The imitability for the proposal to comply with the private open space requirements significantly reduces the amenity of future occupiers of the dwellings and is indicative of a development that has not sufficiently responded to the spatial constraints of the site.

B29

Solar access to
open space

P

P

Complies.

B30

Storage

P

X

Each dwelling should have convenient access to at least 6 cubic metres of externally accessible, secure storage space.

Dwelling One has been provided with external storage within the garage, which does not provide any convenient access to the rear of the site. A condition could be included on any permit issued requiring 6m2 of externally accessible secure storage to be provided to Dwelling One.

 

B31

Design detail

X

X

The proposal does not provide an acceptable design response that respects the existing and preferred neighbourhood character of Romeo Court.

Further articulation to all dwellings is required to improve compliance with Standard B31 Design Detail and reduce the bulk of the proposal.

In particular, further articulation is required  to:

·      The east and south elevations of Dwelling One;

·      The north, east and south elevations of Dwelling Two;

·      The north, east, south and west elevations of Dwelling Three:

·      The east and west elevations of Dwelling Four.

The provision of increased first floor setbacks to the abovementioned elevations of the dwellings would reduce the visual bulk of the proposal and provide an improved neighbourhood character response. The proposal relies on first floor level built form cantilevering over ground floors. The Neighbourhood Character objectives of the General Residential Zone (Schedule 4) specify that upper floors should be setback to soften the scale of the development. Some of the design outcomes associated with this proposal suggest that the scale of development is ambitious in its layout and massing when considering the existing and preferred neighbourhood character.

 

B32

Front fences

P

P

Complies.

B33

Common
property

P

P

Complies.

B34

Site services

P

P

Complies.

CAR PARKING 

Clause 52.06 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme prescribes the rate and design standards for car parking spaces required on site.  Pursuant to this clause the following car spaces are required:

Dwelling No.

No. of bedrooms

Car spaces required

Car spaces provided

Complies

Dwelling One

Three

Two

Two

Yes

Dwelling Two

Three

Two

Two

Yes

Dwelling Three

Three

Two

Two

Yes

Dwelling Four

Three

Two

Two

Yes

Garages should be at least 6.0m long and 3.5m wide for a single space and 5.5m wide for a double space (measured inside the garage or carport).  An open car space should be at least 4.9m long and 2.6m wide.  The proposal complies with these requirements.

Whilst the proposal has provided technical compliance with the car parking provisions at Clause 52.06 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, the proposal does not provide a functional car parking layout.

The vehicle swept path diagrams submitted indicate several points of conflict along the shared accessway servicing Dwellings Two, Three and Four. These conflicts include:

·    Vehicles exiting the tandem car space associated with Dwelling Two would encroach into the landscaping along the south side of the accessway and contact the side boundary fence;

·    Vehicles exiting the tandem car space associated with Dwelling Three would encroach into the landscaping along the south side of the accessway and contact the side boundary fence;

·    Vehicles entering the garage and tandem car space associated with Dwelling Four would make contact with the east facing wall associated with Dwelling Four and the eastern wall of the garage. Additionally, a vehicle would be required to significantly encroach into the landscaping along the north elevation of the shared accessway.

·    Vehicles exiting the garage and tandem car park associated with Dwelling Four would likely make contact with the porch area of Dwelling Four, as well as encroach into the landscaping area along the south and north side of the shared accessway.

The outstanding access issues associated with the site could not be easily resolved by way of condition on a permit. A reduction in the landscaping area along the south side of the accessway would result in an increase in hardstand area and further contribute to the bulk of the proposal.

In addition to this, an application to construct or extend a dwelling or residential building on a lot of this size must provide a minimum garden area equal to 35% of the lot. In its current form, the proposal is providing a minimum garden area of 35.4%. It is likely that any reduction in the landscaped area along the south elevation of the accessway would reduce the landscaped area below the minimum required 35%. Council Officers must refuse an application that does not achieve the minimum garden area requirement.

Satisfactory vehicle access cannot be provided to the site by providing further room along the north side of shared accessway associated with the garages of Dwellings Two and Three. These garages are already constructed along the boundary of the site. Further, these garages are already proposed to be constructed to the minimum required dimensions. A reduction in the length of these garages would not achieve compliance the car parking requirements at Clause 52.06 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

Given the above, the outstanding access issues could not be resolved by way of condition on a planning permit as any condition requiring the submission of satisfactory swept path diagrams would result in a transformation of the proposal.

DEVELOPMENT CONTRIBUTIONS PLAN OVERLAY (SCHEDULE 3)

The site is affected by the Development Contributions Plan Overlay.  Pursuant to Clause 45.06 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, the Development Contributions Plan Overlay enables the levying of contributions for the provision of works, services and facilities prior to development commencing.  Schedule 3 to the Overlay requires contributions for drainage infrastructure for medium density residential development at a current rate of $2.19 per square metre of the total site area.  This requirement must be included as a condition on any planning permit that is issued.

Comments on Grounds of Objection

1.       The proposal is an overdevelopment of the site.

The Whittlesea Planning Scheme does not prescribe a particular density for this site, however, given the number of objectives and standards that cannot be achieved, the density is considered too high and these shortcomings are an indicator of the proposal being an overdevelopment of the site.

2.       The development is visually bulky and inconsistent with the character of the area.

As discussed earlier in the report, the proposal fails to accord with the existing and preferred neighbourhood character particularly due to the visual bulk of the dwellings and provision of two crossovers. The proposal is considered to be visually bulky due to the lack of meaningful first floor setback to all dwellings.

3.       Overlooking/ Privacy

The proposal includes measures to address overlooking in accordance with Standard B22 – Overlooking of Clause 55 - ResCode of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

4.       Insufficient On-Site Car Parking

As discussed elsewhere in this report, the car parking provided on site satisfies Clause 52.06 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. The development is for four dwellings and therefore a visitor car parking space is not required pursuant to Clause 52.06-5 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

Notwithstanding the above, there are numerous outstanding access issues associated with the car parking spaces that would compromise the functionality and useability of these spaces.

5.       Congestion of local streets and loss of on street car parking

The development proposes an additional crossover, which would result in the loss of an on-street car parking space, however the traffic generated by the development is unlikely to unreasonably cause congestion within the street.

6.       Noise Impacts on Street

The noise generated by this proposal is acceptable for a residential zoned area.

7.       Property Value

VCAT has determined on many occasions that property values (including the perception of reduced property values) is not a relevant planning consideration.

8.       Waste Pollution

The waste generated by this proposal is acceptable for a residential zoned area.

9.       Overshadowing to Adjoining Properties

The proposal provides a satisfactory response to Clause 55.05-5 (Overshadowing Open Space Objective).

10.     Overcrowding/Overpopulation of the Street

Clause 16.01-1S- Housing Supply of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme seeks to identify opportunities for increased residential densities to consolidate urban development. Whilst this particular development is not supported, it is considered suitable for a more modest medium density development.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The proposal does not appropriately response to the relevant Planning Policy Framework, including Clause 16.01-1L- Housing Supply of Established Areas and Clause 55 (ResCode). The proposed development does not demonstrate an acceptable level of compliance with the relative requirements of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme predominately due to its visual bulk, inability to provide satisfactory landscaping and outstanding vehicle access issues.

 

 

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to Refuse Planning Application No. 719054 and issue a Refusal to Grant a Planning Permit for Construction of Four Dwellings on the following grounds:

1.       The proposal does not comply with the following Objectives and Standard of Clause 55 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme:

 

a)      B1 Neighbourhood Character;

b)      B2 Residential Policy;

c)      B13 Landscaping;

d)      B14 Access;

e)      B28 Private Open Space;

f)       B31 Design Detail

 

2.       The proposal does not appropriately respond to the neighbourhood              character objectives sought by Schedule 4 to Clause 32.08- General Residential Zone.

 

3.       The proposal does not appropriately respond to the Policy Framework of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme as follows:

 

a)      The proposal does not comply with the policy at Clause 16.01-1L – Housing Supply in Established Areas due to the visual bulk, limited landscaping provisions and inclusion of an additional crossover; and

b)      The built form and landscaping provisions are inconsistent with the key design principles outlined for Neighbourhood Interface Change Areas of the Housing Diversity Strategy;

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Eddy

Seconded:               Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                                       Tuesday 1 June 2021

 


 


 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

ITEM 6.2.5 For Noting - 16 Woodruff Road, South Morang - Construction Compliance   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Development

Author:                                  Manager Building & Planning   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council note the report and that officers from across Council continue to regularly monitor the site for any non-compliance and take immediate required action as needed.  It is further recommended that Council consider all available options in the event the development is not completed by the due date and that senior officers meet with the head petitioner to be appropriately informed and updated.

Brief overview

The original Building Permit was issued in 2015 with multiple extension of time requests approved over the years, currently requiring completion of the dwelling by October 2021.

A petition was tabled at a Council meeting in October 2018 and again in February 2021, originally calling for an investigation to ensure that conditions of the Building Permit and relevant Municipal Laws and Codes are being met and more recently requesting that no further renewing of the building permit occur.

The site has been under construction for many years and is progressing at a slow rate.

rationale for recommendation

Failing to renew the building permit may result in longer delays given there would be no active permit (no works could take place) and a new permit could be sought which would extend the times out further.  It is important however to continue to monitor and respond to non-compliances in a timely manner and consideration may need to be given to how these are responded to should any future request for extension of time to the current permit be received.  Council would need to consider all available options at that time.  As there is no current request, there is not currently a decision to be made on whether or not to extend the permit further.

impacts of recommendation

There is no impact associated with noting the report and there is no decision to be made at present on whether or not to extend the permit.  This decision cannot be made until such time as an extension request is received which would be later in 2021.  Council will need to consider all available options at that time including compliance on site and how far the development has progressed.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Officers have worked with the owner/builder to develop a construction schedule to assist progressing the dwelling further, however delays have occurred as a result of personal circumstances and COVID.  Officers will continue to regularly monitor the site and take appropriate action as required.  Legal guidance will be taken into account should a future request be received to extend the permit further.

Report

Background

A building permit was issued on 19 October 2015 for the construction of a single dwelling at 16 Woodruff Road, South Morang.  The permit required commencement of the dwelling by 19 October 2016 and completion by 19 October 2017. 

As the dwelling was not completed by that date, an extension of time was granted for an additional 12 months to complete the dwelling by 19 October 2018. 

On 10 September 2018 a second extension of time request was received as construction had not finished with strip footings, stumps and sub floor all having been completed and approved.  A petition was subsequently received and tabled at the Council meeting of 2 October 2018 where the following resolution was unanimously carried:

 

THAT Council resolve to receive the petition from 21 residents requesting Council investigate and where appropriate take action to ensure the conditions of the building permit issued for 16 Woodruff Road, South Morang and relevant municipal laws and codes are being met and a report be prepared for a subsequent meeting.

 

A report was tabled at the 13 November 2018 Council meeting for noting.  Since that time, further extension of time requests have been granted due to delays caused as a result of personal circumstances as well as COVID.  Officers have also met with the owner/builder to develop a construction plan and the dwelling has now progressed to frame stage in preparation for roofing. 

A further petition was received from nearby residents to the property, continuing to raise concerns in association with the site.  This was tabled at a Council meeting in February 2021 with a resolution:

THAT Council resolve to receive the petition from 21 residents and a report be presented at the 4 May 2021 Council Meeting.

It is noted that this timeframe was extended to June and the head petitioner was advised accordingly.

Proposal

Council officers have continually been monitoring the site and working with the owner to ensure all requirements of the building permit and relevant municipal laws, including the Building Site Code, are being complied with.  This has included investigating:

·        Noise;

·        Sanitary disposal;

·        Waste disposal;

·        Visual impact;

·        Fencing requirements;

·        Display of Permit details; and

·        Building permit compliance.

Through this process, improvements have been made to the site over time, however a more recent inspection was undertaken by various Council officers where some non-compliances have again been observed and are currently being actioned.

The storage of building materials on site is allowable for construction and where there is a valid building permit, although the site would benefit from being cleaned up which is currently being pursued with the owner.  Failing to respond to these requests could result in referral to Worksafe as well as appropriate enforcement action being taken.

There is currently no request in relation to extending the building permit further and therefore no decision can be made at present, however Council will need to consider all available options should the development not be completed by the due date.

Council officers will ensure proactive monitoring occurs and will continue to work with the owner to bring the site into compliance.  All the requirements of the building permit, Municipal Local Law and Building Site Code will continue to be monitored to ensure compliance at all times and any non-compliances actioned promptly.

Consultation

Discussions have been held with the head petitioner to clarify circumstances, detail what can be controlled by Council and what cannot.  Officers will continue to keep the head petitioner informed and updated.

Critical Dates

The Building Permit will expire in October this year in the event the development is not complete, unless the time on the permit is extended.  A decision will need to be made on any request to extend the permit at the time it is made and taking into account relevant legislative considerations.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications associated with this report.  Officers will continue to actively monitor this site within existing operating resourcing.

Policy strategy and legislation

Compliance with the Building Act, the Municipal Local Law and Building Site Code of Practice will continue to be monitored.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Health, Safety and Welfare - Failure of safety and risk management systems resulting in serious injury or harm to staff or member of public

Council are the relevant Building Surveyor for this site and will need to monitor compliance of construction in accordance with the Building Act and Regulations.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Well-designed neighbourhoods and vibrant town centres

 

Monitoring of the site is needed to ensure compliance.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The slow construction and approach of this project is clearly causing some concern for neighbouring residents of the site, which more recently has not been helped by COVID and other delays.  The construction will continue to be monitored and any non-compliances addressed promptly.

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the report.

2.       Ensure officers from across Council continue to regularly monitor the site for any non-compliance and take immediate required action as needed.

3.       Consider all available options in the event the development is not completed by the due date.

4.       Ensure a meeting is arranged between senior officers and the head petitioner to be appropriately informed and updated.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Chair of Council Wilson

Seconded:               Administrator Eddy

 

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the report.

2.       Ensure officers from across Council continue to regularly monitor the site for any non-compliance and take immediate required action as needed.

3.       Consider all available options in the event the development is not completed by the due date.

4.       Ensure a meeting is arranged, together with regular communication, between senior officers and the head petitioner and any other interested residents to ensure that they are appropriately informed and updated on this matter.

Carried

  

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

6.3       Strong Local Economy

ITEM 6.3.1 For Decision - Proposed Business Advisory Panel

Attachments:                        1        DRAFT CoW Business Advisory Panel Terms of Reference     

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Development 

Author:                                  Manager Economic Development 

 

REPORT SUMMARY

The proposed Business Advisory Panel is being established to further enhance Council engagement with the local business community.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    The proposed Business Advisory Panel (Panel) will work together with Council in delivering the key objectives and advocate for a Strong Local Economy.

·    The function of the Panel will be supported by a Terms of Reference (Attachment 1).

·    The proposed membership of the Panel will include an Administrator / Councillor, Council Officers and up to 10 local business representatives.

Introduction

The purpose of the proposed Business Advisory Panel (Panel) will enable local business leaders work with Council in delivering key objectives and advocacy for a Strong Local Economy.

Background

The proposed Business Advisory Panel has clear linkages with Whittlesea 2040 Goal: Strong Local Economy and the Economic Development Strategy key direction 5 Collaborate with community, business and government to deliver resources and opportunities. The Panel aims to further enhance the partnerships between Council and the business community.

In addition to the proposed establishment of the Business Advisory Panel, Council will be undertaking a number of additional engagement activities with local businesses and stakeholders. Roundtable events and other planned activities will take place throughout the year to further enhance engagement and relationships between business and Council.

Proposal

The proposed Panel Terms of Reference (attachment 1) outlines the Panel’s function, including its purpose, membership, roles and responsibilities and meeting frequency.

Membership to the Group will be determined via application of an Expression of Interest (EoI) responding to selection criteria.

Following the EoI, recommended members will be presented to Council for consideration and endorsement.

Consultation

Advice was sought from Executive Manager Governance and was agreed that the proposed Terms of Reference is suitable.

Critical Dates

Council’s Business Advisory Panel is proposed to be established by September 2021.

A series of roundtable and other engagement activities are currently being planned.

Financial Implications

No financial commitment is required. The establishment of the Panel and its activities will be delivered within existing resources and budget.

Policy strategy and legislation

The proposed Business Advisory Panel has clear linkages with Whittlesea 2040 Goal: Strong Local Economy and the Economic Development Strategy key direction 5 Collaborate with community, business and government to deliver resources and opportunities. The Panel aims to further enhance the partnerships between Council and the business community.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Not linked to the risks within the Strategic Risk Register.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Strong local economy

Key Direction                        Successful, innovative local businesses

 

The proposed Panel will enhance the collaboration between Council and the business community. Through collaboration, the Panel will support successful, innovative local businesses who offer employment and education opportunities for our community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The proposed Business Advisory Panel will strengthen the relationship between the business community and Council to work together in delivering the key objectives and advocate for a Strong Local Economy. The function of the Panel will be supported by a Terms of Reference and seek membership from local business leaders to drive positive outcomes for a successful, innovate local business community.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the Terms of Reference

2.       Endorse the commencement of the Expression of Interest process via engagement with the local business community

3.       Appoint Administrator ………. and Administrator…..….. to the Panel.

 

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Eddy

Seconded:               Chair of Council Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the Terms of Reference;

2.       Endorse the commencement of the Expression of Interest process via engagement with the local business community; and

3.       Appoint Administrator Wilson and Administrator Eddy to the Panel.

Carried

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

6.4       Sustainable Environment

ITEM 6.4.1 For Decision - Adoption of the City of Whittlesea Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030

Attachments:                        1        Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030   

Responsible Officer:           Acting Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Unit Leader Waste & Recycling   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

1.   Adopt the Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 and endorse the document for public release.

2.   Approve the Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 Implementation Plan and refer to the 2021/22 budget approval process for consideration.

3.   Write to all participating stakeholders and community members thanking them for their contribution and efforts in achieving this strategic outcome.

4.   Provide a copy of the Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 to the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change, the Hon. Lily D’Ambrosio and to all local Members of Parliament.

Brief overview

The Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 (the Plan) presents a new approach to managing the waste generated in the municipality. It responds to changes in the waste and recycling industry and community expectations. Kerbside recycling services must change to allow for greater separation of recyclable material to maximise resource recovery and value waste as a resource.

The Plan aims to guide our organisation and our City towards low waste to landfill by 2030, to help our community transition to a circular economy and become a leader in sustainable living through waste avoidance, resource recovery and environmental protection.

rationale for recommendation

Waste management is rated as one of the most important services that Council provides and is a major component of Council’s annual budget. The total cost of managing the community’s municipal waste now exceeds $13 million annually.

The Plan provides extensive waste and recycling services and education programs that will contribute towards protecting public health and wellbeing, local amenity and economic growth.  This Plan also recognises the need to focus on waste avoidance and respond to the changes in the industry and increased community awareness.

 

impacts of recommendation

The Plan presents a new approach to managing the waste generated in the municipality and responds to changes in waste and recycling industry and community expectations. The Plan aims to guide our organisation and our City towards low waste to landfill by 2030 to help our community transition to a circular economy and become a leader in sustainable living through waste avoidance, resource recovery and environmental protection.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

The implementation plan will allow Council to implement service delivery changes that are adaptive to the community’s waste needs and changes in waste management practices.

An interim Council report will be provided in 2026 to monitor Council’s progress and ensure our targets remain on track. A final report will be prepared at the end of the Plan in 2031 to report our progress to Council and community.

 

Report

Introduction

The Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 (the Plan) supersedes the Municipal Waste Management & Resource Recovery Plan 2012-2020.  The plan presents a new approach to managing the waste generated in the municipality and responds to the changes in waste and recycling industry and community expectations.

This Plan is aiming for low waste to landfill by 2030 to help our community transition to a circular economy and become a leader in sustainable living through waste avoidance, resource recovery and environmental protection.

Background

Council provides household waste and recycling collection and drop off services, delivers waste and recycling education programs, services street litter bins and manages and rehabilitates closed landfill sites. The total cost of managing the community’s municipal waste now exceeds $13 million annually.

Increased consumption combined with population growth is placing pressure on the State’s resource recovery system leading to numerous challenges with recycling. Council can no longer rely on resource recovery (recycling) as the only solution for managing municipal waste. Minimising the creation of waste at the source is the key.

Recent changes in the recycling industry and ongoing media attention have pushed waste into the spotlight. The community is more engaged with what happens to its waste than ever before. The community seeks increased, innovative and improved resource recovery services and methods to protect the environment from waste.

Current Status

In the 2019/20 financial year, Council collected:

 

Purpose of the Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030

The Plan aims to guide the organisation and the community towards low waste to landfill by 2030, including transitioning to a circular economy and becoming a leader in sustainable living.

Three key themes are represented throughout the document, as follows:

·    Avoid: To avoid waste generation in the first place.

·    Recover: To recover and recycle as much waste as possible, value waste as a resource and encourage repair, reuse and recycle principles.

·    Protect: To protect the health and safety of our community and the environment from the impacts of waste by adopting best practice waste management principles.

The Plan needed to respond to greater community expectations regarding waste and recycling services (and mandatory changes in kerbside recycling services) to allow for greater source separation of recyclable material to maximise resource recovery.

Developing the Plan

The Plan has been prepared considering the following:

·    Historical waste management processes

·    Current models and principles relevant to waste management

·    The regulatory framework for waste and recycling

·    Broader issues and opportunities that shape how we manage waste and recycling

·    The shared responsibility of governments and communities to reduce and manage waste

·    Feedback from the community.

The state and national targets that influence this Plan are:

·    Cutting total waste generation by 15 per cent per capita by 2030

·    Diverting 80 per cent of waste from landfill by 2030

·    Halving the volume of organic material going to landfill between 2020 and 2030

·    Every household will have access to a food and garden waste bin or local composting by 2030

·    Banning the export of waste plastic, paper, cardboard, glass and tyres commencing in the second half of 2020

·    Significantly increasing the use of recycled content by government and industry

·    Phasing out problematic and unnecessary plastics by 2025

·    Making comprehensive, economy-wide and timely data publicly available to support better consumer, investment and policy decisions.

Goals and Targets

The Plan is designed to guide Council and the community towards a low waste future and aligns with key directions within the Whittlesea 2040 community plan (Connected community, Liveable neighbourhoods, Strong local economy and Sustainable environment).

The following targets have been set to meet the goals and vision of the Plan:

·    Introduce a residential glass recycling service in 2022-23.

·    Extend the food and garden waste service municipal wide in 2023-24.

·    Introduce a litter enforcement team to protect the environment from litter and dumped rubbish in 2023-24.

·    To increase sustainable procurement to 10% of all procurement spend by 2030.

·         To reduce total waste generation by 20 per cent per person by 2030, which equates to saving 11,000 tonnes of waste being generated annually.

·    Divert 80 per cent of waste from landfill by 2030, which equates to diverting an average of 68,000 tonnes of waste from landfill annually.

·    Halve the volume of food and garden waste going to landfill by 2030.

Some examples of key actions arising from the Plan are outlined in the table below.

Action Item

Financial Year

Encourage sustainable procurement across Council.

Ongoing

Undertake a feasibility study on providing alternative residential bin sizes.

2021/22

Develop and implement a residential glass recycling service.

2021/22 -2022/23

Introduce an organisational Low Waste Policy, mandating waste avoidance and recycling at all Council facilities.

2022/23

Enhance the hard waste collection service to support the phase out of tip vouchers.

2022/23

Develop and implement Council’s response to the Victorian Single-use plastics ban.

2022/23

Extend the food and garden waste bin service municipal wide.

2023/24

Introduce a litter enforcement team to protect the environment from litter and dumped rubbish.

2023/24

Standardise kerbside bin lid colours in line with the Recycling Victoria Policy.

2024/25

Support the introduction new local resource recovery drop off sites.

2024/25

Consultation

Consultation on the Plan occurred over two stages, in response to the COVID-19 global pandemic and lockdown fluctuations.

In total, the consultation gathered over 1,200 individual engagements. This includes over 600 online survey engagements and completions, 40 focus group participants, 250 engagements during the face-to-face pop up displays, 250 social media engagements and 30 students who participated in the primary school art competition.

Methods of engagement included discussion papers, online surveys, internal consultation, industry benchmarking, workshops, art competitions, Instagram competitions and pop-up displays.

Stage 1: Discussion Papers

Stage 1 consultation was conducted over a three-month period from October to December 2020, and provided initial learnings from discussion papers, internal consultation, school art competitions, an online survey and an all age Instagram competition.

Overall, Stage 1 survey results were positive, with:

·    86 per cent of survey respondents supporting the idea of a weekly food and garden waste bin service.

·    Over 90 per cent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that Council should lead by example by banning all single use plastics at its facilities and community centres.

·    95 per cent of respondents strongly believed that Council should support businesses and individuals that take leadership in reducing waste.

Stage 2: Draft Plan

Stage 2 consultation was delivered over a three-month period from January to March 2021 and sought community feedback on the draft Plan. Stage 2 allowed for an additional online survey and distribution of the draft Plan.

Every resident that opted in during stage 1 consultation was provided with an electronic or a hard copy of the draft plan inviting them to further comment on the plan, in stage 2.

Furthermore, a series of face-to-face consultation pop-up displays held at shopping centres across the municipality included an engagement activity based on Stage 1 survey responses regarding the topics of service provisions and initiatives. Stage 2 consultation focussed on informing the community about the draft strategy, measuring the community confidence and seeking feedback on the proposed timelines and priorities. It was noted that this activity allowed for active engagement of people outside the typical survey respondents demographic, such as senior and youth residents, resident that were not from our waste networks and residents from CALD households.

Immediately following the end of the consultation, community feedback was collated and changes were made to the draft strategy to reflect community concerns and suggestions.

Several key themes were noted and adapted into the Plan, including:

·    The need for accessible and convenient services

·    Increased incentives and education for waste avoidance

·    Desire for closed loop recycling systems

·    Need for a variety of kerbside collection services (i.e. various size bins)

·    Alternative services not just the removal of existing services.

monitoring and evaluation

An interim Council report will be provided in 2026 to inform our progress and ensure progress remains on target. A final report will then be prepared at the end of the ten-year timeframe (in 2031) to report the outcomes to Council and community.

This plan will form part of the Council Action Plan and as such the actions and targets will be reported on a quarterly basis.

Waste and recycling data is a component of Council’s Annual report. The community will have an annual update on how we are tracking on annually through this report.   

Financial Implications

Funding to implement the actions in the Plan will be referred to the annual Council budget process. Additional opportunities for funding will be sort from The Victorian Government’s Recycling Reform Package, where $129 million dollars is promised for initiatives that will support the reform of kerbside recycling.

Currently a waste charge is applied to all rateable properties that receive a Council waste collection. Our current waste charge for the 2020-2021 financial year is $110.50. Benchmarking of neighbouring Councils has shown that our waste charge is considerably lower due to favourable waste arrangements with Hansons Landfill.

Current industry standard is to pass on the costs of implementing the 4 bins system through the waste charge. Failing to secure full funding for key actions will result in an increase of the waste charge.

It should be noted that 12 out of the 34 proposed actions will not require any extra budget or resourcing and can be rolled out within existing staff and budgets allocations.

Partnerships will be sort with state government, industry, local business, community groups and neighbouring Councils to roll out new initiatives. Advocacy for business investment, and not for profit organisations occur throughout the plan.

Additional funding will be sourced throughout the ten-year period to further progress our vision, goals and strategic actions.

This strategy will allow for 34 new actions to be implemented over the next 10 years. Without any additional funding support, the full cost of implementing and servicing the actions in this plan for the full 10 years are $84,290,985. The majority of the costs comes from implementing the mandated requirements of the Victorian State Government’s Recycling Vic policy 4 bins roll out, being $81,906,660

It is estimated that this plan will require approximately $19,500,000 over the next three years with commencing the standardisation of bin lids colours, introducing a glass bin collection service and extending the food and garden waste bin service to the whole municipality accounting for a large proportion of the expense.

 

Financial Year

Action Items

Possible Funding Source

$19,500,000

Ongoing

Encourage sustainable procurement across Council.

Annual council budget process

$ 255,000

2021/22

Undertake a feasibility study on providing alternative residential bin sizes.

Existing Budget

0.00

2021/22 -2022/23

Develop and implement a residential glass recycling service.

State Government Recycling Reform package

 $ 7,441,619

2022/23

Introduce an organisational Low Waste Policy, mandating waste avoidance and recycling at all Council facilities.

Existing Budget

0.00

2022/23

Enhance the hard waste collection service to support the phase out of tip vouchers.

Existing resident voucher budget

0.00

2022/23

Develop and implement Council’s response to the Victorian single-use plastics ban.

Annual council budget process

$ 250,000

2023/24

Extend the food and garden waste service municipal wide.

State Government Recycling Reform package

$10,309,799

2023/24

Introduce a litter enforcement team to protect the environment from litter and dumped rubbish.

Annual council budget process

$234,000

2021/24

Other proposed actions required.

Annual council budget process

$1,009,582.

Policy strategy and legislation

The Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 is informed by national, state and local government legislation and policies, including:

·    Recycling and Waste Reduction Bill 2020

·    Environmental Protection Act 2018

·    Recycling Victoria (2020)

·    Victorian Single-use Plastics Ban (2023)

·    Whittlesea 2040: A Place for All.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Climate Change - Failure to mitigate or adapt to the risks of climate change

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

The Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 will shape Council’s waste management and circular economy practices for the next ten years, including the provision of kerbside collection services and environmental education and engagement programs.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Sustainable environment

Key Direction                        Leaders in clean, sustainable living

 

The Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 will help Council work towards our overall vision and will focus on the key directions set out under the Whittlesea 2040 goals - Connected community, Liveable neighbourhoods, Strong local economy and Sustainable environment.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 presents a new approach to managing the waste generated within the municipality. This plan is aiming for low waste to landfill by 2030 to help our community transition to a circular economy and become a leader in sustainable living through waste avoidance, resource recovery and environmental protection.

The plan contains 24 actions that reflect community consultation, suggestions and feedback.

Through avoiding waste, recovering as much as possible and protecting the health and safety of our community and environment from the impacts of waste, this plan responds to changes in the recycling industry. By encompassing community expectations, the plan will allow for greater separation of recyclable materials to maximise resource recovery and value waste as a resource. Helping Council work towards our overall vision and focussing on the key directions set out under Whittlesea 2040 goals-connected community, liveable neighbourhoods, strong local economy and sustainable environment.     

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 and endorse the document for public release.

2.       Approve the Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 and Implementation Plan and refer projects to the 2021/22 budget approval process for consideration.

3.       Write to all participating stakeholders and community members thanking them for their contribution and efforts in achieving this strategic outcome.

4.       Provide a copy of the Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 to the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change, the Hon. Lily D’Ambrosio and to all local Members of Parliament.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Chair of Council Wilson

Seconded:               Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

ITEM 6.4.2 For Decision - Contract 2019-119 - Recycling Receipt and Sorting - Contract Variation Report 

Attachments:                        1        Contract 2019-119 - Financial Analysis - Confidential

This attachment has been designated as confidential by the Director Infrastructure & Environment, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains Council business information, being information that would prejudice the Council's position in commercial negotiations if prematurely released. In particular the attachment contains information regarding Council's position in relation to a proposed variation to a Council contact that could reasonably be expected to confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting business and would diminish the strength of Council's position in these negotiations.    

Responsible Officer:           Acting Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Unit Leader Waste & Recycling   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve, in relation to Contract No. 2019-119 for Recycling Sorting and Processing, to:

1.       Approve extension of the contract end date by an additional twelve months, to 30 June 2022 (noting that a Ministerial exemption to Section 186 of the Local Government Act 1989 has been granted for this contract).

2.       Note that a Section 186 exemption to the Local Government Act 1989 has been approved by the Minister for Local Government. The Exemption instrument was prepared by the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group, on behalf of 40 Victorian councils, to allow an extension of the existing contractual arrangements to 30 June 2022.

3.       Note that price variations will be in accordance with the provisions in the Terms and Conditions of the contract.

4.       Approve the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

5.       Note that City of Whittlesea will participate in the State Government Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group’s Collaborative Procurement of Recycling Contracts processes, under the short-term contract arrangements, where this does not preclude Council entering into a separate more beneficial agreement with any party in the future.

Brief overview

·        On Wednesday 25 September 2019, Council formally terminated Contract 2017-75B for Recyclables Acceptance and Sorting with SKM Recycling.

·        Following investigation of several options to divert recyclable material from landfill, at its meeting dated 3 December 2019 Council formally approved Contract 2019-119 for Recycling Sorting and Processing with Cleanaway to 30 June 2021.

·        A Ministerial exemption to Section 186 exemption of the Local Government Act 1989 was prepared by the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG), on behalf of 40 Victorian councils. This exemption has been granted to allow councils to extend the existing recycling sorting and processing contractual arrangements to 30 June 2022.

·        A further twelve-month extension will allow sufficient time for the finalisation of the state-wide collaborative procurement process for recycling processing.

rationale for recommendation

A twelve-month extension of the existing contract will allow enough time for the finalisation of Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group’s (MWRRG) collaborative procurement approach. MWRRG have advised that the timelines for the collaborative procurement process will likely commence in December 2021. Should the projected commencement date change, any existing Council agreements would not preclude Council from being a part of the State Government’s Collaborative Procurement of Recycling Contracts process.

Additionally, Council proposes to implement the glass recycling collection service in the 2022/23 financial year as part of the Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030. A twelve-month extension will allow for proper review of the MWRRG Collaborative Procurement of Contracts in order to understand how a separate glass recycling service will impact the original draft and assessment criteria.

impacts of recommendation

A detailed analysis of Cleanaway’s offer and the negotiated savings outcome is provided in the confidential attachment.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

As part of the contract negotiated rate, Council has accepted to pay full costs for its contamination material to be disposed at Hanson’s landfill in Wollert. To ensure Council maintains a substantial cost saving, regular waste audits conducted in conjunction with Cleanaway will be implemented to ensure that contamination rates remain low. 

 

Report

Background

On Wednesday 25 September 2019, Council formally terminated Contract 2017-75B for Recyclables Acceptance and Sorting with SKM Recycling (SKM). Two weeks later, Council were informed that Cleanaway was successful in acquiring the assets of SKM and had commenced upgrade works at the former SKM processing facilities located in Laverton North and Coolaroo.

At its meeting dated 3 December 2019, Council approved Contract 2019-119 for Recycling Receipt and Sorting which allowed kerbside recyclable material to be processed at Cleanaway’s facility in Coolaroo. This arrangement was approved for a period of nineteen months to 30 June 2021.

The additional transport cartage costs resulting from the change in processing facility were attributable to the kerbside collection contract with JJ Richards and Sons.

The contract allows for three separate one-year extensions by mutual agreement between the parties, and subject to Ministerial exemption of Section 186 of the Local Government Act 1989.

Ministerial Exemption to Section 186 Update

A Section 186 exemption of the Local Government Act 1989 was submitted, by the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG) on behalf of 40 Victorian councils, to the Minister for Local Government for approval on 10 February 2021. The exemption allows councils to extend recycling contracts that expire in 2021 to 30 June 2022 and enable the procurement to proceed within the project timeframes.

The Exemption instrument was approved by the Minister for Local Government on 19 May 2021 and submitted to Council.

State-wide Collaborative Procurement of Recycling Processing

In response to the prevalent gaps in the recycling industry, the MWRRG announced that a feasibility study into a collaborative approach to recycling contracts. Collaborative procurement has the potential to facilitate new private investment in the recycling industry and provides an opportunity for all levels of government to work with industry to strengthen the recycling system.

To date, all parties have reviewed and provided comment on a first draft specification and assessment criteria. It is estimated that the timelines for the collaborative procurement process will commence in December 2021.

This timeframe aligns with the Victorian Government’s circular economy policy, Recycling Victoria, which aims to transform recycling in Victoria by 2030. The policy will introduce a Container Deposit Scheme and four-bin kerbside collection service. These changes are reflected in Council’s Rethinking Waste Plan 2021-2030 which proposes to deliver significant changes to the existing residential and commercial kerbside collection services. These matters will influence future recycling contracts and therefore due diligence dictates that the collaborative procurement process be delayed as necessary.

contract performance

The contract has been performing satisfactorily to date and this is reflected by processed tonnages represented in the table below.

Financial Year

2019/20

2020/21

Total

Tonnages

11,0691

19,1272

30,196

1Tonnages for the 2019/20 financial year are for the period December 2019 to June 2020.

2Tonnages for the 2020/21 financial year have been extrapolated to 30 June 2021.

VARIATION AND EXTENSION

Noting that Council has received a Ministerial exemption of Section 186 of the Local Government Act 1989, it is proposed that the contract be extended for a period of twelve months to 30 June 2022 to allow the finalisation of the MWRRG collaborative procurement of recycling contracts. The contractor’s prices have been checked and are considered competitive, and therefore a variation of $1.97 million is required for the additional twelve-month period.

Council will utilise the twelve-month timeframe to:

·          Collaborate with MWRRG and participate in any necessary briefings to finalise the collaborative procurement of recycling contracts;

·          Deliver environmental education programs that deliver operational cost savings by reducing kerbside contamination rates; and

·          Investigate how the introduction of a separate glass recycling service and Container Deposit Scheme will impact the current recycling processes.

Further details of the proposed variation are provided in the confidential attachment.

Financial Implications

Funding for this contract is available in the 2021/22 annual (recurrent) budget for Sustainable Environment – Recycling Sorting and Processing.

Policy strategy and legislation

The objectives of this contract align with national, state and local government policy, strategy and legislation, including:

·    Recycling and Waste Reduction Bill 2020

·    Environmental Protection Act 2018

·    Recycling Victoria (2020)

·    Victorian Single-use Plastics Ban (2023)

·    Whittlesea 2040: A Place for All.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Climate Change - Failure to mitigate or adapt to the risks of climate change

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Landfills pose a risk of increased greenhouse gas emissions via the build-up of methane during the waste decomposition phase.

Organic material, such as tree branches, contributes to the generation of methane gas within a landfill and therefore removal this material reduces the risk of methane gas generation. Furthermore, providing an alternative use of tree branches via composting into a soil product also contributes to reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Sustainable environment

Key Direction                        Leaders in clean, sustainable living

 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Significant changes are set to occur to the kerbside collection services as part of the Victorian Government’s circular economy policy, Recycling Victoria, which aims to transform recycling in Victoria by 2030. These changes will impact future recycling contracts and as a result, the finalisation of the state-wide collaborative procurement process may be delayed as necessary.

A Section 186 exemption to the Local Government Act 1989 was prepared by the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group, on behalf of 40 Victorian councils, to allow an extension of the existing contractual arrangements to 30 June 2022. The Exemption instrument was approved and signed by the Minister for Local Government on 19 May 2021.

Noting that Council received a Ministerial exemption of Section 186 of the Local Government Act 1989, extension of the existing recycling sorting and processing contract for a period of twelve months to 30 June 2021 will ensure that Council maintains best value processing of kerbside recyclable material, whilst allowing provision for Council to be party to state-wide collaborative procurement for these services in the future.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Approve an extension of the contract end date by an additional twelve months, to 30 June 2022 (subject to Ministerial exemption to Section 186 of the Local Government Act 1989).

2.       Note that a Section 186 exemption to the Local Government Act 1989 has been approved by the Minister for Local Government. The Exemption instrument was prepared by the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group on behalf of 40 Victorian councils, to allow an extension of the existing contractual arrangements to 30 June 2022.

 

3.       Note that price variations will be in accordance with the provisions in the Terms and Conditions of the contract.

4.       Approve the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

5.       Note that the City of Whittlesea will participate in the State Government Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group’s Collaborative Procurement of Recycling Contract processes, under the short-term contract arrangements, where this does not preclude Council entering into a separate more beneficial agreement with any party in the future.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Eddy

Seconded:               Chair of Council Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

ITEM 6.4.3 For Noting - Response to Petition for Replacement of Trees Along Fielding Drive, Mernda   

Responsible Officer:           Acting Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Senior Arborist Planning & Risk   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to note the report.

Brief overview

·    Council deferred the above item at its meeting dated 4 May 2021.

·    Council Officers met with the head petitioner and other interested residents on site at a meeting dated 19 May 2021 to discuss their respective concerns and the items raised within the petition.

·    It is proposed to present a subsequent report to the Scheduled Council Meeting dated 3 August 2021.

rationale for recommendation

This report provides an update to Council on the actions of Officers regarding the investigation and allows sufficient time to prepare a report for a future Scheduled Council Meeting.

impacts of recommendation

Resolution of this report allows Officers sufficient time to prepare a report for a future Scheduled Council Meeting.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

The head petitioner has been advised of the Council Meeting date for presentation of revised Council report.

 

Report

Background

Council at its meeting dated 4 May 2021 resolved to:

defer consideration of Item 6.4.1 – Petition to Replace Trees Along Fielding Drive, Mernda to the 1 June 2021 Council Meeting and, in the interim the Director Infrastructure and Environment and other relevant Council Officers meet with the head petitioner and other interested residents on site to discuss their concerns.

This report provides an update to Council on the actions of Officers regarding the investigation and outlines the next steps.

Consultation

Council Officers met with the head petitioner and other interested residents on site at a meeting dated 19 May 2021 to discuss their respective concerns and the items raised within the petition.

Proposal

It is proposed to present a subsequent report to the Scheduled Council Meeting dated 3 August 2021.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Sustainable environment

Key Direction                        Valued natural landscapes and biodiversity

 

Council acknowledges the value of streetscapes in our local community and the contribution of these trees to local amenity, biodiversity and urban shading / cooling.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Council Officers have met with the head petitioner and other interested residents on site, with a subsequent report to be presented at the Scheduled Council Meeting dated 3 August 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to note the report.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:               Chair of Council Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to defer consideration of Item 6.4.3 Petition to replace trees along Fielding Drive, Mernda to the July 2021 meeting and, in the interim, the Director Infrastructure and Environment and other relevant Council Officers meet with the head petitioner and other interested residents on-site to discuss their concerns.

Carried

  

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                    Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

6.5       High Performing Organisation

ITEM 6.5.1 For Decision - Declaration of Rates and Adoption of Annual Budget 2021-22 

Attachments:                        1        Council Budget 2021-22 Advisory Committee Recommendations and Copy of Submissions - Confidential

This attachment has been designated as confidential by the Director Corporate Services, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that relates to trade secrets or, if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. 

Part of the attachment contains tender amounts submitted by tenderers. The release of this information could reasonably be expected to prejudice the commercial position of the persons who supplied the information or to confer a commercial advantage on a third party.   

2        Annual Budget 2021-22

3        Revenue and Rating Plan 2021-2025   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Financial Services   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.   Accept the recommendations of the Council Budget 2021-22 Advisory Committee (the “Committee”) outlined in Attachment 1, following its hearing and consideration of public submissions on the Proposed 2021-22 Annual Budget, noting that the Committee’s recommendations add a net expenditure of $305,650 to the budget.

2.   Accept officer recommendations regarding non-material considerations in the Annual Budget 2021-22 that have the net effect of reducing the cash surplus position by $50,000.

3.   Adopt the Annual Budget 2021-22 (Attachment 2), noting that the Annual Budget 2021-22 has been updated in accordance with 2.

4.   Adopt the 2021-2025 Council Revenue and Rating Plan (Attachment 3).

5.   Declare that the general rate be declared in respect of the 2021-22 financial year.

Brief overview

The purpose of this report is to consider the outcomes from the Council Budget Submissions Advisory Committee Meeting held on 17 May 2021 (Attachment 1) and adopt the Annual Budget 2021-22 (Attachment 2) and Revenue and Rating plan (Attachment 3).

·    Council approved the Proposed Annual Budget 2021-22 for advertising at the Council Meeting held 6 April 2021.  The advertised Proposed Annual Budget 2021-22 provided for a net cash surplus of $355,650.

·    Following the budget submission period (7 April 2021 to 5pm 5 May 2021), seven written submissions were received.

·    The Committee considered all written and oral submissions that were received and has recommended financial support for four submissions totalling $305,650.

·    During the consultation period, further available information concerning some earlier budgetary assumptions have been enhanced.  This has resulted in officers being able to consider and recommend further non-material financial considerations to the Proposed Annual Budget 2021-22 which decreased the cash surplus by $50,000.

If the Committee and Officer recommendations are accepted, Council’s budgeted 2021-22 cash result will be breakeven.

rationale for recommendation

The recommendation is in accordance with the requirement of Section 94 of the Local Government Act 2020.

impacts of recommendation

Council has developed and engaged on the 2021-22 Annual Budget in accordance with the requirements of Section 96 (2) of the Local Government Act 2020.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Financial performance against budget is monitored closely and presented to the Executive Leadership Team and Council on a regular basis. 

 

Report

Introduction

Administrators and officers have worked together over many months in developing the Proposed Budget to ensure it meets the needs and aspirations of our community.

The 2021-22 Annual Budget re-sets Council's priorities, paving the way for our community to recover, restore and revive after the year of uncertainty COVID-19 created. We will continue to deliver more than 100 services and look forward to a full return to face-to-face delivery after a long period of time where many Council services were adapted to an online model. We also look forward to upgrading many of our existing facilities and assets, maintaining and protecting our natural environment and open spaces, and delivering new infrastructure projects that will accommodate our rapidly growing and diverse community.

In 2021-22, Council will spend $305.4 million to deliver community services and invest in essential new infrastructure. This includes a $76.4 million capital works program.

The proposed rate increase is 1.5 per cent, in line with the order by the Minister for Local Government on 22 December 2020 under the Fair Go Rates System. Council did not seek a variation to the rate cap for the 2021-22 year and is very aware of cost pressures on individuals and businesses.

Council and our community continue to experience the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Council will manage its costs to ensure investment in our local community continues.

Our $2 million COVID Community Recovery Fund that was included in the 2020-21 Annual Budget will be allocated to local projects and activities based on community feedback throughout this year. The allocation of this fund for community-driven initiatives that will be rolled-out in 2021-22 will be resolved by Council at the time of the adoption of the Council Plan 2021-2024. 

Council invited written submissions on the Proposed Annual Budget 2021-22.  A total of seven submissions were received during the submission period, which closed on 5 May 2021.

Background

The Annual Budget 2021-22 (Attachment 1) has been prepared on the principles of responsible financial management to achieve an operating surplus that ensures and maintains long term financial sustainability and on a cash basis to deliver a surplus in order to fund new works.

The compilation of the Annual Budget 2021-22 has been challenging in order to deliver services to a growing community, whilst improving organisation efficiencies and business processes. 

Whilst always difficult to raise revenue, especially in times of economic uncertainty, the rate increase proposed is in line with the rate cap set by the State Government and provides for a responsible mix of recurrent and capital budget expenditures.

CHANGES AS A RESULT OF SUBMISSIONS

The Committee considered all submissions that were received and has recommended financial support for four submissions totalling $305,650.

 

The recommended financial support for submissions is as follows:

·    $5,000 for the Epping Wollert Nepalese Community for equipment and to support the short-term sustainability of the group.

·    $62,000 to support the Findon Pony Club’s re-establishment at a new site subject to a review and confirmation of the infrastructure costs.

·    $38,650 for the operation of Ziebell’s Farmhouse noting that this sum will be in addition to the $90,000 in funding already allocated in the 2021-22 Annual Budget. Further an additional allocation of $50,000 for officers, in conjunction with the Friends of Westgarthtown, to undertake a review of site opportunities and governance arrangements for the Ziebell’s Farmhouse and with officers to provide a report to Council in the next 12 months.

·    $150,000 subject to review and confirmation of costs by Council officers for the repairs of Creeds Farm Living and Learning Centre facilities including continency and external project management.

BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS

Some key features of the budget include:

·    Operating revenue of $238.11 million (excluding developer contributions, non-monetary assets and non-recurrent capital grants)

·    Operating expenditure of $229.02 million

·    $12.03 million to provide services, programs and activities and enable older people to live independently in their homes

·    $9.96 million for provision of family and children services

·    $8.63 million for public health services and programs delivered to protect and enhance community health, safety and wellbeing

·    $5.24 million contribution to provide the Regional Library Service

·    $4.41 million for traffic management services, including school crossings and community education programs

·    $1.96 million for supporting local youth services.

Capital works

The budget includes a new capital works budget of $68.39 million and $8.03 million of works carried forward from 2020-21.

Capital Works Program Highlights

Some of the key highlights of the 2021-22 Capital program across Council's districts include:

South West District (Thomastown, Lalor, Epping)

·    $1.89 million pavilion upgrade at HR Uren Reserve including a separate multi-purpose social space to the existing sporting pavilion, which will be available for community use and provide recreational participation opportunities for residents

·    $2.40 million for Whittlesea Public Gardens Master Plan

·    $0.8 million for ongoing implementation of the Epping Recreation Reserve Master Plan

South East District (Mill Park, Bundoora)

·    $2.79 million for upgrade of McLeans Road Kindergarten (demolition of existing building and construction of a new two room kindergarten)

·    $2.74 million for stage 2 redevelopment of Mill Park Basketball Stadium

Central West District (Epping North, Wollert)

·    $3.43 million for construction of a Community Activity Centre – west of Epping Road at Wollert East

Central East District (South Morang, Mernda, Doreen)

·    $2 million for Quarry Hills Regional Park implementation to transform it into a major regional open space facility

·    $1 million for the Findon Road extension - Williamsons road to Danaher Drive connecting Plenty Road in the east to the Hume Freeway in the west. Project is programmed to align with extension of the Mernda Rail Train Line

·    $2.11 million for construction of a Community Activity Centre – Mernda Villages

·    $1 million for the construction of Sackville Street and Bridge Inn Road intersection

·    $0.9 million for sports ground and turf renewal at Laurimar Reserve West oval

Rural North District (Whittlesea Township and Surrounds)

·    $0.9 million to upgrade Whittlesea skate park to include street skate and park elements, new social spaces, a refurbished BMX track and improve accessibility to cater for a broader range of age groups, encourage female participation, and skaters of different abilities, for the growing Whittlesea community

·    $2 million for the reconstruction of Arthurs Creek road at Yan Yean

In addition to the above, the following major projects covering multiple districts are included in the 2021-22 Capital program:

·    $14.87 million for local road restoration and resurfacing

·    $2.30 million for minor planned renewal works

·    $1.50 million for streetlight bulb replacement program

·    $1.45 million for ongoing programs to upgrade playgrounds and general landscape

Waste Charge

The City of Whittlesea introduced a separate waste charge in 2018-19 and this charge will continue in 2021-22.

Council will, for the second consecutive year, absorb most of the rising costs associated with waste collection. The Victorian Government will increase landfill levy costs to Council by more than 60 per cent in 2021-22. Council proposes to increase its waste charge by 1.5 per cent to recover $10 million of the $12.36 million increase this will cost Council, representing a $2.36 million subsidy for the community.

The 2021-2022 proposed waste service charges are:

·    $114.40 per annum for residential and farming properties

·    $175.20 per annum for commercial and industrial properties.

This will bring average rates and charges (general rates plus waste service charge) to $1,862.77 per household, being 1.51 per cent higher than the 2020-21 level of $1,835.10. Note that the waste charge is not subject to rate capping and the general rate amount includes annualised supplementary rates. 

Proposal

It is proposed that Council consider the inclusion of recommendations of the Committee and Officers’ in determining the Annual Budget 2021-22 for adoption.

Consultation

Public notice was given inviting submissions on the Proposed Annual Budget 2021-2022. A total of seven submissions were received and considered by the Committee appointed by Council.

Critical Dates

The process adopted by Council was:

Council approved Proposed Annual Budget 2021-22 for public notice

6 April 2021

Council gave public notice

7 April 2021

Period for lodging submissions closed

5 May 2021

Committee met to consider submissions

17 May 2021

Council meeting to adopt the Annual Budget 2021-22

1 June 2021

SUBMISSIONS ADVISORY COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

The Committee comprising the Chair Ms Lydia Wilson and Administrator Peita Duncan was appointed to hear and consider submissions. The Committee met on 17 May 2021 and gave each submitter the opportunity to be heard in support of their submission.

After hearing from the submitters, the Committee considered each submission and recommended support for four submissions totalling $305,650.

A full summary of the budget submissions and the recommendations of the Committee are included in Attachment 1.

BuDget adjustment recommended by officers

During the consultation period, further information continued to emerge that has enhanced some budgetary assumptions. This has resulted in some further non-material financial changes totalling $50,000 to the Annual Budget 2021-22. 

Financial Implications

In 2021-22 Council will spend $305.4 million to deliver more than 100 community services and invest in essential new infrastructure.

This includes a $76.42 million capital works program, with projects to build and upgrade community centers, sporting facilities, playgrounds, roads, bike paths and footpaths across our new and established areas.

The Committee’s and Officers’ recommendations will add a net cost of $355,650. The cost of these items will be funded from the initial budgeted surplus of $355,650. If the Committee’s and Officers’ recommendations are accepted, Council’s budgeted 2021-22 cash result will be breakeven.

Policy strategy and legislation

Council prepares its Annual Budget under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2020 and the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2020.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Financial Sustainability - Inability to meet current and future expenditure

The budget is the key tool to manage Council’s short-term financial sustainability.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council adopt the Annual Budget 2021-22 noting the changes recommended by the Committee and officers and notify each submitter of Council’s decision.

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolves to:

1.       Accept the recommendations of the Council Annual Budget 2021-22 Advisory Committee (“Committee”) outlined in Attachment 1, having heard and considered public submissions on the Proposed Annual Budget 2021-22, noting that the Committee’s recommendations will add a net cost of $305,650 to the budget.

2.       Notify all submitters that Council has considered their submissions relating to the Proposed Annual Budget 2021-22 and that the submitters be advised of the outcome of the consideration as it relates to their specific submission, and they be thanked for their contributions. 

3.       Accept officer recommendations of non-material financial changes to decrease the cash surplus in the Annual Budget 2021-22 by $50,000.

4.       Adopt the Annual Budget 2021-22 (Attachment 2).

 

5.       Authorise officers to make the following amendments to the Annual Budget 2021-22 in line with the Advisory Committee Recommendations:

a)      Additional operational expenditure of $5,000 to fund a one-off grant to the Epping Wollert Nepalese Community equipment;

b)      Additional operational expenditure of $62,000 in 2021-22 to support the Findon Pony Club’s re-establishment at a new site subject to a review and confirmation of the infrastructure costs;

c)      Additional operational expenditure of $38,650 in 2021-22 for the operation of Ziebell’s Farmhouse noting that this sum will be in addition to the $90,000 funding already allocated in the 2021-22 Annual Budget. Further an additional allocation of $50,000 in 2021-22 for officers, in conjunction with the Friends of Westgarthtown, to undertake a review of site opportunities and governance arrangements for the Ziebell’s Farmhouse, with officers to provide a report to Council in the next 12 months.

d)      Additional operational expenditure of $150,000 in 2021-22 subject to review and confirmation of costs by Council officers for the repairs of Creeds Farm Living and Learning Centre facilities including continency and external project management.

6.       Adopt the 2021-25 Council Revenue and Rating plan (Attachment 3).

7.       Authorises Officers to make copies of the 2021-22 Adopted Budget and 2021-25 Council Revenue and Rating plan available on Council’s website.

8.       Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to give public notice of the decision to adopt the Annual Budget and submit a copy to the Minister for Local Government.

9.       Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to effect administrative and wording changes to the final Annual Budget document that may be required.

10.     Declare that the amount which Council intends to raise by general rates is $164,062,080 and such further amount as lawfully levied as a consequence of this resolution.

11.     Declare that the general rate be declared in respect of the 2021-22 financial year.

12.     Declare that the general rate be raised by the application of differential rates.

13.     Declare that a differential rate be set for rateable land having the respective characteristics specified below, which characteristics will form the criteria for each differential rate so declared:

Farm Land

Any land which is “farm land” within the meaning of section 2(1) of the Valuation of Land Act 1960.

Other Land

 

Any land which is not farm land, including land which is used or adapted to be used primarily for:

a)      residential; or

b)      commercial purposes.

14.     Determine each differential rate by multiplying the Net Annual Value of each rateable land (categorised by the characteristics described in paragraph 13 of this Resolution) by the relevant percentages indicated in the following table:


Category

Percentage

Other Land (including Residential and Commercial Land)

0.05138479

Farm Land

0.03083088

15.     Record that it considers that each differential rate will contribute to the equitable and efficient carrying out of Council functions and that:

a)      The respective objectives of each differential rate be those specified in the Schedule to this Resolution.

b)      The respective types or classes of land which are subject to each differential rate be those defined in the Schedule to this Resolution.

c)      The respective uses and levels of each differential rate in relation to those respective types or classes of land be those described in the Schedule to this Resolution.

d)      The relevant -

i)       uses;

ii)      geographical locations;

iii)     planning scheme zonings of; 

iv)     types of buildings on; and

v)      the respective types or classes of land be those identified in the Schedule to this Resolution.

16.     Confirm that no amount is fixed as the minimum amount payable by way of general rate in respect of each rateable land within the municipal district.

17.     Declare that no incentives be given by Council for the payment of general rates before the dates fixed or specified for their payment under section 167 of the Local Government Act 1989.

18.     Record that:

a)      Council grants to each owner of rateable land which –

 

 

i)       is located within or part within a Green Wedge, Green Wedge A or Rural Conservation Zone within the meaning of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme; and

ii)      is not less than 8 hectares in area or which, when combined with adjacent land in the same ownership, is continuous and not less than 8 hectares in area;  

a rebate (the Sustainable Land Management Rebate).

b)      The Sustainable Land Management Rebate be an amount equal to -

i)       30% of the general rates which would otherwise be payable in respect of rateable land which is 50 hectares or more in area; and

ii)      20% of the general rates which would otherwise be payable in respect of rateable land which is not less than 8 hectares and not equal to or more than 50 hectares in area or which, when combined with adjacent land in the same ownership, is continuous and not less than 8 hectares and not equal to or more than 50 hectares in area.

c)      The Sustainable Land Management Rebate be conditional upon -

i)       the owner of the rateable land (or his or her agent) bi-annually making application for the Sustainable Land Management Rebate to be granted;

ii)      the ability of the owner of the rateable land (or his or her agent) to demonstrate a commitment to maintaining and improving the quality of their land, consistent with the assessment criteria stated in the Sustainable Land Management Rebate Scheme Application Guidelines;

iii)     the owner of the rateable land (or his or her agent) establishing to the satisfaction of Council such plans for land management works, and the carrying out of such land management works over a specified time, as are consistent with the Sustainable Land Management Rebate Scheme Application Guidelines; and

iv)     the application of, and compliance with, the Sustainable Land Management Rebate Scheme Application Guidelines.

d)      The Sustainable Land Management Rebate be granted to -

i)       assist in the proper and sustainable development of the municipal district;

ii)      support and encourage the application of sustainable land management practices;

iii)     preserve places within the municipal district which are of environmental interest;

iv)     preserve, restore and maintain places of environmental importance and value within the municipal district;

v)      improve the productive capacity of rural land; and

vi)     promote the objectives described in the Sustainable Land Management Rebate Scheme Application Guidelines.

19.     Require that the general rates must be paid -

a)      By lump sum payment, made on or before 15 February 2022; or

b)      By four instalments made on or before the following dates:

i)       Instalment 1:      30 September 2021

ii)      Instalment 2:      30 November 2021

iii)     Instalment 3:      28 February 2022

iv)     Instalment 4:      31 May 2022

20.     Confirm that it will, subject to sections 171 and 172 of the Local Government Act 1989, require a person to pay interest on any general rates which -

a)      that person is liable to pay; and

b)      have not been paid by the date specified for payment.

21.     Authorise Council’s Team Leader Revenue Services to levy and recover the general rates in accordance with the schedule in the Local Government Act 1989 as extracted below.

SCHEDULE

Farm Land Objective

To encourage the use (and continued use) of land for agricultural purposes, and ensure that such rateable land makes an equitable financial contribution to the cost of carrying out the functions of Council.  These include the:

1.       implementation of good governance and sound financial stewardship;

2.       construction, renewal, upgrade, expansion and maintenance of infrastructure assets;

3.       development and provision of health, environmental, conservation, leisure, recreation, youth and family and community services;

4.       provision of strategic and, economic management, town planning and general support services; and

5.       promotion of cultural, heritage and tourism aspects of Council’s municipal district.

Types and Classes

Any rateable land which is ‘farm land’ within the meaning of section 2(1) of the Valuation of Land Act 1960.

Use and Level of Differential Rate

This particular differential rate will be used to support farming by providing a discount for Farm Rate properties.

 

The level of the differential rate is the level which Council considers is necessary to achieve the objectives specified above.

Geographic Location

Wherever located within the municipal district.

Use of Land

Any use permitted under the relevant Planning Scheme.

Planning Scheme Zoning

The zoning applicable to each rateable land within this category, as determined by consulting maps referred to in the relevant Planning Scheme.

Types of Buildings

All buildings which are now constructed on the land or which are constructed prior to the expiry of the 2021-22 Financial Year.

Other Land (Including Residential and Commercial Land) Objective

To ensure that such rateable land makes an equitable financial contribution to the cost of carrying out the functions of Council, having regard to the relative benefits derived from the cost of carrying out of such functions.  These functions include the:

1.       implementation of good governance and sound financial stewardship;

2.       construction, renewal, upgrade, expansion and maintenance of infrastructure assets;

3.       development and provision of health, environmental, conservation, leisure, recreation, youth and family and community services;

4.       provision of strategic and, economic management, town planning and general support services; and

5.       promotion of cultural, heritage and tourism aspects of Council’s municipal district.

Types and Classes

Any rateable land which is not Farm Land.

Use and Level of Differential Rate

This particular rate will be used as the default rate that is applicable to the majority of the properties within this municipal district.

The level of the differential rate is the level which Council considers is necessary to achieve the objectives specified above.

Geographic Location

Wherever located within the municipal district.

Use of Land

Any use permitted under the relevant Planning Scheme.

Planning Scheme Zoning

The zoning applicable to each rateable land within this category, as determined by consulting maps referred to in the relevant Planning Scheme.

Types of Buildings

All buildings which are now constructed on the land or which are constructed prior to the expiry of the 2021-22 Financial Year.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Chair of Council Wilson

Seconded:               Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried UNANIMOUSLY

 


UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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UnconfirmedScheduled Council Meeting Minutes                                                                 Tuesday 1 June 2021

 

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