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Agenda

 

OF Scheduled
COUNCIL MEETING

HELD ON

Tuesday 4 May 2021

AT 6.30pm

summons

 

You are advised that a Meeting of Council has been called by the Chief Executive Officer on Tuesday, 4 May 2021 in Council Chamber, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang at 6.30pm for the transaction of the following business.

 

When attending a Council Meeting a condition of entry is to check-in upon arrival.  Staff are available to assist.

 

C LLOYD

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

 

 

ADMINISTRATORS

 

LYDIA WILSON                            CHAIR OF COUNCIL

On 19 June 2020 the Acting Minister for Local Government, Daniel Andrews appointed the Panel of Administrators for the City of Whittlesea and appointed Lydia Wilson as Chair of the Panel.  The Panel of Administrators comprises of Ms Lydia Wilson, The Honourable Bruce Billson and Ms Peita Duncan.  On 3 March 2021, the Hon. Bruce Billson resigned from his position as Administrator with the City of Whittlesea.  The State Government will make a new appointment to the vacant position.  Ms Lydia Wilson and Ms Peita Duncan will continue to undertake the duties of the Council of the City of Whittlesea until the October 2024 Local Government Election.PEITA DUNCAN                           ADMINISTRATOR

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

 

 

SENIOR OFFICERS

 

 

CRAIG LLOYD                              CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

KRISTI HIGH                                EXECUTIVE MANAGER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

FRANK JOYCE                             EXECUTIVE MANAGER GOVERNANCE

KATE MCCAUGHEY                    DIRECTOR COMMUNITY WELLBEING

AMY MONTALTI                           DIRECTOR CORPORATE SERVICES

JUSTIN O’MEARA                        DIRECTOR PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

DEBBIE WOOD                            DIRECTOR INFRASTRUCTURE & ENVIRONMENT

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

 

ORDER OF BUSINESS

 

The Chief Executive Officer submits the following business:

1.           Opening.. 11

1.1        MEETING OPENING AND INTRODUCTIONS.. 11

1.2        ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT. 11

1.3        Present. 11

2.           Apologies.. 11

3.           Declarations of Interest. 11

4.           Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting.. 11

5.           Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters.. 12

5.1        Questions To ADMINISTRATORS.. 12

5.2        Petitions.. 12

Nil Reports.. 12

5.3        Joint Letters.. 12

Nil Reports.. 12

6.           Officer's Reports.. 13

6.1        Connected Communities.. 13

6.1.1      For Noting - CEO Update - 4 May 2021. 13

6.1.2      FOR DECISION - CONTRACT 2020-97 HR UREN EAST PITCH REDEVELOPMENT - SYNTHETIC TURF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCT. 15

6.1.3      For Decision - Contract 2020-141: Management & Operation of TRAC - Tender Evaluation.. 19

6.1.4      For Feedback - City of Whittlesea Community Awards Committee Terms of Reference, proposed Award types, categories and criteria for 2021. 23

6.2        Liveable Neighbourhoods.. 33

Nil Reports.. 33

6.3        Strong Local Economy.. 35

6.3.1      FOR DECISION - 3 YEAR OLD KINDERGARTEN REFORM.. 35

6.4        Sustainable Environment. 65

6.4.1      For Decision - Petition to replace trees along Fielding Drive, Mernda.. 65

6.4.2      For Decision - Contract 2018-23 - Pre-Booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service - Contract Variation Report. 73

6.4.3      For Decision - Contract 2020-111 - Concrete Construction and Reinstatement - Tender Evaluation Report. 79

6.4.4      For Decision - Cooper Street West Resource Recovery Hub - Proposals to Lease.. 85

6.5        High Performing Organisation.. 99

6.5.1      For Noting - Audit & Risk Committee Report on Activity.. 99

6.5.2      For Decision & Noting: Quarterly Corporate Performance Report for quarter ended 31/3/2021. 109

6.5.3      For Decision - Procurement Policy Review... 157

6.5.4      For Decision - Proposed Motions - MAV State Council Meeting.. 185

7.           Notices of Motion.. 189

Nil Reports.. 189

8.           Questions to Officers.. 189

9.           Urgent BusineSS.. 189

10.        Reports from Delegates Appointed BY Council TO Other Bodies.. 191

10.1       For Noting - Informal Meetings of Administrators and Delegate Meetings - 4 May 2021. 191

11.        Confidential Business.. 197

11.1      Connected Communities.. 197

Nil Reports.. 197

11.2      Liveable Neighbourhoods.. 197

Nil Reports.. 197

11.3      Strong Local Economy.. 197

Nil Reports.. 197

11.4      Sustainable Environment. 197

Nil Reports.. 197

11.5      High Performing Organisation.. 197

Nil Reports.. 197

11.6      Notices of Motion.. 197

Nil Reports.. 197

12.        Closure.. 197

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

 

Note:

At the Chair of Council’s discretion, the meeting may be closed to the public in accordance with Section 66(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 2020. The provision which is likely to be relied upon to enable closure is set out in each item. These reports are not available for public distribution.

 

 

Question Time:

During the meeting, the Chief Executive Officer will answer questions from residents and ratepayers. Questions should be submitted in writing no later than 3 hours prior to the advertised commencement time of a scheduled Council Meeting unless this unreasonably prevents or hinders you from participating. A Question Time form can be downloaded from Council’s website and copies of the form are available at the meeting. Refer: https://www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au/about-us/council/council-meetings/

 

Council is committed to ensuring that all residents and ratepayers of the municipality may contribute to Council’s democratic process and therefore, if you have special requirements, please telephone the Governance Team prior to any Council Meeting on 9217 2294.

 

 

Large Attachments:

Where large attachments form part of the Report, due to the size of the attachments – a copy has not been provided in the Agenda document

Copies of these attachments are available for inspection by the public at the following locations:

a)      Council offices at 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang; and

b)      Council’s internet site – http://cam.whittlesea.vic.gov.au/

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

1.         Opening

1.1       MEETING OPENING AND INTRODUCTIONS

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson will open the meeting and introduce the Administrators and Chief Executive Officer:

 

Administrator, Ms Peita Duncan; and

Chief Executive Officer, Mr Craig Lloyd.

 

The Chief Executive Officer, Craig Lloyd will introduce members of the Executive Leadership Team:

 

Executive Manager Public Affairs, Ms Kristi High;

Executive Manager Governance, Mr Frank Joyce;

Director Community Wellbeing, Ms Kate McCaughey;

Director Corporate Services; Ms Amy Montalti;

Director Planning and Development, Mr Justin O’Meara; and

Director Infrastructure and Environment, Ms Debbie Wood.

 

Following the Introductions, the Chief Executive Officer, Craig Lloyd will then read the following prayer:

 

Almighty God, we humbly beseech thee, to vouchsafe thy blessing upon this council.  Direct and prosper its deliberations to the advancement of thy glory and the true welfare of the people of the Whittlesea City Council.

 

Our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive them that trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever.

 

Amen

 

1.2       ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson will read the following Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners Statement.

 

On behalf of the City of Whittlesea I recognise the rich Aboriginal heritage of this country and acknowledge the Wurundjeri Willum Clan as the Traditional Owners of this place.

 

I would also like to personally acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

 

1.3       Present

2.         Apologies

3.         Declarations of Interest

4.         Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting

Ordinary Meeting of Council held 6 April 2021

5.         Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters

5.1       Questions To ADMINISTRATORS

5.2       Petitions

Nil Reports

5.3       Joint Letters

Nil Reports   


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

6.         Officer's Reports

6.1       Connected Communities

6.1.1      For Noting - CEO Update - 4 May 2021  

Responsible Officer:            Chief Executive Officer

Author:                                  Chief Executive Officer   

 

The CEO Update will be provided verbally by the Chief Executive Officer at the 4 May 2021 Council meeting.

Following the meeting, the CEO Update report will be incorporated into the 4 May 2021 Scheduled Council Minutes in order to ensure that it contains the most up to date information regarding the pandemic situation.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.1.2 FOR DECISION - CONTRACT 2020-97 HR UREN EAST PITCH REDEVELOPMENT - SYNTHETIC TURF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCT 

Attachments:                        1       2020-97 Tender Evaluation Summary - Confidential

The attachment contains information designated as confidential by the Director Infrastructure and Environment, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that—  (i) relates to trade secrets; or (ii) if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. The attachment contains tender amounts submitted by tenderers and tender evaluation scoring prepared by Council officers.  It also contains details of credit and reference checks about the tenderers provided to Council in confidence. The release of this information could reasonably be expected to prejudice the commercial position of the persons who supplied the information or to confer a commercial advantage on a third party.    

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Team Leader Public Realm Development   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

It is recommended that Contract Number 2020-97 for HR Uren East Pitch Redevelopment – Synthetic Turf Design and Construct:

·    is awarded to Tuff Group Holdings Pty Ltd

·    for the lump sum price of $1,363,566.40 (excl. GST)

Brief overview

This report summarises the evaluation of the six tender submissions received for the design and construction of the synthetic soccer pitch on the East Pitch at HR Uren Recreation Reserve.

The tender evaluation panel advises that:

·    six tenders were received; and

·    the recommended tender was the highest ranked and is considered best value.

rationale for recommendation

The recommendation of contract award to Tuff Group Holding is proposed as they have submitted the most competitive lump sum price of all submissions received and have also demonstrated they are suitably qualified and experienced to undertake the design and construction works as specified.

impacts of recommendation

Based on the previous design and construct experience of Tuff Group Holdings Pty Ltd and the initial program submitted with the tender document, there is potential for the works to be completed in a shorter timeframe than initially anticipated. This would enable club and community use of the facility earlier than expected.


what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Through the construction process, the management of works and individual processes will be closely monitored, and construction efficiencies maximised where possible to ensure the completed project is returned to the club and community as soon as possible. Whilst construction efficiency will be maximised where possible, the management and monitoring of the works will ensure that the final outcome meets requirements and standards.

 

 

Report

Background

The purpose of this contract is to facilitate the design and construction of a FIFA accredited synthetic soccer pitch at HR Uren Recreation Reserve in Thomastown.  Tenders for the contract closed on 16 December 2020. The tendered prices and a summary of the evaluation are detailed in the confidential attachment.

EVALUATION

No member of the Tender Evaluation Panel declared any conflict of interest in relation to this tender evaluation.

A Tender Probity & Evaluation Plan was designed specifically for this tender process and it was authorised prior to this tender being advertised.  All tenders received were evaluated in accordance with that plan.  The evaluation involved scoring of conforming and competitive tenders according to these pre-determined criteria and weightings:

Criteria

Weighting

Price

50%

Capability

20%

Capacity

20%

Impact

10%

The weightings reflect the relative importance of each element to this particular contract.  They were determined as being most appropriate after considering numerous factors including (but not restricted to) the time, quality, risk and contract management requirements which were likely to have the most impact on the achievement of best value.

Only tenders that were conforming and competitive were fully scored.  Tender submissions that were evaluated as non-conforming or not sufficiently competitive were set aside from further evaluation.  In cases where this occurred the reasons for that outcome are detailed in the confidential attachment.

The evaluation outcome was as follows:

TENDERER

CONFORMING

COMPETITIVE

SCORE

RANK

Tenderer A
Tuff Group Holding Pty Ltd

Yes

Yes

87.2

1

Tenderer B

Yes

Yes

80.0

2

Tenderer C

Yes

Yes

73.9

3

Tenderer D

Yes

Yes

71

4

Tenderer E

Yes

Yes

70.2

5

Tenderer F

Yes

Yes

N/A

N/A

Refer to the confidential attachment for further details of the evaluation of all tenders.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Sufficient funding for this contract is available in the budget for Implementation of Sports field strategy.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Not linked to the risks within the Strategic Risk Register.

Links to WHITTLESEA 2040 AND the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              Connected community

Key Direction               A healthy and safe community

 

Construction of a synthetic turf soccer pitch at HR Uren Recreation Reserve in Thomastown will not only increase usability of the pitch to the resident club by providing greater weekly hours of use and playability in wet weather but will also provide an all-weather facility for use by the surrounding residential catchment for passive and active recreation.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

The tender from Tuff Group Holdings Pty Ltd was determined to be best value and it is

considered that this company can perform the contract to the required standards.

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to:

1.         Accept the tender submitted by Tuff Group Holdings Pty Ltd for the sum of $1,363,566.40 (excluding GST) for the following contract:

Number:    2020-97

Title:          HR Uren East Pitch Redevelopment – Synthetic Turf Design and Construct

subject to the following conditions:

a)    Tenderer to provide proof of currency of insurance cover as required in the tender documents.

b)    Price variations to be in accordance with the provisions as set out in the tender documents.

c)    Tenderer to provide contract security as required in the tender documents.

2.         Approve the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.1.3 For Decision - Contract 2020-141: Management & Operation of TRAC - Tender Evaluation 

Attachments:                        1       Tender Evaluation Summary - Confidential

The attachment contains information designated as confidential by the Director Corporate Services, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that—  (i) relates to trade secrets; or (ii) if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. In particular the report/attachment contains information regarding tender amounts submitted by tenderers and tender evaluation scoring prepared by Council officers.    

Responsible Officer:            Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Procurement   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

It is recommended that contract number 2020-141 for Management & Operation of TRAC:

·    Is awarded to Belgravia Health and Leisure Group Pty Ltd.

·    For the maximum cost to Council of $130,985 (excluding GST) in the first year for a term from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022 with extension options to 30 June 2024.

Brief overview

The tender evaluation panel advises that:

·    Three tenders were received.

The recommended tender was the highest ranked and is considered best value.

rationale for recommendation

The panel has high confidence that the recommended tenderer’s price is realistic and achievable.  The recommended tenderer scored highest overall indicating best value for the price and excellent alignment with Council’s Active Whittlesea 2019-2028 Strategy and Action Plan that guides the planning, provision and promotion of sport, leisure and recreation programs, services and facilities within the City of Whittlesea. 

The recommendation was a unanimous decision.

impacts of recommendation

The appointment of a new service provider will require a transition in on 1 July 2021.  The approximately eight-week lead time is considered sufficient for an effective transition.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

A range of detailed plans have already been presented to the evaluation panel including those related to health and safety, asset management, transition and marketing.  Officers will work closely with the service provider to ensure the plans are implemented as required.

 

Report

Background

The purpose of this contract is to ensure Thomastown Recreation & Aquatic Centre (TRAC) is managed and operated by a highly qualified organisation that can maximise the value of the leisure facility to the community.

Tenders for the contract closed on 16 February 2021.  The tendered prices and a summary of the evaluation are detailed in the confidential attachment.

EVALUATION

No member of the Tender Evaluation Panel declared any conflict of interest in relation to this tender evaluation.

A Tender Probity & Evaluation Plan was designed specifically for this tender process and it was authorised prior to this tender being advertised.  All tenders received were evaluated in accordance with that plan.  The evaluation involved scoring of conforming and competitive tenders according to these pre-determined criteria and weightings:

Criteria

Weighting

Price

30%

Capability

20%

Capacity

25%

Impact

25%

The weightings reflect the relative importance of each element to this particular contract.  They were determined as being most appropriate after considering numerous factors including (but not restricted to) the time, quality, risk and contract management requirements which were likely to have the most impact on the achievement of best value.

Only tenders that were conforming and competitive were fully scored.  Tender submissions that were evaluated as non-conforming or not sufficiently competitive were set aside from further evaluation.  In cases where this occurred the reasons for that outcome are detailed in the confidential attachment.

The evaluation outcome was as follows:

TENDERER

CONFORMING

COMPETITIVE

SCORE

RANK

Tenderer A - Belgravia Health and Leisure Group Pty Ltd

Yes

Yes

93.8

1

Tenderer B

Yes

Yes

88.2

2

Tenderer C

Yes

Yes

68.5

3

Refer to the confidential attachment for further details of the evaluation of all tenders.


 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

To help mitigate risk this contract has been designed to allow for two differing operational results; a ‘best case’ (non-guaranteed) contract sum and ‘worse case’ (guaranteed) contract sum. The recommended tender has submitted a favourable non-guaranteed budget indicating significant profit along with a guaranteed deficit budget of $ -130,985. Regardless of the operational performance, and end of year net result, there is sufficient allocation in Council’s Draft 2021/22 operational budget to manage this contract within the Major Leisure Facilities recurrent operational budgets.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

This tender evaluation identified the most qualified and overall best value tenderer to manage and operate the Thomastown Recreation and Aquatic Centre. This market leader has demonstrated experience and expertise, quality systems and processes, a diversified business portfolio and provided a sustainable financial offer.  These factors ensure that risk is minimised and that service continuity is maximised to enhance community wellbeing.

Links to WHITTLESEA 2040 AND the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              Connected community

Key Direction               A healthy and safe community

 

The outsourcing of management and operation of this leisure facility to a leader in the leisure services sector ensures the highest quality of service provision to the community.  The recommended tenderer has demonstrated its alignment to the three Key Directions set out in Council’s Active Whittlesea Strategy, which includes raising awareness of inclusive participation opportunities through communications and marketing; providing responsive programs and partnerships to generate positive community outcomes; and providing an accessible, safe and inclusive space.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

The tender from Belgravia Health and Leisure Group Pty Ltd was determined to be best value and it is considered that this company can perform the contract to the required standards. 


 

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to:

1.         Accept the tender submitted by Belgravia Health and Leisure Group Pty Ltd for the maximum cost to Council of $130,985 (excluding GST) in the first year for the following contract:

Number:    2020-141

Title:          Management & Operation of Thomastown Recreation & Aquatic Centre

Term:         1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022

Options:    Term extensions up to 30 June 2024 (only to be exercised if separately approved by Council)

subject to the following conditions:

a)    Tenderer to provide proof of currency of insurance cover as required in the tender documents.

b)    Price variations to be in accordance with the provisions as set out in the tender documents.

c)    Tenderer to provide contract security as required in the tender documents.

2.         Note the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.1.4 For Feedback - City of Whittlesea Community Awards Committee Terms of Reference, proposed Award types, categories and criteria for 2021 

Attachments:                        1       Proposed terms of reference

2       Proposed Community Award Categories and Criteria   

Responsible Officer:            Executive Manager Governance

Author:                                  Team Leader Governance Administration   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

·    adopt the proposed Terms of Reference for the Community Awards Committee;

·    commence an Expression of Interest process for vacant Community Representative positions to the Committee;

·    nominate one Administrator Representatives to the Committee; and

·    ratify the Community Award categories and criteria for 2021.

Brief overview

On 7 December 2020, Council resolved to pilot a Whittlesea ‘Community Awards’ initiative in 2021.  This will be an opportunity to celebrate and recognise community members for their outstanding contribution to the local community.

This report proposes a Terms of Reference (TOR) for the Community Awards Committee (the Committee) and Award categories and criteria for the Community Awards in 2021.

rationale for recommendation

Given the COVID normal era that we are entering, this is an opportune time to recognise the outstanding contributions of volunteers and individuals who have made contributions in our community above and beyond the requirements of the individual’s paid work.

impacts of recommendation

The inaugural Whittlesea Community Awards will be implemented to celebrate and recognise outstanding community contribution. All current members of the former Australia Day Awards Committee will be invited to participate on the newly established Community Awards Committee in the current year.  Any vacant community positions will be advertised.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Direct communication will be emailed to all current members of the former Australia Day Awards Committee to inform them of the pilot Community Awards initiative and to invite existing members to participate on the newly established Community Awards Committee in the current year.  Any vacant community positions will be advertised.

Promotion of the Awards will occur to encourage nominations and attendance at the Awards event.

Report

Background

On 7 December 2020, Council resolved to pilot a Whittlesea ‘Community Awards’ initiative in 2021 to celebrate and recognise outstanding community contribution. 

Proposal

That Council consider the proposed terms of reference (TOR) (Attachment 1) and award categories and criteria (Attachment 2) for the proposed Community Awards Committee and respective awards.

COMPOSITION OF THE COMMITTEE

It is proposed that any current members of the former Australia Day Awards Committee be invited to participate on the Community Awards Committee in the current year and for any vacant community positions to be advertised.  In future years, award recipients will be invited to participate on the community as stated in the Terms of Reference.

COMMUNITY AWARD CATEGORIES AND CRITERIA

The following five Award categories are proposed.  Attachment 2 includes proposed criteria for each Award category:

1.   Citizen of the Year (open to all ages)

2.   Access and Inclusion Citizen of the Year (open to all ages)

3.   Senior Citizen of the Year (be over the age of 60 years as at <date of Council resolution where the award types are ratified>)

4.   Young Citizen of the Year (be aged between 14 and 25 years as at <date of Council resolution where the award types are ratified>)

5.   Sustainable Environment Citizen or Group of the Year (open to all ages)

Council may choose to endorse or amend any or all of the categories and criteria proposed.

CONSULTATION

Consultation has been undertaken with relevant officers across the organisation to inform the development of the TOR and Community Award categories and criteria. 

It is recommended that any vacant Community representative positions and the nomination period for the awards be advertised through the engage.whittlesea.vic.gov.au website and through directly contacting community organisations and advisory committees.

Critical Dates

If Council endorses the Community Award Committee TOR and the Award Categories and Criteria at the Council Meeting on 4 May 2021 the following timeline is proposed:

Tuesday 11 May 2021

Invite members of the former Australia Day Awards Committee to participate on the Community Awards Committee in the current year

Tuesday 18 May 2021

Advertise any vacant Community member positions

Thursday 17 June 2021

Close of nominations for vacant Community member positions

Tuesday 6 July 2021

Council considers Community Representative appointments to Committee

Monday 19 July 2021

First meeting of the Committee

Tuesday 27 July 2021

Open Award Nomination Period

Monday 27 September 2021

Close Award Nomination Period

TBA October 2021

Confidential meeting of Committee held to determine Award recipients

TBA October 2021

Hold Award Ceremony in conjunction with a Community Event and/or Citizenship Ceremony

Financial Implications

Costs for the awards ceremony will be funded through Council’s event budgets.

Policy strategy and legislation

City of Whittlesea linkages include Whittlesea 2040: A Place for All, Council Plan 2017-2021, the Community Building Strategy and the A Voice for All: Community Engagement Policy 2021.

State Government policy linkages include the Victorian Government’s COVID-19 Victoria’s roadmap for reopening.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

The purpose of the Community awards is to recognise the outstanding contributions of individuals for work to support the local community.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A participating community

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The inaugural Community Awards will be a great opportunity to celebrate and recognise significant positive contributions by community members.

The proposed Community Awards Committee Terms of Reference and Award categories and criteria have been developed for Council consideration and endorsement.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the terms of reference of the Community Awards Committee;

2.       Nominate one Administrator Representative to the Committee, Administrator _________;

3.       Seek expressions of interest from the public to fill any vacant community representative positions commencing on 18 May and closing at 5pm on 17 June 2021;

4.       Ratify the Community Award Categories and Criteria; and

5.       Consider Community Representative appointments to the Community Awards Committee at the scheduled Council meeting on Tuesday 6 July 2021.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

6.2       Liveable Neighbourhoods

Nil Reports


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

6.3       Strong Local Economy

ITEM 6.3.1      FOR DECISION - 3 YEAR OLD KINDERGARTEN REFORM 

Attachments:                        1       Kindergarten Infrastructure & Service Plan (KISP) - Confidential

The attachment contains information designated as confidential by the Director Community Wellbeing, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to Council business information, being information that would prejudice the Council's position in commercial negotiations if prematurely released. The attachment contains information shared with Council by the Department of Employment, Education and Training (DET) on the basis that it is ‘confidential and not for circulation’ so that Council can assess its content. It is not in the public interest for Council to publish this information as it will compromise Council’s relationship and ability to negotiate with DET. Once finalised, DET will publish the information on their website.  

2       Proposed demand management projects arising from the draft KISP - Confidential

The attachment contains information designated as confidential by the Director Community Wellbeing, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to Council business information, being information that would prejudice the Council's position in commercial negotiations if prematurely released. The attachment contains information shared with Council by the Department of Employment, Education and Training (DET) on the basis that it is ‘confidential and not for circulation’ so that Council can assess its content.  It is not in the public interest for Council to publish this information as it will compromise Council’s relationship and ability to negotiate with DET.  Once finalised, DET will publish the information on their website.  

3       Two years of quality kindergarten: What does the evidence say?

4       KISP Methodology

5       Council current roles

6       Whittlesea 2040 Principles

7       Building Blocks: Capacity Building Stream Overview

8       Early childhood services in City of Whittlesea - Map   

Responsible Officer:            Director Community Wellbeing

Author:                                  Director Community Wellbeing   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

·      Note the Kindergarten Infrastructure and Services Plan (KISP) (Attachment One) and that it will be jointly signed by the City of Whittlesea (Council) Chief Executive Officer and the Department of Education and Training (DET). DET has requested the KISP remain confidential until such time as it has been signed by both organisations and published on DET’s website.

·      Note Council will undertake additional research and prepare a Kindergarten Reform Options Paper (Options Paper) which includes an analysis of demand implications on Council’s future potential roles and responsibilities; as well as associated operational and capital costs over the next 10 years.

·      Note a report will be presented to Council for consideration by no later than October 2021 which includes the Options Paper and a set of associated recommendations to inform a Building Blocks Partnership Agreement between Council and DET.

·    Endorse a set of key projects as described in (Attachment Two) to ensure demand for three and four-year-old kindergarten is met over the next 18-24 months.  

·    Note advocacy opportunities to address the local impacts of this reform will be considered as part of Council’s advocacy agenda, including:

the gap between infrastructure funding and the actual reasonable cost of establishing and maintaining facilities;

the limitations of existing Precinct Structure Plans and Development Contribution Plans; and

enhancing resourcing of local investment in change management.  Whilst DET is investing in change management, this is only effective and sustainable when complimented by local stakeholders such as councils.

·    Note Council anticipate interest from families and early years stakeholders and will continue engagement regarding the KISP and three-year-old kindergarten reform.

Brief overview

In 2019, the Victorian Government announced it would roll out universal access to three-year-old kindergarten and has committed $5 billion over ten years to this Reform (the Reform). 

The Reform proposes that from 2022, all three-year-olds will have access to five hours of kindergarten per week, rising to 15 hours by 2029; and is forecast to double the number of children receiving kindergarten with major impacts on service providers, workforce and infrastructure.

In mid-March 2020, the Victorian Government launched the Building Blocks Infrastructure Strategy – a new, comprehensive approach to supporting and co-investing in the kindergarten infrastructure needed across Victoria to meet the demand created by the introduction of three-year-old kindergarten.

The Building Blocks Infrastructure Strategy is a new approach to information sharing, collaboration and coordination through the development of a municipal level Kindergarten Infrastructure & Services Plan (KISP). The KISP is not a funding document nor does it commit either party to funding specific projects. Whittlesea’s KISP has been produced in collaboration with the Victorian Government (DET) and requires sign off by the CEO. Using SA2 locality framework, Whittlesea’s KISP forecasts significant unmet demand in some parts of the municipality.

The unmet demand figures are an aggregate of both sessional kindergartens, (planned for through Council) and integrated kindergarten in long day care (provided by the private sector) for the year 2029 at the end of the reform rollout period.

Council currently supports kindergarten by owning and leasing 37 kindergarten facilities and has commitments to develop additional facilities in line with growth in the four-year-old population. With three-year-old kindergarten reform, it is necessary to review all aspects of Council’s role in kindergarten in order to optimise outcomes for kindergarten families and other residents in line with Whittlesea 2040: A Place for All (W2040).

A Kindergarten Reform Project Board has been established to guide Council’s response to this reform and guide development of the proposed Options Paper.

rationale for recommendation

Three-year-old reform presents great opportunities to address systemic disadvantage in Whittlesea over the next decade. Council’s role to date means it is well positioned to play a significant role in achieving community outcomes and benefits. However, the scale and resources required are considerable and Council will need to carefully address its’ operational and financial capacity to ensure that its commitment is sustainable in the long term.

A Whittlesea Kindergarten Reform Options Paper (Options Paper) will inform Council’s future role in kindergarten and will enable a careful assessment of how Council can best respond to kindergarten reform and continue to make a balanced response within the context of delivering the Whittlesea 2040 community vision.

A number of projects have been identified to enable Council and partners meet demand required for four and three-year-old kindergarten in 2022 and 2023. These projects are summarised in (Attachment Two); are aligned to the KISP process; and involve yet to be finalised agreements with external parties. Council will make this information publicly available as soon as DET has advised Council is able to do so.

impacts of recommendation

These recommendations will optimise local access to kindergarten, with an emphasis on supporting our most vulnerable families whilst balancing Council’s investment against other W2040 priorities.  Failure to review current role and practice will see Council’s budget and new works programs distorted by this externally driven reform and may put vulnerable families at risk of missing out on a vital universal service.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

A Kindergarten Reform Project Board has been established to oversee Council’s response to this reform.  The group includes the CEO, Director Community Wellbeing, Manager Family and Children, Manager Strategic Projects, and will oversee a principles-based review of existing and future roles in kindergarten provision. Recommendations will be available by October 2021 in order to inform the 2022/2023 planning and budgeting cycle.

 

Report

Background

Kindergarten Reform Rationale

Evidence shows that investment in early childhood education results in significant social and economic benefits. Two years of kindergarten has an even stronger positive effect on children from disadvantaged backgrounds. For every dollar invested in early years education, Australia receives two dollars of benefit over the life course. [See Attachment Three: ‘Two Years of Quality Kindergarten: What does the evidence say?’]

In 2013, the Federal Government committed to increase universal access to four-year-old kindergarten from 10-15 hours until the end of 2019. It then extended the commitment until end of 2021 and is expected to extend their commitment beyond this date.

In 2019, the Victorian Government committed to provide every child with access to at least five hours of funded three-year-old kindergarten by 2022, progressively scaled up to 15 hours per week by 2029. From the start of 2022, all three-year-olds will have access to 5 hours per week rising to 15 hours by 2029. The roll-out is backed up by an investment of $5 billion over ten years.

These two major reforms have been accompanied by other reforms including:

·    2014: the requirement to have an early childhood teacher [equivalent to primary teaching qualification]; and

·    2016: the staff child ratio changed from 1:15 to 1:11 which triggered a need to expand capacity of existing kindergarten rooms from 30 to 33 children to optimise service viability.

These reforms have had, and continue to have, major impacts on service providers, workforce and infrastructure across the entire sector.

The impacts are magnified in growth areas where legislative frameworks for long term planning for kindergarten provision predate these reforms and are only based on growth in four-year-old populations.

This has led to prioritising kindergarten infrastructure and service provision in growth areas, impacting provision of other services in growth areas during the critical establishment phase when residents in these new communities are most vulnerable. For example, the Precinct Structure Plans and Developer Contribution Plans in growth areas are based on 15 hours of four-year-old kindergarten meaning insufficient land and development contributions are available to respond to three-year-old reform.

Three-Year-Old Kindergarten reform strategies

DET has three major strategies to achieve three-year-old kindergarten reform as outlined in Table One overleaf.

 


 

Table 1: Three Key Kindergarten Reform Strategies

Reform Strategy

Details

Change Management

·    Optimise existing licensed capacity including maximising unused places, adding additional groups, restructuring timetables, mixed-age groups and rotational timetable models.

·    Estimates indicate that by optimising timetabling, 30% more children can be accommodated within existing facilities in Whittlesea, reducing the number of additional rooms which will be required.

Workforce

·    Significant workforce development, attraction and retention.  The sector competes with primary schools for staff and there will be challenges in balancing availability of quality staff across the two sectors.

Building Blocks Infrastructure Strategy [including Kindergartens on School Sites (KOSS)]

·    Mid-March 2020, the Victorian Government launched the Building Blocks Infrastructure Strategy – a new, comprehensive approach to supporting and co-investing in the kindergarten infrastructure needed across Victoria to meet the demand created by the introduction of three-year-old kindergarten (Attachment Seven).

·    Includes significantly increased capital grant funding ($1.6 billion over ten years), strengthened partnerships with local Councils and early years providers, a single streamlined grants program, and the construction and delivery of new Kindergartens On (or next to) School Sites (KOSS).

·    The Victorian School Building Authority (VSBA) has committed to maximise the provision of new kindergarten rooms on State primary school sites (existing and new schools) wherever there is forecast demand for additional kindergarten rooms.

 

Building Blocks Infrastructure Strategy and Kindergarten Infrastructure and Services Plans

Development of municipal KISPs are a key component of the Victorian Government’s Building Blocks Infrastructure Strategy:

·    Are an agreement between DET and each Victorian local government area on agreed capacity and forecast kindergarten demand (all 79 local governments are required to develop a KISP);

·    Identifies data to inform projected population growth and kindergarten infrastructure capacity;

·    Are executed at officer level by Council’s Chief Executive Officer; and

·    Are designed to foster a new approach to information sharing, collaboration and coordination at a municipal level.

The KISP is not a funding document nor does it commit either party to funding specific projects.

However, future investment requests through Building Blocks will align with the KISP and guide Council and DET decisions.  DET have advised that in recognition of the Reform and impact on local government resources, DET grant programs will no longer be a competitive process; with the aim to make grant funding more certain.

Council’s KISP (Attachment One) has been developed and requires immediate CEO signoff. Upon signoff, it will be made publicly available to ensure a transparent and collaborative approach across the market. The KISP will be reviewed in two years’ time in line with emerging new data. Attachment Four summarises the methodology used to develop the KISP including how local data was incorporated and used to forecast unmet demand.

Kindergarten delivery models

In Victoria, local governments as well as the not for profit sector have historically been major contributors to kindergarten provision; and play a key role in planning and delivery of sessional kindergarten infrastructure and local sector development.  Sessional kindergarten programs are the lowest cost option for families funded by the State Government in a not-for profit model.  Local governments’ role can include; provision of infrastructure; direct delivery of services; as well as a range of partners, sector development and coordination roles.  There is wide variation and approaches across Victorian local government.

Long day care providers are also major stakeholders in kindergarten provision via ‘integrated’ kindergarten embedded in the program.  Long day care (subsidised by the Federal Government in a for-profit model) is provided by a range of entities from small stand-alone services operated by community committees of management of NGO operators (local and nation-wide organisations) and for-profit providers which are often commercial chains.  Integrated kindergarten is typically more expensive than sessional kindergarten but is chosen by families where it meets both their childcare needs and their child’s developmental needs.  In growth areas, the role potentially played by long day care providers (in meeting three-year-old reform) is diminished by the challenges these providers experience in establishing viable services during the early development phase of new suburbs.

Kindergarten infrastructure and service operational costs can be contributed to by both the Federal and State Governments, however, typically the actual cost of provision has exceeded these grants and kindergarten providers (both service deliverers and asset owners) have had to fund the difference through fees and other revenue or through access to subsidised infrastructure.

This presents both a challenging environment for all stakeholders in kindergarten but also some opportunities for Local Government to review and realign their roles in kindergarten provision.

The City of Whittlesea’s current role in local kindergarten delivery

Information on Council’s current role in the provision of local kindergarten services is provided in Attachment Five and includes:

·    Infrastructure planning and delivery

·    Administration of the Kindergarten Central Application Scheme (KCAS)

·    Service system and workforce development

·    Facility leasing, ownership and maintenance

·    Change management, partnership and engagement

Council currently owns 37 facilities (due to increase to 39 in 2022). These facilities are leased to a range of not for profit service providers for $138 per room per annum who deliver ‘sessional’ kindergarten.  Sessional kindergarten programs are the lowest cost option for families (funded by the State Government in a not for profit model), with Council placing a priority on low lease costs for its providers so that fees are kept low.  In Whittlesea, some 86.1% of funded kindergarten hours are delivered in ‘sessional’ settings.  A breakdown of management arrangements at the 37 Council owned facilities includes;

·    Committees of management (38%)

·    Early Years Managers (46%)

·    Not-for-profit organisations (8%)

·    Schools (8%)

Sessional Kindergarten in the City of Whittlesea

On average, 78% of Whittlesea’s four-year-olds attend sessional kindergarten, compared to an average of 61% in DET North Western Victoria region (2018 data). This model ensures services remain accessible and affordable for those most vulnerable and children who are prioritised to attend at no cost.  In 2020, 48% of the 2,541 children enrolled in sessional kindergarten in Whittlesea, were identified as vulnerable and attended at no costs. 

Historically, 27% of Whittlesea’s three-year old’s have attended an unfunded three-year-old kindergarten program.  Kindergarten providers have offered this program, at cost, in response to identified need and /or DET capital grant requirements. 

Figure One below illustrates trends in four-year-old enrolments in sessional vs. funded kindergarten places in long day care in Whittlesea over a four-year period for which data is available.

Figure One: Funded kindergarten places

Using DET 2019 available data, of the 3,663 four-year-olds in Whittlesea, 3,281 children accessed funded kindergarten places equating to 89.6%.

Unmet Demand and Vulnerability in Whittlesea

The evidence supporting the benefits of two years of kindergarten notes that vulnerable children particularly benefit from quality programs, especially where there are additional supports available.  Whilst vulnerability measures are complex and multi-factored, at an SA2 level, there is a fairly strong correlation between kindergarten families with concession cards and vulnerability.

In order to reduce barriers to participation, concession card holders are eligible for ‘free’ kindergarten.  This means these families typically choose sessional kindergarten, because accessing integrated kindergarten in long day care incurs other fees.

At an SA2 level, the number of families with concession cards can service as a useful indicator of localities where families will continue to prioritise sessional kindergarten and localities where Council may need to prioritise its investment to support W2040 outcomes.


 

Figure Two below shows the percentage of children with concession cards enrolled in Council’s Kindergarten Central Application Scheme and attending 4-year-old sessional kindergarten. In this figure ‘Whittlesea’ is inclusive of the township and rural surrounds. The Donnybrook locality is not currently included in central application data as there aren’t currently any kindergartens which are confirmed to be operating within the application timelines.

Across almost all localities in the municipality, the proportion of concession card holders is growing over time.  This data points towards an ongoing trend of increasing vulnerability in the community and suggests the preference toward sessional kindergarten will continue.

The high kindergarten participation rates, and the rate of sessional kindergarten are both significant underlying strengths for the community.  This means that all but a few local children are arriving at school age with many of the lifelong benefits of kindergarten already established. Given the systemic ability of early years education to affect positive outcomes, it also means the importance of this Reform is of particular note for Whittlesea (i.e. is likely to drive significant positive outcomes in light of vulnerability described in Figure Two below).

These high rates also require more kindergarten infrastructure per head of population than is typically required in other municipalities; this has also been reflected in Council’s KISP.

Figure Two: Concession card holders (City of Whittlesea Preschool Xpedite)

 

Whittlesea KISP

The Whittlesea KISP identifies unmet need in some Statistical Area (SA) 2’s. Although it is expected that the long day care sector will be able to slightly increase provision of kindergarten places, DET is committed to delivering KOSS’s as a new strategy to mitigate any infrastructure shortages.

The KOSS strategy allows provision of fast tracked, prefabricated modular two room kindergarten facilities, the majority of which are funded by DET/VSBA in terms of initial construction / fabrication. If Councils choose to participate then under this model for each two-room modular unit on a school site, they may be:

·    Required to pay an initial $400,000 contribution to offset the actual costs of establishing the facility (such as furniture, fixtures and equipment).

·    Responsible for the ongoing costs of building maintenance for these additional facilities and other operational costs.

·    Required to enter into a long-term lease for the site/facility (sometimes different entities).

·    Responsible for the engagement of a not for profit kindergarten provider and inclusion on Council’s Kindergarten Central Application Scheme.

This strategy will allow provision of fast tracked, prefabricated modular two room kindergarten facilities at a substantially reduced cost to Councils.

These proposed projects illustrate the priority that DET and VSBA are placing on KISP data and encourage community outcomes through collaboration.

Council already has several successful kindergartens on or next to school site models which provide useful models to inform planning including: Spring Street Kindergarten, Hazel Glen Kindergarten, Epping Views Kindergarten and The Stables Kindergarten.

City of Whittlesea – Projects to meet short term kindergarten demand

A number of projects have been identified to enable Council and partners meet demand required for four and three year old kindergarten in 2022 and 2023. These projects are summarised in Attachment Two (confidential); are aligned to the KISP process; and involve yet to be finalised agreements with external parties. Council will make this information publicly available as soon as DET has published the KISP on its website and / or respective funding announcements have been made by the Minister. This report seeks in-principle support from Council to progress these initiatives.

Building Blocks Partnership Agreement

Given Council’s KISP identifies areas of kindergarten demand that will require additional infrastructure in order to be met, Council has been invited by DET to discuss development of a 'Building Blocks Partnership Agreement’ (Partnership Agreement). This process will commence once the KISP has been signed and will provide greater certainty in funding, planning and implementation of new infrastructure.

The Partnership Agreement will be a long‑term, in‑principle agreement between DET and Council which articulates co-investment in multi-site 'project pipelines'. It will build capacity to accommodate three and four-year-old kindergarten, through multiple projects over several years, under agreed funding parameters.

It may also be possible to leverage off this agreement and incorporate other agreed actions that may broaden the collaboration to maximising the local implementation of service change management and other aspects of the reform rollout and thus optimise Council’s flexibility to allocate resources to achieve the W2040 vision.

It is anticipated the Partnership Agreement’s development will be informed by:

·    Discussion between Council, DET and VSBA at both executive and officer level.

·    Further analysis and research to understand:

Community benefits and how this reform may support improved outcomes – particularly for vulnerable families;

Opportunity cost (what it can/ can’t do as a result of committing to kindergarten reform);

Potential impact of reform activity on Council financial and operational capacity.

Proposal

In the context of this current kindergarten reform, and evolving Federal and State Government funding arrangements, Council has a significant opportunity to undertake important research to inform future decision making about its role in the reform rollout. 

Our future role will need to balance equitable access to this universal service with the broader needs and expectations of the community as expressed in Whittlesea 2040.

To this end, Council will undertake additional research and prepare a Whittlesea Kindergarten Reform Options Paper which includes an analysis of demand implications on Council’s future potential roles and responsibilities; as well as associated operational and capital costs over the next 10 years.

As Council considers its future role in kindergarten provision, it will also be required to continue its current commitment to developing kindergarten infrastructure in line with existing growth area Precinct Structure Plans and the currently endorsed Established Areas Infrastructure Plan.  This commitment is expressed in the 4/15 New Works Program and annual budgets.

 

Table 5: Three-Year-Old Kindergarten Reform Rollout Action Plan

Item/Action

Details

Who

Timelines

KISP

·    Execute the KISP agreement between DET and Council.

·     Inform community about the KISP once the report has been published on DET’s website.

CEO (following presentation to Council for noting)

April 2021

 

Proposed ‘demand management’ projects

·    Progress projects to meet demand in next 18-24 months as outlined in Attachment Two (confidential).

·    Release information about these projects publicly available once DET has advised Council is able to do so.

In-principle Council endorsement sought (this report).

Further reports will be provided as projects evolve.

If endorsed, services would be required to open by 2022 and 2023 to meet forecast demand.

Kindergarten Reform Options Paper

Preparation of an Options Paper which includes:

·    Further analysis of demand implications on current Council’s existing provision model;

·    Identifying options for Council’s future role in the three-year-old kindergarten rollout;

·    Identifying operational and capital costs over the next 10 years associated with each option;

·    Benchmarking against other LGAs;

·    Consideration and assessment of options using Whittlesea 2040 principles as described on page 20 and summarised in Attachment Six.

·    Exploration of key issues and opportunities.

Options will also explore:

·    Working in partnership with early years providers to implement change management strategies and maximise existing infrastructure;

·    Maximising DET owned kindergarten rooms developed on ‘school sites;

·    Examining opportunities to increase access to integrated kindergarten (i.e. long day care).

Kindergarten Reform Project Board

By September 2021

Building Blocks Partnership Agreement

Develop the Building Blocks Partnership Agreement.

 

Kindergarten Reform Project Board

Presented to Council for endorsement prior to signing.

 

By October 2021

Advocacy

·    As part of Council advocacy agenda, identify potential issues with relevant Victorian Government representatives to support a sustainable approach to the implementation of kindergarten reform in City of Whittlesea

Council

Ongoing

Consultation

This report has been informed by ongoing consultation with DET and related authorities in developing the KISP which has enabled important local data to be incorporated into the forecasts rather than more generic modelling.

Council’s Early Years team has:

·    Engaged in ongoing consultation and collaboration with local kindergarten providers resulting in the report recommendations being grounded in a deep understanding of the issues and opportunities service providers have in response to these reforms.

·    Surveyed families regarding their kindergarten intentions and preferences which points to a continued local bias toward sessional kindergarten.

·    Engaged with and surveyed some local long day care providers which gives some insights into the issues and opportunities these service providers have in response to kindergarten reform.

·    Continued to collaborate with the infrastructure planning and new works program teams to optimise delivery of kindergarten infrastructure considering rapidly changing demand.


 

Note Council anticipate interest from families and early years stakeholders following release of the KISP by DET; and will continue engagement regarding the KISP and three year old kindergarten reform. It is anticipated the Options Paper will involve community engagement to understand the impacts of various potential future options. 

Critical Dates

Date

Activity

April - May 2021

·    Execution of KISP

·    Note: not all Victorian local governments have executed their KISP, but this step will inform future planning

September – October 2021

·    Kindergarten Reform Options Paper completed.

·    Options Paper and draft Building Blocks Partnership Agreement presented to Council for endorsement

October 2021

·    Building Blocks Partnership Agreement signed

January 2022

·    Five hours per week of universal 3-year-old funded kindergarten commences

·    1 x potential proposed ‘demand management’ project site opens (subject to further negotiation and agreement with external parties).

January 2023

·    5-15 hours per week of universal 3-year-old funded kindergarten commences

·    2 x potential proposed ‘demand management’ project sites open (subject to further negotiation and agreement with external parties).

January 2029

·    15 hours per week of universal 3-year-old funded kindergarten commences

Table 3: Critical Dates

Financial Implications

The KISP is not a funding document nor does it commit either party to funding specific projects.

Infrastructure delivery financial implications will be determined through the Building Blocks Partnership Agreement and proposed Kindergarten Reform Options Paper (which will also have regard to financial sustainability).

Existing financial commitments to kindergarten provision, including infrastructure development, are managed within existing budgets and the 4/15 New Works Program. The emerging projects to meet short term demand summarised in Attachment Two (confidential), with a preliminary estimate of likely capital contributions projects summarised in Table 4 below. These figures exclude operational costs and also any potential leasing costs (under negotiation).

 

Proposed ‘demand management’ project

Potential capital contribution

(All figures estimates)

Total

Comment

External funding source

Council

$5.1M

Project #1

$1.8M

$100k (Fit out)

$1.9M

 

Council contribution funded from Council’s Furniture, Fittings and Equipment (FFE) budget. These figures exclude facility maintenance.

Project #2

$1.9 M+ (tbc)

$150k (Fit out)

$1.9M (tbc)

Council contribution to be confirmed.

Project #3

(Council owned Laurel Street Whittlesea)

Up to $600k

$1.3M

$1.3M

Council contribution funded from 21/22 FY of the 4/15 New Works Program

 

Table 4: Summary of capital contributions for key proposed ‘demand management’ projects

The long-term operational impact of a larger number of children accessing kindergarten services and an expanded infrastructure profile has yet to be calculated and will be developed in the Options Paper.

Whilst further analysis is required through the Options Paper, it is anticipated that the service and funding gaps required of Council will be considerable and has the potential to effect universal access to two years of kindergarten for young residents and families. Hence even with recent enhancements to kindergarten infrastructure funding, Whittlesea needs the Victorian Government to address the local impacts of its reform, including:

·    The gap between infrastructure funding and the actual reasonable cost of establishing and maintaining facilities;

·    The limitations of existing Precinct Structure Plans and Development Contribution Plans;

·    Enhanced resourcing of local investment in change management.  Whilst DET is investing heavily in change management, their investment is only effective and sustainable when local stakeholders such as Councils can complement this effort.

Policy strategy and legislation

Victorian Government:

State Budget 2019/20, Strategy and Outlook, Paper No. 2, announced the commitment to three-year-old kindergarten as part of their ‘World Class Education System’

Building Blocks Infrastructure Strategy 2020

Education State Early Childhood Reform Plan, 2017 and Roadmap to Reform, 2016 (although these reforms pre-date the introduction of three-year-old kindergarten, they outline the Victorian Government’s vision for the early years)

Precinct Structure Plans

·    Council:

Community Building Strategy

Established Areas Infrastructure Plan

Early Years Policy

Thriving Children, Young People and Families Strategy. 

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Financial Sustainability - Inability to meet current and future expenditure

Whilst further analysis is required, Council anticipates continuing the current approach to kindergarten infrastructure provision in the context of three-year-old kindergarten Reform through to 2029 will impact upon its’ financial sustainability. The Options Paper addressing Council’s future role in kindergarten will make recommendations to ensure the future role is sustainable and optimise community outcomes.  In the interim, given the momentum and reputational impact of insufficient kindergarten provision, it is proposed that Council continues to progress key proposed ‘demand management’ projects summarised in Attachment Two.

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Council was already stretched by the challenge of maintaining access to 15 hours of kindergarten for the rapidly growing local population of four-year-olds. This externally driven reform will result in a doubling of the number of children receiving kindergarten by 2029 on top of growth and demand projections based on four-year-old population.  Whilst DET has a multi-faceted strategy to support kindergarten providers to optimise service delivery and develop additional infrastructure it is not feasible for growth municipalities to achieve universal access to kindergarten with the current outdated planning tools and frameworks which pre-date the current Reform.

The Options Paper will make recommendations to ensure its future role is sustainable and delivers local access to this universal service. 

Strategic Risk Life Cycle Asset Management - Failure to effectively plan for the construction, on-going maintenance and renewal of Council’s assets  

Council already owns and maintains 37 kindergarten facilities, and some are at the end of their effective life or no longer meet current service requirements – for instance, many older rooms only accommodate 30 children and current funding is optimal for 33 children per room.  The need to maintain these assets was addressed by the adoption of the Established Areas Infrastructure Plan in 2017 which ensures existing infrastructure will be progressively maintained and refurbished.  As this plan pre-dates the roll out of three year old reform, individual project scopes are being reassessed on a case by case basis to identify whether there is an opportunity to explore the extent to which additional capacity can be offset by DET/VSBA’s enhanced capital grants.

The Options Paper will make recommendations to ensure future asset management decisions deliver long term local access to this universal service. 

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

Council’s response to kindergarten reform will impact on all families with young children and there may be an opportunity cost analysis associated with future models. In most municipalities, the local Council is the backbone of access to sessional kindergarten and bears the brunt of the community’s expectation that they will have local access to kindergarten for their children. Therefore, community engagement will need to occur to understand the impacts of various potential future roles.  The Options Paper will undertake appropriate engagement and consultations to inform recommendations.

It is also essential that Council maintain an effective and collaborative relationship with DET and other relevant agencies at political, executive and officer level in order to get the best community outcome as these agencies implement the three-year-old reform.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Strong local economy

Key Direction                        Education opportunities for all

 

There is clear national and international evidence that two years of kindergarten delivered by qualified teachers deliver lifelong benefits to the child and the community.  As detailed in Attachment Three, it has been estimated that for every dollar invested in kindergarten, the community receives a lifelong benefit of two dollars.

This compelling evidence of benefit needs to be balanced against whose role it is to invest in these outcomes and the capacity of the various contributors to contribute.  Local governments in Victoria have traditionally invested heavily in kindergarten provision and infrastructure but growth Councils cannot subsidise access to the significant expansion of this universal service.

Under the Community Vision – W2040 – A place for all, Council’s choices in responding to kindergarten reform needs to balance all the other needs and opportunities within the community.

Therefore, the proposal to undertake a principle-based review of Council’s current and future role in kindergarten will enable a careful assessment of how Council can best respond to kindergarten reform and continue to make a balanced response to delivering the community vision.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Three-year-old Reform presents a significant opportunity to address systemic disadvantage in Whittlesea over the next decade. Council’s role to date means it is well positioned to play a significant role in achieving community outcomes and benefits. However, the scale and resources required are considerable and Council will need to carefully address its operational and financial capacity to ensure that this commitment is sustainable in the long term.

In addition, DET and Council has undertaken significant research to prepare the KISP which is presented to Council for noting and execution by Council’s CEO.

The next 6 months will be critical for Council to review its current and future role in response to these reforms. Whilst three-year-old kindergarten reform was initially announced in early 2019, the release of the Building Blocks Infrastructure Strategy in March 2020 has provided additional details about how aspects of the Reform will be implemented between now and 2029. The Options Paper will inform Council’s future role in kindergarten, will enable a careful assessment of how Council can best respond to kindergarten reform and continue to make a balanced response within the context of delivering the Whittlesea 2040 community vision.

In order to meet the emerging kindergarten demand required in 2022 and 2023, it is proposed that Council endorse that the CEO progresses key ‘demand management’ projects; and that Council makes information regarding these projects publicly available as soon as practical (pending DET’s release of the KISP and agreement with external parties).

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the Whittlesea Kindergarten Infrastructure and Services Plan described in Attachment One, (confidential) and that it will be jointly signed by the City of Whittlesea Chief Executive Officer and the Department of Education and Training.

2.       Note Council will undertake additional research and prepare a Kindergarten Reform Options Paper which includes an analysis of demand implications on Council’s future potential roles and associated operational and capital costs.

3.       Note a report will be presented to Council for consideration by no later than October 2021 which includes the Kindergarten Reform Options Paper and a set of associated recommendations to inform a Building Blocks Partnership Agreement between Council and Department of Education and Training.

4.       Endorse the Chief Executive Officer to progress key projects described in Attachment Two (confidential) to ensure demand for three and four-year-old kindergarten can be met over the next 18-24 months. 

5.       Note Council will continue community engagement and information provision about three-year-old kindergarten reform and demand management projects once the Department of Education and Training release the Whittlesea Kindergarten Infrastructure and Services Plan on their website.

6.       Note advocacy opportunities to address the local impacts of this reform will be considered as part of Council’s advocacy agenda.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

6.4       Sustainable Environment

ITEM 6.4.1 For Decision - Petition to replace trees along Fielding Drive, Mernda 

Attachments:                        1       Fielding Drive, Mernda - Google StreetView   

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Senior Arborist Planning & Risk   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

1.       Complete defect works identified in the arborist report.

2.       Adjust the pruning program from every two years to annually.

3.       Include Fielding Drive on the intermediate sweeping program to increase the street sweeping frequency.

4.       Monitor and review the response of the street trees.

5.       Advise head petitioner of agreed actions.

Brief overview

·    Council has received a petition from residents requesting the removal of street trees from Fielding Drive, Mernda. The petition was signed by 13 residents of Fielding Drive, one resident of Harriers Street, and one resident of Dorobolo Street.

·    An arboricultural assessment has been completed and found that most trees in the street were healthy, 12 trees exhibited good growth formation, with four trees exhibiting fair formation. 13 of the 16 trees are anticipated to have a useful life expectancy of 30 to 60 years.

·    The inspection also considered the residents’ concerns regarding leaf litter and tree clearance from houses. It was found that minimal and inconsistent housing setbacks has contributed to the limited clearance. To address concerns, Fielding Drive will be added to the annual ‘street tree pruning program’ and the ‘intermediate sweeping program’.

·    The full removal of trees is not supported or recommended. A revised service response that addressed concerns on pruning and street sweeping services has been implemented and the head petitioned consulted.

rationale for recommendation

The recommendations above are proposed in line with the Councils endorsed Greening Whittlesea Strategy, and Street Tree Management Plans recommendations for the management of mature trees within a streetscape.

impacts of recommendation

Councils tree assets continue to be managed in a sustainable way consistent way consistent with the Council adopted Street Tree Management Plan 2019, and key concerns of residents are addressed.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

A range of available service programs were explored that addressed the overarching concerns of residents through the trees service providers and Council’s street sweeping services. The proposed response will be monitored by regularly to assess tree responses.  Should the current concerns persist this street may be considered in future years for the Street Tree Renewal Program.

 

Report

Introduction

The 15 signatories of the Fielding Drive petition in Mernda are requesting tree removal and replacement of existing nature strip trees. Council investigated the request looking at core issues and commissioned an independent arboricultural assessment to evaluate the status of current tree assets. Issues raised in the petition were concerns mainly on the size of the trees and the mess created from excessive leaf shed.

Background

Fielding Drive, Mernda is a streetscape dominated by a combination of mature Eucalyptus trees including Brittle Gum, Wallangarra Gum and Red Ironbark. Eucalyptus trees are an evergreen tree listed on Council’s approved street tree species list and classified as a medium to large tree. The two main species planted in Fielding Drive in Wallangarra and Brittle Gum, are in the top 10 most common street trees in the City of Whittlesea. Together they combine for a total 8.7 per cent of our street trees. These trees are all currently managed and maintained proactively by Council on a biannual program.

A petition was received on 27 January 2021 signed by 15 residents requesting that Council remove the existing nature strip trees and replant with new trees as part of the Street Tree Renewal Plan. The grounds on which the signatories believe that the current trees are unsuitable include:

·    Trees dropping debris including leaves

·    Frequency of street sweeping (messy street)

·    Leaf shedding become unsafe for foot traffic 

·    Canopy spread and size

·    Branches cracking under wind and weather

·    Darkness created from canopy cover.

An independent tree assessment was undertaken by Greenwood Consulting to assess the current health status and value of the street trees at Fielding Drive. The Municipal Association of Victoria’s accepted methodology for arboriculture assessment, in line with the International Society of Arboriculture - Level 2 Visual Tree Inspection Standards was utilised for this petition.  This report found that most trees are in good health. The report found eight defects amongst the 18 trees in which five were moderate and three low risk. Works are now programmed to rectify these defects. The report identified the overall value of the street trees to be $643,345.

Council also investigated the Fielding Drive trees to assess property clearances in line with the guidelines set out in the Street Tree Management Plan (STMP). In many instances’ property clearances were insufficient, and there is significant inconsistency to property setbacks on the street. These trees will be moved on to an annual pruning cycle to continue to maintain the assets and improve private property clearances.

There are currently two claims against Council for tree related damage in Fielding Drive Mernda. These are being dealt with through Council’s claim process and the individual claimants. The claims are still under investigation and an engineer’s report is underway for one claim.

 

The STMP defines the levels of service provided for Council’s street trees and the criteria by which Council does and does not remove trees. The specific details noted in the petition request along with previous history/interactions with the residents of Fielding Drive, advocacy by the head petitioner and technical investigations of the trees have all been considered in the proposed response.

A range of available service programs were explored that addressed the overarching concerns of residents through the trees service providers and street sweeping services. The proposed response will be monitored regularly to assess tree responses. Should the current concerns persist this street may be considered in future years for the Street Tree Renewal Program.

Proposal

The social, environmental and economic benefits of street trees make them an inherently valuable asset. Council has a current street tree stock of approximately 100,000 trees, the management of which is supported by the Street Tree Management Plan 2019.

The existing street trees in Fielding Drive have been assessed and provide a high level of amenity to the neighbourhood. Historical evidence of tree complaints is limited to two current claims. Current service contract levels can be adjusted to respond to these trees by increased street tree pruning frequency that will achieve better private property clearance. The service level of the of street sweeping can also be adjusted to respond to concerns around excess leaf and debris shedding.

The petition request for removal and replacement of street trees is not supported. In lieu of removal and replacement of all street trees, the following actions are proposed:

Action

Status

1.   Complete defect works identified in the arborist report within 21 days of presenting at Council.

Work programmed. Scheduled to commence after 25 May 2021.

2.   Adjust the pruning program from every two years to annually.

Actioned. Scheduled to commence in January 2022.

3.   Refer Fielding Drive to the intermediate sweeping program to increase the street sweeping frequency.

Actioned. Scheduled to commence in the 2021/22 financial year.

4.   Monitor and review the response of the street trees.

Actioned. Scheduled to commence in January 2022.

5.   Manage two current damage claims (No. 12 & 14) regarding tree roots causing structural damage to house program process.

Awaiting engineering report to progress through Council’s risk management process.

6.   Liaise with head petitioner during this process.

Actions. Formal notification submitted of report to Council meeting dated 4 May 2021.

A range of available service programs were explored that addressed the overarching concerns of residents through the trees service providers and street sweeping services. The proposed response will be monitored regularly to assess tree responses. Should the current concerns persist this street may be considered in future years for the Street Tree Renewal Program.

Consultation

Consultation for this petition has been via the head petitioner, in line with Council’s guidance on petitions management. This has included both verbal updates and written correspondence to the head petitioner. Officers have also responded to further representations for updates by individual signatories.

Fielding Drive, Mernda will also be included in the intermediate sweeping program thereby addressing the collective concerns of residents on excessive leaf shedding of these trees.

Critical Dates

There are no critical dates associated with this report.

Financial Implications

The independent review and assessment of all street trees in Fielding Drive noted that the present value of all trees is $643,345.

The cost of removal and replacement of all street trees is estimated at $27,900.

The cost of retaining the current established trees and adjusting the current pruning regime to annual is $1,425 per annum.

The cost of adding Fielding Drive to the Intermediate sweeping program is $1,000 per annum.

Policy strategy and legislation

The proposal to retain street trees at Fielding Drive, Mernda is consistent with the Council Plan, Council’s Street Tree Management Plan (2019), Natural and Built Shade Policy (2016), Environmental Sustainability Strategy (2013), and Whittlesea 2040 – A Place for All (2018).

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

The City of Whittlesea Street Tree Management Plan 2019 outlines how Council will respond to requests for tree removal from the community. It communicates the criteria and information requirements whereby Council will support tree removals. In the case of Fielding Drive, Mernda, Council has consulted with the head petitioner and undertaken investigations in the recommended timeframe.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Sustainable environment

Key Direction                        Climate ready

 

The proposal acknowledges the value of streetscapes in our local community and the contribution of these trees to local amenity, biodiversity and urban shading/cooling.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The petition requesting removal and replacement of the existing street trees is not supported. A range of additional service measures have now been implemented to address the concerns of petitioners which mitigate the impacts on amenity of the street. Fielding Drive street trees will be monitored and a review to the response of increased pruning frequency will occur in three years.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Complete defect works identified in the arborist report.

2.       Adjust the pruning program from every two years to annually.

3.       Include Fielding Drive on the intermediate sweeping program to increase the street sweeping frequency.

4.       Monitor and review the response of the street trees.

5.       Advise head petitioner of agreed actions.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.4.2 For Decision - Contract 2018-23 - Pre-Booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service - Contract Variation Report 

Attachments:                        1       Contract 2018-23 - Confidential

The attachment contains information designated as confidential by the Director Infrastructure and Environment, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to Council business information, being information that would prejudice the Council's position in commercial negotiations if prematurely released. The attachment contains information regarding Council’s position in relation to a proposed variation to a Council contract that could reasonably be expected to confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting business and would diminish the strength of Council’s position in these negotiations.    

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Senior Waste Services Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

In relation to Contract No. 2018-23 for Pre-Booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service, it is recommended that Council:

·    Approve a variation of $223,779.28 (excluding GST) making a revised contract sum of $624,729.28 (excluding GST).

·    Approve extension of the contract end date by twelve months, to 30 June 2022.

·    Note the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

Brief overview

·    Contract No. 2018-23 for Pre-Booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service was awarded to Contract Tree Services Pty Ltd.

·    The contract commenced on 1 July 2019 for an initial term of two years, ending on 30 June 2021.

·    Contract extension options are available (of any time period) are available through to 30 June 2024.

·    An extension is sought to 30 June 2022 to continue the delivery of this service which necessitates a variation to the contract amount of $223,779.28 (excluding GST).

·    Minor amendments have been made to the terms and conditions of the contract to cater for the increased service demand in the rural areas of the municipality.

·    Council’s Towards Zero Waste Strategy (the Strategy) is currently under development. The additional one-year extension will allow the appropriate time to evaluate the objectives of this service against the goals of the Strategy, explore further options for collaboration with regional local governments that have a similar service, and prepare of a new tender that aims to deliver best value outcomes for the community.


 

rationale for recommendation

The contractor’s prices were benchmarked against other municipalities, and it is considered that the capped lump price offers best value to Council.

Furthermore, the combination of population growth across the municipality and the increased awareness of the service has applied pressure on the delivery of this service. Waiting times have therefore increased in the rural areas, and it is recommended to amend the urban-to-rural delivery ratio to increase the rural supply to meet this demand.

impacts of recommendation

The amendment to the urban-to-rural delivery ratio will allow for residents in the rural areas to access the Pre-Booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service with less waiting time per booking. By adhering to the increasing service demand, this will also ensure that applicable organic material (e.g. tree branches) is diverted from landfill.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Due to the increase in service demand, this amendment will carry additional costs for travel and productivity. It is therefore proposed to increase the lump sum price by a further 11.24 per cent to cover these costs. This increase has been calculated based off the tendered unit rates and the percentage difference of the service delivery (urban-to-rural) ratio between the current and proposed service provisions.

 

Report

Background

Currently, over 80 per cent of residents reside in separate housing (id.CommunityProfile, 2016) and are therefore responsible for the external maintenance of their properties. The 2019 Annual Household Survey results also demonstrate that over one third of residents grow fruit or vegetables on their properties.

The Pre-Booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service (the service) is a highly utilised kerbside service which compliments Council’s successful opt-in, user-pays food and organics kerbside (FOGO) service. The provision of this service aligns strongly with the objectives of Whittlesea 2040, where Council seeks to be a leader in clean, sustainable living.

The service may also provide an alternative option for tenants who may not have access to the FOGO service. Similarly, some households may not have the means of transport to drop off their garden and organic waste to processing facility. The service provides an accessible alternative for households in this category.

Contract 2018-23 for Pre-Booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service was awarded to Contract Tree Services Pty Ltd, and commenced on 1 July 2019 for an initial term of two years, ending 30 June 2021.

Contract extension options (of any time period) are available through to 30 June 2024.

CONTRACT PERFORMANCE

The contract has been performing satisfactorily to date and this is reflected by the number of total collections and tonnages represented in the table below.

Financial Year

2019-20

2020-211

Total1

Collections

8,924

9,393

18,317

Tonnages

478

535

1,013

1The values for the 2020/21 financial year have been extrapolated to 30 June 2021 using the latest actual figures.

A significant increase in uptake of the service has been experienced in the rural setting (since contract inception), and therefore the lead times associated with the rural north have grown over the life of the contract.

A financial summary of the contract is provided in the confidential attachment.

VARIATION AND EXTENSION REQUEST

It is proposed that the contract be extended for twelve months to allow for review preparation of a new tender that will explore the following:

·    A review of kerbside waste management and resource recovery services (including aa review of the feasibility of this service moving forward),

·    Identification of potential collaborative procurement opportunities, and

·    The alignment of objectives of the draft Towards Zero Waste Strategy 2021-2030.

This additional one-year extension will also allow for the appropriate time to consult and engage with other regional local governments that provide a similar service and prepare a new tender that aims to deliver best value outcomes to the community and the region.

It is also proposed within the draft Towards Zero Waste Strategy 2021-2030 to implement the FOGO service municipal wide by the 2022/23 financial year; and once implemented municipal wide, the FOGO kerbside service is projected to revert to a weekly collection service by the. The extension request will allow time to explore the requirement and feasibility of the pre-booked green waste collection service moving forward.

The contractor’s prices have been checked and are considered competitive and it is considered that the capped lump price offers best value to Council. It is therefore proposed to extend the contract term to 30 June 2022, with amendments made to the urban-to-rural deliver ratio to cater for the increasing rural demand.

Further details of the requested variation are provided in the confidential attachment.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The extension of the contact by one year necessitates a variation of $223,779.28 (excluding GST). There is an allocation of funds in the proposed 2021/22 annual budget to provide for this extension period.  Further financial details are provided in the confidential attachment.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Climate Change - Failure to mitigate or adapt to the risks of climate change

Landfills pose a risk of increased greenhouse gas emissions via the build-up of methane during the waste decomposition phase. Organic material, such as tree branches, contributes to the generation of methane gas within a landfill and therefore removal this material reduces the risk of methane gas generation. Furthermore, providing an alternative use of tree branches via composting into a soil product also contributes to reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Links to WHITTLESEA 2040 AND the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              Sustainable environment

Key Direction               Leaders in clean, sustainable living

 

The service reduces the risk of illegal dumping of garden waste as it provides a means for residents to place bundled branches outside their property for kerbside collection.

This service also reduces waste to landfill by providing an alternative to residents who may not have an opt-in, user-pays food and organics bin, and / or who may have used the general waste bin to dispose of branches instead.

Finally, the mulched bundled branches are either sent to the local green waste facility where they are composted and turned into a saleable garden soil product, or alternatively mulch is donated to local schools to utilise on garden beds.

 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

Council is committed under Whittlesea 2040 to be leaders in clean, sustainable living.

Extension of the pre-booked kerbside green waste collection service is sought, in accordance with the contract’s term and conditions and Council’s applicable policy and procedures, to ensure that the service can continue to divert garden and organic waste material from landfill and meet the growing needs of all residents.

The additional one-year extension period will allow for appropriate time to review the objectives of the service against the draft Towards Zero Waste Strategy 2021-2030, engage with regional local government partners that provide a similar service and prepare a new tender that aims to deliver best value outcomes to the community and region.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve, in relation to Contract No. 2018-23, for Pre-booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service to:

1.       Approve a variation of $223,779.28 (excluding GST) making a revised contract sum of $624,729.28 (excluding GST).

2.       Approve extension of the contract end date by twelve months, to 30 June 2022.

3.       Note the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.4.3 For Decision - Contract 2020-111 - Concrete Construction and Reinstatement - Tender Evaluation Report 

Attachments:                        1       Detailed Tender Evaluation - Confidential

The attachment contains information designated as confidential by the Director Infrastructure and Environment, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that—  (i) relates to trade secrets; or (ii) if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. The attachment contains tender amounts submitted by tenderers and tender evaluation scoring prepared by Council officers.  It also contains details of credit and reference checks about the tenderers provided to Council in confidence. The release of this information could reasonably be expected to prejudice the commercial position of the persons who supplied the information or to confer a commercial advantage on a third party.  

2       Schedule of Rates - Works Type A, B and C - Confidential

The attachment contains information designated as confidential by the Director Infrastructure and Environment, under delegation from the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance with Chapter 6(2) of the Governance Rules and sections 66(5) and 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that—  (i) relates to trade secrets; or (ii) if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. The attachment contains a schedule of rates submitted by tenderers that, if released, could reasonably be expected to prejudice the commercial position of the persons who supplied the information or to confer a commercial advantage on a third party.    

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Senior Infrastructure Engineer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

With regards to Contract Number 2020 – 111 for Concrete Construction and Reinstatement, it is recommended that Council resolve to award the contract:

·    To a panel of contractors comprising of the following six companies (shown in alphabetical order):

ASJ Concrete & Constructions

Dal Pozzo Paving

Grounds Paving Pty Ltd

JNR Civil Pty Ltd

N & G Nerone Pty Ltd

Summerhill Civil Pty Ltd.

·    For the tendered schedule of rates provided in the confidential attachment with total expenditure limited to a maximum of $15,000,000.00 (excluding GST).

·    For an initial three-year period from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2024, with extension options of any period up to 30 June 2026.


 

Brief overview

The tender evaluation panel advises that:

·    24 tenders were received

·    Six tenderers are recommended to form a panel of contractors.

The recommended tenderers were not the highest ranked but are considered best value because they form a broad spectrum of companies that cover the variety of concrete reinstatement and asset renewal works issued under this contract. The recommended panel affords Council the flexibility to scale its works to provide best value across the life of the Contract.

rationale for recommendation

Council has an obligation under the Road Management Act (2004) to ensure safe and useable access of its footpath and shared user path network for all residents and does so through the provision of concrete reinstatement and construction works contract. Tenders were received and evaluated in accordance with the approved Tender Probity and Evaluation Plan against weighted criteria which reflect the critical, risk-based elements of this particular contract.

impacts of recommendation

Should Council award the contract to the recommended tenderers, Council will be able to streamline the service delivery of its pathway reinstatement and asset renewal works without the addition of lead times for tendering out individual concrete construction works.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Council will utilise this contract for the delivery of concrete reinstatement and asset renewal works. The contract will expedite the procurement and delivery of concreting works in the maintenance, operations and New Works delivery areas of Council.

 

Report

Background

The City of Whittlesea has a network of approximately 1,200km of concrete footpaths and shared user paths throughout the municipality, with this figure ever increasing due to the continuous growth and an expanding capital delivery program, such as the Missing Links Pathway Program.

Council has an obligation under the Road Management Act (2004) to ensure safe and useable access of its footpath and shared user path network for all residents and does so through the provision of concrete reinstatement and construction works contract.

Services under this contract are also utilised by internal project management teams for competitive concrete pricing for New Works delivery projects such as the Missing Links Pathway Program.

Contract Number 2020-111 for Concrete Construction and Reinstatement is proposed to commence 1 July 2021 for an initial term of three years, ending 30 June 2024, with extension options available for any period up to 30 June 2026.

Tenders for the contract closed on 16 February 2021.  The tendered prices and a summary of the evaluation are detailed in the confidential attachment.

EVALUATION

No member of the Tender Evaluation Panel declared any conflict of interest in relation to this tender evaluation.

A Tender Probity & Evaluation Plan was designed specifically for this tender process and it was authorised prior to this tender being advertised.  All tenders received were evaluated in accordance with that plan.  The evaluation involved scoring of conforming and competitive tenders according to these pre-determined criteria and weightings:

Criteria

Weighting

Price

50%

Capability

20%

Capacity

20%

Impact

10%

The weightings reflect the relative importance of each element to this particular contract.  They were determined as being most appropriate after considering numerous factors including (but not restricted to) the time, quality, risk and contract management requirements which were likely to have the most impact on the achievement of best value.

Only tenders that were conforming and competitive were fully scored.  Tender submissions that were evaluated as non-conforming or not sufficiently competitive were set aside from further evaluation.  In cases where this occurred the reasons for that outcome are detailed in the confidential attachment.


 

The evaluation outcome was as follows:

Tenderer

Conforming

Competitive

Score

Rank

Tenderer N

YES

YES

88.37

1

Tenderer W

(Summerhill Civil Pty Ltd)

YES

YES

82.86

2

Tenderer C

(ASJ Concrete & Constructions)

YES

YES

79.78

3

Tenderer H

(Grounds Paving)

YES

YES

78.6

4

Tenderer K

(JNR Civil Pty Ltd)

YES

YES

77.9

5

Tenderer P

(N&G Nerone Paving Pty Ltd)

YES

YES

77.2

6

Tenderer X

YES

YES

76.6

7

Tenderer G

(Dal Pozzo Paving)

YES

YES

76.4

8

Tenderer S

YES

YES

74.6

9

Tenderer F

YES

YES

73.9

10

Tenderer A

YES

YES

72.3

11

Tenderer O

YES

YES

71.5

12

Tenderer J

YES

YES

69.0

13

Tenderer B

YES

YES

68.1

14

Tenderer E

YES

YES

67.6

15

Tenderer D

YES

YES

64.6

17

Tenderer U

YES

YES

67.5

16

Tenderer L

YES

NO

N/A

N/A

Tenderer R

YES

NO

N/A

N/A

Tenderer T

YES

NO

N/A

N/A

Tenderer I

NO

NO

N/A

N/A

Tenderer M

NO

NO

N/A

N/A

Tenderer Q

NO

NO

N/A

N/A

Tenderer V

NO

NO

N/A

N/A

The highest ranked tenderer was not recommended for award of this contract because they presented a significant reputational and occupational health and safety risk to Council when delivering concrete reinstatement and asset renewal works.

The confidential attachment provides further details of the evaluation of all tenders.

Financial Implications

Sufficient funding for this contract is available from across Council, including but not limited to the Maintenance and Operations Departmental (recurrent) budget for concrete reinstatement works and various New Works (capital) project budgets.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Strategic Risk Life Cycle Asset Management - Failure to effectively plan for the construction, on-going maintenance and renewal of Council’s assets

By establishing a panel of supply contractors for concrete reinstatement and construction works, Council will be able to streamline the service delivery of its pathway reinstatement and asset renewal works without the addition of lead times for tendering out individual concrete construction works.

Furthermore, this will ensure Council will continue to meet its infrastructure maintenance (footpaths and shared user paths) obligations under the Road Management Act (2004) of ensuring safe and useable access to the network in a timely, and cost-effective manner.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Smart, connected transport network

 

Council will be able to streamline the service delivery of its pathway reinstatement and asset renewal works without the addition of lead times for tendering out individual concrete construction works.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The tenders from ASJ Concrete & Constructions, Dal Pozzo Paving, Grounds Paving Pty Ltd, JNR Civil Pty Ltd, N & G Nerone Pty Ltd and Summerhill Civil Pty Ltd were deemed to provide best value, mitigate against identified risks and cover the broad spectrum of work offered. It is recommended that these companies form a panel of contractors to deliver the scope of services under the contract.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.         Accept the tenders submitted by the following companies (shown in alphabetical order):

·    ASJ Concrete & Constructions

·    Dal Pozzo Paving

·    Grounds Paving Pty Ltd

·    JNR Civil Pty Ltd

·    N & G Nerone Pty Ltd

·    Summerhill Civil Pty Ltd.

for the schedule of rates detailed in the confidential attachment for the following contract:

Number:    2020 – 111

Title:          Concrete Construction and Reinstatement

Term:         1 July 2021 to 30 June 2024

Options:    Term extensions of any period up to 30 June 2026 (only to be exercised if separately approved by Council)

Value:        Total expenditure is limited to a maximum of $15,000,000.00 (excluding GST) unless otherwise approved by Council

subject to the following conditions:

a)   Tenderer to provide proof of currency of insurance cover as required in the tender documents.

b)   Price variations to be in accordance with the provisions as set out in the tender documents.

2.         Approve the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.4.4 For Decision - Cooper Street West Resource Recovery Hub - Proposals to Lease 

Attachments:                        1       Site Plan

2       Proposed Occupancies Site Plan   

Responsible Officer:            Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Consultant   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

Obtain approval from Council to commence the community engagement process in accordance with Section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Council’s Community Engagement Policy, on Council’s intention to enter into leases on its properties at 480 Cooper Street and at 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping. 

Brief overview

·    Council presently holds two lease agreements within the Cooper Street Hub that are approaching expiry in 2021 (at 480 Cooper Street) and 2022 (at 335-355 O’Herns Road). 

·    Prior to entering new lease agreements, it was decided to take the opportunity to ensure Council’s significant land holdings within the Cooper Street Hub are contributing to positive environmental outcomes.  An industry wide Expression of Interest (EOI) has been undertaken.

·    The EOI process relates solely to the occupation and leasing of Council owned property within the Cooper Street Hub, negotiation of waste disposal contracts has been managed by a separate procurement activity.

·    Seven formal submissions were received in response to the EOI process and four were shortlisted for further consideration.  One shortlisted applicant subsequently withdrew their interest when officers restated that feedstock from Council’s waste operations was not guaranteed.

rationale for recommendation

Following a lengthy process to source the best combination of occupiers at the Council owned property known as the Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub (CSRRH), it is intended to undertake a community engagement process under section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 and in accordance with Council's Community Engagement Policy in respect of the proposal before entering into the lease.  The proposed leases will be subject to appropriate terms and conditions including the specification and formalisation of in-kind benefits.

impacts of recommendation

Undertake a community engagement process in accordance with Section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 and in accordance with Council’s Community Engagement Policy, in relation to the proposed leases subject to appropriate terms and conditions, including the specification and formalisation of in-kind benefits at the Council owned property known at the Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub (CSRRH). 

These proposed agreements will not only deliver financial benefit to Council but will continue current and expand on future recycling programs benefitting the Whittlesea community.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Undertake a community engagement process in accordance with Section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 and in accordance with Council’s Community Engagement Policy.  Once these agreements are in place, Council officers will continually monitor terms and conditions to ensure best practices and services to the community are maintained.

 

 

 

Report

Background

Council owns the properties known as 480 Cooper Street, Epping, and 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping (totalling 77Ha) (Attachment 1 – Site Plan). The two sites are predominantly vacant land with part of the property being a landfill site with gas extraction facilities still in place, whilst the balance is made up of internal roads and hardstand areas.

An integral part of delivering a cohesive and integrated waste and resource recovery system is the concept of waste and resource recovery hubs.  A hub is a facility, or group of facilities, that manage or recover waste or material streams.  Hubs are described across three levels, state, regional and local.  A hub of state significance can be part of a broader industrial or employment precinct.  The Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Implementation Plan 2016 (Metro Implementation Plan) and Statewide Waste and Resource Recovery Infrastructure Plan (SWRRIP) identifies 14 Hubs of State Importance within metropolitan Melbourne.  These plans identify the Cooper Street Precinct in Epping as a Hub of State and Metropolitan importance.

Council presently holds two lease agreements within the CSRRH with operators that provide, amongst other services, organic and construction & demolition (C & D) materials processing.  These leases are approaching expiry in 2021 (at 480 Cooper Street) and 2022 (at 335-355 O’Herns Road).  The expiry of these leases presented Council with an opportunity to reflect on the contribution its significant land holdings within the Cooper Street Hub could make to our local and regional environmental outcomes.  To this end it was decided that an Expression of Interest (EOI) process would be used to identify the most suitable lessee(s).

Expression of Interest - Initial Assessment

Seven formal submissions received in response to the EOI were assessed using the matrix below.  Four were shortlisted for further consideration.

The four shortlisted applicants were asked to present to the working group in order to further clarify details of their submission.  At that stage Bioelektra withdrew their interest when officers restated that Council’s waste service contracts were subject to separate tender processes and therefore feedstock from Council’s waste operations would not be guaranteed.  Presentations were provided by the three remaining applicants in late March 2020.

In-Kind Benefits

The remaining three applicants became the focus of further consideration, predominantly to determine, in addition to a site rental to be paid to Council, what in-kind benefits they might provide to Council and the community (e.g. landfill diversion, resident vouchers for drop-off of green waste and other materials, processing of contractor materials such as parks maintenance green waste, etc.).

·    Suez, Ecodynamics, Smart Recycling, Salvos Stores Consortium (SESS)

- Expressing interest in Cooper Street

·    Repurpose It (RPI)

- Expressing interest in Cooper Street and O’Herns B

·    Aurora Construction Materials (ACM). 

- Expressing interest in O’Herns B

The table below shows which applicant’s proposed uses are likely to provide in-kind benefits.  Only proposed uses on Cooper Street and/or O’Herns A, B, and C were considered. 

It is worth noting that RPI have pre-existing plans to construct in-vessel FOGO facilities on their property at 460 Cooper Street. 

 


 

Applicant Lease Proposal

The table below shows the general lease terms being sought by the remaining three applicants.

Proposed Lease Allocations

(see Attachment 2 – Proposed Occupancies Site Plan)

Following a detailed review of the submissions received as part of the EOI process and subsequent discussions and negotiations with preferred firms (potential tenants/partners), the following lease allocations (and partnerships) are proposed:

1.         Repurpose It (RPI)

As RPI have been the successful tenderer for Council’s recently awarded FOGO contract, have invested heavily in their own site adjoining Council’s Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub (CSRRH) and their EOI offer was the most attractive (financially and also with in-kind benefits), we propose a lease of two parcels of land within the CSRRH.

RPI purchased adjoining land at 460 Cooper Street, Epping, in March 2017 and specialise in construction material recycling (500,000 tonnes pa).  They have 50 full time staff and 50 part time, currently have a 24/7 operation with full compliance to Council and EPA regulations.  They are an innovative firm (Westpac business awards - top 20/2400) and have a high sustainability reputation.  They have established a partnership with Downer who is seeking large scale investment in resource recovery technology (including establishment of education facility and research testing lab) and are open to partnerships with other proposed tenants on CSRRH.  They also have proposals for waste transfer, timber recycling and R&D.

 

Part 480 Cooper Street, Epping

Situated at the rear of the site with a land area of approximately 11.524 hectares, this parcel will be utilised by RPI specifically for Council’s FOGO contract.  It is proposed that the occupancy of this parcel mirror the term of the FOGO contract which is an initial term of ten years with an option of ten years (at Council’s discretion).  RPI have offered an annual rental of $300,000 for each year in the first ten year term as well as the second ten year term should Council exercise its option to continue both the FOGO contract and the lease.  The FOGO contract gives Council the flexibility to exercise the second term from between 1 to 10 years and it is intended that the proposed lease will mirror this flexibility.  One of numerous conditions that will be part of the proposed lease agreement is for RPI to meet all fire requirements on Council’s land made by Fire Rescue Victoria.

Part 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping

This parcel can be described as the “dog-leg” portion of the site with an area of approximately 14.3 hectares and the centre portion of the site of 13.5 hectares, which will both be utilised by RPI to assist with the many waste and resource recovery activities that the they are involved.  It is also proposed that the occupancy of this parcel mirror the term of the FOGO contract which is an initial term of ten years with an option of ten years (at Council’s discretion).  RPI have offered an annual rental of $50,000 for each year in the first ten year term.

2.         Ecodynamics

The SESS Consortium (SESS) submission to Council’s EOI process dissolved following Suez’s unsuccessful FOGO tender bid.  (EcoSmart) provided an acceptable revised offer with Ecodynamics operating as the head lessee.  Ecodynamics is an existing tenant at the CSRRH and have an established and successful relationship with Council.  Established in 1988, Ecodynamics Group is a vertically integrated landscaping construction, materials supply, nursery and services company, employing more than 150 people across three states.  As the only business of its kind in the Australian landscaping industry, Ecodynamics Group consists of four distinct yet complementary businesses which have been assembled to provide a seamless, risk free service to our client base, primarily encompassing the civil infrastructure industry.  Ecodynamics are experienced at bringing new people to the construction environment and training them to have long, safe and fulfilling careers. They recognise and celebrate their ability to create lasting good through their work: providing rewarding careers, building strong communities, and creating healthy environments as lasting legacies for local asset holders. It is with this vision in mind that Ecodynamics intend to further develop the Cooper Street Waste Precinct into a world class facility by demonstrating the positive impact of the circular economy to Council and its community members.

Part 480 Cooper Street, Epping

Situated at the front of the site with a land area totalling approximately 14.609 hectares, this parcel will be utilised by Ecodynamics in the same way as it is currently utilised. Ecodynamics will occupy 7.962 hectares themselves and sub-lease 6.647 hectares to Smart Pallets (a timber pallet recycling firm).  This will ensure that the full drop-off recycling range of services continues to be offered to the Whittlesea community.  This voucher based drop-off service will continue to be provided to the community, which currently consists of green waste drop-off (approximately 10,432 collections annually) timber drop-off (approximately 2,200 collections annually) and rubble drop-off (approximately 874 collections annually).  These in-kind services save the community approximately $1.23 million per annum.

Ecodynamics have offered an annual rental of $40,000 to occupy the 14.609 hectares plus continuing the in-kind benefits of recycling drop-off at Cooper Street for all Whittlesea residents.  It is proposed that Ecodynamics be offered a lease term of ten years, an option of ten years with annual CPI rental increases.

One of numerous conditions that will be part of the proposed lease agreement is for RPI to meet all fire requirements on Council’s land made by Fire Rescue Victoria.

3.         Aurora Construction Materials (ACM)

ACM has been the existing tenant at 335 O’Herns Road since 2007 (through a 15 year lease/permit recycled concrete and quarry operations and has invested $20 million on Council’s land to date).  ACM is 100% Australian owned and operated and employs over 100 staff with 60 located at Epping (four sites overall) with a further 124 jobs to be created if awarded a new lease.  They contribute a direct and indirect income of approximately $7 million annually in the local economy (200 suppliers), reprocesses 400,000 tonnes of waste rock and producing over 120,000 cubic metres of concrete product containing recycled material.  ACM has also stated that they will partner with a solar panel provider to offset electricity costs, similar to the trial run at Wollert landfill, and have invested $2 million in E-crete as a more sustainable alternative to concrete.  It is proposed that a new lease be given to ACM essentially continuing to operate under similar terms of their existing lease with Council.

Part 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping

This is the parcel of the site slightly set back from the front boundary with an area of approximately 10.2 hectares.  ACM have offered an annual rental of $42,000 to occupy the 10.2 hectares plus in-kind benefits consisting of:

·    The establishment of free of charge community drop-off facilities for relevant construction and demolition products.

·    Products to be discounted for Council, Council’s agents, and City of Whittlesea residents.

It is proposed that ACM be offered a lease term of ten years, with an option of ten years with annual CPI rental increases. 

ACM have also stated that when the solar project is finalised, they would also propose a lease of approximately 7.73 hectares of land at the front of 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping, for an annual rental of $32,000.

Proposal

To source the best combination of occupiers at the Council owned property known at the Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub (CSRRH) by finalising lease negotiations with the three remaining short-listed applicants, establishing appropriate terms and conditions, including the specification and formalisation of in-kind benefits.

Consultation

Council held an information session open to the wider waste industry which received 75 registrations.

Council officers have carried out an Expression of Interest campaign which was widely communicated to the wider waste industry.  Ongoing discussions have been held with applicants throughout the EOI process.  It is also intended to undertake an “IAP2 ‘Inform’ level of community consultation in accordance with Council’s Community Engagement Policy.

Critical Dates

Council presently hold two existing leases within the CSW Resource Recovery Hub which expire in 2021 (480 Cooper Street) and 2022 (335-355 O’Herns B) respectively.

Council, under Section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020, must undertake a community engagement process in accordance with Council’s Community Engagement Policy on the proposal should it receive an application to lease a Council owned property where the lease is for a period of ten years or more or the rental exceeds $100,000 per annum (during the life of the term).

Financial Implications

The financial implications related to awarding the above leases fall into two categories, annual rent and in-kind benefits.

Policy strategy and legislation

Under Section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020, Council must undertake a community engagement process in accordance with its community engagement policy.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk

The expression of interest campaign will enable current and prospective Tenants to develop and implement new and sustainable practices within Council’s existing former landfill sites and gas extraction areas.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Sustainable environment

Key Direction                        Leaders in clean, sustainable living

 

Food and Garden Organics Waste Collection – trial a better service option for the disposal of organic waste to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase diversion from landfill.

The purpose of the expression of interest campaign is to ensure Council’s significant land holdings within the Cooper Street Hub are contributing to positive environmental outcomes, whilst maximising in-kind benefits and long-term capital investment for the community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Council has three viable submissions in response to the Expression of Interest for the use of Council owned property within Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub (being specifically 480 Cooper Street and 335-355 O’Herns Road parcels A, B, and C).  Council officers are seeking approval to proceed to Council for the following lease arrangements:


 

1.         RePurpose It (RPI)

As the successful tenderer for Council’s recently awarded FOGO contract, it is proposed that a lease be given to RPI for Council’s CSRRH for 11.524 hectares of land at 480 Cooper Street and 27.8 hectares of land at 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping, at annual rental amounts of $300,000 and $50,000 respectively subject to Council terms and conditions.

2.         Ecodynamics

As an existing tenant at the CSRRH, Ecodynamics be offered a continuation of their current occupancy of 14.609 hectares of 480 Cooper Street, Epping, at an annual rental of $40,000 plus the continuation of in-kind benefits to the Whittlesea community and subject to Council terms and conditions.

3.         Aurora Construction Materials (ACM)

As an existing tenant at the CSRRH, ACM be offered a continuation of their current occupancy of 10.2 hectares of 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping, at an annual rental of $42,000 plus the continuation of in-kind benefits to the Whittlesea community and subject to Council terms and conditions.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Provide written communication to each of the three short-listed Applicants and advise of the process of reporting to Council and undertaking a community engagement process pursuant to the Local Government Act 2020.

2.       Undertake community engagement in accordance with Section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 and also in accordance with Council’s Community Consultation Policy, on its intentions to enter into separate leases on its properties known as the Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub (CSRRH) under the following terms and conditions

a)      To lease

i)       Part 480 Cooper Street, Epping (approximately 11.524 hectares) to Repurpose It (RPI) for an initial term of ten years with an option of ten years, at an annual rental of $300,000 for each year of both terms plus “in-kind” benefits. 

ii)      Part 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping (an area of approximately 14.3 hectares and the centre portion of the site of 13.5 hectares) to Repurpose It (RPI) for an initial term of ten years with an option of ten years at an annual rental of $50,000 for each year plus “in-kind” benefits.

b)      To lease Part 480 Cooper Street, Epping (situated at the front of the site with a land area totalling approximately 14.609 hectares) to Ecodynamics at an annual rental of $40,000 plus in-kind benefits for a term of ten years with an option of ten years with annual CPI rental increases.

 

 

c)      To lease Part 335-355 O’Herns Road, Epping (with a land area of approximately 10.2 hectares) to Aurora Construction Materials (ACM) at an annual rental of $42,000 plus in-kind benefits for a term of ten years with an option of ten years.

3.       Receive a further report on the proposed lease following the close of the community engagement process.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

6.5       High Performing Organisation

ITEM 6.5.1      For Noting - Audit & Risk Committee Report on Activity 

Attachments:                        1       Audit & Risk Committee Report on Activity for the Six Months Ended 31 March 2021   

Responsible Officer:            Executive Manager Governance

Author:                                  Internal Compliance Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to note the Audit & Risk Committee’s Report on Activity.

Brief overview

Section 54(5) of the Local Government Act 2020 requires that the Audit & Risk Committee prepare a biannual report on its activities. A copy of that report is to be provided to the Chief Executive Officer for tabling at an ordinary Council meeting.

rationale for recommendation

Council is required to comply with the requirements of the Local Government Act 2020.

impacts of recommendation

Council will meet its legislative requirements and comply with its Audit & Risk Committee Charter.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Provision of the Audit & Risk Committee’s biannual report on activity to Council ensures that Council is regularly informed of the operations of the Audit & Risk Committee.

 

 

Report

Background

The Audit & Risk Committee is an independent advisory committee of Council and its role is to report to Council and provide appropriate advice and recommendations on matters presented to it.  It acts in this capacity by monitoring, reviewing and advising on issues within its scope of responsibility and assisting Council’s governance obligations to its community.

The Committee meets four times a year, in February, May, August and November.

The introduction of the Local Government Act 2020 expanded the scope and requirements of Audit & Risk Committees, with Committees required to prepare a biannual report on their activities and have that report tabled at an ordinary Council meeting.

Proposal

In accordance with Section 54(5) of the Local Government Act 2020, the Audit & Risk Committee is required to prepare a biannual report on its activities. A copy of that report is to be provided to the Chief Executive Officer for tabling at an ordinary Council meeting.

At its 12 November 2020 meeting, the Audit & Risk Committee determined that it would prepare a report for Council on its activities following 31 March and 30 September each year.

Following the Audit & Risk Committee meeting held on 25 February 2021, a report has been prepared by the Committee on its activities for the six months to 31 March 2021. The report is included as Attachment 1.

The Audit & Risk Committee Chairperson will attend the Council meeting to discuss the report.

Consultation

The attached report has been prepared by the Audit & Risk Committee.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications arising from this report.

Policy strategy and legislation

The Audit & Risk Committee’s role and responsibilities are outlined in Division 8, Section 53 and 54 of the Local Government Act 2020.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

The Audit & Risk Committee assists Council in monitoring its governance requirements and provides advice to Council to assist with fulfilling its oversight responsibilities.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

 

The establishment of the Audit & Risk Committee and the reports it receives are reflective of Council’s commitment to the implementation of good governance principles. The Committee provides advice to Council to assist with fulfilling its oversight responsibilities for the financial and non-financial reporting process; internal controls; the audit process; risk management; and Council’s process for monitoring compliance with legislation, regulations and the Code of Conduct.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

In accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 2020, Council is provided with a copy of the Audit & Risk Committee’s Report on Activities for the Six Months to 31 March 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to note the Audit & Risk Committee’s Report on Activity.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.5.2 For Decision & Noting: Quarterly Corporate Performance Report for quarter ended 31/3/2021 

Attachments:                        1       Attachment 1 - Quarterly Corporate Performance Report

2       Attachment 2 - Project Progress Report

3       Attachment 3 - Grants Status Update

4       Attachment 4 - Reserves Detail   

Responsible Officer:            Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Coordinator Management Accounting   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

·        Note the Quarterly Corporate Performance report for March 2021.

·        Note that 27 major initiatives in the Council Action Plan 2020-21 are on track to be achieved by 30 June 2021.

·        Council to resolve and amend the annual measures for the following major initiatives:

Cycling and walking - continuing to improve the local shared path network and advocate for further external funding to read: Complete the annual assigned Bicycle plan actions;

Aboriginal Heritage Study - partnering with the Aboriginal community to improve identification and protection of tangible and intangible Aboriginal cultural heritage (phase 1) to read: Scope finalised with project partners;

Green Wedge Management Plan review - developing the roadmap for managing our green wedge over the next decade to read: Completion of draft Green Wedge Management Plan 2021-2031 for community consultation;

Town Centres Improvement Program - continue upgrading Thomastown and Lalor through appealing streetscapes, consistent urban design and transformation at Rochdale Square shopping centre to read: Draft Urban Design Framework prepared for Thomastown/Lalor; and

Develop the Council Plan 2021-2025 – Developing the medium-term plan towards achieving Whittlesea 2040: A place for all to read: Community consultation on draft Council Plan 2021-2025 completed,

·        Council to resolve to defer the Municipal Local Law Review major initiative for this year.

·        Note the New Works Program Performance for the period ended 31 March 2021 and progress of projects as outlined in Project Progress Report (Attachment 2).

·        Note the status of the infrastructure grants as at the end of March 2021 as outlined in Grants Status Update (Attachment 3).

·        Note the Financial Performance for the period ended 31 March 2021.


 

Brief overview

Council Action Plan

·        The Council Action Plan 2020-21 includes 31 major initiatives to be delivered in 2020-21.

·        Two major initiatives are at risk of not being achieved by 30 June 2021.

·        Two major initiatives will not be achieved by 30 June 2021. The Municipal Local Law Review has been re-prioritised and will be deferred for this year and Findon Road extension is now scheduled for completion in October 2021.

Capital Works

·        As at 31 March 2021, year to date Capital Works expenditure of $36.36 million is $11.25 million less than budget. The forecast for the year ending 30 June 2021 is $65.63 million. It is forecast that works of $8.03 million will be carried forward to 2021-22.

Financial Performance

·        For the nine months ended 31 March 2021, Council has recorded an operating surplus of $61.85 million, which is ($4.34 million) unfavourable to the year to date budget.

·        This surplus is reported based on the Australian Accounting Standards and includes all revenue recognised in the financial period, including gifted subdivisional assets (non-monetary), developer contributions and grants towards capital works projects. It is important to note that the operating surplus is not a cash surplus; therefore, it does not convert to immediately available cash for Council. Significant amounts of the surplus are restricted by legislation and must be used for future infrastructure investment.

·        For the nine months ended 31 March 2021 Council incurred direct COVID-19 related expenditure of $1.58 million. In addition, Council incurred reduced income of $2.89 million largely due to forced facility closures during the State Government imposed COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. The combined impact of additional expenditure and revenue losses totalled $4.39 million for the nine-month period.

rationale for recommendation

The recommendation is in accordance with the requirement of Section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020 that as soon as practicable after the end of each quarter of the financial year, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a quarterly financial report is presented to the Council at a Council meeting which is open to the public.

impacts of recommendation

Council has been presented with a Quarterly Corporate Performance report in accordance with the Local Government Act 2020 that shows Council’s financial performance against the Annual Budget 2020-21 and progress of Council Action Plan major initiatives.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Financial performance against budget is monitored closely and presented to the Executive Leadership Team and Council on a regular basis. 

The organisation is closely monitoring progress against the Council Action Plan major initiatives as well as data identifying emerging community needs particularly as a result of the pandemic. This ensures Council is responsive to the changing environment in a timely manner and can adjust the program of work as required.

Report

Introduction

Council is required by the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act) to prepare a Council Plan containing the strategic objectives of Council, strategies for achieving those objectives, and indicators to monitor the achievement of those objectives.

The attached report includes a comprehensive summary of:

·        Progress of 2020-21 Council Plan Action major initiatives

·        Progress of 2020-21 New Works Program to 31 March 2021

·        Council’s financial performance to 31 March 2021.

To comply with the Act, the report includes the following comparisons for the nine months ended 31 March 2021:

·        Actual and budgeted operating revenues and expenses

·        Actual and budgeted capital revenues and expenses

·        Actual movements in the balance sheet

·        Actual movements in the cash flow statement.

It is noted that the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Council’s services and financial circumstances will continue and this has been the subject of a number of previous Council reports.

Background

Council Action Plan

Council adopted the Council Plan 2017-21 (Update 2020) including the Council Action Plan 2020-21 at a Special Council Meeting on 25 June 2020 (adjourned to 7 July 2020). The Council Plan is the key strategic document providing direction over the Council term. The Council Action Plan is developed annually as an accompaniment to the Council Plan and includes the major initiatives that are to be achieved each year.

As at 31 March 2021, the Council Action Plan is projecting an 87 per cent achievement rate across 31 major initiatives by 30 June 2021.

There are four initiatives reported as ‘Off track’ this quarter:

Major initiative

Annual measure

Quarter 3 comment

Mernda Sports Hub - Developing a site masterplan and finalising the business case for the Hub

Site master plan is developed and business plan for the site stadium is completed

Council has commenced master planning and will consider preliminary business case options in June 2021. The site masterplan and full business case will be finalised in the latter half of 2021.

Municipal Law Review - Closing legal gaps so issues around parking, littering and animal management can be resolved

Council has considered the Municipal Law 2021 for adoption by 30 June 2021

This initiative has been re-prioritised and is proposed to be deferred for this year.

 

Major initiative

Annual measure

Quarter 3 comment

Findon Road extension - Improving traffic flow in South Morang along Findon Road, Williamsons Road and Danaher Drive to Plenty Road

Findon Road extension is completed

The project had changes to the initial scope with inclusion of an additional signalised intersection with a local street and encountered delays with Melbourne Water for working around and protection of their assets. Council is finalising these approvals with both Department of Transport and Melbourne Water respectively. This has impacted the project delivery date with a likely new completion date of October 2021.

City Climate Change action plan - Planning with residents, businesses and industry to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

City Climate Change Action Plan Options Paper is developed

Community consultation has commenced and Science Based Carbon Reduction Target is developed, however the City Climate Change Action Options Paper is delayed due to the alignment with the Council Plan 2021-2025 consultation and engagement activities and this task is not on track.  The City Climate Change Action Options Paper is to be delivered by December 2021.

Capital Program

Council adopted the 2020-21 New Works Program on 7 July 2020 with a budget of $84.22 million plus approved additional carry forward works from 2019-20 of $5.76, providing a total budget of $89.98 million. 

The financial expenditure performance of the New Works Program to 31 March 2021 is detailed below.

YTD
Actual
$'000

YTD
Budget
$'000

YTD
Variance
$'000

Adopted Budget
$'000

Adjusted

Budget
$'000

Forecast
$'000

Property

9,146

12,004

2,857

22,580

24,896

15,984

Plant and equipment

720

1,490

770

1,800

1,900

1,839

Infrastructure

26,491

34,112

7,621

59,839

63,186

47,808

36,357

47,606

11,249

84,219

89,982

65,630

Represented by:

 

 

 

 

 

 

New assets

16,520

24,426

7,905

49,124

50,578

28,195

Asset renewal

11,966

14,218

2,253

22,933

23,886

22,945

Upgrade/expansion

7,871

8,962

1,091

12,162

15,519

14,491

Total Capital Works

36,357

47,606

11,249

84,219

89,982

65,630

COVID-19 Impact Analysis

Stage 4 restriction of the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on some projects as a result of general work disruptions in the normal planning, tendering and construction activities.  At this stage, 13 projects have been directly impacted (10 per cent of total projects with a total budget of approximately $23.14 million).  Delays to these identified projects are resulting in an actual delayed expenditure of approximately $2.67 million, which is appearing in the March results.  This impact will continue until year end and may increase due to the continued impact of COVID-19 and the impact of supplies and materials to projects.

Infrastructure Grants

A summary of recent infrastructure grants outcomes is included in the Grants Status Report (Attachment 3).  Over 50 per cent of project submissions have been successful ($12.5 million), enabling many projects to be brought forward in the New Works Program with impacts to both the current year budget and future years.  Applications to the value of $10.4 million are still awaiting outcomes / announcements.

Financial Performance

The Financial Performance Report for the period ended 31 March 2021 includes the following financial statements included in Quarterly Corporate Performance Report (Attachment 1):

·        Comprehensive Income Statement

·        Balance Sheet

·        Statement of Cash Flows

·        Statement of Capital Works

·        Summary of Reserves

Operating performance

 

YTD
Actual
$'000

YTD
Budget
$'000

YTD
Variance
$'000

Adopted

Budget
$'000

Forecast
$'000

Operating

 

 

 

 

 

Income

224,270

220,206

4,064

346,586

  360,357

Expenditure

162,419

154,018

(8,401)

214,809

226,380

Surplus (deficit)

61,852

66,188

(4,337)

131,777

133,977

Capital and other revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Share of other comprehensive income of associate

45

-

(45)

-

45

Capital non-recurrent grants

(1,626)

(2,415)

789

(2,815)

(8,429)

Developer contributions

(9,131)

(8,488)

(644)

(114,026)

(118,295)

Adjusted underlying surplus

51,139

55,286

(4,237)

14,936

7,297

For the quarter ended 31 March 2021, Council has recorded an operating surplus of $61.85 million, which is currently a ($4.34 million) unfavourable position to budget.

Council is forecasting a $133.98 million full year operating surplus, which is $2.2 million favourable to the Adopted Budget.

This surplus is reported based on the Australian Accounting Standards and includes all revenue recognised in the financial period, including gifted subdivisional assets (non-monetary), developer contributions and grants towards capital works projects. It is important to note that the operating surplus is not a cash surplus; therefore it does not convert to immediately available cash for Council. Significant amounts of the surplus are restricted by legislation and must be used for future infrastructure investment.

The operating result is a key figure to assess Council’s financial performance. Although Council is a not-for-profit organisation, it should still generate a surplus to ensure future financial sustainability.

 

 

COVID-19 Impact Analysis

A comprehensive review of Council’s budgeted revenue and expenditure for the remainder of the financial year has been undertaken to quantify the impacts of the pandemic on service delivery and financial performance.

As at the end of March, the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic to date is as follows:

·        Direct COVID-19 expenditure to the end of March is $10.67 million which includes Working for Victoria expenditure of $9.09 million

·        Income impact of ($2.89 million), which relates to community and leisure facilities ($2.25 million) and rates interest not charged ($638,000). Further analysis on the impact of COVID-19 on this income will be undertaken.

It is anticipated the COVID-19 pandemic and associated State Government restrictions will adversely affect the cash position and the net current asset due to reduced revenue and a decreased return on investments.

Proposal

That Council notes the Quarterly Corporate Report for the period ended 31 March 2021 (Attachment 1), which is presented for consideration by Council in accordance with the Local Government Act 2020.

Consultation

Reported information has been sourced and discussed with line management and project managers across the organisation. Consultation has also been undertaken with the Executive Leadership Team.

Critical Dates

Select information from this report will be presented to the:

·        Council Briefing on Tuesday 20 April 2021

·        Council meeting on Tuesday 4 May 2021

·        Audit and Risk Committee on Thursday 27 May 2021.

Financial Implications

All matters raised in this report, which have a financial implication, have been reflected in the Quarterly Corporate Performance Report for the quarter ended 31 March 2021 (Attachment 1).

Policy strategy and legislation

Section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020 provides that as soon as practicable after the end of each quarter of the financial year, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a quarterly budget report is presented to the Council at a Council meeting which is open to the public. The quarterly budget report must include a comparison of the actual and budgeted results to date and an explanation of any material variations.

Further, periodic progress reporting against the Council Action Plan increases transparency and contributes to discharging Council’s reporting duties.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

Performance reporting is an effective existing treatment enhancing governance of Council’s operations.

Strategic Risk Financial Sustainability - Inability to meet current and future expenditure

This report provides Council with an oversight of the City of Whittlesea’s key financial information and performance obligations to enable monitoring and to ensure City of Whittlesea’s financial position is sustainable.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

 

This report provides Council with oversight of Council’s key financial information to enable regular monitoring and to ensure that Council aligned to its strategic direction, cost-effectiveness and efficient delivery of services.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

For the quarter ended 31 March 2021, Council’s operating surplus showed an unfavourable year to date variance of ($4.34 million) against budget. Council’s New Works program was $11.25 million behind budget.

Of the 31 major initiatives in the Council Action Plan 2020-2021, 27 major initiatives are on track to be achieved by 30 June 2021. Council is closely monitoring progress and investigating mitigating actions to ensure timely delivery of the Plan.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the Quarterly Corporate Performance report for March 2021.

2.       Note that 27 major initiatives in the Council Action Plan 2020-21 are on track to be achieved by 30 June 2021.

3.       Amend the annual measures for the following major initiatives:

a)      Cycling and walking - Continuing to improve the local shared path network and advocate for further external funding to read: Complete the annual assigned Bicycle plan actions

b)      Aboriginal Heritage Study - Partnering with the Aboriginal community to improve identification and protection of tangible and intangible Aboriginal cultural heritage (phase 1) to read: Scope finalised with project partners

c)      Green Wedge Management Plan review - Developing the roadmap for managing our green wedge over the next decade to read: Completion of draft Green Wedge Management Plan 2021-2031 for community consultation

d)      Town Centres Improvement Program - Continue upgrading Thomastown and Lalor through appealing streetscapes, consistent urban design and transformation at Rochdale Square shopping centre to read: Draft Urban Design Framework prepared for Thomastown/Lalor

e)      Develop the Council Plan 2021-2025 - Developing the medium-term plan towards achieving Whittlesea 2040: A place for all to read: Community consultation on draft Council Plan 2021-2025 completed.

4.       Council to resolve to defer the Municipal Local Law Review major initiative for this year.

5.       Note the New Works Program Performance for the period ended 31 March 2021.

6.       Note the status of the infrastructure grants as at the end of March 2021.

7.       Note the Financial Performance for the period ended 31 March 2021.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.5.3      For Decision - Procurement Policy Review 

Attachments:                        1       2021 Procurement Policy   

Responsible Officer:            Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Procurement   

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

1.       Note that the Procurement Policy review under section 186A of the Local Government Act 1989 was concluded on 24 March 2021 and that the existing policy will remain in force until 30 June 2021.

2.       Adopt the revised Procurement Policy (Attachment 1) in accordance with section 108(6) of the Local Government Act 2020 with an effective date of 1 July 2021.

3.       Review the Procurement Policy in consultation with the other members of the Northern Councils Alliance at least once in every 4 year term of the Council.

Brief overview

In the spirit of collaboration, key staff of the Northern Councils Alliance (NCA) crafted a standard Procurement Policy compliant with the Local Government Act (LGA) 2020.  The policy was based on the existing City of Whittlesea Procurement Policy but it now includes numerous improvements that further enable collaboration and ensure a consistent, best practice approach to compliance and achievement of best value.

While the review process meets LGA 1989 requirements, the establishment of a new policy under LGA 2020 with an effective date of 1 July 2021 affords Council the opportunity to introduce improved practices and greater flexibility at the earliest opportunity.  Future reviews are intended to be conducted in consultation with our regional partners in the NCA.

rationale for recommendation

The benefits of a standardised policy across the councils in the Northern Region include minimising obstacles for collaboration, greater consistency (leading to better compliance and best practice across the region) and a standardised approach for addressing Audit/IBAC concerns.

impacts of recommendation

The establishment of a regionally standardised policy will help businesses to deal with Northern Region councils in a simpler and more consistent way.  Increased collaboration will assist the sector to leverage economies of scale, but it also has the potential to increase bureaucracy and restrict opportunities for small and medium enterprises and local businesses.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

There are limitations in the policy on the scale, complexity and value of contracts that will require mandatory consideration for collaborative procurement.  This will help ensure that the additional administrative effort is justified and that opportunities to engage with local and or SME businesses are maintained when appropriate.

Report

Introduction

Council’s Procurement Policy has been reviewed within the current financial year in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1989.

A new policy which meets the new procurement related provisions of the updated Local Government Act 2020 is now presented for adoption with an effective commencement date of 1 July 2021.

Background

The new Local Government Act 2020 (LGA 2020) places a stronger focus on collaboration and allows each Council to set its own procurement thresholds, exemptions, etc.  This is a rare opportunity to align policy within the sector with a view to better enabling collaboration by:

·    Creating a standardised regional public tendering threshold and a common set of exemptions, and

·    Establishing common evaluation criteria and related preference mechanisms.

The annual review of the Procurement Policy commenced in mid 2020 when the LGA 2020 came into effect and was concluded on 24 March 2021.  No change is proposed to the existing policy - instead the aim is to replace it with a revised policy under section 108 of the new Act as soon as the procurement provisions come into effect on 1 July 2021.

In the spirit of collaboration, the Procurement Leads and the Corporate Services Directors of the seven council members of the Northern Councils Alliance (NCA) have developed a regionally standardised policy.  The adoption of a standard Procurement policy will establish a consistent approach to procurement across the Northern Region. 

It is intended that the policy will be adopted in accordance with LGA 2020 by all NCA members.  There are numerous policy requirements under the new Act which differ from existing obligations.  According to section 108(3) the new policy must include the following:

·    The contract value above which the Council must invite a tender or seek an expression of interest.

·    A description of the criteria to be used by the Council to evaluate whether a proposed contract provides value for money.

·    A description of how the Council will seek collaboration with other councils and public bodies in the procurement of goods or services.

·    The conditions under which the Council may purchase goods or services without inviting a public tender or expression of interest.

·    A description of the process to be undertaken in inviting a public tender or expression of interest.

All of these requirements have been addressed in the updated policy to ensure full legislative compliance. 

Some key features of the policy are:

·    The policy was based on City of Whittlesea’s existing Procurement Policy with substantial retention of our previous policy positions, including evaluation criteria.

·    Compliance aspects and evaluation criteria that apply to all the councils are standardised and it will be recommended these be adopted by all councils with no changes. Ideally, any future amendment to those sections would be agreed by all seven members of the NCA as this standardisation is crucial to enabling collaborative procurement.

·    Appendices allow each council to capture its own specific requirements (e.g. sustainable procurement approach, quotation thresholds, financial approval limits, etc.) which can be independently amended without detriment to collaboration.  The existing arrangements approved at City of Whittlesea are reflected in the appendices without change as they were all recently reviewed.

·    The policy includes a new section that specifies how and when collaborative procurement activity will be undertaken (regardless of who we collaborate with).

·    A common public tendering threshold of $300,000 including GST is proposed to apply to contracts for goods, services and/or works. 

·    A number of exemptions to that threshold are listed, most of which are exemptions available under existing legislation. Some additional exemptions have been incorporated to better enable flexibility to undertake the most appropriate sourcing approach to help ensure best value is achieved. 

PUBLIC TENDER THRESHOLD

To determine the proposed tendering threshold of $300,000 including GST, the NCA took a number of factors into consideration:

·    The broad differences in size, budget, locality and procurement maturity within the NCA member organisations necessitated compromise, uplifting smaller members and slightly restraining larger members.  The threshold alignment enables collaboration without undue impact on any member’s ability to achieve best value.

·    The existing s186 thresholds ($150,000 for services/goods and $200,000 for works) have remained unchanged for about a decade.  The increase to $300,000, while above CPI, is still low enough to drive substantial open competition.

·    In the NCA over 90 per cent of publicly tendered contracts are currently valued over $300,000.

·    Under section 108(4)(a) of LGA 2020 the threshold cannot exceed any prescribed maximum. While no regulations have yet been introduced, a conservative early approach helps ensure our policy will remain compliant if a maximum is prescribed.

·    Many other Victorian councils are considering adopting a similar threshold (e.g. the Eastern Region Group of Councils was considering a threshold of $250,000 to $300,000).

COLLABORATION

The policy requires that Council must consider collaboration on contracts with a minimum value of $1 million per annum.

The Northern Region Procurement Excellence Network (i.e. the key procurement Staff of the NCA) will develop an annual consolidated contract register to identify appropriate collaborative procurement opportunities.

There will be an ability to opt-in to collaborative contracts during the contract term to assist with alignment of needs and remove barriers.  Each participating council must be involved in:

·    The initial decision to undertake the Collaborative Procurement;

·    Preparation of, and agreement to, the specifications;

·    Ensuring probity for the Collaborative Procurement, and

·    The acceptance of tenders and awarding of contracts.

Any Federal or State Government grant funded projects may be excluded from collaborative procurement.

Proposal

It is proposed that the policy is adopted as presented with minimal or no change to the content in the body text which is common to all drafts presented to members of the NCA.  The policy is required to be reviewed by Council at least once in every term.  It is intended that any changes to the body text are made in consultation with, and collectively by, all NCA members to ensure standardisation is maintained to the greatest degree practicable.

Council specific requirements that are detailed in the appendices may be amended at any time as they do not affect other NCA members and have little or no impact on collaboration.  To ensure the ability to meet operational and strategic needs, it is proposed that the appendices may be reviewed and amended at any time or frequency (i.e. as and when required by the Council or the Executive Leadership Team).  As a minimum this will occur once in every Council term when the body of the policy is reviewed.

Consultation

The standardised Procurement Policy was collaboratively drafted by procurement staff of the NCA in consultation with their Corporate Services Directors.  Representatives of Local Government Victoria from the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (DJPR) have endorsed the collaborative approach.

The draft policy was reviewed by Maddocks Lawyers who provided feedback on compliance with the requirements of the Act. Recommended amendments were incorporated.

The updated draft was sent to the Municipal Association of Victoria and Sustainability Victoria for review and comment. Recommended amendments were incorporated.

A final legal review was conducted by Maddocks Lawyers with all final recommendations incorporated.

Enquiries with Council’s Public Affairs team confirmed a community engagement process is not a pre-requisite to publish or endorse the Procurement Policy.

Critical Dates

Under the Local Government Act 2020:

·    The current Procurement Policy under Local Government Act 1989 (LGA 1989), will continue to apply until a new procurement policy is adopted;

·    Each Council must adopt a complying policy which must be implemented on a date between 1 July 2021 and 31 December 2021 inclusive; and

·    The new policy must be reviewed once during each Council term.

The endorsement of the new policy in May with an effective date of 1 July allows sufficient time to ensure appropriate implementation, training and promotion in relation to the amended procurement requirements.  Aligning the change with the commencement of a new financial year will ensure data enables consistent reporting.

Financial Implications

The efficient and effective procurement of goods and services is an outcome of good governance and effective financial management. It ensures that public funds are used in a proper manner and that best value is achieved.

Policy strategy and legislation

The Procurement Policy has key linkages with legislation and a range of internal and external strategies and policies. Refer to section 5 of the attached policy for further details.

As the revised policy is based on Council’s existing policy, it continues to align with the delivery of Whittlesea 2040 priorities.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Financial Sustainability - Inability to meet current and future expenditure

The effective management of strategic procurement is evidenced by amendments relating to a regional collaboration policy and the setting of performance targets. The maximisation of savings and sustainable procurement spend is a key action in the mitigation of financial sustainability risks.

Strategic Risk Contractor Management - Failure to manage contractors to deliver agreed outcomes

Effective contract management is essential to ensuring benefits are realised and operational risks are mitigated. The Procurement Policy mandates contract management requirements commensurate with the complexity of the procurement and proactive management by Council Staff to ensure the community receives value for money.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More cost-effective investment through better return on investment, efficiency and an engaged workforce

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The revised Procurement Policy improves opportunities to collaborate and introduces more flexibility to procure works goods and services via the methodology that will best achieve value for money with minimal risk.

The policy meets Council’s high standards of transparency, probity and efficiency while supporting the principles of good governance and the delivery of Whittlesea 2040 priorities.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Note that the Procurement Policy review under section 186A of the Local Government Act 1989 was concluded on 24 March 2021 and that the existing policy will remain in force until 30 June 2021.

2.   Adopt the revised Procurement Policy (Attachment 1) in accordance with section 108(6) of the Local Government Act 2020 with an effective date of 1 July 2021.

3.   Review the Procurement Policy in consultation with the other members of the Northern Councils Alliance at least once in every 4 year term of the Council.

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

ITEM 6.5.4 For Decision - Proposed Motions - MAV State Council Meeting   

Responsible Officer:            Executive Manager Governance

Author:                                  Principal Governance Advisor   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to support the submission of the following motions for consideration at the MAV State Council Meeting on 21 May 2021:

1.   The MAV State Council request the Victorian Government to call upon Federal and State governments to work with local government in the roll-out of the Covid-19 mass vaccination programs.  Council is concerned that not enough planning is being done at a municipal level to adequately support a mass vaccination program in the community and to ensure that those at risk and the general community have access to a Covid-19 vaccine service provider. Council is also concerned that unsustainable systems are being set up that will not service the community into the future as new Covid-19 scenarios evolve potentially requiring regular booster doses and new vaccinations as the virus changes; and

2.   The MAV State Council request the Victorian Government to work with Councils for whom three year old kindergarten reform is forecast to have major consequences to ensure that reform objectives are realised in a way that does not undermine Councils’ financial sustainability and capacity to deliver on a range of other community priorities.  The City of Whittlesea estimates the local gap between forecast demand and currently planned provision for kindergarten in our municipality will be approximately 4000 (additional) places required by 2029.  

Brief overview

The MAV State Council meets twice a year and considers proposed motions from member Councils.  It is proposed that Council submit two motions to the State Council meeting scheduled to be held on 21 May 2021.

rationale for recommendation

The proposed motions align with and promotes Council’s operational priorities and ongoing advocacy efforts to other levels of government.

impacts of recommendation

The proposed motions, if adopted by the MAV, will further Council’s advocacy efforts with other levels of government aimed at improving community safety and strengthening Council’s long-term financial sustainability.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Council is also writing to local MP’s seeking support for the proposed motions.

 

Report

Background

The MAV State Council meets twice a year and considers proposed motions from member Councils.

Proposal

It is proposed that Council submit the two motions to the MAV State Council meeting on 21 May 2021.

Australian Covid-19 Vaccination Program

Proposed motion:

The MAV State Council writes to the Premier of Victoria and Ministers for Health, Jobs and Local Government to call upon Federal and State governments to work with local government in the roll-out of the Covid-19 mass vaccination programs. 

Council is concerned that not enough planning is being done at a municipal level to adequately support a mass vaccination program in the community and to ensure that those at risk and the general community have access to a Covid-19 vaccine service provider. 

Council is also concerned that unsustainable systems are being set up that will not service the community into the future as new Covid-19 scenarios evolve potentially requiring regular booster doses and new vaccinations as the virus changes.

Council’s Rationale for the motion:

In Victoria, local government is a major provider of immunisation services to infants, school aged children and adults.  Councils are mandated under the Victorian Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 to coordinate and provide immunisation services to the local community. 

Local Government has been a trusted provider of vaccinations to the community for decades and coordinates locally with General Practice and Community Health Centres to maintain the high vaccination rates that Victoria has achieved.  City of  Whittlesea Council’s Immunisation Team administers over 30,000 vaccines per annum. Victorian local government therefore has expertise and experience to be a major partner in the roll-out of both the Federal and Victorian Governments’ mass vaccination programs.

To date, Victorian Councils have received very little formal briefing or advice on local governments role in mass vaccinations, despite our clear expertise, administration and systems, local networks, large public venues, and staffing.  The Commonwealth and State have concentrated on local GPs , Pharmacists,  Hospitals and Community Health as the key providers.

We note in the State Governments Victorian Covid-19 Vaccination Guidelines that Health Services Hubs, health services, GPs, and pharmacies are designated as providers.  There is no mention of local government or the need to consult locally for planning, communications, venues etc.

Within the City of Whittlesea, we have 11 GP clinics (out of 59) who responded to the Expression of Interest from the Eastern Melbourne Primary Health Network to deliver Covid-19 vaccinations. We are also aware that Northern Health and DPV Health will be providing vaccination services.  We are concerned that with this limited number of service providers it will take potentially years to vaccinate our community.

 

3YO Kindergarten Reform

Proposed motion:

The MAV State Council request the Victorian Government to work with Councils for whom three year old kindergarten reform is forecast to have major consequences to ensure that reform objectives are realised in a way that does not undermine Councils’ financial sustainability and capacity to deliver on a range of other community priorities. 

The City of Whittlesea estimates the local gap between forecast demand and currently planned provision for kindergarten in our municipality will be approximately 4000 (additional) places required by 2029.  

Council’s Rationale for the motion:

In 2019, based on compelling evidence of lifelong benefits, the Victorian government announced universal access to 15 hours of three-year-old kindergarten and committed almost $5billion over ten years.

From the start of 2022, all three-year-old’s will have access to 5 hours per week rising to 15 hours by 2029.

This is the latest of a series of Kindergarten reforms impacting Victorian local governments across their varying roles in kindergarten:

·    2013 the federal government committed to increase universal access to four-year-old kindergarten from 10 to 15 hours which triggered a need for additional capacity.

·    2014 the requirement to have an early childhood teacher

·    2016 the staff child ratio changed from 1:10 – 1:11 which triggered a need to expand capacity of many existing kindergarten rooms to optimise service viability.

The impacts of 3-year-old reform are magnified in growth areas where legislative frameworks for long term planning for kinder provision predate these reforms and are only based on growth in four-year-old populations.

Kindergarten infrastructure and operational costs are contributed to by both the federal and state governments, however, typically the actual cost of provision has exceeded these grants and providers have had to fund the difference through fees and other revenue.

The rollout of 3-year-old kindergarten needs to occur in a way that does not impact the financial viability of Victorian local governments or their capacity to deliver a balanced range of services to their communities.

Consultation

Administrators were briefed on the proposed motions at a Briefing meeting held on 12 April 2021 and provided in principle support for both motions.

Critical Dates

The deadline for submission of proposed motions was 23 April 2021. However, as in principle support for the motions was provided by Administrators at the Briefing meeting held on 12 April 2021, the two motion were submitted before the deadline.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications in relation to the proposal.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk

 Not linked to the risks within the Strategic Risk Register.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        Driving better community outcomes through improved service access, satisfaction and advocacy

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council support the proposed motions for consideration at the MAV State Council meeting.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to support the submission of the following motions for consideration at the MAV State Council Meeting on 21 May 2021:

1.   The MAV State Council request the Victorian Government to call upon Federal and State governments to work with local government in the roll-out of the Covid-19 mass vaccination programs.  Council is concerned that not enough planning is being done at a municipal level to adequately support a mass vaccination program in the community and to ensure that those at risk and the general community have access to a Covid-19 vaccine service provider. Council is also concerned that unsustainable systems are being set up that will not service the community into the future as new Covid-19 scenarios evolve potentially requiring regular booster doses and new vaccinations as the virus changes; and

2.   The MAV State Council request the Victorian Government to work with Councils for whom three year old kindergarten reform is forecast to have major consequences to ensure that reform objectives are realised in a way that does not undermine Councils’ financial sustainability and capacity to deliver on a range of other community priorities.  The City of Whittlesea estimates the local gap between forecast demand and currently planned provision for kindergarten in our municipality will be approximately 4000 (additional) places required by 2029.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

7.         Notices of Motion

Nil Reports 

8.         Questions to Officers

9.         Urgent BusineSS


10.       Reports from Delegates Appointed BY Council TO Other Bodies

ITEM 10.1  For Noting - Informal Meetings of Administrators and Delegate Meetings - 4 May 2021   

Responsible Officer:            Executive Manager Governance

Author:                                  Governance Officer   

 

recommendation summary

That Council note the record of Informal Meetings of Administrators and Delegate Meetings for the period 23 March 2021 to 28 April 2021 as set out in the tables below in this report.

BRIEF OVERVIEW

The Council is required to note at a Council Meeting that meetings involving Administrators have taken place and topics discussed.  This report provides details involving the Panel of Administrators within the last month.

rationale for recommendation

It is a requirement of Chapter 6 of the Governance Rules for Informal Meetings of Administrators to be reported to Council.  Whereas delegate reports may be reported to the Council meeting at the Administrator’s discretion.

impacts of recommendation

This report will be presented to each monthly scheduled Council Meeting. 

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

No impacts are expected.  On rare occasions an item considered at a meeting receives a media enquiry.  If requests for more information are received, these will be managed by our communications team in consultation with the Chair of Administrators.


 

Report

Background

It is a requirement of Chapter 6 of the Governance Rules for Informal Meetings of Administrators records to be reported to Council.  Whereas delegate reports may be reported to the Council meeting at the Administrator’s discretion.

The Local Government (Whittlesea City Council) Act 2020 dismissed all Councillors from the City of Whittlesea effective Saturday 21 March 2020.  Ms Lydia Wilson was appointed Interim Administrator for a three-month period commencing on 21 March 2020.

On 19 June 2020, the Panel of Administrators for the City of Whittlesea were appointed.  The Panel of Administrators comprises of Chair Ms Lydia Wilson, the Hon Bruce Billson and Ms Peita Duncan.

On 5 March 2021, the Hon Bruce Billson resigned from his position as Administrator with the City of Whittlesea. The State Government will make a new appointment to the vacant position.

Ms Lydia Wilson and Ms Peita Duncan will continue to carry out the role, responsibilities and functions of a Councillor as set out in Section 231(1)(a) of the Local Government Act 2020 until their appointment ends following the October 2024 Local Government Elections.

In accordance with Rule 1 (Chapter 6) of the Governance Rules 2020 an Informal Meeting of Administrators is a meeting of at least one Administrator that is:

·    scheduled or planned for the purpose of discussing the business of Council or briefing Administrators;

·    attended by at least one Officer; and

·    not a Council Meeting, Delegated Committee Meeting or Community Asset Committee Meeting.

The Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a summary of the matters discussed at the meeting are tabled at the next Council Meeting and recorded in the minutes of that Meeting.

Proposal

Informal Meetings of Administrators records not previously reported to Council are detailed in the following table:

Informal Meetings

Administrator attendees

Officer attendees

Matters discussed

External: Local Government Victoria – Online Meeting

26 March 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

CEO

 

1.    Implementation Matters for Mayors, Councillors and CEOs

Nil disclosures

External: Meeting with Whittlesea Agricultural Society and Whittlesea Showgrounds Committee

1 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

CEO

Whittlesea Showgrounds and Recreation Reserves Committee of Management:

1.    Introduction meeting

2.    History and background of Committees

3.    Major and general works undertaken

4.    Relevance to the City of Whittlesea recent document the Whittlesea Township Strategy

5.    City of Whittlesea representation on the Committee

 

 

Whittlesea Agricultural Society Inc:

1.    Introduction meeting

2.    History and background of the Society

3.    Significance and contribution to the broader community

4.    Annual Show and its connection to the City of Whittlesea and other collaborations

5.    Whittlesea Township Strategy

Nil disclosures

Internal: Council Briefing

6 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

DCS

DCW

DIE

DPD

EMG

EMPA

MED

MPUD

SAPR

TLPRD

 

1.    Council Meeting Forward Plan

2.    Contract 2020-97 – HR Uren East Pitch Redevelopment – Synthetic Turf Design and Construct

3.    Petition to Replace Trees Along Fielding Drive, Mernda

4.    Motions (of statewide significance) for consideration at MAV State Council Meeting May 2021

5.    Supporting our Business Community

6.    General Business:

a)    Aboriginal Gathering Place

b)    Administrator/Executive whereabouts

c)    Investment Attraction Strategy

d)    Structure

e)    COVID-19 Vaccination

f)     26 April – Citizenship Ceremony

g)    Epping Animal Welfare Facility

h)    Agricultural Society & Whittlesea Showgrounds

i)     Administrator & CEO Q&A

Nil disclosures

Internal: Council Briefing

12 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

DCW

DIE

DPD

EA-CEO

IMMO

IMEI

IMFC

IMSP

IPPO

SWSO

TLEY

WRO

1.    Contract 2018-23 – Pre-booked Kerbside Green Waste Collection Service – Contract Variation Report

2.    3 Year Old Kindergarten Reform

3.    Epping Community Services Hub Management

4.    General Business:

a)    Laurimar Trees

b)    Mass Vaccination

c)    Administrator Appointment Update

d)    Recruitment

Nil disclosures

Internal: Council Briefing

20 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

CFO

DCW

DCS

DIE

DPD

DPE

EA-CEO

EMG

MACP

MCD

MCP

MCSA

SIE

TLBS

TLCPI

TLGA

TLHS

TLMLF

TLP

1.    Cooper Street West Resource Recovery Hub

External in attendance: Gino Mitrione, Consultant, Partners Property Advisory & Valuations

2.    Quarterly Corporate Performance Report for Quarter Ended 31 March 2021

3.    Contract 2020-111: Concrete Construction and Reinstatement – Tender Evaluation Report

4.    Contract 2020-141: Management and Operation of TRAC – Tender Evaluation

5.    Procurement Policy review

6.    City of Whittlesea Community Awards Committee Terms of Reference, Proposed Awards Categories and Criteria for 2021

7.    Update on New Legislation for Aquatic Facilities

8.    General Business:

a)    MAV Motions

b)    New Administrator – LGA advised ‘on track’

c)    Laurimar Cricket Nets

d)    Trail Blazers meeting

e)    DPV & Northern Health weekly meetings

Nil disclosures

Internal: Council Briefing

26 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

DPD

DCW

DCS

DIE

EMG

EMPA

IMEI

MED

PMIA

1.    Investment Attractions Strategy – Urbis Consultants

Externals in attendance: Urbis Consultants – Mark Dawson, Mariko Kimura and Sue Say

2.    Olivine Place Launch

External in attendance: Chris Bracher, Community Development Manager MIRVAC

3.    General Business:

a)    State Government discussions

b)    Mill Park Leisure Centre gym opening

c)    MAV motions

d)    Federal Government grants funding

Nil disclosures

Delegate Meetings attended by Administrators are detailed in the following table:

Committee Meetings

Administrator attendees

Officer attendees

Matters discussed

Yarra Plenty Regional Library 2021-2025 Strategy Board Briefing

25 March 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

 

DCW

DPD

 

1.    Yarra Plenty Regional Library Strategic Planning Session

Nil disclosures

Whittlesea Community Connections Board Meeting

19 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

 

1.    Update provided by the Legal Team

2.    Overview provided on the role and current activities, partnerships developing with Aboriginal organisations and future plans.

3.    Governance issues

Nil disclosures

Yarra Plenty Regional Library – Ordinary Board Meeting

22 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

DCW

1.    Presentation by Whittlesea Branch Manager

2.    CEO Report

3.    Quarterly Finance Report

4.    Draft Budget 2021/2022 and Strategic Resource Plan 2022/2025

5.    EEO Anti-Discrimination Bullying and Sexual Harassment Policy

6.    Performance Improvement Disciplinary Policy

7.    OHS Policy

8.    2021 Christmas Hours and Closedown

9.    Draft YPRL Library Plan 2021-2025

Nil disclosure

Media & Event Commitments

Media & Event Commitments

Date

Administrator attendees

Internal: Redevelopment of Mill Park Basketball Stadium – Turning of the Sod

25 March 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

External: Ivanhoe Library and Cultural Hub – Launch Ceremony

25 March 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

External: Online Briefing with the Minister for Local Government

30 March 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

External: New Epping Sod Turn – Riverlee

31 March 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

Internal: Photoshoot regarding the resurfacing of Yale Drive, Epping, using 97% recycled materials

6 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

Internal: Information Session - Support for Commercial Tenants

7 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

Peita Duncan

Internal: Mernda Social Support Services Centre – Turning of the Sod

22 April 2021

Peita Duncan

Public Event: Citizenship Ceremony

26 April 2021

Lydia Wilson (Chair)

The table below represents an Index of Officer titles:

Initials

Title of Officer

Initials

Title of Officer

CEO

Chief Executive Officer – Craig Lloyd

MCP

Manager City Presentation – Anthony Kyrkou

CFO

Chief Financial Officer – Mark Montague

MCSA

Manager City Safety & Amenity – Andrew Mason

DCS

Director Corporate Services – Amy Montalti

MED

Manager Economic Development – Sarah Rowe

DCW

Director Community Wellbeing – Kate McCaughey

MPUD

Manager Parks & Urban Design – Susan Hecker

DIE

Director Infrastructure & Environment – Debbie Wood

PMIA

Project Manager – Investment Attraction – Kate Weatherley

DPD

Director Planning & Development – Justin O’Meara

SAPR

Senior Arborist Planning & Risk – Will Jones

DPE

Directorate Projects Executive – Jack Jansen

SIE

Senior Infrastructure Engineer – Samuel Beshai

EA-CEO

Executive Assistant to Chief Executive Officer – Madeleine Knowles

SWSO

Senior Waste Services Officer – Simone Chetwynd-Brown

EMG

Executive Manager Governance – Frank Joyce

TLBS

Team Leader Business Support – Rod Cann

EMPA

Executive Manager Public Affairs – Kristi High

TLCPI

Team Leader Corporate Planning & Improvement – Robert Kisgen

IMEI

Interim Manager Equity & Inclusion – Joanne Kyrkilis

TLEY

Team Leader Early Years – Bridgid Keele

IMFC

Interim Manager Family & Children – Steve Ward

TLGA

Team Leader Governance Administration – Amanda Marijanovic

IMMO

Interim Manager Maintenance & Operations – Anthony Kyrkou

TLHS

Team Leader Health Services – Ralph Mertins

IMSP

Interim Manager Strategic Projects – Catherine Simcox

TLMLF

Team Leader Major Leisure Facilities – Jacinda Hunt

IPPO

Infrastructure Planning & Projects Officer – Nadine Klobucar

TLP

Team Leader Procurement – Tom Masters

MACP

Manager Active & Creative Participation – Ben Waterhouse

TLPRD

Team Leader Public Realm Development – Adrian Napoleone

MCD

Manager Capital Delivery – Nick Mazzarella

WRO

Waste & Recycling Officer – Randa Almushcab

Consultation

Consultation has taken place with Council Officer representatives of each of the meetings and committees that qualify as an Informal Meeting of Administrators. In relation to delegates reports consultation was undertaken with the office of the Chief Executive Officer.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Policy Strategy and Legislation

Section 9(2)(i) of the Local Government Act 2020 provides that Council must in the performance of its role give effect to the overarching governance principles which includes that the transparency of Council’s decisions, actions and information is to be ensured.

It is a requirement of Chapter 6 of the Governance Rules for Informal Meetings of Administrators records to be reported to Council.

Whereas delegate reports may be reported to the Council meeting at the Administrator’s discretion.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Governance Rules Informal Meetings of Administrators will be presented at each monthly Council meeting.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High Performing Organisation

Key Direction                        More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

The provision of this report is in line with Whittlesea 2040 and the Council Plan by ensuring Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

It is recommended that the report containing details of the business transacted at recent Informal Meetings of Administrators and Delegate Meetings be noted.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to note the records of the Informal Meetings of Administrators and Delegate Meetings to the period 23 March 2021 to 28 April 2021 in the table set out in the report.

  


Scheduled Council Meeting Agenda                Tuesday 4 May 2021

 

11.       Confidential Business

11.1     Connected Communities

Nil Reports

 

11.2     Liveable Neighbourhoods

Nil Reports

 

11.3     Strong Local Economy

Nil Reports

 

11.4     Sustainable Environment

Nil Reports

 

11.5     High Performing Organisation

Nil Reports

 

11.6     Notices of Motion

Nil Reports

12.       Closure