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Minutes

 

OF Scheduled
COUNCIL MEETING

HELD ON

Monday 7 December 2020

AT 3.00pm

VIA ZOOM


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

 

 

COUNCIL

 

LYDIA WILSON                            CHAIR OF COUNCIL

THE HON. BRUCE BILLSON       ADMINISTRATOR

On 19 June 2020 the Acting Minister for Local Government, Daniel Andrews appointed the Panel of Administrators for the City of Whittlesea and appointed Lydia Wilson as Chair of the Panel.  The Panel of Administrators comprises of Ms Lydia Wilson, The Honourable Bruce Billson and Ms Peita Duncan and they will undertake the duties of the Council of the City of Whittlesea until the October 2024 Local Government Election.PEITA DUNCAN                           ADMINISTRATOR

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

 

 

SENIOR OFFICERS

 

 

CRAIG LLOYD                              CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

FRANK JOYCE                             ACTING EXECUTIVE MANAGER GOVERNANCE

KATE MCCAUGHEY                    DIRECTOR COMMUNITY WELLBEING

AMY MONTALTI                           DIRECTOR CORPORATE SERVICES & PERFORMANCE

JUSTIN O’MEARA                        DIRECTOR PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

DEBBIE WOOD                            DIRECTOR INFRASTRUCTURE & ENVIRONMENT

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

 

ORDER OF BUSINESS

 

The Chief Executive Officer submitted the following business:

 

1.           Opening.. 11

1.1        MEETING OPENING & INTRODUCTIONS.. 11

1.2        PRAYER BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER.. 11

1.3        ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT. 12

1.4        VERBAL COVID-19 UPDATE BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER.. 12

1.5        PRESENTATION BY VICTORIA STATE EMERGENCY SERVICE TO COUNCIL – MUNCIPAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN AUDIT CERTIFICATE.. 14

1.6        AWARDS WON BY TWO LOCAL BUSINESSES Repurpose It and Floridia Cheese AT NORTHERN BUSINESS ACHIEVEMENT GRAND FINALE.. 16

1.7        CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER STATEMENT. 17

1.8        Present. 17

2.           Apologies.. 17

3.           Declarations of Interest. 17

4.           Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting.. 18

5.        Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters.. 18

5.1        Questions To ADMINISTRATORS.. 18

5.2        Petition TABLED.. 19

5.2.1      Request to Council to reject the construction of five dwellings at 30 Paddock Street, Whittlesea (Planning Application Number: 2020-719338) 19

5.3        Joint Letters.. 21

Nil Reports.. 21

6.           Officers’ Reports.. 23

6.1        Executive Services.. 25

6.1.1      For Noting - COVID-19 Update on Key Issues - December 2020. 25

6.1.2      For Decision - Scheduled Council Meetings for 2021. 31

6.1.3      For Decision - Proposed adoption of the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law 2020. 37

6.1.4      For Noting - Annual Report 2019-2020. 57

6.1.5      For Noting - Informal Meetings of Administrators - 7 December 2020. 61

6.2        Planning and Development. 67

6.2.1      For Noting - Epping Community Services Hub Annual Report. 67

6.2.2      For Noting - Whittlesea Community Connections Annual Report. 91

6.3        Community Wellbeing.. 103

6.3.1      For Decision - Refocusing Council's 2021 Australia Day Celebrations.. 103

6.3.2      FOR DECISION - Sporting and Community Pavilion Guidelines and Sports Lighting Policy Update.. 113

6.3.3      For Decision - Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre at Mernda Project Scoping.. 181

6.4        Infrastructure and Environment. 195

6.4.1      For Decision - Contract 2020-68 - Food and Organics Waste Disposal and Processing - Tender Evaluation Report. 195

6.4.2      For Decision - Review of the Road Management Plan and Endorsement of Draft for Public Exhibition.. 201

6.4.3      For Decision - Integrated Water Management Strategy - Water for All. 301

6.4.4      For Decision - Traffic Management - Masons Road.. 333

6.5        Corporate Services and Performance.. 351

6.5.1      For Decision - Cooper Street West Resource Recovery Hub - Shortlist of Expression of Interest process for lease of council land at 480 Cooper Street, Epping.. 351

6.5.2      For Noting - Quarterly Financial Report for the period ended 30 September 2020. 417

6.5.3      For Decision - 2020/21 New Works Program - First Quarter Report. 441

6.5.4      For Noting - Council Action Plan 2020-2021 Quarter 1 Progress Report. 469

7.           Notices of Motion.. 477

Nil Reports.. 477

8.           Questions to Officers.. 477

9.           Urgent Business.. 477

10.        Reports from Delegates Appointed by Council to Other Bodies.. 477

11.        Confidential Business.. 481

11.1      Executive Services.. 481

11.1.1    FOR NOTING – CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES AND ASSOCIATED ACTIONS OF CEMAC MEETING HELD 23 NOVEMBER 2020. 481

11.2      Planning and Development. 483

Nil Reports.. 483

11.3      Community Wellbeing.. 483

Nil Reports.. 483

11.4      Infrastructure and Environment. 483

Nil Reports.. 483

11.5      Corporate Services and Performance.. 483

Nil Reports.. 483

11.6      Notices of Motion.. 485

Nil Reports.. 485

12.        Closure.. 486

 

 

Note:

In these Minutes, Resolutions adopted by Council are indicated in bold text.

 

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

1.         Opening

1.1       MEETING OPENING & INTRODUCTIONS

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson opened the meeting at 3:00PM and provided the following introductory statement:

“Welcome to this Council meeting of 7 December which is again being livestreamed. This is the last Council meeting for the year with the next Council meeting being in early February 2021.

 

I am Lydia Wilson, Chair of the Panel of Administrators and I would also like to introduce my colleagues, Administrators Ms Peita Duncan and The Hon. Bruce Billson.

 

I would also like to introduce our Chief Executive Officer, Mr Craig Lloyd and Mr Lloyd if I could ask that in turn you introduce the members of your Executive Leadership Team in attendance today.”

 

The Chief Executive Officer, Mr Craig Lloyd then introduced the members of the Executive Leadership Team:

 

“Good afternoon everyone, we also have with us:

 

Director Planning & Development, Mr Justin O’Meara;

Director Community Wellbeing, Ms Kate McCaughey;

Director Infrastructure & Environment, Ms Debbie Wood.

Director Corporate Services & Performance, Ms Amy Montalti; and

Acting Executive Manager Governance, Mr Frank Joyce.

 

These members of the Executive Leadership Team will join us during the meeting.”

1.2       PRAYER BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Following the Introductions, the Chief Executive Officer read the following prayer:

 

Almighty God, we humbly beseech thee, to vouchsafe thy blessing upon this council.  Direct and prosper its deliberations to the advancement of thy glory and the true welfare of the people of the Whittlesea City Council.

 

Our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive them that trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever.

 

Amen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.3       ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson read the following statement:

“On behalf of the City of Whittlesea I recognise the rich Aboriginal heritage of this country and acknowledge the Wurundjeri Willum Clan as the Traditional Owners of this place.

I would also like to personally acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.”

1.4       VERBAL COVID-19 UPDATE BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

The Chief Executive Officer verbally informed the Council of some key points in relation to the COVID-19 Update (please refer to item 6.1.1 of this Minutes document for a complete version of the COVID-19 Update Report that was circulated to the Council):

 

“In November, Victoria welcomed the Last Step of the Victorian Government’s roadmap to re-opening and our restrictions eased and our facilities began to reopen. It is a great achievement to have zero cases in Victoria for 38 consecutive days. Also, pleasing that our testing rates remain high in the City of Whittlesea so our community is being very vigilant in helping to contain the virus.

 

During November, Council services continued to open in line with the roadmap. Our customer service desks in South Morang and Westfield reopened. Our libraries, TRACC, the Epping Animal Welfare Facility, Community Activity Centres, Neighbourhood Houses and sports pavilions all reopened during November with appropriate modifications and COVID-safe plans in place.

 

We were also able to resume services including:

 

o    social support and respite for carers groups;

o    the LEAP golf program;

o    pet animal and pest plant inspections;

o    inspections of vacant blocks for the fire danger period; and

o    face to face maternal and child health appointments increased.

 

The impacts on business continue to be felt - in November, 21 food or health and beauty premises closed permanently. It is encouraging though to see new businesses open in our municipality and we wish them every success.

 

Council is working to provide local businesses support in as many ways we can by:

 

o    providing outdoor dining infrastructure; and

o    continuing to waive footpath trading permits.

 

A second 4-week campaign promoting local businesses has been relaunched under the banner of “Shop Local for Christmas” to encourage support for local businesses in the lead up to Christmas. We’ve continued our financial support to local relief agencies with two new financial and one in-kind request received from three non-government organisations in November.

 

Council is also continuing to develop new projects that will help our community to reconnect and recover from the impacts of the pandemic through arts, culture and creativity.

 

 

The annual City of Whittlesea Christmas Carols event was re-imagined this year and will be delivered online via social media and the Whittlesea Arts website on Friday 11 December. The Summer Series of events has also been adapted to meet ongoing changes to restrictions. The season will kick off with a series of five free family entertainment and film nights throughout the municipality in January, featuring live music, circus performers, food trucks and a feature film on a large outdoor cinema screen.

 

From today, we will be moving into a COVIDSafe Summer plan. This will allow Victorians more freedom but obviously with some necessary rules and restrictions that are still required until a vaccine is available. Density limits have increased which means more opportunity for our local food businesses.

 

A greater return to offices has also been foreshadowed for early in the new year. Council will be considering that in terms of its own offices and the number of staff we will be able to have return. I just want to finally acknowledge what a challenging year it has been for our community and thank everyone for staying home and for working together to reduce COVID numbers. Let’s hope that the COVIDSafe Summer plan provides a much more optimistic outlook for 2021. Thank you.”


 

Chief Executive Officer Explanatory Note
The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson sought to suspend standing orders in order to provide the Victorian State Emergency Service with an opportunity to present Council with a certificate relating to the Municipal Emergency Plan Audit.
1.5       PRESENTATION BY VICTORIA STATE EMERGENCY SERVICE TO COUNCIL – MUNCIPAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN AUDIT CERTIFICATE

suspension of standing orders

MOved:                       Administrator Wilson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to suspend Standing Orders to provide the Victorian State Emergency Service with an opportunity to present Council with a certificate relating to the Municipal Emergency Plan Audit.

CARRIED

 

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson provided some background information regarding Council’s involvement with local emergency services:

Council has a very long history of working with local emergency services, agencies and community organisations through the Municipal Emergency Management Planning Committee to plan for emergencies that might impact on our community.

The Committee is responsible for developing the Municipal Emergency Management Plan which spells out how emergencies are to be responded to locally. 

Council has a key role in supporting frontline agencies as well as providing relief and recovery services to the affected community.

Every 3 years the State Emergency Service audits the Municipal Plan to ensure that it complies with relevant guidelines.

I am pleased to advise that in October 2020 the Plan was audited by the Victoria State Emergency Service who specifically acknowledged the efforts of Council and commended Council emergency management staff for their time given in developing [the] plan and for participating in the audit process. To quote: ‘Their effort is reflected in the high standard of [the] plan, supporting systems and feedback received from the audit panel members’

The general comments in the Audit Workbook state and I quote: ‘the plan is comprehensive, well-structured and shows a commitment to supporting the community in emergencies’.

I would now like to introduce John Chaplain who is the Regional Manager Operations of the Victorian State Emergency Service, to say a few words.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following the Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson’s introduction, Mr John Chaplain, Regional Manager Operations, Victorian State Emergency Service read out the following speech:

Thank you for the invite to present the audit results today. You have covered off a fair bit of my thunder there, which is fine. The Whittlesea Municipal Emergency Plan was conducted in virtual mode using Microsoft Teams, a challenge in itself I have to say. One of the things made easier for us was the high level of evidence that Council were able to show prior to that. We do a pre audit, and that pre audit was able to make the day a much easier process, otherwise, if that didn’t occur we would be trying to share documents which is just almost impossible.

The backdrop to the audit here is somewhat different than normal as we all know. The impact of covid has affected us all, it has affected all our abilities to do certain things and so on. Having said that, to get to the audit stage is a triumph in itself to be honest in these times. There has also been some restructuring that has occurred in your agency which adds to the backdrop of this sort of work. SES seconded one of your staff, Peter Duncombe who came into my team and I have to say that Peter was absolutely fantastic, we did not want to give him back. He did very well for us and we got Peter at a time where we needed him but obivously that put you one Council Officer down aswell.

The previous plan needed some signficant work aswell, even though it was ok it wasn’t at the level it is at now. The other thing to add is the significant change in the sector particularly the changes to legislation that is going on at the moment. It takes us into a whole lot of change. The backdrop is pretty complex to be honest, the result that we got is that the evidence produced by Council was absolutely extensive. It covered off not only that Council’s plan complied with the audit, it actually surpassed many of the areas aswell and this is a consistent thing with the City of Whittlesea Council. The standard that Council is putting up each audit is of high quality.

The plan was quick, concise and well articulated. It picked up on identified improvements from the last audit. It is easy just to get a plan up and say ok we have met minimum standards, but Council has gone beyond that. The plan will now easily convert to the new legislation, and Council has shaped it in the way that meets the standards set out now as we move forward in the sector with the new legislation. The new structure being embedded currently will ensure the maintenance of the standards are being maintained. All of that is a fantastic result.

Two highlights that I have picked out by talking to the auditor was that the Whittlesea Emergency Management Team have excellent stakeholder relationships with all the sector, industry and community at large. They understand the community, the risks and the community need. The other side of it which is really good, which has happened since Black Saturday, is your operational readiness. It is one thing to have a plan and it's another thing to be operationally ready to respond to events as required to keep the community safe. Time after time, you prove that.

The Department of Human Services and Victoria Police are also part of the audit panel and strongly support the Whittlesea Emergency Plan and its planning arrangements. They've articulated that in their letters. I would like to say well done to the team as well, Neville Kurth, Jacinta Elliott, Peter Duncombe, Ben Harries, David Foster, plus our SES person there, Gerabeth Abbott who has done a fantastic job in linking it all together with the plan. The strong support from the leadership team as well as an executive here at Whittlesea. I would just like to say congratulations on an excellent result. This will no doubt lead you on to maintaining this high level of standard into the future. So well done to everyone involved. Thank you.

 

 

After Mr John Chaplain, Regional Manager Operations, Victorian State Emergency Service spoke, the Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson concluded the presentation as follows:

“Thank you very much, Mr Chaplain, for being with us today. Also, it's great to hear your staff acknowledgements, both Council staff and also staff of the other emergency services agencies such as your own. From my perspective it's really heartening to also hear your comment about the Whittlesea's operational readiness, that's really a very good comment to make.

 

I wasn't aware that there were that many challenges, both in terms of legislative changes, but also the fact that you had to do a fair amount of the auditing virtually. So, thank you again for coming along to the council meeting and for all of your efforts, on behalf of our local communities. Thank you.”

1.6     AWARDS WON BY TWO LOCAL BUSINESSES Repurpose It and Floridia Cheese AT NORTHERN BUSINESS ACHIEVEMENT GRAND FINALE

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson provided the meeting with the following update regarding two local businesses, Repurpose It and Floridia Cheese who had recently won awards at the recent Northern Business Achievement Grand Finale Breakfast.

“Could I also take this opportunity, before we move into formal Council business to formally acknowledge two local businesses that received very significant awards at the recent Northern Business Achievement Grand Finale breakfast on 3 December 2020.

This event is an initiative of NORTH Link and presents an opportunity to acknowledge and celebrate the successes and achievements of small to medium sized enterprises within Melbourne’s north.

All three of the Administrators were present at this event, and we were all so proud of the standout achievements of our local businesses, Repurpose It and Floridia Cheese.

In relation to Repurpose It, they are an Epping based business, and it was awarded the Chairs Award for their achievements in circular economy which is supported by the use of best practice technologies to recover resources from typically untreatable waste that has been historically sent to landfill.

They operate a state of the art washing plant that recovers valuable sand and aggregates from contaminated soil and problematic waste glass. This is a cutting edge business that is at the forefront of tackling some of the real challenges of our times in the sustainability and resource re-use areas. We congratulate George Hatzimanolis and the team at Repurpose It for their outstanding achievement.

Secondly, Floridia Cheese, located in Thomastown proved successful in three categories - the Export Award, Student Placement Employer of the Year and the top accolade of Business of the Year. A remarkable achievement.

Floridia Cheese has become one of the most respected and awarded traditional Italian cheese manufacturers in Australia. They are a family owned business, over 3 generations, which has been in the City of Whittlesea since they opened some 65 years ago. They are proud locals that live and breathe the City of Whittlesea and whilst we celebrate their extraordinary business success we also congratulate them on their continued contribution over many years to their local community as evidenced by their Student Placement Award.

During such a challenging year, the resilience of our business community really needs to be commended and Council will continue to support our businesses throughout this time.

This is the second year that a Whittlesea business has won the top award with That’s Amore Cheese winning last year. This highlights the strength of the food business sector within the City of Whittlesea and the northern region. Again, to Repurpose It and Floridia Cheese, our sincere congratulations.”

 

RESUMPTION OF standing orders

MOved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to resume Standing Orders.

CARRIED

 

1.7       CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER STATEMENT

The Chief Executive Officer read out the following statement:

“Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the State Government directives around working from home, this Council Meeting is being held entirely on-line via Livestream.

The meeting is being conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2020 and the Minister for Local Government’s Good Practice Guideline MGPG-1 for Virtual Meetings.

If at any stage during the meeting a technical issue prevents all Administrators from participating in the livestream, the meeting will be adjourned until the matter is resolved.”

1.8       Present

Members:

Ms Lydia Wilson                  Chair of Council

The Hon. Bruce Billson       Administrator

Ms Peita Duncan                 Administrator

Officers:

Mr Craig Lloyd                     Chief Executive Officer

Mr Frank Joyce                    Acting Executive Manager Governance

Ms Kate McCaughey           Director Community Wellbeing

Ms Amy Montalti                  Director Corporate Services & Performance

Mr Justin O’Meara               Director Planning & Development

Ms Debbie Wood                 Director Infrastructure & Environment

2.         Apologies

Nil

3.         Declarations of Interest

NIL

 

 

 

 

 

4.         Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:                Administrator Billson

 

THAT the following Minutes of the preceding meeting as circulated, be confirmed:

Scheduled Meeting of Council held 17 November 2020.

Carried

 

Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters

5.1       Questions To ADMINISTRATORS

NIL 

The answers provided verbally by the Chief Executive Officer at the meeting in response to questions asked by members of the public are preliminary answers provided on a without prejudice basis.  A formal written response to each question is sent following the Council meeting which contains Council official position on the matter.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

5.2       Petition TABLED

5.2.1    Request to Council to reject the construction of five dwellings at 30 Paddock Street, Whittlesea (Planning Application Number: 2020-719338)

 

Administrator Wilson tabled a petition from 36 residents requesting Council consider the following: 

‘We the undersigned, residents and ratepayers of Whittlesea City Council, request the Council to reject the construction of five dwellings at 30 Paddock Street, Whittlesea (Planning Application Number: 2020-719338.’

 

COUNCIL RESOLUTION

 

MOVED:                       Administrator Wilson

SECONDED:                Administrator Billson

 

THAT Council resolve to receive the petition regarding a request to Council to reject the construction of five dwellings at 30 Paddock Street, Whittlesea and that the petition be considered as part of the relevant planning application report to Council at the March 2021 Scheduled Council meeting.

 

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

5.3       Joint Letters

Nil Reports 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.         Officers’ Reports

 

Chief Executive Officer Explanatory Note

Under the Governance Rules 2020, Administrators are to be provided an opportunity to speak regarding each of the reports contained within the Agenda, without the need to indicate opposition for the purpose of debate.

 

 

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.1       Executive Services

6.1.1      For Noting - COVID-19 Update on Key Issues - December 2020  

Responsible Officer:            Chief Executive Officer

Author:                                  Chief Executive Officer   

 

Key points in relation to the COVID-19 Update was provided verbally by the Chief Executive Officer at the meeting (refer to section 1.4 of this Minutes document).

The contents of the complete COVID-19 Update on Key Issues – December 2020 report was circulated to Council prior to the meeting and is as follows:

CONTEXT

Victorians welcomed the Third Step (last step) in the Victorian Government’s Covid-19 roadmap to re-opening on Sunday 8 November. Many restrictions were lifted on social gatherings and leaving home; exercise and recreation; limits at community facilities, retail stores and hospitality venues. This was good news for City of Whittlesea residents and local businesses.

Council immediately commenced re-opening its facilities and welcomed more people into libraries and swimming facilities in line with Victorian Government advice. It was pleasing to see local testing sites continue to report steady numbers through November, showing that the City of Whittlesea remains vigilant in containing the virus.

A COVIDSafe Summer plan is now in place (announced Sunday 6 December), which will allow Victorians more freedoms but with some necessary rules and restrictions that are required until a vaccine is available. From today (Monday 7 December), masks will only be required when physical distancing cannot be maintained. It remains mandatory that masks are worn on public transport, in rideshare vehicle and taxis, in some retail settings including indoor shopping centres, supermarkets, department stores and indoor markets.

Density limits in pubs, restaurants and cafes increase and the use of electronic record keeping via QR code is mandatory. Council is working on a plan to bring staff back to the office. Essential, community-facing, staff will be among the first with a plan to increasing number over the coming months.

The Customer Service desks at the Civic Centre in South Morang and at Westfield are open for residents to visit with queries and to make payments. Council is now focusing its efforts on recovery. A $2 million Covid-19 Recovery Fund was approved in the 2020-21 Budget. Council will work with the community in the new year on a plan to allocate these funds in a manner that will help our residents and businesses recover from the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.

COUNCIL SUPPORT

Council focused on resuming services in line with Victoria Government announcements and on supporting community recovery throughout November. This included:

·     Reopening local public facilities and resuming essential in person services.

·     Supporting community reconnection through online arts and cultural activities and advising groups and clubs on how to safely recommence activities.

·     Assisting businesses to plan for and adapt to changes to restrictions under the State Roadmap.

·     Supporting local businesses with outdoor dining infrastructure and waiver of footpath trading permits.

·     Waiving registration renewal fees for local food, health and beauty premises impacted by Stage 4 restrictions.

·     Providing financial and practical support to community members through hardship applications, grants, information and referrals for emergency relief.

·     Providing financial and in-kind support to local services under the $500,000 Emergency Relief Fund to help them to provide emergency food relief and essential items to vulnerable community members.

COMMUNITY IMPACTS

On jobs and our economy

According to ABS data, local employment figures continue to stabilise. As of the 31 October, there were 94.6% of the number of payroll jobs in the local Whittlesea-Wallan region compared to mid-March, which was a 1% gain on the previous month.  The unemployment rate in the local North East Melbourne region (which includes the City of Whittlesea) also fell 0.9% to 7.9% during October while the workforce participation rate increased by 1.4% to 65.1%.

These trends are reflected in Victorian figures, with the number of payroll jobs increasing by 1.1% in the month from 17 October to 14 November.  However, local emergency relief providers continue to report increased levels of financial hardship in the community. This is likely to peak again in early 2021 when the Federal Government’s Coronavirus Supplement is further reduced from $250 to $150 per fortnight.

In November, 21 food or health and beauty premises closed permanently. This is consistent with the number of closures in October (23) and remains considerably higher than the number of permanent closures in September (13) and August (15). However, Council data indicates that for every food or health and beauty premise that has closed during 2020, a new business has opened. This upward trend in new premises has continued as lockdown restrictions continue to lift. Interestingly, many new registrations are for home-based businesses, including cakes, hairdressing and beauty services.  

On our vulnerable community

Local services continue to report demand for emergency food relief, essential items and mental health support. However, data from Whittlesea Community Connections indicates that demand appears to be stabilising, with the number of community members requiring support falling from a high of 369 clients in August to 336 clients in November.

Vulnerable groups continue to be at risk of food insecurity and financial hardship, including people on low incomes, those in unstable accommodation and those who were already unemployed or have lost employment during the pandemic. International students and refugees and asylum seekers continue to be particularly vulnerable because of financial insecurity, fear of seeking financial assistance due to visa status, low awareness of available supports, social isolation and poor mental health.

COUNCIL RESPONSE

Services

Council continued to resume services throughout November in line with State Government announcements and the Third Step of the Roadmap. Customer service centres at the Civic Centre and Westfield Plenty Valley reopened to the public on November 4 with limited staff, density quotients and strict cleaning protocols in place.

Libraries, TRACC, Epping Animal Welfare Facility, Community Activity Centres, Neighbourhood Houses and sports pavilions all reopened in November with appropriate modifications and COVID-safe plans in place. Other services to resume during November include parking enforcement, social support and respite for carers groups, the LEAP golf program, pest animal and pest plant inspections, and inspections of vacant blocks for the fire danger period. Face to face maternal and child health appointments have also increased.

While office-based staff continue to work from home where possible, this will be reviewed in early December based on further State Government announcements. Council is preparing to reopen PRACC and the Great Hall at the Civic Centre in January 2021 with density quotients in place. The Farmers and Makers Market is also expected to resume in February.

Emergency relief

Council continued to provide financial and in-kind support to local non-government organisations under the $500,000 Emergency Relief Fund. Two new financial and one in-kind requests were received from three non-government organisations in November. One of these financial requests as well as an outstanding earlier request were funded under the Emergency Relief Fund, totalling $10,250. Both of these requests will go towards providing Christmas hampers for local vulnerable families.

All current funding arrangements with local providers concluded at the end of November, so a new round of requests is anticipated in early December. Since 6 April 2020, 20 local organisations have received financial support under the Emergency Relief Fund, totalling $331,168.68. In total, Council has received 178 requests for support from 50 organisations since 6 April 2020.

Creating jobs

Recruitment for the Working For Victoria program concluded at the end of November. Under this program, Council has employed a total of 294 people to the equivalent of 258.5 full time positions, with 147 working directly within Council and 147 within local community service and partner organisations.

Business support

Supporting our local business community to recover from the impacts of the pandemic continues to be a priority. Council has provided more than $450,000 to local businesses experiencing financial hardship under the Business Relief and Resilience Program.

This funding will be used to adapt business models to be COVID safe, improve business continuity and adapt and revitalise spaces.

Council also continues to work with local businesses and shopping precincts to transition to outdoor dining under the $500,000 State Government ‘Outdoor dining and entertainment package’. Stage 1 of the project will be rolled out before Christmas and involve installation of outdoor dining furniture and infrastructure in key locations across the municipality. A second 4-week campaign promoting local businesses has been relaunched under the banner “Shop Local for Christmas” to encourage support for local businesses in the lead up to Christmas.

Businesses registered with Council under the Food Act or Public Health and Wellbeing Act that suffered impacts under Stage 4 restrictions (around 90% of registered businesses) will receive a 100% waiver of 2021registration fees. This will amount to more than $500,000 in fee relief for local premises. 

Council is also supporting local businesses through:

·         Establishing and promoting ‘Whittlesea Localised’, an online Business Directory to encourage local business support and share opportunities and good news stories

·         Promoting good news stories of local business innovation through print and social media

·         Waiving fees for new and existing footpath trading permit holders until September 2021

·         Supporting businesses to expand footpath trading area into neighbouring properties, if feasible and permitted.

Many local businesses also continue to receive support under Stage 1 of the $90,000 Business Support Package launched in April. This included a three-month Business Development Program, dedicated business support line, mentoring and local promotional campaigns.

Economic stimulus grants

Council was awarded $6,997,167 under the Federal Government’s non-competitive Local Roads & Community Infrastructure Program. This is in addition to an initial funding pool of $1,417,408 announced in July. This program aims to stimulate local economic activity and generate jobs as part of the Federal Government’s COVID-19 Pandemic Recovery Program.

The return of bond monies continues to be expedited for business owners who have implemented landscaping in accordance with approved plans. Twenty bonds were returned in November, totalling $87,052.50 (153 bonds in total since 6 May, totalling $607,499.50).

Financial support

In October, Council received an additional 6 hardship applications via the COVID-19 Hardship Policy. A total of 177 applications have been received since 6 April, and 136 have been approved.

A $50,000 Sports Club Emergency Grants program remains open for clubs to apply for up to $1,000 to cover out-of-pocket expenses. One club received funding during November. To date, 21 applications have been approved, totalling $27,637.69.

Fifty percent of fees for summer sports clubs have also been waived. The Reconnection Grant Program closed in November, which invited applications for initiatives to support community groups to reconnect and reactivate following lockdown restrictions. Fourteen applications were funded, totalling $49,594.95. A second round will be launched in March 2021.

Community connection

Council is continuing to develop new projects that will help our community to reconnect and recover from the impacts of the pandemic through arts, culture and creativity. The annual City of Whittlesea Christmas Carols event was re-imagined this year to be delivered online. Community members were supported to learn a collection of carols and record videos of their performances. A total of 345 videos were submitted, which have been stitched together into a virtual community choir extravaganza. The event will be livestreamed on the Whittlesea Arts website and social media on Friday 11 December.

The Summer Series of events has also been adapted to meet ongoing changes to restrictions. The season will kick off with a series of five free family entertainment and film nights throughout the municipality in January, featuring live music, circus performers, food trucks and a feature film on a large outdoor cinema screen.  Council’s annual Community Art Exhibition will be exhibited in the Great Hall from 21 January to 18 February 2021. The 90 artworks will also be displayed online for the first time.

To assist our older adults to stay healthy, active and connected, Council continues to deliver a series of online programs targeting digital literacy, mental and physical health and social connection. Feedback from participants indicates that although seniors are looking forward to returning to face-to-face programs, the online format has had considerable benefits in helping people to stay engaged, connected and healthy during lockdown restrictions.

Council’s newly established Arabic Community Support Group, African Community Support Group and Asylum Seeker Social Support Group continue to provide support and information to members of our culturally and linguistically diverse communities. Council also continues to work with Study Melbourne and local tertiary institutions to support local international students impacted by the pandemic. 

 

 

Public health

Council has continued to support local drive through testing sites throughout the municipality. Testing rates continued to decline throughout November, consistent with other testing sites across Melbourne.

Recovery planning

Work has begun on developing the Municipal Recovery Plan.  An initial Recovery Plan focusing on actions through to 30 June 2021 will be finalised in the new year, this will contain many of the actions currently underway and reflect the many adjustments which have been made to Council’s services in order to support recovery. The plan will continue to be updated as changes or opportunities arise.  Also, in early 2021 there will be a series of community engagements across a range of Council functions and these will be used to obtain community input on how to allocate the $2million Community Recovery Fund.

COMMUNICATIONS

Council continues to use all communication mediums to share DHHS and Council information including print, radio, digital and social media. Events continue to be adapted for online formats and hosted via the Whittlesea Unites Facebook page and the Arts Website.

CONCLUSION

Council thanks the community for continuing to adhere to evolving Victorian Government rules restrictions that will help keep the number of new COVID-19 cases at zero. With a CovidSafe Summer plan now in place, we encourage residents to continue to follow the rules in place over the next few months.

 

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Wilson

Seconded:                Administrator Billson

 

THAT Council resolves to note the verbal update by the Chief Executive Officer on the impacts of COVID-19 on our community.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.1.2      For Decision - Scheduled Council Meetings for 2021  

Responsible Officer:            Chief Executive Officer

Author:                                  Team Leader Governance Administration   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council resolve to adopt a Council Meeting schedule for 2021.

Brief overview

A proposed schedule of Council Meeting dates for 2021.  The schedule is based on one meeting per month from February to December with provision for two meetings to be held in community venues outside the Civic Centre.

rationale for recommendation

In accordance with the Local Government Act 2020 and section 9 of Council’s Governance Rules the date, time and place of scheduled Council meetings are to be determined, and may be altered, by resolution of the Council with reasonable notice to be provided to the public.

impacts of recommendation

Council will comply with the Governance Rules by adopting and advertising a scheduled Council Meeting schedule for 2021.

Conducting Council meetings throughout the year enables Council to undertake its decision making role and as the meetings are open to the public (unless there is a specific reason to close the meeting to the public) they also give the community an opportunity to become involved in Council’s decision-making process on issues that affect the community.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Scheduled Council Meeting dates for 2021 will be published on Council’s website and promoted through Council’s social media to encourage members of the community to watch Council meetings by live-stream or recording.  In addition, members of the public will be encouraged to attend Council meetings in person, in line with the physical distancing restrictions in place at the time of each meeting due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Report

Introduction

To adopt a schedule of Council Meetings for 2021.

Background

Council Meetings are generally held in the Council Chamber.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic section 394 of the Local Government Act 2020 allows Council meetings to be held remotely by electronic means of communication up until 26 April 2021.

All Council meetings are live-streamed, and a recording is publicly available, therefore can be viewed by residents at their convenience.

On occasion in previous years, Council has also held Council Meetings at community locations that have included the Barry Road Community Activity Centre in Thomastown and Mernda Village Community Activity Centre.

It is proposed that Council consider scheduling Council meetings at community locations in 2021. 

Proposal

Council proposes all meetings are to be held on a Tuesday with the exception of the November meeting which is proposed to be held on a Monday due to the Melbourne Cup Day Public Holiday.

It is proposed that Council:

1.       Adopt the Council Meeting schedule for 2021 as follows:

2 February                 

3 August

2 March

7 September

6 April

5 October

4 May

8 November

1 June

7 December

6 July

 

2.       Set the venue as the Council Chamber, Council Offices, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang unless otherwise determined by Council resolution and the commencement time of Council Meetings at 6:30pm; and

3.       Give public notice of the adopted Council Meeting schedule for 2021.

community council meetings

In 2021 Council may consider holding one or more Council Meetings in a community venue outside the Council Chamber in South Morang.  The Council Meeting could also include a community forum on the same night and the meeting itself may deal with content a little different to the usual Council Meeting – for example more community focussed content and no confidential business.

The timing of those community Council Meetings can be determined in the future and Council can resolve to amend its meeting cycle to include those venues.  The timing of the Community Council Meetings could be coordinated around key community engagement items such as the Council Plan and Annual Budget. 

The number of people that can attend Council Meetings will depend on COVID-19 physical distancing restrictions in place at the time of the nominated meeting date. 

Community Council Meetings would:

·    Provide community members and Council an opportunity to meet face-to-face;

·    Provide Council with a more direct opportunity to inform the local community on current and future Council matters such as proposed developments, service changes or enhancements and key local elements of the new works program;

·    Provide local residents with an opportunity to raise issues and questions in a public forum with Council, with a focus on a specific geographic area of the City; and

·    Encourage community participation in Council’s decision-making processes as a means of further strengthening local community identity and Council engagement with the community.

It is proposed the format of a Council Meeting held at a community venue could include the following:

Community Forum Meeting – 6.00pm to 7.00pm

This meeting will provide an opportunity to discuss local topics with the community.  The community will be given an opportunity to submit questions in advance of the meeting, with the intent that these questions will be addressed on the night.  Anyone who submits a

question will receive a written response irrespective of whether an interim response is provided at the Community Forum Meeting.

 

Refreshments – 7.00pm to 7.30pm

Light refreshment will be provided in a COVID safe manner.

 

Scheduled Council Meeting - 7.30pm- 8.30pm

The Scheduled Council meeting will run as usual with any confidential business being adjourned to the following week. It is expected that the Scheduled Council Meeting would close at 8.30pm and that the event would conclude by 9pm.

 

Further discussions will be held with Council to determine specific dates and content for a Community Council Meeting.  Council will confirm the dates and locations of Community Council Meetings at the Council meeting to be held in February 2021.

Critical Dates

The dates for Council meetings proposed for 2021 have taken account of public holidays and other sector specific events such as major conferences.

Financial Implications

Costs associated with holding Community and Council meetings are covered in existing budgets.

Given that Community Centres are not set up for the conduct of a Community Forum/Council Meetings, it is necessary to hire a sound system to ensure that debate and discussion can be heard throughout the room and for the purpose of livestreaming.  Projectors and monitors are also required.  Catering, staff attendance and other incidental costs are also involved.

The cost of this hired equipment, staff attendance, catering and other incidentals is expected to be in the order of approximately $13,000 per Community Council Meeting and quotes will be obtained once venues are confirmed.  Catering is sourced locally.

Policy strategy and legislation

In accordance with the Local Government Act 2020 and Council’s Governance Rules 2020 Council is required to set the date, time and place of Scheduled Council Meetings and that reasonable notice be provided to the public.  In accordance with Council’s Public Transparency Policy 2020 Scheduled Council Meetings promote openness and transparency in Council decision-making processes and promotes greater understanding and awareness by the community of how Council’s decisions are made.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

Regular Council meetings promote open and transparent decision making and civic engagement.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              High-performing organisation

Key Direction               More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

 

Council will work to build a stronger sense of community within neighbourhoods and across the municipality and create new opportunities for social networks and civic engagement.

Conducting Council meetings throughout the year gives the community an opportunity to become involved in Council’s decision-making process on issues that affect the community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that the proposed schedule of Council Meetings for 2021 be adopted and advertised to the public.  The schedule of meeting dates will facilitate Council's decision-making processes by ensuring that regular meetings are held and that Council meetings are promoted to the public.  Council will confirm the dates and locations of Community Council Meetings at the Council meeting to be held in February 2021.  The content of these can be determined at a later date and Council can resolve on those as a separate matter. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the Council Meeting schedule for 2021 as follows:

2 February                 

3 August

2 March

7 September

6 April

5 October

4 May

8 November

1 June

7 December

6 July

 

2.       Set the venue as the Council Chamber, Council Offices, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang unless otherwise determined by Council resolution and the commencement time of Council Meetings at 6:30pm; and

3.       Give public notice of the adopted Council Meeting schedule for 2021.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Wilson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the Council Meeting schedule for 2021 as follows:

2 February

3 August

1 March

7 September

6 April

5 October

4 May

8 November

1 June

7 December

6 July

 

2.       Set the venue as the Council Chamber, Council Offices, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang unless otherwise determined by Council resolution and the commencement time of Council Meetings at 6:30pm; and

3.       Give public notice of the adopted Council Meeting schedule for 2021.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.1.3    For Decision - Proposed adoption of the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law 2020 

Attachments:                        1       Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No.1 of 2020)

2       Local Law Community Impact Statement   

Responsible Officer:            Chief Executive Officer

Author:                                  Governance Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

To seek a resolution of Council to make the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No.1 of 2020) (as contained in Attachment 1).

Brief overview

On 1 September 2020 Council adopted the Governance Rules in accordance with section 60 of the Local Government Act 2020. The Governance Rules regulate the procedures for meetings of Council and delegated committees, and largely replicate Council’s existing Procedural Matters Local Law.

Due to the duplication contained in the existing Procedural Matters Local Law, it is now appropriate to adopt a new Local Law which contains only those provisions which are not addressed in the Governance Rules. The proposed Local Law is intended to repeal the existing Procedural Matters Local Law (No. 1 of 2018).

rationale for recommendation

As both the Procedural Matters Local Law and the newly adopted Governance Rules regulate Council meeting procedures, it is necessary to adopt a new Local Law that does not contain the provisions that are now redundant in order to avoid confusion.

The provisions contained in the proposed Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law relate to the use of the common seal and to offence provisions which cannot be included in the Governance Rules as the Governance Rules do not have the same status as a Local Law.

In accordance with the Local Government Act 1989, Council undertook a public submissions process in relation to the proposed Local Law. The submission period commenced on 13 October 2020 and closed on 12 November 2020, no submissions were received during this period.

impacts of recommendation

Adopting the proposed Local Law will remove the overlap between the newly adopted Governance Rules and the existing Procedural Matters Local Law which both regulate Council meeting and committee meeting procedures.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Council will review the proposed Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law as part of a broader review of the new policies, procedures and Governance Rules adopted under the Local Government Act 2020.

It is proposed that this review occur in 2021 once Council has been operating under the relevant policies, procedures and Governance Rules for a number of months and can assess their performance.

 

Report

Background

In July 2018 Council adopted the Procedural Matters Local Law (No. 1 of 2018) (PMLL) to regulate its procedures for meetings of Council and Advisory Committees. The PMLL was drafted in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1989 and was adopted following a public submission process.

Under the new Local Government Act 2020, Council adopted Governance Rules on 1 September 2020. The Governance Rules are required to regulate meeting procedure and accordingly most procedures that were regulated by the PMLL are now regulated by the Governance Rules.

To avoid any confusion caused by meeting procedures being contained in both the PMLL and the Governance Rules, it is necessary to adopt a new Local Law that only contains the provisions that are not covered by the Governance Rules. This includes the provisions relating to the use of Council’s Common Seal and the offence provisions. These provisions could not be included in the Governance Rules as the Governance Rules do not have the same status under the Local Government Act as a Local Law. It is not possible under the Local Government Act 1989 for Council to simply adopt an amended PMLL with the duplicated provisions removed. The correct process is to adopt a new Local Law. 

At the 6 October 2020 Council Meeting, Council resolved to endorse the proposed Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law No.1 of 2020 for the purpose of public consultation and to invite public submissions in accordance with sections 119(1) and 223 of the Local Government Act 1989.

Proposal

It is proposed that Council make the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No. 1 of 2020) which contains provisions relating to:

·    The use of Council’s Common Seal;

·    Offence provisions relating to the misuse of Council’s Common Seal; and

·    Offence provisions relating to disorderly conduct at Council meetings.

The making of the new Local Law will also repeal Council’s existing PMLL and remove any confusion regarding the application of the Governance Rules 2020 to meeting processes and procedures.

Consultation

Council gave notice of the proposed Local Law in the Victoria Government Gazette and issued public notices in The Age newspaper (13 October 2020) and The Northern Star Weekly (20 October 2020).  Notice was also given on Council’s website where a copy of the proposed Local Law and the Community Impact Statement (Attachment 2) accompanying the Local Law were also made available to the public.

An Advisory Committee comprised of the Council was appointed at the 6 October 2020 Council Meeting to receive, hear and consider submissions in accordance with s 223 of the Local Government Act 1989.

During the consultation period of 13 October 2020 to 11 November 2020, no public submissions were received. Accordingly, a meeting of the Advisory Committee was not required.

Financial Implications

Costs were incurred in preparing the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No.1 of 2020) including the cost of legal advice.  Additional costs have been incurred in placing notices in the Government Gazette and public notices in publications generally circulating the municipality.  The total cost is estimated at $4,000 plus GST and is included in Council’s recurrent budget.

Policy strategy and legislation

Legislation

Local Government Act 1989

The making of the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No.1 of 2020) has been done in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 1989 which continues to regulate the adoption of a new Local Law until July 2021.  Legal advice has been obtained to ensure the process complies with section 119 and section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989.

Local Government Act 2020

The need to adopt a new Local Law has arisen due to the requirement of the Local Government Act 2020 that Council adopt Governance Rules to regulate the meeting procedures for meetings of Council and delegated committees.

Council’s Policies and Procedures

Governance Rules 2020

The Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No. 1 of 2020) contains only the matters now not addressed by the Governance Rules and will work alongside the Governance Rules.  For example, where there is disorderly conduct at a Council Meeting, the Governance Rules regulate how the conduct is to be addressed in the first instance. The Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No. 1 of 2020) will then provide the relevant offence provisions for where the person displaying the disorderly conduct has failed to comply with the directions given under the Governance Rules.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

If Council does not adopt a new Local Law, there is a risk of confusion for Council and members of the public on whether provisions of the Procedural Matters Local Law or provisions of the Governance Rules apply to different meeting processes, particularly where there are inconsistencies between the two.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

 

Adopting the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No.1 of 2020) will remove any potential confusion between the existing PMLL and the Governance Rules. The making of the new Local Law has provided the community with the option to actively participate in a consultative process.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The making of the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No.1 of 2020) will remove the duplication and any inconsistency between the existing PMLL and the newly adopted Governance Rules 2020.  It is recommended that Council make the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law (No.1 of 2020), as contained in Attachment 1 of this report.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolves to:

1.   Make the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law No. 1 of 2020 as contained in this report (Attachment 1), having:

a)       completed the statutory process under Part 5 of the Local Government Act 1989 for the making of the proposed Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law No. 1 of 2020;

b)      undertaken, and been satisfied with, the evaluation of the proposed Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law No. 1 of 2020, as set out in the Community Impact Statement (Attachment 2); and

c)       not received any submissions in respect of the proposed Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law No. 1 of 2020.

2.      Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to:

a)       give public notice, and notice in the Victoria Government Gazette, of the making of the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law No. 1 of 2020; and

b)      send a copy of the Common Seal and Conduct at Meetings Local Law No. 1 of 2020, as made, to the Minister for Local Government.

 

 

 

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.1.4      For Noting - Annual Report 2019-2020

Attachments:                        1       Annual Report 2019-2020 (distributed separately)   

Responsible Officer:            Chief Executive Officer

Author:                                  Marketing & Partnerships Coordinator   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to receive and note the 2019-2020 Annual Report in accordance with Section 134(1) of the Local Government Act 1989.

Brief overview

The 2019-20 Annual Report has been developed to provide an overview of Council’s performance for the 2019-2020 financial year.

rationale for recommendation

The 2019-2020 Annual Report has been developed to meet the legislative requirements of the Local Government Act 1989

impacts of recommendation

Council’s acceptance of the Annual Report will ensure we meet our legislative reporting requirements under the Local Government Act 1989.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Finalisation of the report in accordance with legislative requirements ensures no measures are required as Council will be compliant.

 

Report

Background

Council’s performance for the 2019-2020 Annual Report has been reported against each Council goal to demonstrate how Council is performing in achieving the 2017-2021 Council Plan. Performance has been measured as follows:

·      Results achieved in relation to the strategic indicators in the Council Plan;

·      Progress in relation to the major initiatives identified in the 2019-2020 Annual Budget;

·      Services funded in the Budget and the persons or sections of the community who provided those services; and

·      Results against the prescribed service performance indicators and measures.

Highlights include:

•     Our organisation’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic which included support and relief for our community, staff redeployment and the transition to working from home for the majority of our workforce.

•     $67 million was spent on our New Works Program, which included more than 128 projects to build and upgrade community centres, sporting fields, tennis courts, playgrounds, roads, bike paths and footpaths across our municipality.

•     Work continued on the $25 million refurbishment of Mill Park Leisure with the state of the art facility expected to re-open in summer 2020-21.

•     Renegotiated or tendered 55 contracts resulting in $3.6 million in savings for the organisation in 2019-20 and long term-savings of $17.8 million.

•     Delivered a successful trial of a food and garden organics waste collection service, leading to the introduction of the service municipal-wide from 1 July 2020.

•     Continued to deliver a number of essential services to our community. These include waste and recycling collection services, building and planning services, maternal and child health services, maintenance and provision of local parks and open spaces, services and support for the aged, people with a disability and migrants. 

Proposal

It is recommended that Council receive and note the 2019-2020 Annual Report. 

Consultation

Copies of the Annual Report will be made available at Council Offices and at the Yarra Plenty Regional Library branches of Lalor, Thomastown, Mill Park and Whittlesea.  A copy will also be published on Council’s website at whittlesea.vic.gov.au.

Critical Dates

The Annual Report is to be submitted to the Minister for Local Government by 30 November 2020. A public notice will be placed in the local paper to let residents know that copies of the Annual Report are available for inspection and that it will be considered by Council at this meeting. 

Financial Implications

The Annual Report was produced within approved budget allocations. 

Policy strategy and legislation

A copy of the Annual Report including the Audited Performance Statement and Financial Statements will be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government in accordance with Section 131(6) of the Local Government Act 1989.

The Annual Report promotes open and transparent government by reporting Council’s operations.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Management - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities by Management resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

Under the Local Government Act 1989, Council must produce an Annual Report that complies with the statutory obligations and forward to the Minister for Local Government within three months after the end of the financial year. The deadline for the 2019-20 financial year was extended to 30 November 2020.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                                 High-performing organisation

Key Direction                                 Driving better community outcomes through improved service access, satisfaction and advocacy

 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The City of Whittlesea 2019-2020 Annual Report is an integral part of Council’s commitment to open and accountable governance. It provides the community with an overview of Council’s performance and achievements during the 2019-2020 financial year in delivering against Council’s priorities set out in the 2017-2021 Council Plan and 2019-2020 Annual Budget.  It also provides detailed financial statements relating to Council’s financial position which continues to remain sound. 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to receive and note the 2019-2020 Annual Report in accordance with Section 134(1) of the Local Government Act 1989.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Wilson

Seconded:                Administrator Billson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.1.5    For Noting - Informal Meetings of Administrators - 7 December 2020   

Responsible Officer:            Chief Executive Officer

Author:                                  Governance Officer   

 

recommendation summary

That Council note the record of the Informal Meetings of Administrators as set out in the table in the report.

BRIEF OVERVIEW

The Council is required to note at a Council Meeting that meetings involving Administrators have taken place and topics discussed.  This report provides details involving the Panel of Administrators within the last month.

rationale for recommendation

It is a requirement of Chapter 6 of the Governance Rules for Informal Meetings of Administrators records to be reported to Council.

impacts of recommendation

This report will be presented to each monthly scheduled Council Meeting. 

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

No impacts are expected.  On rare occasions an item considered at a meeting receives a media enquiry.  If requests for more information are received, these will be managed by our communications team in consultation with the Chair of Administrators.


 

Report

Background

It is a requirement of Chapter 6 of the Governance Rules for Informal Meetings of Administrators records to be reported to Council.

The Local Government (Whittlesea City Council) Act 2020 dismissed all Councillors from the City of Whittlesea effective Saturday 21 March 2020.  Ms Lydia Wilson was appointed Interim Administrator for a three-month period commencing on 21 March 2020.

On 19 June 2020, the Panel of Administrators for the City of Whittlesea were appointed.  The Panel of Administrators comprises of Chair Ms Lydia Wilson, the Hon Bruce Billson and Ms Peita Duncan.

Ms Lydia Wilson, the Hon Bruce Billson and Ms Peita Duncan will carry out the role, responsibilities and functions of a Councillor as set out in Section 231(1)(a) of the Local Government Act 2020 until their appointment ends following the October 2024 Local Government Elections.

In accordance with Rule 1 (Chapter 6) of the Governance Rules 2020 an Informal Meeting of Administrators is a meeting of at least one Administrator that is:

·    scheduled or planned for the purpose of discussing the business of Council or briefing Administrators;

·    attended by at least one Officer; and

·    not a Council Meeting, Delegated Committee Meeting or Community Asset Committee Meeting.

The Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a summary of the matters discussed at the meeting are tabled at the next Council Meeting and recorded in the minutes of that Meeting.

Proposal

Informal Meetings of Administrators records not previously reported to Council are detailed in the following table:

Assembly Details

Administrator attendees

Officer attendees

Matters discussed

Council Briefing

9 November 2020

Lydia Wilson

(Chair)

The Hon Bruce Billson (Administrator)

Peita Duncan

(Administrator)

CEO

DCCW

DCIE

DCPD

DCSP

EMCA

LPC

MCBP

MCDT

MCP

MG

MLCF

MMP

PM

SIE

TLAM

 

1.    Review of the Road Management Plan and Endorsement of Draft for Public Exhibition.

2.    Traffic Management – Masons Road.

3.    Lalor Streetscape Improvements Works (Stage 2) Contract 2019-131 – Council Variation Report.

4.    Thomastown Streetscape Improvement Works (Stage 2) Contract 2020-82 – Tender Evaluation Report.

5.    Sporting and Community Pavilion Guidelines and Sports Lighting Policy Update.

6.    Assemblies of Council – 17 November 2020 Council Meeting Report.

7.    General Business – 17 November 2020 Council Meeting:

a.    Panel Contract Expenditure Reports.

b.    Petitions for Council Meetings.

8.    Council Appointments to Organisations and Committees Review.

Nil disclosures

 

Whittlesea Youth Advisory Committee

9 November 2020

The Hon Bruce Billson

(Administrator)

Peita Duncan

(Administrator)

MFCYP

PRO SPSO

YDO

YDOP TLYS

 

1.     Welcome and Opening.

2.     State of Purpose and Whittlesea Youth Advisory Committee Charter.

3.     Apologies and Introductions of Invited Guests and City of Whittlesea Staff.

4.     Previous Minutes and Actions.

5.     Consideration of Reports:

a)    Youth Futures Summit; and

b)    Youth Focus Group Report – 2020 Northern Partnership Engagement Program Consultation Workshop.

6.     Guest Presentation from Sustainability Planning – Climate Change Strategy.

7.     Guest Presentation from the Pandemic Response Team – Experiences of Young People during COVID Response Period.

8.     Guest Presentation from Whittlesea Community Connections – The Leaders of Tomorrow.

9.     Discussion Topic – Young People’s Connection to Spaces and Places in the City of Whittlesea.

10.   Updates and Other Business:

a)    Expression of Interest to extend Youth Advisory Committees term of membership;

b)    Youth Strategy;

c)    City of Greater Dandenong Youth Leadership Forum; and

d)    End of year celebration.

Nil disclosures

Council Briefing

17 November 2020

Lydia Wilson

(Chair)

The Hon Bruce Billson (Administrator)

Peita Duncan

(Administrator)

CEO

AEMG

DCCW

DCIE

DCPD

DCSP

EMCA

MG

PGA

 

1.     Draft Administrator Code of Conduct 2020.

2.     Draft Administrator Gift and Benefits Policy.

3.     Scheduled Council Meetings for 2021 – 7 December 2020 Council Meeting Report.

4.     Procedural Matters Local Law – Outcome of Public Submissions Process.

5.     Other Business:

a)    Refocusing Council’s 2021 Australia Day Celebration – 7 December 2020 Council Meeting Report;

b)    Update regarding Affordable Social Housing; and

c)    Options relating to the inclusion of the prayer at the monthly Council meetings.

Nil disclosures

Meeting with Danielle Green, Member for Yan Yean

19 November 2020

Lydia Wilson

(Chair)

 

CEO

1.     Northern Trails Strategy - Mernda/Whittlesea Rail Trail and other trails.

2.     Doreen United Soccer.

3.     Well Well Well Whittlesea - Health and Sport Led Recovery. 

4.     Yan Yean Road.

5.     COVID Economic Recovery. 

6.     Public Housing Package.

7.     GSF progress on current projects and future plans.

8.     Sport & Recreation Capital.

Nil Disclosures

 

 

The table below represents an Index of Officer titles:

Initials

Title of Officer

Initials

Title of Officer

AEMG

Acting Executive Manager Governance – Frank Joyce

MG

Manager Governance – Michael Tonta

CEO

Chief Executive Officer – Craig Lloyd

MLCF

Manager Leisure & Community Facilities – Benjamin Waterhouse

DCCW

Director Community Wellbeing – Kate McCaughey

MMP

Manager Major Projects – Nick Mazzarella

DCIE

Director Infrastructure & Environment – Debbie Wood

PGA

Principal Governance Advisor – Angelo Mamatis

DCPD

Director Planning & Development – Justin O’Meara

PM

Project Manager – Paul Diffey

DCSP

Director Corporate Services & Performance – Amy Montalti

PRO

Pandemic Response Officer – Tracey Pahor

EMCA

Executive Manager Corporate Affairs – Kristi High

SIE

Senior Infrastructure Engineer – Samuel Beshai

LPC

Leisure Planning Co-ordinator – Stephanie Ristevska

SPSO

Sustainability Planning Strategy Officer – Min Jiang

MCBP

Manager Community Building & Planning – Belgin Besim

TLAM

Team Leader Asset Management – Michael Butler

MCDT

Manager City Design & Transport – Ben Harries

TLYS

Team Leader Youth Services – Ren Grayson

MCP

Manager City Presentation – Anthony Kyrkou

YDO

Youth Development Officer – Liz Wyndham

MFCYP

Manager Family Children & Young People – Wendy Castles

YDOP

Youth Development Officer Participation – Jansu Gaz & Emma Shelton

Consultation

Consultation has taken place with Council Officer representatives of each of the meetings and committees that qualify as an Informal Meeting of Administrators.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Policy Strategy and Legislation

Section 9(2)(i) of the Local Government Act 2020 provides that Council must in the performance of its role give effect to the overarching governance principles which includes that the transparency of Council’s decisions, actions and information is to be ensured.

It is a requirement of Chapter 6 of the Governance Rules for Informal Meetings of Administrators records to be reported to Council.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Governance Rules Informal Meetings of Administrators will be presented at each monthly Council meeting.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Enabling the vision

Key Direction                        Making it happen

The provision of this report is in line with Whittlesea 2040 and the Council Plan by ensuring Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

It is recommended that the report containing details of the business transacted at recent Informal Meetings of Administrators meetings be noted.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council note the records of the Informal Meetings of Administrators to the period ending 19 November 2020 in the table set out in the report.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:                Administrator Billson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

  

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.2       Planning and Development

ITEM 6.2.1 For Noting - Epping Community Services Hub Annual Report 

Attachments:                        1       Epping Community Services Hub Annual Report 2019/20

2       Epping Community Services Hub Annual Report 2019/20 Extended Version - Confidential - Confidential

This Attachment has been designated as confidential information under section 66(5) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that—  (i) relates to trade secrets; or (ii) if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. In particular, the attachment contains financial information and information relating to third parties that, if released, could reasonably be expected to prejudice the commercial position of the business that supplied the information or to confer a commercial advantage on a third party.    

Responsible Officer:            Director Planning and Development

Author:                                  Social Policy & Project Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council note the attached Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) Epping Community Services Hub Annual Progress Report 2019 - 2020.

Brief overview

The Epping Community Services Hub (ECSH) is a significant partnership project between the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) and Council to provide integrated service delivery to the Whittlesea Community. ECSH is run under a MOU attached to the building lease. BSL manage the ECSH, including the operation of the facility and the relationship with partner organisations based within the facility.

Since it’s inception, Council has played a major partnering and funding role in the Epping Community Services Hub. The value of Council’s investment over the period is estimated at $1.97M, and has continued to provide considerable and much needed support for the Whittlesea community – particularly low income and vulnerable residents

The aim of the ECSH is to provide a local, integrated service model for the Whittlesea community in line with the goals of Whittlesea 2040.

ECSH opened in July 2016 and since then has been consistently expanding the available service mix achieving 95% occupancy in the July to September 2019 quarter. This equates to in excess of 2850 services delivered per quarter during the reporting period. Evaluations conducted early 2020 found that the hub had improved service delivery to the community and increased the efficacy and efficiency of partner organisations. ECSH was found to have achieved a successful model of colocation and a strong foundation for collaboration.

This Partnership Project also attracted significant funding for the State Government through the State Government’s Interface Growth Fund and it has been showcased as a best practice model of service delivery at various conferences and forums.

During the first Melbourne COVID 19 the ECSH remained open to provide essential service to the community including access to computers for Centrelink reporting, job searches and printing.

BSL, in partnership, with Council and partner organisations have developed an outcomes framework to measure the impact of services. The outcomes will help shape the scope of service delivered into the future.

rationale for recommendation

The Epping Community Services Hub Annual Report is the key reporting structure for this partnership. It provides an overview of the annual progress in delivering services through this project.

impacts of recommendation

The recommendation has no anticipated impact on the partnership or service delivery from the ECSH.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

No measures have been established as there are no anticipated impacts.

 

Report

Background

In September 2014, Council undertook an Expression of Interest (EOI) process for the occupancy of the Council owned property at 713 High Street, Epping (the site). The aim was to establish a Community Services Hub that would facilitate the expansion of much needed service provision to the municipality and attract best practice collaborative governance and service models.

Council sought interest from agencies to take on the role of lead agency and lead tenant. This agency would manage the facility and to facilitate a collaborative environment, and to partner with other agencies that would like to be accommodated within the building as sub tenants. On 24 February 2015, Council resolved to endorse BSL as the lead agency and lead tenant and lease the site to BSL for a five -year period: “... BSL will take on the lease for the facility for a five- year period and with the consent of Council, will sub lease to appropriate services providers”.

Proposal

BSL is now in its fourth year of a five-year lease on the ECSH building. The current lease will expire on 31 March 2021. This report relates solely to BSL’s reporting requirements whilst matters relating to the Lease arrangements will be the subject of a future report.

The annual report (attached) covers the period from 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020. During the first part of the reporting timeframe ECSH was continuing to develop the service offering and work towards a more integrated service delivery model. As a result of COVID 19 and the initial Melbourne lockdown in March 2020 the operations of ECSH have had to be modified. Many agencies have moved to home-based working which has impacted on the opportunities for information sharing and collaboration. ECSH did remain open during the first lockdown to provide essential services to the community.

Pre – lockdown achievements

Services delivered

In the period July 2019 – March 2020 ECSH ran at between 88% and 95% occupancy. Between 24 and 28 partner organisations ran up to 45 programs per quarter. The partner organisations managed in excess of 2850 appointments per quarter over the first three quarters of the reporting period.

Evaluation and learnings

Council and the BSL both undertook evaluations of ECSH during the reporting period. These evaluations found:

·    Overall ECSH had achieved a successful co-location of multiple agencies and improved service delivery to the community.

·    There was a strong foundation for collaboration, but integration has not been achieved, or is likely to be achieved.

·    Partner Organisations have seen an improvement in efficacy and efficiency.

·    A democratic leadership style that provides clear direction while allowing Partner Organisations agency works best at ECSH.

·    The quarterly meetings between the Council and BSL were useful.

·    There has been work to clarify terms such as collaboration and integration to ensure a shared understanding of these terms and expectations.

Collaboration

Prior to the COVID 19 shutdown the partners within ECSH worked to develop an integrated service delivery model through:

·    A bi-monthly Innovation and Collaborations Group.

·    Quarterly market places for internal and external services (information sharing).

·    A community Market place working group.

·    Monthly lunchbox information sessions.

·    A variety of celebrations and events.

COVID 19 and lockdown

ECSH remained open during the initial March 2020 lockdown. While many agencies moved to home based working essential services remained open for the community. The computer hub was particularly well utilised during this time for community members to undertake job searches, printing, reporting to Centrelink, making phone calls and charging phones.

The utilisation of meeting and consultation rooms was down, as were collaboration and networking events. Two partner organisations left ECSH and there have been several requests for rent relief during this period, this is expected to grow.

Consultation

The attached BSL report is informed by consultations BSL held, as lead agency, with partner organisations and the ECSH Leadership and Strategy Group.

Critical Dates

There are no critical dates associated with this report.

Financial Implications

There are no changes to financial implications for Council as a result of this report.

Council has played a major partnering and funding role in the Epping Community Services Hub. Since its inception, the value of Council’s investment over the period is estimated at $1.97 M.

The current model at the Epping Community Services Hub, endorsed by Council on 24 February 2015, involves a lead agency (BSL) leasing the building from Council and then developing sub-leases with individual agencies (subject to Council approval).

Policy strategy and legislation

Whittlesea 2040 A Place for All.

Epping Central Structure Plan (2011).

Human Services Needs Analysis (2014 and 2017).

South Morang Precinct Community Infrastructure Analysis (2013).

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

ESCH responds to gaps in service provision and infrastructure and is consistent with Council priorities and plans. The Epping Central Structure Plan (2011), the South Morang Civic Precinct Community Infrastructure Analysis (2013), the Human Services Needs Analysis (2014 and 2017) and the Council Plan identify substantial demand for additional infrastructure and community services in the municipality, particularly those targeting the needs of young people, families, new migrants, CALD communities, seniors and people with disabilities. The ESCH provides an opportunity to meet the current needs of the community and respond to the evidence of significant population growth.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A healthy and safe community

ECSH responds to the demand for a range of services identified in the Human Services Needs Analysis (2014 and 2017). The service delivery model provides an additional benefit to users who can access a variety of services in one location.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Epping Community Services Hub has been in operation for four years. The Brotherhood of St Laurence has provided strategic leadership and operational management of the Hub. This is third report to Council covering 2019-2020. This period includes a growth in the service pre COVID-19 and the response to the pandemic. While the service grew and developed in the first half of the reporting period the pandemic and associated first Melbourne lockdown required a substantial change to working arrangements.

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to note the report.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.2.2    For Noting - Whittlesea Community Connections Annual Report 

Attachments:                        1       WCC Annual Report 2019 20   

Responsible Officer:            Director Planning & Development

Author:                                  Social Policy & Project Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to note the Whittlesea Community Connections Annual Report 2019 – 2020.

Brief overview

The City of Whittlesea has a long-standing partnership with Whittlesea Community Connections (WCC) in the provision of services to the community, aligned with Whittlesea 2040 goals. 

As part of the City of Whittlesea and WCC service agreement (2018 – 2028), WCC are required to provide an annual report detailing progress against the agreed activities and outcomes.

Council is a major funder and partner of WCC. This partnership provides much needed support for the Whittlesea community – particularly low income and vulnerable residents; and was able to pivot services quickly and efficiently during the COVID pandemic in 2020.

In 2019/20 WCC has:

·    Supported 420 clients through their casework service.

·    Provided volunteer training to 80 community members in basic computer skills, identifying and responding to family violence, mental health first aid and child safety.

·    Made significant changes to their model of delivery due to the pandemic and first Melbourne lockdown with assistance from City of Whittlesea through Council’s deployment, emergency relief and Working for Victoria programs.

·    Provided food hampers for over 3000 Whittlesea residents (April to June 2020)

·    Established a Friendly Connections program supporting isolated and vulnerable people.

·    Through the Whittlesea Volunteer Resource Service provided over 140 community members with information and support to connect them to a local volunteer role.

·    In collaboration with Council, developed an outcomes evaluation framework for the services delivered through the service agreement.

·    In partnership with Council identified and advocated for local responses in relation to housing and homelessness, emergency relief and multicultural issues.

rationale for recommendation

The Annual Report is a requirement of the Service Agreement between Council and WCC.

impacts of recommendation

There are no anticipated impacts, rather this is a reporting requirement of the service agreement.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

There are no anticipated impacts.

 

Report

Background

Whittlesea Community Connections (WCC) has worked in partnership with Council since its inception 48 years ago. This partnership covers a range of areas, programs and services that are focused on improving residents’ health and wellbeing, improving their access to information and support services and helping them connect and participate. The partnership has both a population-wide focus and a targeted focus on those most marginalised and disadvantaged in our community. 

In July 2018 Council and WCC entered a 10-year service agreement to deliver on three priority areas:

·    Community Help.

·    Community Engagement.

·    Volunteer Resource Service.

As part of that service agreement WCC are required to provide an annual progress report on the progress in each of the priority areas.

The attached report provides an overview on the progress made by WCC on these priority areas and highlights key achievements.

Achievements

The service agreement delivers:

Community help

·    Delivered 987 casework sessions to 420 clients to provide a range of services including advocacy, advice and referral, financial assistance and community capacity building.

·    Developed tools to monitor the impact of the casework which has shown in increase in knowledge for clients with 60% deemed as having good and 29% having reasonable knowledge after support (up from 98% having very poor knowledge before).

·    Convened the Whittlesea Multicultural Issues Network, Whittlesea Housing and Homelessness Advisory Group and Whittlesea Farm and Food collective.

·    Worked with Coroners Court to identify systemic issues and provide possible solutions.

Community engagement

·    Convened the Women’s Advisory Group, where 18 women from CALD backgrounds participated in monthly meetings. Evaluation of this group showed an increase in the understanding of family violence and its drivers and the confidence to connect.

·    Convened the Leaders of Tomorrow group with 22 young people participating in monthly meetings and contributing in planning activities for young people in Whittlesea.

·    Consulted with migrant and refugee communities on their experience of multiculturalism and how the experience can be improved.

 

Volunteer Resource Service

·    Provided intake and assessment for 142 volunteers.

·    Provide training for 80 community members in a range of skills including basic computer skills, responding to family violence and mental health first aid.

·    Developed a Volunteer Emergency Management Plan.

·    Contributed to the Victorian State Volunteer Strategy consultation and Federal review of Volunteer Management Activity.

COVID-19 Response

WCC have identified COVID-19 as both a significant challenge and an opportunity for how it delivers services.  With the support of the City of Whittlesea through staff deployment, access to emergency relief funds and Working for Victoria program WCC has been able to modify their model of operation to respond to community needs.  As a result of the pandemic, to 30 June 2020, WCC have:

·    Moved to telephone and remote based services.

·    Introduced a central response line to quickly respond to community members needs including food relief, financial assistance and casework support.

·    Developed community fact sheets on a range of topics.

·    Supported isolated and vulnerable people through the Friendly Connections program with individual phone calls.

Proposal

That the Whittlesea Community Connections Annual Report 2019-20 be presented to Council for noting.

Consultation

Council meet with WCC quarterly to monitor the Services Agreement and agree an annual workplan.

Critical Dates

There are no critical dates associated with the annual report.

Financial Implications

WCC has met or exceeded the specified outputs for the second year of their Service Agreement. Funding for the organisation in 2019/2020 was $424,965. This will increase to $435,589 in 20/21 as specified in the Service Agreement.

Policy strategy and legislation

The partnership between Council and WCC enables the delivery of key policy initiatives outlined in several Council policies and strategies including:

·    Whittlesea 2040 A place for all: the services, programs and outcomes align with key goals and directions.

·    Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan: specifically, the partnership is underpinned in this Plan:

Create safe and welcoming community events.

Implement initiatives that address community safety, emergency management and violence against women and their children.

Implement responsive and prevention approaches.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

The work of WCC focusses on strengthening community engagement and building capacity to enhance social inclusion.

Strategic Risk Emergency Management - Failure to manage and respond to an emergency event which may be detrimental to community health and wellbeing

WCC has quickly adapted and increased their services to respond to the changing needs of the community as a result of the pandemic and lockdown.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A healthy and safe community

 

WCC provide a range of services that help maintain and improve health and safety for the Whittlesea community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Council is a major funder and partner of Whittlesea Community Connections. This partnership provides much needed support for the Whittlesea community – particularly low income and vulnerable residents. The overview of activities for 2019/20 represent the second twelve months of the 10 year Service Agreement between Council and WCC.

In the first half of the reporting period WCC continued to provide important services to the Whittlesea community. In addition, they developed internal process to better monitor outcomes and use this knowledge to improve services.

 

 

 

The second half of the reporting period was dominated by the outbreak of the pandemic and associated lockdown. In partnership and support from the City of Whittlesea, WCC quickly adapted their service model to respond. This included changing the way existing services were delivered as well as developing a range of new services to meet the changing needs of the community. The capacity to pivot services quickly and efficiently has provided essential services to the most vulnerable in the community.

WCC has met or exceeded all output targets and continue to provide an essential service to Council and the community.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to note the report.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       administrator Wilson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.3       Community Wellbeing

6.3.1      For Decision - Refocusing Council's 2021 Australia Day Celebrations

Attachments:                        1       CoW Festival Program Summary   

Responsible Officer:            Director Community Wellbeing

Author:                                  Manager Community Cultural Development   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

This report is presented to Council for endorsement of the recommendations. The report recommends that:

1.       On January 26, Australia Day, Council’s activities be civic focused and continue to conduct a Citizenship Ceremony on this day.

2.       Council ceases to hold an Australia Day event on 26 January and undertakes community consultation as part of a wider municipal festival and events review. This review will consider fireworks and performances being scheduled at more appropriate times to address fire risk concerns, community safety, value for money as well as cultural and community development opportunities.

3.       Council pilots a Whittlesea ‘Community Awards’ initiative in 2021, in lieu of holding ‘Australia Day Awards’.

4.       A Whittlesea festival and events review report is presented to Council for consideration, including community consultation findings, no later than July 2021. 

5.       Council continues its ongoing program of Reconciliation education and engagement to foster understanding, awareness and respectful dialogue around these issues in the Whittlesea community.

Brief overview

The City of Whittlesea (Council) delivers an Australia Day public event each year on January 26 as part of its’ festival and events season.  While the event is supported by some in our community, it also contributes to the distress and trauma experienced by our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents on and around this day.

The 26 January has become an increasingly complex and contested date to celebrate Australia Day in recent years. The City of Whittlesea (Council) recognises this complexity and is committed to moving forward in a way that serves to heal, unite and build bridges of understanding across our community. This approach is in line with Council’s primary purpose under the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act) “…to ensure the peace, order and good government of each municipal district” (ss 1 (1)).

The next steps around 26 January present an opportunity for Council to make significant progress along its’ Reconciliation journey. This progress is consistent with Council’s adopted Reconciliation Policy (2015); considerable action undertaken through the Stretch Reconciliation Plan (2017); as well as significant advice from the Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (WRG).

In addition, a number of operational issues are impacting on the delivery of Council’s Australia Day event and ‘Australia Day Awards’ which make it timely to no longer hold this event or allocate awards on this day. Council will conduct a review of the festivals and events program in 2021 which will be guided by Council’s vision of Whittlesea as ‘a place for all’.

Council will continue to hold Citizenship Ceremonies on 26 January, including invitation of a Wurundjeri Elder to participate and undertake an Acknowledgement of History as appropriate to Wurundjeri customs and lore.

rationale for recommendation

There are a number of policy, operational, financial, public health, safety, reputational and relational risks associated with continuing to hold a major event on 26 January.

impacts of recommendation

The Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (WRG) reports that our Aboriginal community will feel heard, respected and hopeful if Council demonstrates leadership through endorsement of these recommendations. Council’s Stretch Reconciliation Plan (Stretch RAP) identified (page 5) that:

·    83 per cent of Victorians believe that Aboriginal Australians ‘hold a special place as the first Australians’.

·    84 per cent of people surveyed across the City of Whittlesea agreed that something should be done to reduce discrimination experienced by people from racial or ethnic minority groups in Australia.

Council acknowledges, however, that some of our community support continuation of a major event on 26 January and may respond negatively which may be expressed to Council, the WRG or directly to media and on social media channels.  

The recommendation also seeks to mitigate risk associated with a fireworks display at this time of year; potential COVID-19 community transmission risks associated with holding a major event during a pandemic (and when restrictions over the 2020/21 summer are unclear at time of writing); as well as financial (value for money) issues associated with staging the event in recent years.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Council will conduct a Whittlesea festival and events review (the review) to explore new and inclusive models and address emerging delivery risks. The review’s community engagement process will be conducted across our diverse demographic as well as with the Wurundjeri Land Council (Traditional Owners) and local Elders. The review will also address: seasonal (fire risk) and environmental concerns, community health and safety, value for money as well as cultural and community development opportunities.

Council will also:

·    Work with local communities and stakeholders to pilot a Whittlesea ‘Community Awards’ initiative in 2021, in lieu of holding ‘Australia Day Awards’.

·    Complete a Whittlesea Fireworks Policy review and present a revising draft to Council for consideration prior to April 2021.

·    Continue to monitor the Department of Health and Human Services’ (DHHS) advice regarding Victoria’s roadmap for reopening to ensure that festivals and events are in line with public health guidelines.

·    Continue to deliver its ongoing program of Reconciliation education and engagement to foster understanding, awareness and respectful dialogue around these issues in the Whittlesea community.

Report

Background

The Australia Day Celebration is part of Council’s annual festival provision. The event is held on 26 January in the evening between 6pm – 9.30pm and includes music, entertainment, food and a fireworks finale. Council also holds a citizenship ceremony and the City of Whittlesea Australia Day Awards on this date. 

Australia Day on 26 January is a gazetted public holiday that has been celebrated nation-wide since 1994, marking the anniversary of the arrival of the First Fleet of British ships in 1788. For many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, 26 January is not a day of celebration, rather it is a day of sadness and trauma.

At a local level, the Australia Day Celebration has been the subject of debate, with Council’s advisory body, the Whittlesea Reconciliation Group (WRG), advocating on multiple occasions for the celebratory event to be moved to a less sensitive date.  Whittlesea’s Traditional Owners, the Wurundjeri Land Council, has also indicated they would like to celebrate Australia Day, but on a more inclusive date:

 

“…The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community are very proud Australians, who would very much like to be able to celebrate a day of national pride, but how can we be expected to celebrate on a date that to us symbolises a loss of country and culture...”

 

Wurundjeri Land Council (2017)

https://www.smh.com.au/opinion/we-want-to-celebrate-a-day-of-national-pride-just-not-this-one-20170824-gy3ay3.html

Hence the 26 January has become an increasingly complex and contested date to celebrate Australia Day in recent years. Council recognises this complexity and is committed to moving forward in a way that serves to heal, unite and build bridges of understanding across our community. This approach is in line with Council’s primary purpose under the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act) “…to ensure the peace, order and good government of each municipal district” (ss 1 (1)).

In addition, a number of operational issues are impacting on the delivery of Council’s Australia Day event which make it timely to cease holding this event and review the festivals and events program in 2021.

Proposal

This report addresses the community impact and the delivery challenges associated with conducting public celebrations on 26 January and recommends steps aligned with Council’s Whittlesea 2040 vision of becoming a “place for all”.

The report recommends that while Council continues to conduct a Citizenship Ceremony on January 26, it ceases to hold a public Australia Day event on this date. Instead Council will pilot a Whittlesea ‘Community Awards’ initiative in 2021, in lieu of holding ‘Australia Day Awards’ and undertake community consultation as part of a wider municipal festival and events review.

Whittlesea Aboriginal Community

The City of Whittlesea has the second largest Aboriginal population in metropolitan Melbourne; 1.2% or 2023 people according to Council research. 

 

Members of the Aboriginal community and the WRG have regularly raised concerns about conducting an event on a day that causes high levels of distress for Aboriginal people; and the WRG has advised Council that holding celebrations on this date is no longer appropriate.  In recent times, the issue of Council holding an Australia Day celebration event has impacted Council’s relationship with the WRG and slowed progress in the Reconciliation space. Whittlesea’s Aboriginal community reports increased levels of racism around Australia Day and the WRG receive increased racist commentary on their Facebook page.

Reconciliation approaches

Council has a policy commitment to Reconciliation, cultural safety and inclusion, and is viewed as a leader in the sector by peak bodies such as Reconciliation Victoria and Reconciliation Australia. Council’s vision for reconciliation is driven by Council’s Reconciliation Policy which states:

The City of Whittlesea values local Aboriginal communities and cultures; Council recognises they hold a special place as the First Peoples of Australia. Council is committed to inclusivity, equity and engagement with local Aboriginal people and communities.

Council is one of only five Victorian Council’s to adopt a Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan.  We have more Aboriginal staff than any other Council in Victoria with an Aboriginal Employment Pathways Strategy laying out a road map to foster a culturally appropriate and inclusive workplace.  We have an Aboriginal Inclusion Charter which emphasises the importance of mutually respectful and beneficial partnerships between Aboriginal communities and Council with a view to achieving the best possible outcomes for the whole community.

Conducting a large-scale celebratory event on January 26 could be seen to be inconsistent with these commitments and achievements.

Australia Day event – operational context   

·    Risk and security this national public holiday has seen an increase in anti-social behaviour and Victoria Police have heightened risk management concerns regarding terrorism and hostile vehicle incursion at mass gatherings particularly on this day. Victoria Police have imposed year-on-year risk management requirements which have resulted in significant increases in costs.

·    Budget - the budget for this event has increased significantly over the past decade. This increase reflects changes to the regulatory environment, increased resources required to manage and implement risk control measures and a resulting increase in staffing levels – contractors and Council staff. The security/risk related expenditure as a percentage of the event has risen from 10% to around 40% while expenditure on community entertainment and activities has been reduced from 18% to 9% during this period. A summary of event costs is provided in Table 1 below.

·    Program - the program budget has reduced over time to compensate for increased security and risk costs. This reduction is coupled with increasing difficulty in attracting high-quality performers, musicians and MCs to perform on this day.  Council has been informed by industry agents that many artists and performers are no longer willing to perform at Australia Day events; and limits the content able to be sourced for the program. A summary of other Whittlesea festivals and events are summarised in Attachment 1.

·    Fireworks – the fireworks finale drives public attendance at the event site and in the surrounding streets and local viewing points. It is, however, an activity that increasingly divides opinion; anti-firework sentiment increased significantly during the 2020 devastating bushfires. The cancellation of Council’s Australia Day fireworks in that year saw a decrease in attendance of 65% on previous years.

Council is reviewing its Fireworks Policy and once revised will be presented to Council for endorsement and community consultation, prior to April 2021.  The revised draft policy considers prohibiting fireworks during the designated fire danger period which would preclude fireworks continuing as part of events held in the January period (including Australia Day).

 

Council has recently reviewed its Fireworks Policy which is now pending community consultation. The draft policy recommends not permitting fireworks during the designated fire danger period which, if endorsed by Council, means that fireworks cannot continue as part of Council’s Australia Day event.

 

Year

Budget

Net Cost

Number of Attendees

% CoW residents

19/20

$75,461

$83,740

1500 attendance (no fireworks)

87% from CoW

18/19

$90,235

$72,394

4500 attendance

93% from CoW

17/18

$75,756

$70,745

1500 attendance (heavy rain/ wind)

89% from CoW

COVID-19 impact upon events

Restrictions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have created a challenging and uncertain environment for large events.  Council is unable to safely plan for any large public gatherings to be delivered in the next few months. The recommendation also seeks to mitigate any potential COVID-19 community transmission risks associated with holding a major event during a pandemic (and when restrictions over the 2020/21 summer are unclear). 

The Department of Health and Human Services’ (DHHS) Victoria’s roadmap for reopening – How we live in Victoria states that under the ‘Last Step’ public events are subject to the requirements listed in DHHS’ public event framework (details of which are forthcoming and most up to date public health advice).

The ‘Last Step’ is proposed to include restrictions on event numbers up to 500 people in any one space and dependant on the venue‘s ability to maintain a density quotient.  Large events will be treated on an individual basis, based on requirements and epidemiology at the time and an approved public Covid Safe plan.

Australia Day Awards and Citizenship ceremonies

City of Whittlesea’s Australia Day Awards are announced and presented at the Australia Day event. The award categories for 2020 included:  Citizen of the Year, Access and Inclusion Citizen of the Year, Senior Citizen of the Year and Young Citizen of the Year. 

Nominations for these awards has been in decline for some time, with the exception of the Senior Citizen of the Year category. Changing the awards and piloting an alternate awards model with a community focus may make them more locally relevant and provide an opportunity to refresh their role (such as working more closely with service organisations). Attracting nominations for these awards has been a challenge and attempts to date to address this (such as streamlining the application process) has not helped. It is unclear as to whether declining applications are a reflection of a change in sentiment from the local community in relation to the awards being held on Australia Day.  Changing from an Australia Day to a ‘Community’ awards’ focus will involve changes to Council’s City of Whittlesea Australia Day Awards Ceremony Committee, including a possible name change of the Committee and terms of reference.

 

 

 

The Federal Government has recently reiterated its’ requirement that local government will continue to hold Citizenship Ceremonies on this day and has developed a revised Australian Citizenship Ceremonies Code.  Failure to hold a Citizenship Ceremony on 26 January could result in the Federal Government withdrawing the ability of Council to conduct any Citizenship Ceremonies. It is proposed to conduct a Citizenship Ceremony on Australia Day in 2021, including invitation of a Wurundjeri Elder to participate and undertake an Acknowledgement of History as appropriate to Wurundjeri customs and lore.

Consultation 

The WRG has consulted with the Aboriginal community and the broader community on this issue over the past three years and have advocated to Council for change. These consultations and advocacies have included:

·    WRG consulting widely in the development of a joint letter and position paper which was presented to Council in 2017 and a second joint letter in 2019.

·    Council’s celebrations on 26 January have been discussed at the bi-annual Mayor and CEO meetings with the Aboriginal community, as an issue that deeply affects the community and its relationship with the Council.

·    WRG’s Change the Date campaign in 2019 reached 63,582 people with nearly 20,000 online engagements, 1,090 likes, and over 150 residents signing up to take part in further action, demonstrating growing community support.

·    Aboriginal community leaders expressed support for WRG’s campaign, including the CEO’s of Bubup Wilam and the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service, the Director of Dardi Munwurro Men’s Healing Services and the Whittlesea Aboriginal Elders Group – Elders Motivated and Deadly.

·    Whittlesea Interfaith Network has long advocated for Council to increase dialogue around this issue.

·    Community members of Council’s City of Whittlesea Australia Day Awards Ceremony Committee have been contacted and advised of proposed changes in this report.

Council notes the WRG’s extensive consultation outlined above. Building on this engagement, Council’s festivals and events review will undertake consultation across our diverse communities and consider a tailored range of celebrations and events which also address environmental, safety and value for money issues; as well as cultural and community development opportunities.

Critical Dates

Nil

Financial Implications

Re-focusing Council’s 2021 Australia Day Celebration event would allow $5000 of 2020/21 event budget to be re-directed into community consultation and remaining monies ($77,331) into community recovery or to support impacted organisational finances in the 2020/21 financial year.

Policy strategy and legislation

Council’s Reconciliation Policy includes: 'reconciliation is about building better relationships between the wider Australian community and Aboriginal peoples for the benefit of all Australians'.

Council’s key document providing direction in Aboriginal matters is the Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) 2017-2020. The Stretch RAP is structured into three pillars: Respect, Relationships and Opportunities. 

Other City of Whittlesea linkages include:

·    Aboriginal Inclusion Charter.

·    Building Respect: Whittlesea’s Anti-racism Strategy 2015-2019.

·    Festival and Events Policy.

·    Whittlesea 2040: A Place for All.

·    Community Building Strategy.

·    City of Whittlesea Australia Day Awards.

State Government policy linkages include:

·    Victorian Government Aboriginal Inclusion Framework.

·    Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework.

·    Victorian Government’s COVID-19 Victoria’s roadmap for reopening

Federal Government linkages include:

·    Australian Citizenship Ceremonies Code in accordance with the Australian Citizenship Act 2007.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

The purpose of festivals and events is to bring communities together – to strengthen community connection. This event divides opinion and challenges Council’s relationship with the local Aboriginal community. Continuing with the event in its current form compromises Council’s ability to achieve Goal 1: Connected Community articulated in Whittlesea 2040: A Place for All.  

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

In accordance with the Australian Citizenship Ceremonies Code, local government councils must hold a Citizenship Ceremony on 26 January as part of their Australia Day celebrations. Failure to hold a Citizenship Ceremony on 26 January could result in the Federal Government withdrawing the ability of Council to conduct any Citizenship Ceremonies.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              Connected community

Key Direction               A socially cohesive community

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Whilst Whittlesea’s Australia Day public event is supported by some in our community, it also contributes to the distress and trauma experienced expressed by the Wurundjeri Land Council as Traditional Owners and many of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents on and around this day. In addition, the event no longer aligns with Council’s demonstrated leadership in Reconciliation and associated policy; and is at odds with advice from Council’s WRG. 

At an operational level it is increasingly challenging to deliver a great community experience due to increased risk mitigation and unpredictable environmental factors.

The additional pandemic restrictions placed on the delivery of public events now provide Council with the opportunity of time and space to review event delivery and to have conversations with the community about a refreshed festivals and events program, which brings communities together in line with the Whittlesea 2040 vision of “a place for all”.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Hold a civic focused Citizenship Ceremony on January 26, Australia Day.

2.       Cease holding an Australia Day event on 26 January.

3.       Undertake community consultation as part of a wider municipal festival and events review which considers fireworks and performances being scheduled at more appropriate times to address fire risk concerns, community safety, value for money as well as cultural and community development opportunities.

4.       Pilot a Whittlesea ‘Community Awards’ initiative in 2021, in lieu of holding ‘Australia Day Awards’.

5.       Note that a Whittlesea festival and events review report will be presented to Council for consideration, including community consultation findings, no later than July 2021. 

6.       Continue its ongoing program of education and engagement to foster understanding, awareness and respectful dialogue around Reconciliation issues in the Whittlesea community.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:                Administrator Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried UNAMIMOUSLY

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.3.2      FOR DECISION - Sporting and Community Pavilion Guidelines and Sports Lighting Policy Update

Attachments:                        1       Sporting & Community Pavilion Guidelines 2020

2       Sports Lighting Policy 2020   

Responsible Officer:            Director Community Wellbeing

Author:                                  Leisure Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council adopt the City of Whittlesea Sporting and Community Pavilion Guidelines 2020 and Sports Lighting Policy 2020.

Brief overview

Due to recent industry changes Council’s current sports lighting and sporting and community pavilions polices are outdated. In collaboration with local sporting clubs, industry experts and sporting peak bodies, officers have developed updated policies. These updated policies articulate consistent service levels to inform future planning and design of local level sporting infrastructure and community pavilions (‘pavilions’).

rationale for recommendation

To improve player safety, reduce Council’s environmental impact and maximise flexible participation opportunities. The updated Sports Lighting Policy recommends installation of LED competition standard lighting rather than the less efficient metal halide lighting.

The updated Sporting and Community Pavilion Guidelines 2020 (the Guidelines) recommends increases in some room sizes and outlines the essential infrastructure standards needed to provide compliant and functional pavilions that support the delivery of viable sporting competitions in line with current State Sports Associations (SSA) guidelines.

impacts of recommendation

Whilst both policies recommend an increase in the current outdated provisions, these changes bring Council in line with current and expected sport and industry standards, which are required to manage potential injury risk and participation opportunities, as well as address reputational risks associated with inconsistent built form and design approaches  across the municipality.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

·    Updated policy position will be shared with Council stakeholders to guide future infrastructure delivery and set clear expectations.

·    Upgrades to existing sports lighting infrastructure that doesn’t meet the standards outlined within the policy, will be prioritised in accordance to need, asset condition, club participation/diversity, expected community benefit and utilisation.

·    Flexible design of pavilions to provide multi-purpose facilities will enable increased usage, increase return on investment and potentially reduce the financial implications to Council.

Report

Background

Within the City of Whittlesea, adult obesity rates are increasing and the prevalence of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and osteoporosis are higher than the Victorian averages.

 

To help address these health indicators and reduce the burden of preventative disease, Council invests in the provision of high quality, accessible and locally available community sporting infrastructure.

 

Council currently manages 32 sporting reserves with a further 22 planned for delivery over the next 20 years. However, changes in industry and sport compliance standards, participation trends and community expectations have rendered Council’s current policy position outdated; risking the ability of new and future developments meeting community demand.

 

Following the adoption of Whittlesea 2040: A Place for All and the Active Whittlesea Strategy 2019-28 and in response to the above-mentioned considerations, two Council policies have been updated to increase alignment to Council’s current strategic priorities and set standardised service levels for the construction of future sport and leisure infrastructure:

 

1.   Sporting and Community Pavilion Guidelines 2020 – These guidelines provide minimum standards for sporting and community pavilion projects to ensure the delivery of compliant and functional pavilions that meet the needs of community user groups. These guidelines provide an updated position on the existing Sports Pavilion Strategy adopted by Council, 20 March 2007.

 

2.   Sports Lighting Policy 2020 – This policy provides minimum standards for the delivery of sports lighting at outdoor sports facilities such as sports grounds, fields and courts. This policy provides an updated position on the existing Sports Lighting Policy adopted by Council,19 November 2013.

 

The review process was informed by State Sporting Associations, local sporting clubs and outlines Council policy platforms that:

 

·    Are now reflective of industry / sport compliance standards. 

·    Will deliver fit for purpose infrastructure that meets the needs of community user groups.

·    Ensures a consistent approach to the design and delivery of sporting infrastructure.

·    Supports inclusivity and fosters healthy, safe and active participation opportunities.

·    Encourages stakeholder collaboration to deliver a project with clear expectations.

Proposal

Sporting and Community Pavilion Guidelines 2020

The Guidelines clearly define Council’s minimum standard provision, role and function in developing and building new sporting and community pavilions.

 

The consistent planning and design advice provided within the Guidelines ensures an equitable approach to facility construction throughout the municipality by setting a default service standard for local level facilities.

Sporting industry standards traditionally adopt a tiered approach to facility standards where facility expectations increase with the level of sport played. Local level facilities are reflective of the basic minimum facility components required to facilitate viable community sporting competition.

 

The Guidelines balance a ‘Sport First’ approach with the need for more flexible and inclusive community spaces by documenting the pavilion components required to meet the needs of the sporting user groups and components that would facilitate multipurpose and increased community use (i.e. community storage areas). This will encourage greater utilisation of sporting and community pavilions and ensure that any future pavilions remain fit for purpose, welcoming and accessible to the broader community.

 

In addition, the Guidelines outline a streamlined process to facility planning and delivery, which is aligned to Council’s internal Enterprise Project Management Framework. This enables users of the document to clearly understand key tasks, roles and responsibilities in the facility development and delivery process and outlines a transparent approach to assessing any enhancements that are outside of the Guidelines. Upgrades to existing pavilions that do not meet the standards outlined within the Guidelines will be prioritised according to asset condition, participation, community benefit and utilisation.

Sports Lighting Policy 2020

The Sports Lighting Policy (the Policy) relates to the installation and management of sports lighting on outdoor sports grounds, fields, tracks and courts that are owned and / or operated by Council. The standards are informed primarily by compliance to State Sporting Association competition guidelines and the Australian Standards for Sports Lighting (AS 2560.2018).

 

Council’s current policy recommends the construction of sports lighting to training standards of 50 lux and the use of metal halide globes. However, as the provision of compliant sports lighting contributes to the continued health, wellbeing and safety of the community through increased physical activity opportunities, the revised policy outlines a new approach and recommends an increase in Council’s minimum provision standard.

 

Under the new policy, it is proposed that Council provides LED competition standard lighting with lux levels ranging from 100 to 350 lux in line with individual sport compliance standards.

 

This increase in provision standards will:

·    Ensure that Council is providing safe and compliant facilities that minimise the risk of participant injury.

·    Future-proof facilities, reducing the need for Council to retrospectively add or upgrade sports lighting shortly after their initial construction.

·    Enable the increased usage of sports facilities and support sporting clubs in diversifying their offer to include weeknight social competitions and flexible night fixtures at facilities that have reached capacity.

·    Reduce sports clubs carbon footprint and provide financial savings for volunteer based clubs.

The use of energy efficient LED lights is supported by Council's Zero Net Emissions Plan and has the following benefits:

·    Minimising light pollution for the surrounding population.

·    Reducing Council’s carbon footprint.

·    Increasing the energy efficiency of Council infrastructure.

·    Providing a longer asset life span in comparison to Metal Halide lighting.

·    Reducing maintenance requirements.

In addition to outlining minimum provision standards, the Policy also outlines Council’s approach to future sports lighting upgrades. Upgrades to existing sports lighting infrastructure that does not currently meet the standards outlined within the Policy will be prioritised according to asset condition, participation, community benefit and utilisation.

Consultation

Both policies were developed following a comprehensive benchmarking and consultation process with stakeholders including local sporting clubs, AFL Victoria, Cricket Victoria, Football Victoria, Hockey Victoria, Lacrosse Victoria, Netball Victoria, NRL Victoria, Rugby Victoria, Softball Victoria, Tennis Victoria, benchmarking with other LGA’s and various internal council departments.

 

A local government benchmarking consultation informed Council’s understanding of the context of sport infrastructure delivery across the broader local government sector and key learnings from other projects to promote continuous improvement. It is common practice across all local governments for policies such as these to be publicly available and adopted by Council, not internally by Council executives, as they will have significant benefit and impact to the community.

Critical Dates

No critical dates.

Financial Implications 

The development of sport and leisure infrastructure constitutes a significant investment for local government. An initial investigation of future LED lighting projects indicate that the proposed increase in provision standards outlined in the Policy will increase initial capital costs by approximately $20,000 - $30,000 per site. This cost increase can be managed through Council annual New Works Program and is expected to be recouped through design efficiencies and reduced maintenance requirements.

 

Recent pavilion design has mirrored the standards outlined within the Guidelines, without the formal support from a council endorsed position, to ensure pavilion design meets industry and sports compliance standards. It is therefore anticipated that any variation in capital expense towards the delivery of future sporting and community pavilions will be minor.

 

Immediate implementation of the policies to 2020/21 projects can be accommodated within the current 2020/21 budget and any future budget impacts will be presented for Council’s consideration as part of the annual budget process.

 

External grants, partnerships and advocacy to funding bodies will continue to be explored to offset Council costs for delivery. Opportunities for the consolidation of facilities to increase viability of operations and economies of scale will also be explored on a case by case basis to reduce the financial implications on Council.

Policy strategy and legislation

These policies are aligned to:

·    Whittlesea 2040 – Goal 1: Connected Community through increased physical activity rates (Direction 1.2).

·    Active Whittlesea Strategy 2019 – Key Direction 3: Open Space / Infrastructure.

·    Whittlesea Council Plan 2017 – 2021

·    Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan 2017 – 2021

·    Equal and Safe Strategy 2019

·    Environmental Sustainability Strategy 2012-2022

·    Gender Equality in Design Guidelines 2017

·    Community Building Strategy 2019

·    Open Space Strategy 2016

·    Zero Net Emissions 2022 – Council Energy Transition Plan

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Long-term planning for sport and leisure infrastructure contributes towards Council’s commitment to building a healthy and safe communities through increasing participation in sport and physical activity.

Strategic Risk Financial Sustainability - Inability to meet current and future expenditure

The updated policy positions will enable Council to adequately plan and budget for continued investment into sports ground lighting and sports and community pavilion infrastructure across the next 20 years.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A healthy and safe community

 

The policies respond to several Whittlesea 2040 key directions including:

-      Key direction 1.2 ‘a healthy and safe community’ as it will lead to improved facility provision resulting in increase in physical activity opportunities.

-      Key direction 1.1 ‘a socially cohesive community’ and key direction 1.3 ‘a participating community’ through the growth of social networks and opportunities for residents to volunteer within the local sporting context.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Providing fit for purpose sporting infrastructure plays a central role in creating equitable sporting opportunities and enables sporting clubs to create opportunities for social connection, physical activity and community leadership. The updated policies will ensure sporting infrastructure continues to increase physical activity opportunities encouraging healthier lives for the residents of the City of Whittlesea.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Sporting and Community Pavilion Guidelines 2020 and Sports Lighting Policy 2020.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried UNANIMOUSLY

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.3.3    For Decision - Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre at Mernda Project Scoping 

Attachments:                        1       Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre at Mernda: Planning Timeline

2       Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre at Mernda: Potential options canvassed   

Responsible Officer:            Director Community Wellbeing

Author:                                  Senior Leisure Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council:

·    Undertake a feasibility and comparative analysis for an Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre at Mernda which considers the following two options:

25 metre pool and facilities option (Option 8); and a

50 metre pool and facilities option (Option 9).

·    Undertake planning to ensure this major project aligns with and consolidates other nearby major strategic planning initiatives such as the Mernda Town Centre and Health and Wellbeing Hub.

·    Receive a report exploring both these options for consideration in 2021.

Brief overview

The report provides an overview of the Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre at Mernda (MAISC) project, including recent community consultation findings, and provides a recommendation for the exploration of two options.

rationale for recommendation

·    The MAISC was identified in the 2011 Mernda Regional Recreation Reserve (MRRR) Master Plan; a recommendation from the 2014 Major Leisure and Aquatic Facilities Strategy (MLAFS); as well as Indoor Sports Facility Feasibility Study (ISSFS).

·    The Whittlesea Netball Basketball Plan 2019 (WNBP) was endorsed in December 2019; recommending the construction of six indoor sports courts and eight outdoor netball courts at the site as short-term high priority projects. 

·    Recent community consultation undertaken indicates strong support for both aquatic and sports courts provision, and an increase in the community’s perceived value in the provision of lap swimming. 

impacts of recommendation

MAISC will provide a myriad of opportunities for participation in active recreation, leisure activities and structured sport; resulting in positive physical, mental and social health outcomes for decades to come.  However, the capital costs associated with the facility options are significant; Council will need to significantly strengthen its advocacy platform to attract external funding if the project’s capital cost is to be financially attainable.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

·    Further refinement of MAISC facility scope and opportunities through the development of a comparative feasibility stage and detailed business case.

·    Develop a detailed communication, community engagement and advocacy plan to provide opportunities for community input as significant stakeholders in the project.

 

Report

Background

The proposed Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre (MAISC) is being designed as a multi-purpose, aquatic, leisure and indoor sports court facility to service the Mernda, Doreen and surrounding areas. Identified in the 2011 Mernda Regional Recreation Reserve (MRRR) Master Plan, the MAISC was a key recommendation from the 2014 Major Leisure and Aquatic Facilities Strategy (MLAFS) and Indoor Sports Facility Feasibility Study (ISSFS). The MLAFS stipulated the four guiding principles for facilities as:

·    Accessible and Equitable

·    Maximising Social and Health Benefits

·    Affordable

·    Viable

Since 2014, Council officers have consulted extensively with the local community and worked closely with Sport and Leisure Solutions (SALS) consultancy group to determine facility scope, provisional costings (including capital and operating costs), non-financial impacts and demand assessment. SALS’ expert independent advice has been critical to the development of various business case options and financial modelling, to provide evidence based and sector relevant recommendations on size, scale and components of the MAISC facility. 

From 2014 to 2018, extensive planning and feasibility work  was undertaken on the project, and a summary is provided in Attachment 1. During this time a number of options have been considered and developed for the site. Attachment 2 includes a summary of these options. The project was presented to Council on a number of occasions throughout 2019, with several facility options considered. A summary of 2019 Council decisions is summarised in Table 1 below.

Council meeting

Decision summary

February 2019

Council endorsed two facility options (Option 2 and Option 7) for further development through a business case and discussion at a future Council Briefing.

Option 2 – included a 25m lap pool with minimal warm water and play pools and relatively small gymnasium and program room footprint.

Option 7- included no lap pool with enhanced warm water and play pools and gymnasium and program room footprint.

August 2019

Council resolved to note a report on 50m pool costings.

December 2019

Council endorsed the Whittlesea Netball Basketball Plan 2019 (WNBP) which identified the construction of six indoor sports courts and eight outdoor netball courts on the Mernda Sports Hub site.

December 2019

Council resolved to undertake further community consultation regarding facilities options including provision of a 50-metre pool and large-scale water play such as water slides.

Table 1: 2019 Council decisions

Considering the sheer size of any potential investment and importance of the facility, further consultation was undertaken with the broader community in 2020 to establish current community priorities.  These findings are summarised in the consultation section of this report and indicate strong community support for the project.  A key theme identified was that travel is a clear current barrier to accessing aquatic and leisure facilities; which limits participation.  There is also strong support for both aquatic and sports court provision within the facility. 

The recent consultation results also showed a significant increase in perceived community value for the provision of lap swimming, and as such it would be prudent of Council to consider its inclusion with the project scope. 

Recent evidence from Sport and Recreation Victoria and data collected throughout the development of the project’s planning stages suggests there is a need for aquatics and leisure centres (ALC’s) to transition from being fitness centres to focusing more on improving community health and well-being outcomes, and prevention of chronic illnesses.

The benefits of physical activity and social interaction on the health and wellbeing of communities are well documented, and once constructed, MAISC will provide a myriad of opportunities for participation in active recreation, leisure activities and structured sport; resulting in positive physical, mental and social health outcomes for decades to come. 

Importantly, MAISC facilities and programs will play a significant role in providing a safe and inclusive space to encourage use by underrepresented communities such as women and girls, older adults and culturally and linguistically diverse residents. 

The next stage of planning will also consolidate opportunities for this leisure infrastructure to complement and enhance Council’s existing strategic planning in the area, specifically the future Mernda Town Centre and Health and Wellbeing Hub; and to ensure adequate integrated urban planning supports optimal outcomes for this site and the Whittlesea community.

OPtions Assessment

Following the recent community consultation, issues have emerged in relation to the current Council endorsed facility options (Options 2 and 7) which identify they do not represent the facility model required to achieve a balanced community health and wellbeing outcome or appropriately address the community sentiment for lap swimming provision.  In particular:

-     While Option 2 would cater for lap swimmers, swim clubs and squads, advice indicated that the reduced warm water exercise, water play and learn to swim areas could be a significant under provision for the broader community.  The smaller gymnasium could also limit accessibility during peak usage period and decrease any financial return.

-     In contrast, the increased provision of warm water exercise, water play and learn to swim areas presented in Option 7 would sufficiently cater for the broader community need, however the lack of lap swimming provision would not be palatable for swim clubs and lap swimmers and inhibit the facilities ability to hold events.

In response to the above, it is proposed the Council undertake a comparative analysis of two further options that attempt to balance community sentiment, projected participation and wider health benefits in a fiscally responsible way. These options have been identified as Option 8 (25m pool with enhanced warm water and water play pools etc), and Option 9 (50m pool with enhanced warm water and water play pools etc).

 

 

Table 2 provides an overview of project scope options and high-level/ indicative cost estimates.

SCOPE NAME

OPTION 2 – base

OPTION 7 – wellbeing/ no lap pool

OPTION 8 – wellbeing/ 25m lap pool

OPTION 9 – wellbeing/ 50m lap pool

AQUATIC PROVISION

LAP SWIM POOL

8 lane 25m pool

Close

8 lane 25m pool

8 lane 50m pool

WARM WATER POOL

200m2

300m2

300m2

300m2

WATER PLAY

290m2

350m2

350m2

350m2

LEARN TO SWIM POOL

100m2

200m2

125m2

150m2

SPA

Close

Checkmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

STEAM

Checkmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

SAUNA

Checkmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

LEISURE / HEALTH PROVISION

GYMNASIUM

450m2

600m2

600m2

600m2

PROGRAM ROOMS

2

3

3

3

CRECHE/CARE ROOM

190m2

190m2

190m2

190m2

HEALTH SUITES

Close

Checkmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

FINANCIAL FORECASTING

CAPITAL COST

$44.8M

$44.7M

$51M

$55.7M

ANNUAL (NET)

Break even to $100,000

$200,000 to $300,000

$300,000 to $400,000

$100,000 to $200,000

10 YEAR (NET)

$0 to $1M

$2M to $3M

$3M to $4M

$1M to $2M

SPORTS COURTS PROVISION

INDOOR COURTS

6 multipurpose courts with supporting amenities

OUTDOOR COURTS

8 floodlit netball with supporting amenities

FINANCIAL FORECASTING

CAPITAL COST

$24.6M

ANNUAL (NET)

Breakeven to $250,000

10 YEAR (NET)

$0 to $2.5M

MAISC: BUILT FORM

CAPITAL COST

$69.4M

$69.3M

$75.6M

$80.3M

Table 2: Project scope options indicative cost overview

It should be noted that cost estimates are provided based on an area component schedule and refer to costings for capital infrastructure only.  Whilst the estimates include allowance for contingencies - 7.5% for design and 7.5% for construction, with additional $500,000 allowance for abnormal ground conditions (rock etc.). Further investigation is required to understand requirements and costs of civil infrastructure required for the site, including likely significant rock removal and water management. 

 

 

In assessing the relative benefits associated with each option, officers have considered a range of factors summarised in Table 3 below.

Factor

Description

Capital Costs

The size and complexity of aquatic and leisure centres means that they are expensive to build due to the variety of spaces, air and water handling, and the scale of the facility.  Each of the proposed options provides for a facility that is of a comparatively modest scale while still meeting community needs.

Operational Return

Financial forecasting using assumptions for pricing structure, facility operating hours and management models. This report notes further analysis is required regarding operational return for each model.

Areas such as group fitness and programs, gym space and learn to swim/programmable water space provide strong revenue streams, while activities such as lap swimming are costly by comparison to the space they require.  The options provided seek to balance operational return from those areas most utilised.

Potential Funding Models

Previously a range of private funding models have been investigated including sourcing funds from major financial institutions and partnership arrangements with other organisations/operators from the private or public sector. Ultimately these options require Council to provide either a guaranteed return on investment to the funder, to provide long term tenure with the facility returned at the ‘end’ of its life, or to compromise on Council’s social imperatives for such a facility.  As such, it was recommended that Council is best served by using its own funding sources and maximising support from State and/or Federal Governments. However, as these conversations were undertaken ‘pre-COVID’ it would be appropriate to revisit this concept in the current financial and political environment.

Community Health and Wellbeing Benefit

As outlined above, the guiding principles for MAISC have been identified (Accessibility and Equity; Maximising Social and Health Benefits; Affordability; and Viability); and are particularly important due to the health status of many of our residents - particularly to those not catered for by the private sector.

Table 3: Option considerations

Consultation

Consultation phases undertaken in 2017 and 2018 to inform the Mernda Aquatic Centre Planning Study and WNBP respectively, showed significant community support for MAISC with key priorities highlighted including cost and affordability, safety, transport connectivity and accessibility. 

The objective of the February 2020 consultation was to understand which facilities and amenities at MAISC would suitably reflect the various health and wellbeing needs of the community. Engagement activities utilised included surveys, online activation and face-to-face consultation.  

 

 

 

In total, 3278 people responded to the survey, with summary of responses summarised in Table 4 below.

Theme

Findings

Demographics

·    63.9% female and 34.5% male. Others prefer not to say, self-describe or non-binary.

·    54% of respondents are aged 35-49 years and 22% are aged 25-34 years.

·    71% of respondents live in a couple family with children.

·    39% of respondents live in Mernda and 38% live in Doreen.

Existing community behaviours and barriers

85% of respondents have visited an aquatic and leisure centre or indoor sports stadium in the past 12 months. Top 5 facilities visited:

·    Watermarc Greensborough (21%)

·    Thomastown Recreation and Aquatic Centre (8%)

·    Mill Park Basketball Stadium (8%)

·    Eltham Leisure Centre (8%)

·    Whittlesea Swim Centre (8%)

Top 5 main reasons for visiting:

·    Kids – fun and entertainment (17%)

·    Personal fitness – lap swimming (11%)

·    Sport – competitive indoor hardcourt (11%)

·    Kids – swim lessons (11%)

·    Kids – keeping them active (9%)

Community aspirations for MAISC facilities

The top 5 facilities that respondents would be likely to use at MAISC:

·    Pool – lap swimming (50m pool/competitive) (12%)

·    Exercise – gym (9%)

·    Water play – water slide (7%)

·    Exercise – group fitness (7%)

·    Water play – indoor splash playground (7%)

Community priorities for staged delivery

Ranked by facilities which would provide the greatest community outcome/health benefits:

1.   Pool / relaxation / water play

2.   Exercise / gym / group fitness

3.   Sport / indoor and outdoor basketball and netball courts

4.   Programs / allied health / childcare

Table 4: summary of responses

It is important not to consider to the survey results in isolation, but rather in conjunction with previous consultation results/key findings community demographics and health and wellbeing statistics and trends.  A summary of key findings in previous consultation phases is outlined in Attachment 2.

Critical Dates

Development of the Mernda Sports Hub masterplan and finalising the business case for MAISC is a 2020/21 Council Action Plan item.

Financial Implications

The four options being presented to Council range from $69.4M to $80.3M. Importantly, these prices now incorporate the provision of the indoor and outdoor courts as per Council adopted WNBP.  The newly presented Options 8 and 9 will require a greater capital outlay than previously presented Options 2 and 7, but (based on preliminary estimates) will provide a net favourable return of up to $6.5M (Option 8) and $4.5M (Option 9) to Council over a 10 year period (excluding capital outlay).

Representatives of the Victorian Government (Sport and Recreation Victoria) have identified a high level of interest in the project and indicated a strong alignment with the Government’s $3M Better Pools Grants Scheme. However, it is imperative that Council undertake a sophisticated and targeted advocacy campaign to raise awareness of the project with a range of commonwealth agencies and further explore any potential to provide public private partnership opportunities. 

Whilst securing Victoria Government and potentially Federal grants for the project will be a priority, it is currently proposed that the project costs will be sourced via Council’s borrowing. Development and delivery of the project is currently included on Council’s long-term capital works pipeline, although the exact project costings and associated shortfall will not be known until the feasibility and comparative analysis is completed and a preferred option resolved upon.

Policy strategy and legislation

An overview of links to Council policy and strategy is provided in the background section of this report and summarised in Attachment 1.  Strong synergies exist between the project and the Active Whittlesea Policy, MLAFS and the WNBP.

The project aligns with Active Victoria 2017-2021; the State Government’s guiding framework for investment in sport and recreation opportunities across the state. 

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Community and Stakeholder Engagement - Ineffective stakeholder engagement resulting in compromised community outcomes and/or non-achievement of Council's strategic direction

Planning and execution of methods of consultation were restricted due to the definitive timeframes provided in the Council Resolution of 17 December 2019.

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

 

The provision and scope of facilities at MAISC has the ability to impact negatively on the health and wellbeing of the Mernda and Doreen communities, as an under provision of facilities will decrease the number of programs and services available to the community.  As a barrier to participation, a decrease in opportunities to partake in such programs and services creates challenges in promoting equitable access. 

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Connected community

Key Direction                        A participating community

 

The Council Plan supports a participating community where the community are well informed, and decisions are made locally.

The objective of the consultation undertaken was to provide the community with the opportunity to share their opinion on facilities and programs to be considered in the next planning phase for MAISC.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Finalising the scope and provision of the future MAISC is a decision of considerable importance to Council and the local community.  Such facilities have an inter-generational impact and represent a major infrastructure investment and service delivery priority.

It is imperative that the final business case decision making process is evidence based, informed and balances capital and recurrent facility cost to meet the well documented local community health and wellbeing needs of the community. 

It is recommended that Council endorse next steps for this project which includes a comparative analysis of Option 8 (25m lap pool with wellbeing features) and Option 9 (50m lap pool with wellbeing features) as presented in Table 2. Further analysis of these options will better inform the development of the final business case.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Undertake a feasibility and comparative analysis for an Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre at Mernda which considers the following two options as described in Table 2 of this report, including:

a)      A 25-metre pool and facilities option (Option 8), and 

b)      A 50-metre pool and facilities option (Option 9).

2.       Receive a report exploring both these options for consideration in 2021, as well as strategic linkages to the Mernda Town Centre Hub.

3.       Note the next stage of planning will also consolidate opportunities for the project to enhance Council’s existing strategic planning in the area, specifically the future Mernda Town Centre.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried UNAMIMOUSLY

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.4       Infrastructure and Environment

ITEM 6.4.1    For Decision - Contract 2020-68 - Food and Organics Waste Disposal and Processing - Tender Evaluation Report 

Attachments:                        1       Financial and Contractual Arrangements - Confidential

This Attachment has been designated as confidential information under section 66(5) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that—  (i) relates to trade secrets; or (ii) if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. The attachment contains tender amounts submitted by tenderers and tender evaluation scoring prepared by Council officers. It also contains details of credit and reference checks about the tenderers provided to Council in confidence. The release of this information could reasonably be expected to prejudice the commercial position of the persons who supplied the information or to confer a commercial advantage on a third party.    

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure and Environment

Author:                                  Senior Waste Services Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

It is recommended that contract number 2020-68 for Food and Organics Waste Disposal and Processing:

·    Is awarded to Repurpose It Pty Ltd;

·    For the lump sum price of $30,216,176.02 (including contingency, excluding GST); and

·    For a term from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2031, with extension options to 30 June 2041.

BRIEF OVERVIEW

The tender evaluation panel advises that:

·    Two conforming and three non-conforming tenders were received.

·    The recommended tender was the highest ranked and is considered best value because it outlined a holistic, local circular economy solution for Council’s food and organics waste processing incorporating in-vessel treatment and minimisation of adverse amenity risks, such as odour.

RATIONALE FOR RECOMMENDATION

The tender evaluation clearly demonstrated that Repurpose It Pty Ltd is the preferred tenderer to deliver food and organic processing services in accordance with Council’s requirements. The company demonstrated the right capability and capacity to accept the material, with minimal risk to Council.

impacts of recommendation

This contract allows the City of Whittlesea to locally process its food and garden waste material, further increasing resource recovery and diversion from landfill.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

There will be regular consultation and engagement with the relevant stakeholders throughout the life of the contract. Any change in the delivery of services shall be communicated to affected parties in a timely manner, with contingency plans developed to manage such risks.

 

 

Report

Background

In 2016-17, councils across metropolitan Melbourne sent an estimated 878,000 tonnes of municipal solid waste to landfill. Organic food waste is estimated to make up over 36 per cent of this landfilled garbage, with organic garden waste contributing a further eight per cent of this total.

Organic waste deposited within landfills is decomposed by bacteria in anaerobic conditions to produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas with at least 25 times stronger global warming potential than carbon dioxide. Most landfills serving metropolitan Melbourne collect some landfill gas, however keeping the organic material out of landfill is the most effective way of reducing emissions. For this reason, improving the recovery of the organic material generated by community is a key goal of the State Government’s circular economy policy, Recycling Victoria.

Council commenced an opt-in kerbside food organics and garden organics (FOGO) waste collection service on 1 July 2020. Residents choosing to utilise this service dispose of food and organic waste material within a 240-litre kerbside bin. Over 47,000 tenements (representing approximately 59 per cent of the applicable properties) currently choose to utilise this service.

Recycling Victoria mandates several items that Council must implement by the 2026/27 financial year, including a FOGO service for all residents. With these parameters in mind, it is anticipated that Council would transition from the current fortnightly, opt-in FOGO service to a municipal-wide kerbside collection service by the 2022/23 financial year.

Council currently utilises the existing leasing arrangement at 480 Cooper Street for these services, however this lease expires on 30 June 2021.

The purpose of this contract is to engage a suitably qualified contractor to continue the acceptance, sorting and processing of Council’s FOGO material. Tenders for the contract closed on 7 October 2020.

EVALUATION

No member of the Tender Evaluation Panel declared any conflict of interest in relation to this tender evaluation.

A Tender Probity & Evaluation Plan was designed specifically for this tender process and it was reviewed by an independent, external Probity Auditor prior to this tender being advertised.  All tenders received were evaluated in accordance with that plan.  The evaluation involved scoring of conforming and competitive tenders according to these pre-determined criteria and weightings:

Criteria

Weighting

Price

65 %

Capability

5 %

Capacity

5 %

Impact

25 %

 

The weightings reflect the relative importance of each element to this particular contract.  They were determined as being most appropriate after considering numerous factors including (but not restricted to) the time, quality, risk and contract management requirements which were likely to have the most impact on the achievement of best value.

Only tenders that were conforming and competitive were fully scored.  Tender submissions that were evaluated as non-conforming or not sufficiently competitive were set aside from further evaluation.  In cases where this occurred the reasons for that outcome are detailed in the confidential attachment.

The evaluation outcome was as follows:

TENDERER

CONFORMING

COMPETITIVE

SCORE

RANK

Tenderer A1
Repurpose It Pty Ltd

Yes

Yes

98.4

1

Tenderer A2

No

No

N/A

N/A

Tenderer B

Yes

Yes

89.2

2

Tenderer C1

No

No

N/A

N/A

Tenderer C2

No

No

N/A

N/A

Refer to the confidential attachment for further details of the evaluation of all tenders.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The current FOGO service provision is a user-pays service, whereby residents are charged $77.00 (in the 2020/21 financial year) for fortnightly kerbside collection of their food and organics material.

As this user-pays charge covers the costs for both collection and processing of the FOGO material, sufficient funding for this contract is available in the budget for food organics and garden organics waste processing.

The financial implications of the service (including collection, sorting and processing, and the ongoing provision of caddies and liners) in the 2020/21 financial year, compared to the current financial year (2019/20) is provided in the table below:

 

FY2019/20

FY2020/21

Operation (collection, sorting and processing)

2,917,410

3,427,211

Miscellaneous (caddies, liners, etc.)

399,482

44,610

TOTAL

3,316,892

3,471,821

A detailed analysis of the financial implications and specific contractual matters is provided in the confidential attachment.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

The provision of food waste recycling services can prevent the deposition of organic material into landfill, lessening their potential to pollute surrounding land and waterways, as well as reducing the community’s overall environmental footprint.

Links to WHITTLESEA 2040 AND the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              Sustainable environment

Key Direction               Leaders in clean, sustainable living

The continued provision of contemporary waste and resource recovery services, such as food and organics processing, can prevent the deposition of materials into landfill, lessening their potential to pollute surrounding land and waterways, as well as reducing the community’s overall environmental footprint.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

The tender from Repurpose It Pty Ltd was determined to be best value and it is considered that this company can perform the contract to the required standards. 

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to:

1.         Accept the tender submitted by Repurpose It Pty Ltd for the sum of $30,216,176.02 (including contingency, excluding GST) for the following contract:

Number:    2020-68

Title:          Food and Organics Waste Disposal and Processing

Term:         1 July 2021 to 30 June 2031

Options:    Term extensions up to 30 June 2041 (only to be exercised if separately approved by Council)

subject to the following conditions:

a)    Tenderer to provide proof of currency of insurance cover as required in the tender documents.

b)    Price variations to be in accordance with the provisions as set out in the tender documents.

c)    Tenderer to provide contract security as required in the tender documents.

2.         Approve the funding and contractual arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

3.         Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to negotiate and approve any outstanding variations to the terms and conditions of the contract.

 

 

4.         Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to negotiate and approve a variation to the terms and conditions of the contract if the commencement date of the contract is varied.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.4.2    For Decision - Review of the Road Management Plan and Endorsement of Draft for Public Exhibition 

Attachments:                        1       Draft Road Management Plan (2021)

2       Draft Road Management Plan (2021) - Tracked Changes   

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure and Environment

Author:                                  Senior Infrastructure Engineer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Endorse the draft Road Management Plan (2021) for the purposes of allowing consultation in accordance with Section 55 of the Local Government Act 2020.

2.       Advertise Council’s intention to amend its Road Management Plan in the Government Gazette, The Age and the Whittlesea Leader.

3.       Establish a Committee of Council comprising Administrator Wilson, Administrator Billson and Administrator Duncan to consider any written submissions in relation to the draft Road Management Plan (2021) and make recommendations to Council on any such submissions.

4.       Provide copies of the draft Road Management Plan (2021) available for inspection at the following locations:

a)      Council Offices at 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

b)      City of Whittlesea website – www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au

5.       Seek written public submissions on the draft Road Management Plan (2021) during the period Monday 11 January 2021 to 12 noon on Monday 22 February 2021.

Brief overview

Council is required to update its Road Management Plan (the Plan) in accordance with the Road Management Act 2004. The current review of the plan commenced in August 2020 and must be completed by 30 June 2021 unless otherwise directed by the relevant Road Minister or by Council and Chief Executive Officer.

rationale for recommendation

The Road Management Plan sets the maintenance frequency for local roads and identifies when Council is required to undertake repairs to address faults in our footpath and road network. The current Plan has been reviewed and updated where required to match current industrial trends and standards.

impacts of recommendation

Should Council endorse the draft Road Management Plan (2021) for the purposes of allowing consultation, the updated Plan will be placed on public exhibition for feedback before it is finally adopted by Council.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Public notices advising of the draft Plan will be placed in a daily circulating newspaper and the Government Gazette calling for submissions over a 42-day period from the date of advertisement. Traditional marketing and communication channels will also be used throughout the consultation period to further promote the Plan. Hard copies of the Plan will also be made available at Council Offices and will be viewable online on the City of Whittlesea website.

 

Report

Introduction

This report provides details on the process to consider and adopt a revised Road Management Plan by the Council in accordance with the Road Management Act 2004.

Background

The Road Management Act 2004 (the Act) has established a statutory framework for the management of public roads. The Act applies to road authorities including the City of Whittlesea. The Road Management Plan (the Plan) is made in accordance with the Act and its purpose is:

(a)     To establish a management system for the road management functions of a road authority which is based on policy and operational objectives and available resources; and

(b)     To set the relevant standard in relation to the discharge of duties in the performance of those road management functions.

The Road Management Plan sets the maintenance frequency for local roads and identifies when Council is required to undertake repairs to address faults in our footpath and road network. The maintenance of a safe road and footpath network and availability of resources are the primary considerations for setting the hazard and defect intervention levels.

Council at its meeting dated 29 August 2017 endorsed a draft Road Management Plan dated 30 June 2017 for the purpose of public consultation in accordance with Section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989.

Following public advertisement, the Road Management Plan (2017) was finalised and adopted by Council on 21 November 2017.

Road Management Plan (2017)

The current Road Management Plan was prepared in accordance with guidance provided in the Code of Practice for Road Management Plans. Its contents are arranged in six sections and one appendix, as detailed below:

·        Introduction

Outlines the purpose, objectives, key stakeholders, duty of road users, and how it relates with the Community Plan and Asset Management Policy.

·        Road Asset Description

Provides descriptions of the types of road infrastructure.

·        Road Infrastructure Hierarchy

Provides hierarchy classification of road infrastructure relevant to setting performance standards.

·        Performance Standards

Specifies the performance standards to ‘inspect, maintain and repair’ public roads. This is the core part of the plan which defines the timelines of Council tasks. This section is often considered in any civil liability claims against Council relating to road or footpath conditions.

·        Management System

Outlines the current management system and what is required to be established to help discharge Council’s duty to ‘inspect, maintain and repair’ public roads.

·        Review of Road Management Plan

Schedules the next review.

In accordance with the Act, Council Officers and key external stakeholders have reviewed the Plan and its context to reflect current industrial trends and standards. The process is outlined in the table below.

 

Description

Date

Start of review process

August 2020

Internal consultation

Aug 2020 – Nov 2020

Draft report for public consultation presented to Council

December 2020

Public consultation and feedback review

Jan 2021 – Feb 2021

Final report for Council adoption

May 2021

Register of Public Roads

It should also be noted that Council publishes its Register of Public Roads (updated half-yearly) on its website to provide greater transparency and information for the community with regards to specific local roads, their designated hierarchy and anticipated response timeframes.

Proposal

The draft Road Management Plan (2021) proposes updates to the current plan, as follows:

Changes to Policy and Strategy Linkages

The Plan proposes to include references to other policies and strategies that guide the future direction of Council. This ensures that Council objectives, such as active travel, are acknowledged when considering the adequacy of its performance standards.

Changes to Performance Standards

A suite of amendments to the performance standards are proposed in the next Road Management Plan (2021). Some of these changes propose to extend timeframes and expand levels of intervention in alignment with regional municipalities, however most changes propose to tighten timeframes and reduce defect tolerances.

All proposed changes consider current trends and industry benchmarks. The City of Whittlesea’s performance standards were reviewed against similar municipalities and differences were evaluated by Council Officers to determine Council’s exposure to risk.

Importantly, all proposed changes incorporate feedback from the Municipal Association of Victoria and Council’s Insurer, who undertook their own independent benchmarking exercise across the State.

 

Changes to the Next Scheduled Review

The draft Plan dictates that the next Road Management Plan review must commence by 1 August 2024 and be completed by 30 June 2025 unless otherwise directed by the relevant Road Minister or directed by the Council and Chief Executive Officer.

Copies of the draft Road Management Plan (2021) and tracked changes are provided in Attachments 1 and 2, respectively.

Consultation

All Victorian councils are required by the Act to place their Road Management Plan on public exhibition for feedback. Submissions will therefore be invited for a period no less than 28 days, whereby a Committee of Council will be appointed to consider any written submissions received in response to Council’s public notice.

Given the impacts of COVID-19, it is proposed to extend the consultation period to 42 days to ensure the community has adequate time to respond.

A public notice advising of the draft Plan is required to be placed in a daily circulating newspaper and the Government Gazette calling for submissions over a 42-day period from the date of advertisement.

It is proposed to advertise the amendment in:

·        The Government Gazette.

·        The Age.

·        The Whittlesea Leader.

Submissions will be considered, and the draft Plan amended where appropriate. The draft Plan will then be presented to Council for adoption following consideration of any submissions received.

Traditional marketing and communication channels will also be used throughout the consultation and engagement process to further promote the draft plan, its key themes and amendments, such as social media posts, multi-lingual media, and press releases.

It is noted that the community consultation and engagement is required for Asset Management Plans in accordance with the Local Government Act 2020. A Transport (road) Asset Management Plan will be developed using best-practice engagement principles in due course, with the Road Management Plan (2021) to be revised, where appropriate.

Critical Dates

The Road Management Plan review process commenced in August 2020 and must be completed by 30 June 2021.

Financial Implications

It is anticipated that there will be financial implications associated with the proposed changes to inspection frequencies, intervention levels and response times. This will be evaluated in conjunction with the public consultation and adoption of the updated Road Management Plan.

For context, the current operational expenditure funding profile is provided in the table below, however it is forecast that the current level of infrastructure maintenance resourcing will need to increase to align with the obligations set out in the new Plan.

Financial Year

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

Proposed Budget

($ million)

15.849

16.011

16.242

16.477

Policy strategy and legislation

The review of the Road Management Plan aligns with the following policy, strategy and legislation:

·    Road Management Act 2004

Division 5 regarding development of a Road Management Plan

·    Local Government Act 2020

Section 55 regarding community engagement

·    Whittlesea 2040

Connected Community: a healthy and safe community

Liveable Neighbourhoods: smart, connected transport network

·    Road Management Plan 2017

Section 6 regarding review of the Plan

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Life Cycle Asset Management - Failure to effectively plan for the construction, on-going maintenance and renewal of Council’s assets The Road Management Plan is an essential document that sets the inspection frequency, intervention levels and maintenance response timeframes for Council’s local road and footpath network.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Smart, connected transport network

 

The Plan sets the maintenance frequency for local roads and identifies when Council is required to undertake repairs to address faults in our footpath and road network. These repairs are required to preserve the asset in a state of utility to facilitate a smart, connected transport network.

Updating the plan will improve standard of maintenance to align with current industrial trends and standards.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The current Road Management Plan dated 30 June 2017 is due for review. The review commenced in August 2020 and is to be completed by 30 June 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the draft Road Management Plan (2021) for the purposes of allowing consultation in accordance with Section 55 of the Local Government Act 2020.

2.       Advertise Council’s intention to amend its Road Management Plan in the Government Gazette, The Age and the Whittlesea Leader.

3.       Establish a Committee of Council comprising Administrator Wilson, Administrator Billson and Administrator Duncan to consider any written submissions in relation to the draft Road Management Plan (2021) and make recommendations to Council on any such submissions.

4.       Provide copies of the draft Road Management Plan (2021) available for inspection at the following locations:

b)      Council Offices at 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang

c)      City of Whittlesea website – www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au

5        Seek written public submissions on the draft Road Management Plan (2021) during the period Monday 11 January 2021 to 12 noon on Monday 22 February 2021.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:                Administrator Billson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.4.3    For Decision - Integrated Water Management Strategy - Water for All 

Attachments:                        1       Draft Whittlesea Water for All - our water strategy (2020-2030)   

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure and Environment

Author:                                  Team Leader Sustainability Policy Program   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the Integrated Water Management (IWM) Strategy, Whittlesea Water for All – our water strategy (2020-2030) and endorse the document for public release.

2.       Request Officers to refer shovel ready IWM Strategy projects for consideration as part of the 2020/21 mid-year budget review process. 

3.       Request Officers prepare an IWM Strategy Implementation Plan and Capital Works Delivery Plan and refer to the 2021/22 budget approval process for consideration.

4.       Write to all participating stakeholders and community members thanking them for their contribution and efforts in achieving this strategic outcome.

Brief overview

Whittlesea Water for All (Attachment 1) is Council’s first Integrated Water Management Strategy (IWMS) and is the largest and most comprehensive study of our municipality’s water systems undertaken. The strategy sets a pathway for the City of Whittlesea to become leaders in Integrated Water Management and achieve Council’s Whittlesea 2040 Goals, particularly Sustainable Environment. It was developed using contemporary best-practice methodologies, drawing on expertise from IWM consultancies, university research centres, local water authorities, and expert stakeholder engagement professionals.

rationale for recommendation

Water security in Melbourne is projected to be limited in the next decade due to population growth, urbanisation and climate change. Water is a key enabler of liveability outcomes for our City and its community. Council can play a lead role in the integrated planning, use and management of this precious finite resource to enable better outcomes for all.

impacts of recommendaTIONS

The strategy presents a new, integrated approach to improving water use and managing waterway health. It responds to the real and urgent need to secure a safe and affordable water supply. We will have cleaner and healthier waterways, and greener and cooler public open spaces. This strategy will guide our organisation and our City toward leading practice in the planning, use and management of water resources and environmental assets.

 

 

 

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

The IWM Strategy outlines a pathway to best manage our water assets to reduce risks associated with public health, amenity, legal and reputational consequences, associated with poor water quality outcomes. An implementation and capital works plan will be developed to drive the achievement of the Strategy outcomes. Council will monitor and report on the Strategy outcomes once every Council term, and key actions will be reported annually as part of the Water Management Service Plan reporting processes.

Report

Introduction

Whittlesea Water for All (Attachment 1) is Council’s first Integrated Water Management Strategy (IWMS) and Action Plan. It is a pivotal part for delivering on Council’s Whittlesea 2040 Vision, Goals and Key Directions particularly Goal 4, Sustainable Environment; that we highly value our natural landscapes and biodiversity, are climate ready and are leaders in clean sustainable living.

Whittlesea Water for All sets the pathway for the City of Whittlesea to become leaders in Integrated Water Management. It was developed using contemporary best-practice methodologies, drawing on expertise from IWM consultancies, university research centres, local water authorities, and expert stakeholder engagement professionals.

The outcomes of this strategy will keep our waterways clean and our priority green spaces irrigated. Council and the community will also be better prepared for floods and droughts, and it will improve our water efficiency - a key indicator of the Whittlesea 2040 Strategy.

Background

Our Water Context

The need for water in our municipality is increasing substantially as our population grows, and at the same time, regional water supplies from drinking water reservoirs are likely to have less water as the climate changes. Wastewater production and stormwater runoff also increase with population growth and urbanisation, causing significant challenges for our creeks, rivers and surrounding environment.

The City’s projected water needs are illustrated in Figure 1 below. These forecasts demonstrate the urgent need to strategically manage our water resources across the whole water cycle. Consequently, we need to find smarter ways to become IWM leaders in the planning, use and management of our precious water resources that deliver co-benefits for our community, socially, economically and environmentally. 

Figure 1. Water in the City of Whittlesea

 

Rapid urban growth has already led to the development of over $53 million of IWM Assets in Council’s care. The first step in the pathway toward IWM leadership is to ensure that these existing assets are managed well and operating effectively in order to mitigate ongoing operational costs and public health risks resulting from premature asset failure.

To meet this challenge the strategy prioritises asset maintenance and renewal and process strengthening activities before progressing to new asset development and major project delivery. Innovative solutions, new technologies, and productive partnerships with community groups, developers, research institutions, and water utilities are embedded throughout the program, from the early asset renewal projects right through to major exemplar initiatives.

Our Water Management Progress and Achievements

Up until now, Council action has been guided by two separate plans: The Sustainable Water Use Plan (2016) and the Stormwater Management Plan (2012), which will be superseded by this new integrated approach in delivering our Whittlesea Water for All (2020-2030) strategy.

The actions taken under our previous water use and waterway health plans as well as the renewed focus, capacity and momentum built by developing this Strategy have led to significant achievements in water management. Some of these key IWM achievements are as listed below:

·        Water Conservation, harvesting, and reuse: Large-scale stormwater harvesting, recycled, water connected housing developments, an aquifer recharge and storage trial, and broad roll out of rainwater tanks in council buildings has helped Council almost halve its drinking water use (per population) since 2011 and double its use of stormwater for irrigation purposes since 2016. Specific achievements:

o   Council’s drinking water use has reduced from 2.5kL/ person in 2001, to 1.3kL/person in 2018.

o   Our buildings have water-saving fittings throughout and over 50 preschools (and others) have rainwater tanks.

o   Alternative water supplies water 11% of our public open space.

o   Melbourne Markets rainwater used to irrigate Mosaic Rec Reserve.

o   Mernda Aquifer water storage system trialled.

o   Award-winning Internet-enabled water monitoring system developed with local schools for platypus habitat management.

·        Grant funding: Council has received over $330,000 in grants from Melbourne Water and the Victorian Government Office of Living Victoria since 2014. This has supported stormwater, rainwater, and Internet of Things smart sensor pollution monitoring initiatives, including contributing to the development of this Whittlesea Water for All 2020-2030 strategy.

·        Partnership Projects: We are working with a range of partners to deliver innovative projects including the Whittlesea Community Farm, the Upper Merri Creek IWM Pilot Plan, community education portals, recycled water use, smart technology driven flood mitigation, and new development opportunities. Our partners include water authorities, state government departments, community and indigenous group representatives, Developers, universities, and other councils. 

 

 

Purpose of the new IWM Strategy

The Whittlesea Water for All strategy presents a new, integrated approach to improving water use and managing waterway health. It responds to the real and urgent need to secure a safe and affordable water supply for our City and our organisation, and will prepare us for a future with population growth and increased development, water shortages and increased risk and severity of drought, heavier rain events and stormwater flooding. This strategy will guide our organisation and our City toward leading practice in the planning, use and management of water resources and significant environmental assets.

 

Developing the Strategy

The comprehensive process used to develop this strategy included:

·        Preparation of the municipal context package which analysed and interpreted extensive data sets, undertook Water Sensitive Cities performance and transition benchmarking and describes IWM considerations for the City, as well as the key drivers, challenges and opportunities.

·        Mapping and analysis of proposed actions for delivery of W2040 Goals and Key Directions and IWMS Outcomes.

·        Audit of Council’s Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) assets and stormwater treatments, which included investigations into maintenance and renewals costs.

·        Comprehensive Communications and Engagement Plan including a series of expert stakeholder and community workshops to develop the agreed Vision, Outcomes, Actions and Indicators.

·        Scenario based planning, exploring future scenarios such as major drought or a hotter climate.

·        Identification, high level business case, performance testing of targets and assessment of IWM opportunities including a series of enabling factors and on-ground opportunities.

·        Preparation of the draft strategy and prioritised actions.

IWMS Goal and Outcomes, Indicators and Measures of Success

Figure 2 lists the Strategy’s Goal, Outcomes, Indicators and Measures. The Goal and Outcomes were codesigned in expert stakeholder and community workshops in 2019.  The Outcomes and Measures were integral in prioritising the IWM Actions alongside W2040 Goals and Key Directions.

Figure 2: IWMS Goals, Outcomes, and Measures

Our Goal:

By 2030, the City of Whittlesea will be leaders in the planning, use and management of water for the benefit of all.

Outcome

Indicator

Measure of success (10-year targets)

Cleaner

Our local waterways are healthy and clean

Improve the water quality of our local waterways

By 2030, Council will pro-actively maintain and budget for renewal and maintenance of all its water assets to ensure they meet environmental standards and are fit for the community’s enjoyment and use.

Greener

Our priority urban and rural landscapes are green and healthy

Increase the proportion of public open space supported by alternative water sources

By 2030, at least 25% of public open space will be supported by an alternative water source.

Smarter

Our community uses potable water for drinking and alternative water is available for all other purposes

Decrease in community potable water use

 

 

Decrease in council potable water use

Community potable water use will be at least 5% below the State Government Target for per capita consumption.

 

By 2030, Council potable water consumption will reduce by a further 20% (on a kilolitre per capita basis).

Prepared

Our city is prepared for droughts and floods

Decrease local flooding impacts

Less than 2% residential properties at risk of flooding in a 1 in 5-year rainfall event.

Less than 10% commercial and industrial properties at risk of flooding in a 1 in 10-year rainfall event.

United

Our community and partners value water and work together to improve water planning, use and management

Increase in community stewardship of water resources

By 2030, the Plenty River, Merri, Darebin and Edgars Creek will have vibrant and effective community stewardship* programs.

*stewardship activities including enhancement plantings, litter and weed removal, citizen science, community co-design for revitalisation projects and the celebration of cultural identity and place. 

It is important to note that the IWM outcomes, indicators and measures will deliver against all 4 Whittlesea 2040 Goals in a multitude of ways. Further information is provided in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Delivering on Whittlesea 2040 Goals

Whittlesea 2040

Relevant IWMS Outcomes

Goal 1: Connected Community

Key directions:

    A healthy and safe community

    A participating community

Cleaner, Greener, United

For example, improving our public places along key waterways together with community provides multiple benefits, it will connect our community, provides health and wellbeing, improves safety, facilitates stewardship of our waterways and improves environmental health.

Goal 2: Liveable Neighbourhoods

Key directions:

    Well-designed neighbourhoods and vibrant town centres

Cleaner, Greener, Smarter, Prepared, United

For example, working with developers to deliver improved and innovative water management solutions in their estates will enhance liveability, public amenity, and preparedness for climate change events.

Goal 3: Strong Local economy

Key directions:

    Increased local employment

    Education opportunities for all

    Successful, innovative local businesses

Smarter, United

For example, utilising recycled water in agribusiness practices through the Whittlesea Community Farm partnership project will; provide volunteering, education and employment opportunities; and grow and provide fresh food to the local food relief network.

Goal 4: Sustainable Environment

Key directions:

    Valued natural landscapes and biodiversity

    Climate ready

    Leaders in clean, sustainable living

Cleaner, Greener, Smarter, Prepared

For example, utilising stormwater from roads and carparks to water trees, nature strips and parks will support irrigation needs and help control flooding.

Action Planning

The actions listed in the draft Strategy were developed in partnership with local authorities, property developers, industry experts, community representatives, and staff from right across the organisation. A total of 266 initiatives were submitted from internal and external stakeholder groups and these were prioritised and shortlisted according to their impacts.

The actions were mapped against the Strategy Outcomes and then categorised based on action type to help manage the delivery across the organisation. Actions will be embedded into Council’s four-year Water Management Service Plan and future capital works will be delivered under an IWM capital works investment program.

The first four action categories are: Asset Renewal, New Works & Innovation, Community Engagement, and Partnerships & Advocacy. The fifth category, ‘Setting up for Success’, captures actions that ensure our organisation has the tools, resources, knowledge, and networks required to manage our water assets efficiently and deliver the Strategy.

Some key actions are listed below.

1.    Setting up for Success

·   Appoint an IWM Lead to coordinate and lead water management activities across the organisation.

·   Establish improved knowledge sharing processes and design standards to foster collaboration and innovative problem solving.

·   Review and update the water asset maintenance programs and develop a strategic long-term asset management plan.

2.    Asset Renewal, New Works and Innovation Projects

·   Major renewal of underperforming existing wetlands and lakes are being planned to improve the health and amenity of these assets for our community.

·   Real-time water quality sensors in our waterways and smart irrigation control systems to be installed across multiple sites and connected to our MAV award-winning Smart Cities network to help manage our assets.

·   Investigations underway to use of stormwater at Main Street Reserve, using the Edgars Creek channel to move that water. Smart sensors and controls will manage tank levels and maintain a healthy water flow through the creek.

·   We are exploring the use of interconnected smart rainwater tanks as a buffer to reduce peak stormwater flows in flood prone areas.

·   Assessments of our existing and future assets across the whole municipality will be undertaken to identify further opportunities to expand the use of non-potable water and find more efficient ways to irrigate our open spaces and significant trees.

3.    Partnerships and Community Engagement

·   The Upper Merri Creek IWM Pilot Project is unprecedented in its approach to collaboration between the different governing authorities and our indigenous community.  It is piloting a new partnership approach to managing water at the sub-catchment level, supporting all agencies to work together to address challenges and create positive outcomes for the local community and the environment in the Upper Merri Creek sub-catchment. The partners in this project include Yarra Valley Water, Melbourne Water, Victorian Planning Authority, Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung Group, Hume City Council, Mitchell Shire and the City of Whittlesea.

·   The Whittlesea Community Farm and Food Collective is an integrated model for community food production and distribution that will develop new agricultural practices suitable for peri-urban areas using recycled water and renewable energy. It will showcase the use of recycled water and test water-efficient food production technologies and waste processing. The project recently attracted a $1.5 million State government grant to enable the development of this innovative farming enterprise. The project, which is a partnership between Whittlesea Community Connections, Yarra Valley Water, City of Whittlesea and Melbourne Polytechnic, will also provide volunteering, education and employment opportunities in best-practice sustainable agriculture systems suitable for peri-urban areas.

·   We are working with developers and State authorities to include water saving technologies in new homes and to plan for better water outcomes in new developments. Together we have found opportunities for passive irrigation of significant river redgum stands, residential technology demonstrations for new home builders, and are exploring closed-loop water network opportunities.

·   We will continue to advocate for residential water saving initiatives including smart water meters, lower water use targets, community grants and education programs and will seek action from State Authorities to improve the public amenity and ecological value along Plenty River, Darebin Creek, and other significant waterways in our region.

Asset Investment

An IWM capital works investment program will be prepared to support the delivery of this Strategy. It will be designed to transition our municipality toward exemplar water management capabilities over the next ten years. Innovation and partnerships will be embedded into numerous projects throughout all stages of the program.

Council already owns and manages over 12,500 IWM assets throughout the municipality, including several industry-leading stormwater capture, storage and reuse assets. It is important to ensure that these assets are performing at optimum levels to deliver the water quality outcomes that they are designed to, and many are due for major renewal works, so asset audits and renewal projects should be prioritised in the first few years of this plan.

It is likely this asset renewal work will near completion within 3 to 5 years, allowing Council to shift focus to building new water harvesting and reuse assets. The exemplar projects such as large-scale water harvesting, smart-controlled rainwater tank networks, and major waterway revitalisation might be expected to commence in the second half of this ten-year program.

Officers will also to continue to collaborate with the many partners to identify, scope, and prepare business cases for the innovative water management projects that we aspire to deliver in future years. This will ensure the organisation is well placed to identify and act upon funding and partnership opportunities as they emerge.

Existing Capital Works budget allocation could cover most of the asset renewal and minor upgrades works for the first three years. Larger projects will need to be costed and submitted in the capital works approval program for individual assessment.

Asset Maintenance and Renewal

Auditing and altering Council’s IWM Asset maintenance and renewal program is a key action in the IWM Strategy, and works have begun on this critical activity.

High-level benchmarking of the City of Whittlesea’s water management asset maintenance liability estimated that the current maintenance program is underfunded, and this exposes the organisation and our community to health and amenity risks.

 

 

 

Inadequate maintenance can lead to reduced asset lifespan and premature need for major renewal, driving costs up. In addition, failing assets lead to poorer community experience and have significant public health and reputational risks. A failing wetland, pond, or raingarden would be evident to our community through its declining vegetation, reduced presence of birds and fish or poor species biodiversity. Water stagnation and odour follow, along with the potential for algal blooms. In some cases, the waterbody must be fenced off and closed to the public while its health is restored.

Detailed reviews of our water asset maintenance programs are underway to evaluate the investment needs alongside the health and organisational risks for each asset type. Amendments to this program will be implemented in a staged manner that prioritises risk mitigation, and findings from this review will also inform future asset planning activities.

Consultation

The Whittlesea Water for All – our water strategy (2020-2030) was informed by an extensive consultation and engagement process. The IWMS Communications and Engagement Plan ran for the length of the project, and reached regional water authorities, property developers, community groups, university research groups, and a range of other informed stakeholders in addition to the breadth of our own experienced Council staff.

Key activities included:

1.       Community Water Values Survey - 302 responses were received after strong promotion through targeted newsletter articles, emails to 79 relevant community groups and 131 residents who agreed to be contacted after Whittlesea 2040, a social media drive, and face to face discussions and surveying at key community locations.

2.       Community Reference Group - formed through existing community groups and interested community members reached via the survey, this group provided input into the community values, vision, outcomes and action plan development. Attendance of four 3-hour workshops over an 8-month period.

3.       Institutional Stakeholder Workshops - key organisations and Council staff across a range of departments who impact, manage or utilise water in some way attended four workshops over an 8-month period. The workshops focused on professional and technical design and a review of the opportunities and outcomes.

MONITORING AND EVALUATION

The Strategy, its implementation and its measures of success will be reported upon at least once every Council term (4 years).

Key water management actions will also be reported annually as part of the Water Management Service Plan reporting processes.

The Strategy will undergo a mid-term review at year five (2025), and final review at year 10 (2030).

Financial Implications

Operational and Capital Budgets will be carefully considered and prioritised to demonstrate that Council can adequately resource this Strategy implementation without placing excessive additional demand on ratepayers. Initial estimates predict that this Strategy will require additional capital investment considerations of approximately $3,000,000 over the next three years toward achieving best practice efforts in sustainable water management.

Large scale new works capital projects, including exemplar projects, will be costed and considered in future Budget approval processes and balanced against other priority projects within the program.

Project scoping and business case development will begin immediately to ensure that Council is ready to leverage current and emerging external funding opportunities.

The risk posed on not providing the adequate ongoing asset maintenance levels, as previously mentioned, can lead to a reduced asset lifespan and the premature need for major renewal/reconstruction works, driving costs up significantly. Projections using Melbourne Water industry guidelines show that the difference in renewal costs for maintained and non-maintained assets could be upwards of a $65 million liability by 2040.

Improvements to Council’s IWM operational maintenance program will therefore require a well-considered and sustainable investment plan, the scale of which will be scoped and optimised as a key action arising from this strategy. Given the current financial uncertainty, any changes to operational maintenance budgets will need to be implemented in a staged manner over the Strategy 10 year implementation plan in order to achieve alignment with best practice standards, with priority placed on reducing Council’s long term risk exposure with minimised upfront expenditure.

Policy strategy and legislation

The following Council strategies and corporate actions relate to the IWMS:

·        Whittlesea 2040 – This Strategy delivers on W2040’s Vision, all four Goals and multiple Key Directions with a particular emphasis on Sustainable Environment.

·        2019/2020 Council Plan Action - Development of the Draft Whittlesea Water for All Strategy and Action Plan.

·        Actions from the Strategy will inform Council’s Water Management Service Plan.

The following State level strategies and legislation are referenced in the IWMS:

·        Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DEWLP)- State Environmental Protection Policy, Waters of Victoria and Water for Victoria 2017.

·        Port Phillip Water Catchment Management Authority - Regional Catchment Strategy.

·        Melbourne Water - Healthy Waterways Strategy.

·        Yarra Valley Water Strategy Suite.

·        Yarra Strategic Directions Statement IWM Forums.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Climate Change - Failure to mitigate or adapt to the risks of climate change

Water will play a key role in adapting to the impacts of climate change. And conversely climate change will reduce our water security. The improved planning use and management of water will be essential to ensure reduced risks of flooding, drought, reduced urban heat island effects, and community well-being. As well as ensuring the health of our waterways.

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Critical community services and infrastructure rely on adequate water supply to ensure community health and well-being; flood management for community safety; irrigation to ensure access to quality open space and sports facilities; and urban greening to keep our City cool in the warmer months to reduce heat-related illnesses for our community.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Sustainable environment

Key Direction                        Leaders in clean, sustainable living

 

The development of Whittlesea Water for All Strategy and Action Plan will establish a consistent focus on water management, articulate clear strategic outcomes and indicators, and inspire a range of activities through extensive consultation and rigorous options and data analysis. This will enable Council to make informed decisions about investment required to achieve the Strategy Outcomes.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Whittlesea Water for All – our water strategy (2020-2030) provides a pathway to maturing Council’s water planning, use and management processes and deliver high-quality new and upgraded assets, both on our own and with our regional partners.

Over time this Strategy will transition our organisation and our municipality into a best practice Water Sensitive City, with exemplar, innovative projects to lead our community in sustainable living.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the Integrated Water Management Strategy, Whittlesea Water for All – our water strategy (2020-2030) and endorse the document for public release.

2.       Request Officers to refer shovel ready IWM Strategy projects for consideration as part of the 2020/21 mid-year budget review process. 

3.       Request Officers prepare an IWM Strategy Implementation Plan and Capital Works Delivery Plan and refer to the 2021/22 budget approval process for consideration.

4.       Write to all participating stakeholders and community members thanking them for their contribution and efforts in achieving this strategic outcome.

 

 

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       administrator Wilson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried UNANIMOUSLY

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.4.4    For Decision - Traffic Management - Masons Road 

Attachments:                        1       Surrounding Land Use Map

2       Community Consultation to Date

3       Traffic Management Plan

4       Community Feedback Summary   

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure and Environment

Author:                                  Project Manager   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council resolve to:

1.    Endorse the proposal for 15 speed treatments along Masons Road to reduce traffic volumes, vehicle speeds, and improve road safety.

a.    Include the works into the 2020/2021 new works program Mid-Year Budget review process for consideration, or

b.    Include into the 2021/2022 annual Budget approval process for delivery.

2.    Review the effectiveness of the traffic treatments in delivering the desired outcomes 24 months after installation.

3.    Not proceed with options for the full road closure, one-way treatment, or modified T-Intersection on or along Masons Road at this time.

4.    Note the extensive consultation process undertaken and significant community engagement and feedback received in arriving on this outcome.

5.    Write to the head petitioner advising of the Council decision on this matter.

Brief Overview

Traffic management on Masons Road has been an ongoing issue for residents due to rapid development in the area. Traffic volumes have increased from under 100 vehicles per day (vpd) in the late 1990’s to approximately 4,200vpd in the urbanised section between Plenty Road and Sumner Drive and 850vpd in the unsealed section west of Texel Drive as of January 2020 causing increasing risk and amenity issues requiring resolution.

rationale for recommendation

The proposal to install raised pavements in Masons Road has proven to be the most supported approach with the community of all 3 proposals. In other locations raised pavements have been successful in reducing speeds, improving safety and deterring traffic volumes, thereby improving residential amenity.

impacts of recommendation

The traffic intervention treatments will have the impact of reducing speeds, traffic volumes and Increased amenity and road safety outcomes.

 

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Council will continue to monitor traffic conditions in Masons Road and review 24 months after the installation of the raised pavements and changes to the arterial road network are complete.

 

Report

Introduction

The purpose of this report is to present the community consultation results and outcomes of the recent one-way trial and consider the traffic management options for Masons Road Mernda/Wollert.

Background

Masons Road is an east-west connection between Epping Road and Plenty Road on the urban growth boundary, north of Bridge Inn Road, and was originally constructed for farm access. It consists of a 4km unsealed rural western section that abuts the green wedge zone and Hanson Quarry and Landfill, and a 2.4km sealed urban eastern section that abuts the urban growth boundary and rural conservation zone.

Refer Attachment 1 for a land use map.

Traffic management on Masons Road has been an ongoing issue for residents and Council due to development in the area. Traffic volumes have increased from under 100 vehicles per day (vpd) in the late 1990’s to approximately 4,200vpd in the urbanised section between Plenty Road and Sumner Drive and 850vpd in the unsealed section west of Texel Drive as of January 2020. This is the result of:

-        Development of the surrounding areas such as Mernda and Doreen creating more demand for traffic movements in the area;

-        Ongoing State Government works on Plenty Road and development works along Bridge Inn Road causing delays, and thus residential and development related traffic are seeking alternative routes; and

-        Limited alternative east/west connections within the municipality which current projects such as the O’Herns Road upgrade, O’Herns Road Diamond Interchange and Findon Road Extension will seek to address.

This increased traffic demand has resulted in an increased rate of deterioration of Masons Road and an annual maintenance cost on the unsealed section of approximately $175,000, significantly higher than other unsealed roads across the municipality. Additionally, the increase in traffic has resulted in a decrease in residential amenity in both the sealed and unsealed sections of Masons Road due to the dust, speeding vehicles, traffic and rapid degrading of the unsealed gravel road surface.

INITIAL OPTIONS ANALYSIS

Following a single vehicle fatality crash in August 2018, Council undertook a traffic study, including an independent road safety audit and a strategic analysis of road use, on Masons Road to determine how to address the ongoing issues with the road.

The Road Safety Audit made 28 recommendations for the unsealed section and 20 for the sealed section. These recommendations commonly related to protection of roadside hazards, installation of signage, and the trimming of trees. The high-risk recommendations have been actioned or are scheduled for action in the 2020/21 delivery year. $120,000 has been expended so far on high risk recommendations and remaining works are estimated at $100,000. Other accepted recommendations will progress over the next 3 years, and remaining works are estimated to cost $250,000.

 

Sealing or urbanising Masons Road was investigated and detailed in the 7 May 2019 Council Report but it was deemed cost-prohibitive and advised that any funding, advocacy, or effort is best prioritised towards the upgrading the key arterial Bridge Inn Road rather than duplicating arterial roads in close proximity. It was also found that upgrading Masons Road would increase both traffic speeds and volumes, creating further safety issues and challenges for Masons Road residents.

At its meeting of 7 May 2019 Council resolved to commence the process to create a closure point on Masons Road as per section 12 of the Road Management Act (2004) and seek community consultation and feedback. This commenced a series of public consultation that determined Council’s direction and proposed treatments for Masons Road.

Consultation

Three rounds of consultation have been undertaken to date, each responding to community feedback and refining the proposal further based on community’s views.

These are outlined in Attachment 2 and discussed below.

Road Closure

Following an extensive consultation process including establishment of a committee of Council comprising the Mayor and North Ward Councillors, Council resolved (1 October 2019) to suspend the road closure proposal, due to strong community and emergency services opposition, and trial the effectiveness of a one-way travel restriction. This limited a 3km unsealed section of Masons Road, between Epping Road and Wilkes Court, to one-way eastbound traffic only. This trial was in place between 3 February 2020 to 3 August 2020.

One-way Trial

The one-way trial was effective at reducing traffic volumes on the unsealed section of Masons Road. Two rounds of traffic surveys in April and July 2020 showed that the traffic volume reduced by approximately 80%, of which 60% was attributable to the one-way restriction on Masons Road. The remaining 20% is attributed to the COVID pandemic and seasonal factors impacting the results. This was determined by taking controlled surveys on other local roads in the area to control for the pandemic.

Community consultations undertaken in July 2020 showed that there was widespread community objection to the one-way treatment on Masons Road. Additionally, residents on the sealed section of Masons Road between Plenty Road and Texel Drive raised concerns of speeding traffic and requested raised pavements in this section as well. This approach was further supported by the feedback and input received from a series of four online community forums held on 29 July 2020.

Based on these community consultation and feedback avenues, it was determined to further investigate alternative treatments for the sealed section of Masons Road that might contribute to the overall reduction of impacts to residents, both on the gravel section of Masons Road and those on the sealed section.

Raised Pavements and Modified T-Intersection

In response to the July 2020 community consultation, our Engineering Teams developed a series of traffic management device options designed to achieve the desired outcomes in a less intrusive manner than the one-way or proposed road closure options. This included 15 raised pavements on the sealed section of Masons Road (to reduce speeds and deter traffic) and modifying the Masons Road/Pearsons Road intersection with a change in priority direction to prevent westbound through movements (an option suggested for consideration by Victoria Police in their original submission to Council’s road closure option).

The modified T-intersection change in direction limited the travel impact to a reduced 1km detour, in contrast to that of the more significant 11km one-way trail detour option.

This proposal was put to the community in September 2020 to gain feedback and determine the level of community and emergency services support.

The community consultation showed that 79.2% of residents that live on Masons Road (n=48), and 47.1% of the wider community (n=295), are supportive of the raised pavements. This demonstrates support in addressing the safety and amenity concerns of the residents living on the sealed section of Masons Road, over the inconvenience that the raised pavements will cause to the broader community preferring Masons Road as a cut through road, of which is not as intended. Plans showing the proposed raised pavement treatments are available in Attachment 3.

Further, the community consultation also showed that 39.6% of residents that live on Masons Road (n=48) and 10.9% of the wider community (n=293) are supportive of the modified intersection change in direction. The disparity between the feedback from those on Masons Road with those not on Masons Road demonstrates the treatment will cause more inconvenience to the wider community than those living on Masons Road, discouraging its use as a through road.

There was strong and opposition for the proposed change to the intersection from the majority of Masons Road residents (including the receipt of a petition signed by 112 residents) including those from Lockhart Street who were concerned for the impacts of having the detoured traffic utilising their street, particularly on the families with young children along the road.

Following discussions with the head petitioner, it has been confirmed that the petition opposes the modified T-intersection at Pearsons Road along the sealed section of Masons Road but does support the installation of the raised pavements, a road closure at a location along the unsealed section or the reinstatement of the one way travel restriction.

The petition verbatim requested the following:

“reconsider the changes to Masons Road closure due to safety and inconvenience concerns of residents of Masons Road and nearby streets. We support the speed humps, however the road closure of Masons Road along with detour we do not support. We would also support the road being closed or restricted to one way as it was during the trial in 2020. However residential access to Masons Road from Pearsons Road needs to remain open to home owners.”

Feedback on the proposal from emergency services has been mixed. The raised pavements are not supported by the CFA and Ambulance Victoria, indicating that speed reduction treatments slow down response times in the event of an emergency. The modified intersection has been opposed to by the CFA, even with access for emergency services being exempted, but supported by Ambulance Victoria.

As mentioned above, the original submission from Victoria Police with regards to Council’s initial road closure option indicated that their preference was for Council to first look at engineering options for treating the sealed section of Masons Road with appropriate speed and road safety methods, including potential changes to priority direction, be considered along the sealed section of Masons Road before a major road closure is considered.

It is acknowledged that there have been responses that indicate a preference to construct Masons Road between Epping Road and Plenty Road as an alternative to Bridge Inn Road. This proposal emphasises the wider expectation of using Masons Road as an alternative east-west connection and does not align with all resident views living along the sealed section of Masons Road or the strategic priorities for the road network in this area and will therefore undermine advocacy for the improvement of Bridge Inn Road.

A summary of the consultation results is provided in Attachment 3

Proposal

Given the outcomes of the community consultation, the petition received, and the effectiveness of raised pavements, it is recommended to proceed with the installation of the 15 raised pavements from savings in the 2020/21 or as part of the 2021/22 new works program. The estimated cost is $225,000. The road closure, one-way, and modified intersection is not recommended to proceed at this time based on the strong views of the community.

Council’s Traffic and Transport Engineers have undertaken a review and an analysis of the effectiveness of raised pavements (speed humps) for reducing speed and cut through or ‘rat running’ traffic, where this treatment has been applied in other streets within the municipality. This evaluation showed that the operating speeds, where 85% of the traffic are travelling at or below is reduced on average by 12km/h and traffic volumes decrease (on average) by approximately 40%.

Other considerations with regards to current and future transport infrastructure works occurring in this section of the municipality include the Department of Transportations (DoT) upgrade to Plenty Road Stage 2 works and significant developer works ongoing along Bridge Inn Road. Further South, Council is underway with constructing the Findon Road extension project that will create our major East/West connection across the municipality that links into the upgraded O’Herns Road diamond interchange also currently under construction. These major transport upgrades and connections will have a significant impact on the traffic movements of our residents in the near future and will likely reduce the current demands placed on Masons road as a preferred cut-through road alternative.

It is recommended that where the 15 raised pavements option is endorsed, that an evaluation of their effectiveness occurs in 24 months’ time, once these and other works are completed, to determine how these treatments have impacted on traffic movements, before any further road closure, one way or alternative traffic treatments are revisited.

Financial Implications

A total of $225,000 is estimated to be required for the construction of 15 Long Ramp Raised Pavements in the existing urban sealed section of Masons Road. This can be funded through savings in the 2020/2021 program and considered in the mid-year Budget review process, or considered in  the 2021/22 new works program annual Budget process.

Policy strategy and legislation

Road Management Act (2004)

City of Whittlesea Road Safety Strategy (2017):

Address safety of all road and path users.

Address driver behaviour and attitude towards vulnerable road users: pedestrian, cyclists and cyclists and motorcyclists.

City of Whittlesea Bicycle Plan 2016-2020:

Key Direction 3: Build and maintain a high quality network.

City of Whittlesea Integrated Transport Strategy (2014):

Action RF 2.2: Manage local roads to improve amenity and safety for users.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Health, Safety and Welfare - Failure of safety and risk management systems resulting in serious injury or harm to staff or member of public

The current traffic conditions on the urban section of Masons Road see a significant and increasing number of motorists travelling on and exceeding the speed limit. This presents a risk to the community due to the increased risk and impact of road trauma and negative amenity impacts

Strategic Risk Service Delivery - Inability to plan for and provide critical community services and infrastructure impacting on community wellbeing

Council needs to ensure that the local road and transport network is safe to use and meets community expectations for use, safety and amenity.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Liveable neighbourhoods

Key Direction                        Smart, connected transport network

 

Council’s primary East/West connection in this area of the municipality is Bridge Inn Road. The encouragement of traffic to utilise the key connections throughout the municipality, and not cut through residential areas that are not designed for the volume of traffic, is critical to creating liveable neighbourhoods, and provide for a smart and well-connected transport network.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Masons Road services a diverse segment of our community with contrasting views on how best to address the challenges of road safety, vehicle volumes, amenity, and appropriate maintenance levels along its length. Council has undertaken three rounds of community consultation and engagement with the local community and emergency services over approximately 18 months, refining the traffic management proposals based on community feedback in order to determine the preferred method of addressing the challenges presented.

Each proposal has been supported by some sections of the community and strongly opposed by others. The proposal that has received the most support and is considered to be appropriate in delivering effective outcomes with the minimal impact on directly affected residents is the installation of 15 raised pavements along the sealed section of Masons Road.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the proposal for 15 speed treatments along Masons Road to reduce traffic volumes, vehicle speeds, and improve road safety.

a)      Include the works into the 2020/2021 new works program Mid-Year Budget review process for consideration, or

b)      Include into the 2021/2022 annual Budget approval process for delivery.

2.       Endorse the proposal for 15 speed treatments along Masons Road to reduce traffic volumes, speeds, and to improve road safety, and for this to be included into the 2020/21 new works program Mid-Year Budget review process where saving can be found or included in the 2021/2022 annual Budget approval process for delivery.

3.       Review the effectiveness of the traffic treatments in delivering the desired outcomes 24 months after installation.

4.       Not proceed with options for the full road closure, one-way treatment, or modified T-Intersection on or along Masons Road at this time.

5.       Note the extensive consultation process undertaken and significant community engagement and feedback received in arriving on this outcome.

6.       Write to the head petitioner advising of the Council decision on this matter.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Wilson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried UNAMIMOUSLY

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.5       Corporate Services and Performance

ITEM 6.5.1      For Decision - Cooper Street West Resource Recovery Hub - Shortlist of Expression of Interest process for lease of council land at 480 Cooper Street, Epping 

Attachments:                        1       Site Plan

2       CSRRH Hub Plan

3       Summary of Submissions - Confidential

This Attachment has been designated as confidential information under section 66(5) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that it contains details relating to private commercial information, being information provided by a business, commercial or financial undertaking that—  (i) relates to trade secrets; or (ii) if released, would unreasonably expose the business, commercial or financial undertaking to disadvantage. The attachment contains EOI submissions and financial details provided to Council in confidence. The release of this information could reasonably be expected to prejudice the commercial position of the persons who supplied the information or to confer a commercial advantage on a third party.  

4       Proposed Property Allocation   

Responsible Officer:            Director Corporate Services and Performance

Author:                                  Senior Property Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.    Endorse the two shortlisted Applicants (Re Purpose-It and Suez, Ecodynamics, Smart Recycling, Salvos Stores Consortium) from the expression of interest process to negotiate leases for the site (for food organics and garden organics, and other waste recycling activities).

2.    Continue negotiation with the Applicant that is awarded contract number 2020-26 for Food and Organics Waste Disposal and Processing (to be awarded at this Council meeting) for a lease of the two northern sections of the site including quantification of 'in-kind' financial benefits to Council.

3.    Continue negotiation with the other shortlisted Applicant for a lease of the two southern sections of the site for waste recycling activities including quantification of 'in-kind' financial benefits to Council.

4.    Report back to Council on the proposed leases and to seek approval to undertake community engagement in respect of the proposed leases as required under s 115(4) of the Local Government Act 2020.

Brief overview

·    Council currently leases its land at 480 Cooper Street, Epping (to Ecodynamics) for the purposes of timber and green waste recycling and this lease is expiring in 2021.

·    Council officers invited industry specialists to an information session and provided a high-level understanding of the existing conditions and constraints relevant to Council owned property within the Cooper Street Hub. Submissions to lease were received from Re Purpose-It (RPI) and the SESS consortium (Suez, Ecodynamics, Smart Recycling, Salvos Stores (SESS)) for the future use of 480 Cooper Street, Epping.

·    Leases would be granted in conjunction with the award of Council’s Food and Organics Waste Disposal and Processing (FOGO) tender.

rationale for recommendation

·    The lease will run concurrently with the party awarded Council’s FOGO Tender. The balance of land (not used for green waste processing) will remain available (via EOI) to the existing tenancies currently operating on-site and will be subject to another Council report in early 2021.

·    Applicants have confirmed that in-vessel green waste processing can be established within 12-18 months if awarded Council’s FOGO Tender.

impacts of recommendation

Failure to secure suitable leases on Council’s land holdings could potentially limit the ‘in-kind benefits’ (drop-off of green waste and other materials, processing of contractor materials such as parks maintenance green waste) offered to Council, its contractors and ratepayers.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

·    Council officers will liaise with the two shortlisted applicants with the intent of reaffirming their lease offer and codifying in-kind benefits and capital investment.

·    Further reports will be prepared seeking Council’s approval to invite public submissions on the proposed lease under Sections 115 of the Local Government Act 2020.

 

Report

Background

Council presently holds two lease agreements within the Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub (CSRRH) (Attachments 1 and 2).  The expiry of these leases in 2021 presented Council with an opportunity to reflect on the contribution its significant land holdings within the Cooper Street Hub could make to our local and regional environmental outcomes.  To this end it was decided that an Expression of Interest (EOI) process would be used to identify the most suitable lessee(s) for the site.

An information session was held for industry specialists which provided a high-level briefing on the existing conditions and constraints relevant to Council owned property within the CSRRH. Each attendee was also provided with a suite of documents and encouraged to submit an EOI by 5 February 2020.

Whilst seven submissions were received in response to the campaign, only four applications were shortlisted as viable candidates (which was later reduced to three) (Attachment 3).

For the purposes of this report, Council is only being asked to consider the submissions received in response to the future use of 480 Cooper Street, Epping, and the granting of a  lease in conjunction with the award of Council’s FOGO tender. The tender, being contract number 2020-26, will be awarded at the same council meeting as this report is being considered.

The following table shows which Applicant’s proposed uses are likely to provide in-kind benefits at 480 Cooper Street, Epping. 

 

 

RPI have confirmed their pre-existing plans to construct in-vessel food organics / garden organics (FOGO) facilities on their property at 460 Cooper Street, Epping which is adjoining the Council site at 480 Cooper Street, Epping. RPI have stated that their decision to commit to the capital investment will not be influenced by the award of the FOGO Tender, however if they are awarded the contract and gain access to 480 Cooper Street, Epping they would be able to take advantage of the existing infrastructure, allowing them  to offer increased financial benefit in delivery of the Food and Organics Waste Disposal and Processing contract as well as  additional waste related services to the community.

A similar commitment was presented by SESS, however, their decision to construct in-vessel FOGO facilities would be entirely dependent on being awarded Council’s FOGO Tender. Should SUEZ not be awarded the contract, the SESS consortium’s lease offer alters (as do its commitments to in-kind benefits and infrastructure spending).

Following the FOGO tender award, Council will re-approach all prospective lessees and reaffirm their intention to lease (along with their land requirements), as well as re-establishing the ‘in-kind’ benefits and capital investment options. This would enable Council to offer the two northern sections of 480 Cooper Street, Epping to the preferred FOGO tenderer and offer the two southern sections to the other shortlisted applicant.

Proposed Lease Allocations

Based on the assessments outlined it is recommended that:

1.   The two northern sections of 480 Cooper Street, Epping (marked in red outline on Attachment 4 – Proposed Property Allocation) be leased to the applicant who is awarded the FOGO tender and aligned with the contract term; and

2.   The two southern sections of 480 Cooper Street, Epping (marked in blue and yellow outline on Attachment 4 – Proposed Property Allocation) be leased to the other shortlisted applicant.

Next steps

1.   Advise parties of the outcome.

2.   Negotiate and formalise lease arrangements for the applicant awarded the FOGO tender including,

a.   Codify in-kind benefits for including:

§ Non-contracted kerbside collections (community vouchers, hard waste collection, dumped rubbish management, etc).

§ Disposal of materials generated through Council maintenance activities and carried out either directly by Council or by contractors working directly on behalf of Council (e.g. parks maintenance, road maintenance, etc.).

§ Procurement of tenderers products at Council purchasing rates extended to include contractors working directly on behalf of Council.

3.   Negotiate and formalise lease arrangements with the other shortlisted applicant.

Proposal

To finalise lease negotiations and establish appropriate terms and conditions, including the specification and formalisation of in-kind benefits, of the Council owned property known as the Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub (CSRRH).

Consultation

Council held an information session for waste industry specialists which received 75 registrations.

Council officers have carried out an Expression of Interest campaign which was widely communicated to the waste industry.

Further information sessions were carried out with the short-listed applicants (Re-Purpose It and SESS) to codify the ‘in-kind’ benefits and capital investment if awarded the lease.

Financial Implications

The financial implications related to awarding the above leases fall into two categories, annual rent and in-kind benefits.

Annual rent

480 Cooper Street, Epping

A definitive rental is yet to be determined, however, applicants have proposed an annual rental of between $100,000 and $300,000.

In-Kind Benefits

The value of in-kind benefits cannot be calculated at this stage.  However, to gain an understanding of the potential value, the benefit being realised through Council’s current arrangements at 480 Cooper Street of vouchers issued to ratepayers (consisting of green waste x 10,432; timber x 2,200; and rubble x 874) could provide a community benefit of approximately $1.23 million.

A full accounting of in-kind benefits will be provided in the next stage of reporting, prior to advertising of the proposed lease agreements.

Policy strategy and legislation

Council, under Sections 115 of the Local Government Act 2020, must invite public submissions on the proposed lease once the details have been resolved.

Negotiation with the shortlisted applicants cannot occur until the award of Council FOGO tender (contract number 2020-26).

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Contaminated Land - Failure to prevent significant negative impact of Council’s decisions and management relating to contaminated sites

The expression of interest campaign has identified possible tenants to develop and implement new and sustainable practices within the Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       Sustainable environment

Key Direction                        Leaders in clean, sustainable living

 

Food and Garden Organics Waste Collection – trial a better service option for the disposal of organic waste to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase diversion from landfill.

The purpose of the expression of interest campaign is to ensure Council’s significant land holdings within the Cooper Street Hub are contributing to positive environmental outcomes, whilst maximising in-kind benefits and long-term capital investment for the community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Council has received two viable submissions in response to the Expression of Interest for the use of Council land at 480 Cooper Street, Epping, which sits within Cooper Street Waste & Resource Recovery Hub.

Lease negotiations will be undertaken and will be reported back to Council in 2021. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the two shortlisted Applicants (Re Purpose-It and Suez, Ecodynamics, Smart Recycling, Salvos Stores Consortium) from the expression of interest process to negotiate leases for the site (for food organics and garden organics, and other waste recycling activities).

2.       Continue negotiation with the Applicant that is awarded contract number 2020-26 for Food and Organics Waste Disposal and Processing for a lease of the two northern sections of the site including quantification of 'in-kind' financial benefits to Council.

3.       Continue negotiation with the other shortlisted Applicant for a lease of the two southern sections of the site for waste recycling activities including quantification of 'in-kind' financial benefits to Council.

4.       Report back to Council on the proposed leases and to seek approval to undertake community engagement in respect of the proposed leases as required under s 115(4) of the Local Government Act 2020.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.5.2    For Noting - Quarterly Financial Report for the period ended 30 September 2020 

Attachments:                        1       Financial Performance Report for the period ended 30 September 2020   

Responsible Officer:            Director Corporate Services and Performance

Author:                                  Team Leader Financial Services   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

Note the Financial Performance Report for the period ended 30 September 2020.

Brief overview

·      For the three months ended 30 September 2020, Council has recorded an operating surplus which is $1.8 million ahead of the year to date budget. The main contributing factors to this favourable variance are greater income than budgeted from operating grants and below budget expenditure on employee benefits and materials and services offset by below budgeted income from capital grants.

·      The forecast operating result for the year ending 30 June 2021 is an operating surplus which is $2.58 million less than budget. The main contributing factor to the unfavourable forecast result is the forecast impact of the State Government’s COVID-19 restrictions on Council’s income predominately in the leisure and community facilities area.

·      As at 30 September 2020, year to date Capital Works expenditure of $9.38 million is slightly ahead of budget. The forecast for the year ending 30 June 2021 is expected to meet at least 85% of the capital budget.

rationale for recommendation

The recommendation is in accordance with the requirement of Section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020 that as soon as practicable after the end of each quarter of the financial year, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a quarterly financial report is presented to the Council at a Council meeting which is open to the public.

impacts of recommendation

Council has been presented with a quarterly financial report in accordance with the Local Government Act 2020 that shows that Council’s financial performance against the Annual Budget 2020-21.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Financial performance against budget is monitored closely and presented to the Executive Leadership Team and Council on a regular basis. 

 

Report

Background

The Financial Performance Report for the period ended 30 September 2020 (Attachment 1) includes the following financial statements:

·        Comprehensive Income Statement

·        Balance Sheet

·        Statement of Cash Flows

·        Statement of Capital Works

·        Summary of Reserves.

Operating performance

 

YTD
Actual
$'000

YTD
Budget
$'000

YTD
Variance
$'000

Adopted Budget
$'000

Forecast
$'000

Operating

 

 

 

 

 

Income

186,543

187,378

(830)

346,586

  347,959

Expenditure

41,868

44,493

2,626

214,809

218,762

Surplus (deficit)

144,675

142,885

1,796

131,777

129,197

Capital and other revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Capital non-recurrent grants

162

(1,094)

1,256

(2,815)

(2,289)

Developer contributions

(2,948)

(3,214)

266

(114,026)

(114,024)

Adjusted underlying surplus

141,889

138,577

3,318

14,936

12,884

The Annual Budget for the 2020-21 financial year has an operating underlying surplus of $14.94 million.

For the quarter ended 30 September 2020, Council has achieved an operating surplus of $144.72 million, which is currently a $1.8 million favourable position to budget.

This surplus is reported based on the Australian Accounting Standards and includes all revenue recognised in the financial period, including gifted subdivisional assets (non-monetary), developer contributions and grants towards capital works projects.  The operating result is a key figure to assess Council’s financial performance. Although Council is a not-for-profit organisation, it should still generate a surplus to ensure future financial sustainability.

The key drivers of this favourable variance are listed below.

·    Total year to date income is ($830,000) unfavourable to budget, which is largely due to favourable variances in the following:

$1.7 million in unearned grant income recognised as income in 2020-21 due to delay in timing of expenditure associated with COVID-19 restrictions.

$574,000 in construction supervision fees due to a higher proportion of work relating to industrial construction which has a higher supervision fee.

These variances are offset by the following unfavourable variances:

($208,000) in green waste bin charges with the variance anticipated to decrease as additional bins are taken up as the Food Organics and Garden Organics initiative progresses.

($323,000) in the building and planning area which experiencing a reduction in statutory fees as development activity has shown a decline with the continuance of State Government's ongoing COVID-19 restrictions.

($745,000) in Developer Contributions which is mainly attributable to a slowdown in development activity across the municipality and will continue to be monitored to see if this trend continues.

($837,000) in Leisure and Community Facilities' venues due to their closure in line with ongoing State Government COVID-19 restrictions.

($1.87 million) in capital grants as a result of the budget not being phased to reflect that grant income is only recognised when funding obligations have been met.

·    Total year to date expenditure is $2.63 million favourable to budget which is largely due to favourable variances in the following:

$1.63 million in materials and services as the State Government's COVID-19 restrictions have limited expenditure primarily for facilities management, footpath maintenance, debt collection and waste management.

$580,000 in finance costs due to a reduction in interest expense with budgeted loans not yet being progressed.

$373,000 in employee benefits as a result of vacancies across the organisation.

The forecast operating result for the year ending 30 June 2021 is an operating surplus of $129.2 million which is $2.58 million less than budget. The main contributing factors to the unfavourable forecast result are the forecast impacts of the State Government’s COVID-19 restrictions on the income associated with leisure and community facilities being $2.1 million less than budget and the Working for Victoria employee benefits being $2.02 million offset by a forecast increase in operational grant income of $3.72 million.  

After eliminating non-recurrent capital grants and other items, the adjusted underlying surplus is $141.89 million, which is $3.32 million ahead of budget. An underlying surplus is the net surplus for the year adjusted for non-recurrent capital grants and contributions. It is an accepted measure of financial sustainability as it is not impacted by non-recurring or once-off items of revenue and expenses that can often mask the operating results.

Capital performance

 

YTD
Actual
$'000

YTD
Budget
$'000

YTD
Variance
$'000

Annual Budget
$'000

Forecast
$'000

Property

2,441

2,083

(358)

24,896

24,896

Plant and equipment

389

22

(367)

1,900

1,900

Infrastructure

6,549

7,176

627

63,186

63,186

Total Capital works

9,379

9,281

(98)

89,982

89,982

The 2020-21 Adopted Budget is $89.98 million, comprising of $74.52 million of new Capital Works projects and $15.46 million carried forward from the 2019/20 financial year.

Year to date Capital Works expenditure of $9.38 million is slightly ahead of budget. The forecast for the year ending 30 June 2021 is expected to meet at least 85% of the capital budget.

Detailed analysis of the New Works program is provided in the 2020-21 New Works Program – First Quarter Report that is a separate report at this Council meeting.


 

Financial position

 

YTD
Actual
$'000

Annual Budget
$'000

Audited 2020
$'000

Cash and investments

195,620

201,747

204,289

Net current assets

311,884

161,091

169,836

Net assets and total equity

4,080,875

4,145,583

3,944,937

The financial position as at 30 September 2020 shows a cash and investment balance of $195.62 million compared with $204.29 million as at 30 June 2020.

The cash and investment balance was sufficient to meet restricted cash and intended allocations of $185.59 million at the end of September.

Restricted cash is the amount of cash holdings Council requires to meet external restrictions such as trust funds and statutory reserves. Cash for intended allocations includes cash held to fund future capital works and project works.

It is anticipated the COVID-19 pandemic and associated State Government restrictions will adversely affect the cash position and the net current asset due to reduced revenue and a decreased return on investments.  A summary of these impacts is outlined in Attachment 3 – COVID-19 Impact report.

Proposal

That Council notes the Financial Performance Report for the period ended 30 September 2020 (Attachment 1), which is presented for consideration by Council in accordance with the Local Government Act 2020.

Consultation

A review of Council’s financial performance for the period ended 30 September 2020 has been undertaken in consultation with the Executive Leadership Team and department managers for the preparation of this report.

Financial Implications

All matters raised in this report which have a financial implication have been reflected in the Financial Performance Report for the period ended 30 September 2020 (Attachment 1).

Policy strategy and legislation

Section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020 provides that as soon as practicable after the end of each quarter of the financial year, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a quarterly budget report is presented to the Council at a Council meeting which is open to the public. The quarterly budget report must include a comparison of the actual and budgeted results to date and an explanation of any material variations.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Financial Sustainability - Inability to meet current and future expenditure

This report provides Council with an oversight of the City of Whittlesea’s key financial information and performance obligations to enable monitoring and to ensure City of Whittlesea’s financial position is sustainable.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More cost-effective investment through better return on investment, efficiency and an engaged workforce

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

For the three-month period ending 30 September 2020, Council’s underlying surplus showed a favourable year to date variance of $3.32 million against budget.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolves to note the Financial Performance Report for the period ended 30 September 2020.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

6.5.3      For Decision - 2020/21 New Works Program - First Quarter Report

Attachments:                        1       Financial Summary

2       Project Progress Report

3       Project Status Photos

4       Grant Status Report

5       Project Adjustments   

Responsible Officer:            Director Infrastructure & Environment

Author:                                  Team Leader Business Support   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.      Note the 2020/21 First Quarter New Works Program report.

2.      Approve the proposed budget adjustments as listed in Attachment 5.

Brief overview

·    The annual approved budget for 2020/21 (including carry forwards) is $89,982,304.

·    The value of work completed in the first quarter is $9,379,289.

·    Stage 4 COVID-19 restrictions have caused some delays due to workforce limitations on construction sites and delivery of supplies.

·    Infrastructure Grant Applications totalling $10,006,908 have been successful since 1 July 2020.

rationale for recommendation

Due to successes in recent grant opportunities and economic stimulus programs, a number of new projects are proposed to be added to the 2020/21 New Works Program that were not originally part of the Adopted Budget and adjustments made to projects where scope has changed due to the available funding opportunities.

Council approval is requested to revise the 2020/21 New Works Program to adjust the original project scope and to add new projects to our program that will deliver improvements to our local roads, playgrounds and facilities.

impacts of recommendation

Approval of the project adjustments as listed in Attachment 5 will enable projects to progress as planned and be delivered within the agreed timeframes of the funding agreements entered with State and Federal Government funding agencies.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

Regular reporting and monitoring is undertaken of the New Works Program.  A detailed mid-year review will be undertaken to assess the impacts of the COVID-19 Stage 4 restrictions on the program.

Report

Introduction

This report provides an overview of the financial performance and status of the New Works Program at the end of the 2020/21 financial year first quarter.  This report includes:

·    A financial summary of the 2020/21 program to the end of September 2020 (Attachment 1).

·    A detailed progress report on individual projects within the New Works Program (Attachment 2).

·    Photos on the progress of a sample of completed and significant projects (Attachment 3).

·    Status report on Infrastructure Grant Applications (Attachment 4).

·    Proposed project budget adjustments (Attachment 5).

The value of work completed in the first quarter is $9,379,289 which includes payments and accruals for work completed to the 30 September 2020.

In addition, there are contract and purchase orders committing another $25,505,604 which indicates a good level of delivery preparedness for this period of time.

Background

Council adopted the 2020/21 New Works Program on 7 July 2020 with a budget of $74,523,973 plus $15,458,331 carry forward, providing a total budget of $89,982,304.

Consultation

The New Works Program is a component of the Council budget which undergoes statutory community engagement as part of the annual budget cycle.  Additionally, specific external and internal stakeholder consultation is undertaken for individual projects and programs.

Financial Implications

A summary of the program performance by group can be found below.  A list of all projects with their current status has been included in Attachment 2.

Financial Status of the New Works Program by Group:

Group

Year to Date Actuals

Year to Date Budget

Variance to YTD Budget

Annual Budget   

Buildings

4,618,498

4,016,067

-602,431

21,585,458

Drains

69,248

75,000

5,752

502,773

Feasibility & Planning

37,982

50,000

12,018

1,000,000

Open Space

1,253,249

1,592,815

339,566

19,554,135

Plant & Equipment

313,206

22,000

-291,206

1,664,597

Roads & Paths

2,691,695

3,245,053

553,358

43,466,996

Transport

395,412

280,000

-115,412

2,208,345

Total

9,379,289

9,280,935

-98,354

89,982,304

The program expenditure is slightly ahead of the year-to-date budget and reflects the phasing of the planned budgets for the first quarter. 

COVID-19 Impacts

COVID-19 Stage 4 restrictions during the first quarter have impacted on construction activity and delivery of equipment and material supplies to many projects.  Projects that have been significantly affected include: 

·    PID 0076 - Local Road Resurfacing Works.

·    PID 1589  - Redevelop Mill Park Leisure Centre.

·    PID 1915  - Refurbish Building Whittlesea Aquatic Facility.

·    PID 2192  - All Abilities Play Space.

A mid-year review will be undertaken towards the end of the second quarter to better understand the impact of the restrictions on individual projects and forecast year-end position of the 2020/21 New Works Program.

In addition to the direct impacts of COVID-19, there are also some indirect impacts as a result of general work disruptions in the normal planning, tendering and construction activities both within Council, permit and service authority approvals.  It is difficult to quantify these indirect impacts at this stage, but they will be further evaluated during the mid-year review process.

Project Budget Adjustments

A number of minor changes to the New Works Program are proposed in the first quarter.  These adjustments fall into the following categories:

·    Project budgets to be reduced to contribute to Organisational savings (COVID-19)

·    Projects with unbudgeted external funding (e.g. successful grants)

·    Project savings to offset additional budget requirements

The proposed project adjustments result in an increase to the adopted expenditure budget of $4,147,655, giving a revised budget following the first quarter of $94,129,959.  This is reflected in Attachment 5.

Infrastructure Grants

A total of $19,126,789 grant applications has been submitted since 1 July 2020 with $10,006,908 being successful to date. $5,285,000 has been unsuccessful and there is $3,834,881 in applications with outcomes pending.

 

 

 

Economic Stimulus Funding programs are regularly being announced by both the Federal and State Governments to stimulate the economy and provide jobs, to offset the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.  These grants are in addition to the annual grant opportunities that are available to local government and come with strict funding conditions in terms of timelines and adoption of the State Government Working for Victoria program.  These infrastructure grants provide an opportunity to bring forward community infrastructure in the 4 Year New Works Program.  A review of delivery resources is currently underway to ensure this additional project funding can be delivered in accordance with the funding agreements. 

Refer to Attachment 4 for a listing of successful applications, applications pending announcements and applications that have been unsuccessful.

Policy strategy and legislation

Business cases are prepared for individual projects to ensure best value against the relevant policies and strategies.

Lessons learnt and continuous improvement plans are implemented to enhance systems, processes and practices to improve the planning and delivery of the New Works Program.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Life Cycle Asset Management - Failure to effectively plan for the construction, on-going maintenance and renewal of Council’s assets

Council prepares a 4/15 Year New Works Program to plan for future new infrastructure and renewal needs.  Failure to address community needs will result in inadequate infrastructure and services being provided.

 

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                              High-performing organisation

Key Direction               More cost-effective investment through better return on investment, efficiency and an engaged workforce

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

This report provides a summary of the status of the New Works Program at the end of the first quarter of the 2020/21 financial year.  The year-to-date expenditure is within forecast, however the full impact of COVID-19 Stage 4 restrictions have yet to be fully assessed.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the 2020/21 First Quarter New Works Program report.

2.       Approve the proposed project budget adjustments as listed in Attachment 5.

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Wilson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

ITEM 6.5.4    For Noting - Council Action Plan 2020-2021 Quarter 1 Progress Report 

Attachments:                        1       Council Action Plan 2020-2021 - Status Quarter 1   

Responsible Officer:            Director Corporate Services and Performance

Author:                                  Corporate Planner Business Partner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

1.   Note the report, including that COVID-19 has impacted on the delivery timelines of some of the Council Action Plan 2020-21 initiatives; and

2.   Note that 28 major initiatives in the Council Action Plan 2020-21 are on track to be achieved by 30 June 2021.

Brief overview

·    The Council Action Plan 2020-21 includes 31 major initiatives to be delivered in 2020-21.

·    3 major initiatives are at risk of not being achieved by 30 June 2021 and cite COVID-19 as the major factor for delay.

rationale for recommendation

At this point, it is not proposed to change the Council Action Plan 2020-2021, hence the recommendation is for Council to note the progress. Two key factors may influence changes to the Plan as the year progresses, namely:

·    Major initiatives included in the Plan are severely impacted to the point they become not achievable in 2020-2021; none of the initiatives in the Plan are as severely impacted as at quarter 1.

·    A clearer picture of pandemic impact and short-term recovery initiatives emerges, triggering the need for specific changes.

impacts of recommendation

Major initiatives will be progressed based on the initial plans but are exposed to a higher degree of uncertainty. Short-term pandemic recovery planning is progressing irrespective of changes to the Council Action Plan 2020-2021 at this point, and recovery planning progress will be reported as part of the respective initiative already included in the Plan.

what measures will be put in place to manage impacts

The organisation will closely monitor progress against the major initiatives as well as data identifying emerging community needs particularly as a result of the pandemic. This will ensure Council is responsive to the changing environment in a timely manner and can adjust the program of work as required.

Report

Background

Council adopted the Council Plan 2017-21 (Update 2020) including the Council Action Plan 2020-21 at a Special Council Meeting on 25 June 2020 (adjourned to 7 July 2020).  The Council Plan is the key strategic document providing direction over the Council term.  The Council Action Plan is developed annually as an accompaniment to the Council Plan and includes the major initiatives that are to be achieved each year.

Proposal

That Council resolve to:

·      Note the report, including that COVID-19 has impacted on the delivery timelines of some of the Council Action Plan 2020-21 initiatives; and

·      Note that 28 major initiatives in the Council Action Plan 2020-21 are on track to be achieved by 30 June 2021.

council action plan 2020-2021

Attachment 1 – CAP Annual Measures and Quarter 1 Milestones

As at 30 September 2020, the Council Action Plan is projecting an 90% achievement rate across 31 major initiatives by 30 June 2021.

There are three initiatives reported as ‘Issues identified’ this quarter:

Major initiative

Annual measure

Status

Q1 Comments

Biodiversity asset mapping - Updating our data on local flora and fauna to enable strong biodiversity decisions in a changing ecological environment (year 1).

Biodiversity mapping and ecologist report completed.

Issues identified

Internal consultation is complete. External agency consultation has been extended due to the delay of the public consultation for Department of Environmental Land and Water Planning’s (DELWP) Green Wedge and Agriculture Land Review project due to COVID-19 restrictions. Detailed scoping indicates that the timing will allow surveying to commence in autumn to ensure future milestones are met. Work has started on the contract specifications and project brief.

Streets for people - Engaging with residents and businesses to upgrade the streetscape and public spaces in the designated priority area.

Consult and engage with community to develop a draft Streets for People Local Area Traffic Management and Streetscape Improvement Plan for the designated priority area.

Issues identified

Delayed due to social restrictions in place as a result of pandemic. Remote virtual public consultation is currently being investigated.

Aboriginal Heritage Study -

Partnering with the Aboriginal community to improve identification and protection of tangible and intangible Aboriginal cultural heritage (phase 1)

Delivery of Phase 1 consultation report and agreement by City of Whittlesea, Wurundjeri

Woi-wurrung Cultural Heritage Aboriginal Corporation  (WWCHAC) and Aboriginal Victoria on the framework for Phase 2.

Issues identified

Delays have been experienced due to the COVID-19 restrictions, causing delays with Elders' involvement. Work is underway with newly appointed staff at WWCHAC to progress development of project scope.

Please refer to Attachment 1 – 2020-21 Council Action Plan - Status Quarter 1.

Consultation

Reporting is sourced from line management and project managers across the organisation. Directors and the Executive Leadership Team have reviewed the information.

Critical Dates

Council Action Plan initiatives need to be achieved by 30 June in order to be reported accordingly in the 2020-21 Annual Report.

Financial Implications

This report has no direct financial implications. Delayed Council Action Plan items may incur additional costs which will be considered within the respective project context.

Policy strategy and legislation

Periodic progress reporting against the Council Action Plan increases transparency and contributes to discharging Council’s reporting duties.

link to strategic risks

Strategic Risk Governance - Ineffective governance of Council’s operations and activities resulting in either a legislative or policy breach

Performance reporting is an effective existing treatment enhancing governance of Council’s operations.

Links to whittlesea 2040 and the CoUNCIL Plan

Goal                                       High-performing organisation

Key Direction                        More informed Council decisions based on strong advice and community consultation and engagement

 

The quarterly Council Action Plan performance report seeks to increase transparency of the organisation’s performance for management to monitor and evaluate operations and continuously improve performance.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020 and Chapter 5.7 of the Governance Rules 2020, officers providing advice to Council are required to disclose any conflict of interest they have in a matter and explain the nature of the conflict.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Of the 31 major initiatives in the Council Action Plan 2020-2021, 28 major initiatives are on track to be achieved by 30 June 2021. Significant delays, due to COVID-19 have placed three of these major initiatives at risk of not being completed on time. Council is closely monitoring progress and investigating mitigating actions to ensure timely delivery of the Plan.

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the report, including that COVID-19 has impacted on the delivery timelines of some of the Council Action Plan 2020-21 initiatives; and

2.       Note that 28 major initiatives in the Council Action Plan 2020-21 are on track to be achieved by 30 June 2021.

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:                Administrator Wilson

 

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Recommendation.

Carried

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

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Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

7.         Notices of Motion

Nil Reports 

8.         Questions to Officers

NIL 

9.         Urgent Business

NIL 

10.       Reports from Delegates Appointed by Council to Other Bodies

The Chair of Council, Lydia Wilson invited the Administrators to report back to Council on recent meetings they had attended.

 

Firstly, Administrator Duncan provided an updated in relation to recent meetings she had attended:

 

Chief Executive Officer Employment Matters Advisory Committee Meeting (CEMAC) – 23 November 2020

 

“I attended this meeting to discuss chief executive matters.”

 

Whittlesea Reconciliation Group Meeting – 26 November 2020

 

“This was a very good meeting and the highlights from this meeting was a recap of two days of planning that the group did. I believe that two weeks prior to this meeting being held they planned what the new year will look like in terms of what activities and strategies they will deploy. A winter festival was also discussed which was very exciting. Also, the group has a Christmas gathering on the 17 December 2020. It will be good to finally have the opportunity to meet that group in person and I am very much looking forward to it.”

 

Northern Business Achievements Award – 3 December 2020

 

“Congratulations to our two winners in the municipality.”

 

Whittlesea Community Connections Launch of Reimagining Volunteering for Contemporary Australia - 3 December 2020

 

“A very interesting presentation by three or four different presenters on the next vision of how volunteering in Australia looks like and to make it more relevant to the demographics in our society and the diversity in our society. It was very worthwhile attending that meeting. I thank them for inviting me to attend.”

 


 

After Administrator Duncan’s update, Administrator Billson provided an insight into recent meetings he had attended recently:

 

Metropolitan Local Government Waste Forum Meeting – 20 November 2020

 

“This meeting concerned looking at the container deposits scheme that the State Government is currently consulting on and really looking at that through a local government lens. There are some implications for local government with the Victorian container deposits scheme. It was a discussion around what the objectives of the scheme may be, mechanics and governance arrangements and what sort of model may be bought to utilise in Victoria compared to those operating elsewhere. Also, there was discussion regarding what the impacts may be for local government including our City.”

 

Chief Executive Officer Employment Matters Advisory Committee Meeting (CEMAC) – 23 November 2020

 

“I also attended the CEMAC meeting with Administrator Duncan and Administrator Wilson for chief executive matters. At this meeting we looked at performance expectations for Mr Lloyd and I am very pleased that he is on board and congratulate him on his early start at the City of Whittlesea.”

 

Northern Business Achievement Awards – 3 December 2020

 

“The grand finale - it was great to see Floridia Cheese and Repurpose It recognised with Floridia Cheese taking the big one and winning the major award.”

 

Whittlesea Community Futures Meeting - 7 December 2020

 

“Director Community Wellbeing, Kate McCaughey is the new chair for this group. A big welcome and introduction to Kate. The previous chair of the group, Julian Edwards did an excellent job, I want to congratulate Julian on his work with this group, it is not a home game for him as he is more of a planner but he got very involved in community development and social services policy. I thank him for his time leading that group. We also had a discussion around the strategic coordinating group that has been formed that will really bind together the Whittlesea Community Futures group. We also had an important presentation on family violence as well as Donna Bennett from Home Street talking about youth homelessness and the Victorian Government Big Housing Build initiative.”

 

MAV Councillor Induction Sessions -  24 November and 3 December 2020

 

“I enjoyed two days of the MAV’s Councillor induction sessions. They were really useful sessions.  The MAV outlined some of the new requirements of the Local Government Act 2020 but also some of the broader contextual challenges that local government faces and what MAV is doing specifically to support our efforts and enterprise as individual municipalities.”  

 

To conclude, Chair of Council Lydia Wilson provided a summary of meetings she had recently attended:

 

Meeting with Danielle Green, Member for Yan Yean - 19 November 2020

 

“I attended this meeting together with our Chief Executive Officer. We met with Danielle Green, Member of Yan Yean to discuss a number of local issues.”

 

 

Chief Executive Officer Employment Matters Advisory Committee Meeting (CEMAC) – 23 November 2020

 

“This committee clearly comprises of the three Administrators and together with an independent advisor. A really important Advisory Committee of Council.”

 

Whittlesea Reconciliation Group Meeting – 26 November 2020

 

“I attended this meeting alongside Administrator Duncan and my colleague has already talked about some of the critical issues on the agenda of that particular meeting.”

 

Meeting with Craig Ondarchie, Member for Northern Metropolitan Region - 2 December 2020

 

“I met with Craig Ondarchie, Member for Northern Metropolitan Region alongside our Chief Executive Officer to discuss a number of local issues.”

 

Northern Business Achievement Award – 3 December 2020

 

“As with my Administrator colleagues, I also attended this awards grand finale and as we have indicated earlier we were all extremely thrilled to see the success of our key local businesses, Repurpose It and Floridia Cheese.”

 

Council Resolution

Moved:                       Administrator Duncan

Seconded:                Administrator Billson

 

THAT Council resolve to note the Delegate’s reports.

Carried


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

11.       Confidential Business

11.1     Executive Services

11.1.1  FOR NOTING – CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES AND ASSOCIATED ACTIONS OF CEMAC MEETING HELD 23 NOVEMBER 2020

 

Report

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public under section 66(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 2020 to consider confidential information under section 3(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 on the grounds that the report/attachments contain details relating to:

 

·     personal information, being information which if released would result in the unreasonable disclosure of information about any person or their personal affairs. In particular, the report/attachments contains information regarding the Chief Executive Officer KPIs and details relating to the employment of the Chief Executive Officer.

 


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

11.2     Planning and Development

            Nil Reports

11.3     Community Wellbeing

            Nil Reports

11.4     Infrastructure and Environment

            Nil Reports

11.5     Corporate Services and Performance

            Nil Reports


Scheduled Council Meeting Minutes      Monday 7 December 2020

 

11.6     Notices of Motion

            Nil Reports

 

COUNCIL RESOLUTION

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

THAT the Chair of Council recommended that the meeting be closed to the members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following confidential matter in accordance with Section 66(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 2020 as follows:

11.1.1  CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES AND ASSOCIATED ACTIONS OF CEMAC MEETING HELD 23 NOVEMBER 2020

This report is presented to Council as a confidential document on the grounds that it contains:

 

●   personal information, being information which if released would result in the unreasonable disclosure of information about any person or their personal affairs. In particular, the report/attachments contains information regarding the Chief Executive Officer KPIs and details relating to the employment of the Chief Executive Officer.

CARRIED

 

Chief Executive Officer Explanatory Note
The motion to re-open the meeting to the public was moved and carried in the confidential portion of the meeting. In the confidential portion of the meeting, the Council determined to re-open the meeting to the public for a second time once they returned to the open portion of the meeting in order to promote public transparency.
ACCORDINGLY, THE MEETING WAS CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC AT 4:48PM.

 

COUNCIL RESOLUTION

Moved:                       Administrator Billson

Seconded:                Administrator Duncan

THAT the Chair of Council re-open the meeting to the public.

Carried

 

 

THE MEETING WAS RE-OPENED TO THE PUBLIC AT 4:56PM.

12.       Closure

DELETE THE CLOSURE TEXT NOT REQUIRED

THERE BEING NO FURTHER BUSINESS THE CHAIR OF COUNCIL CLOSED THE MEETING AT 4:57PM.

 

CONFIRMED THIS 2ND DAY OF FEBRUARY 2021.

 

 

___________________________

LYDIA WILSON

CHAIR OF COUNCIL