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Agenda

 

OF Ordinary
COUNCIL MEETING

HELD ON

Tuesday 4 September 2018

AT 6.30pm

summons

 

You are advised that a Meeting of Council has been called by the Acting Chief Executive Officer on Tuesday, 4 September 2018 in Council Chamber, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang at 6.30pm for the transaction of the following business.

 

L THOMPSON

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

 

 

COUNCILLORS

 

KRIS PAVLIDIS                               MAYOR, SOUTH WEST WARD

LAWRIE COX                                   SOUTH WEST WARD

STEVAN KOZMEVSKI                   SOUTH WEST WARD

CAZ MONTELEONE                       SOUTH WEST WARD

EMILIA LISA STERJOVA               DEPUTY MAYOR, NORTH WARD

TOM JOSEPH                                  NORTH WARD

RICKY KIRKHAM                            NORTH WARD

SAM ALESSI                                    SOUTH EAST WARD

ALAHNA DESIATO                         SOUTH EAST WARD

NORM KELLY                                  SOUTH EAST WARD

MARY LALIOS                                 SOUTH EAST WARD


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

 

 

SENIOR OFFICERS

 

 

LIANA THOMPSON                          ACTING CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

RUSSELL HOPKINS                         DIRECTOR COMMUNITY SERVICES

NICK MANN                                       DIRECTOR CITY TRANSPORT & PRESENTATION

HELEN SUI                                        DIRECTOR CORPORATE SERVICES

JULIAN EDWARDS                           ACTING DIRECTOR PARTNERSHIPS, PLANNING & ENGAGEMENT

MICHAEL TONTA                              MANAGER GOVERNANCE

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                           Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

 

ORDER OF BUSINESS

 

The Acting Chief Executive Officer submits the following business:

1.            Opening.. 11

1.1         MEETING OPENING AND PRAYER.. 11

1.2         ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT.. 11

1.3         Present.. 11

2.            Apologies.. 11

3.            Declarations of Interest.. 11

4.            Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting.. 11

5.            Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters.. 11

5.1         Questions To Councillors.. 11

5.2         Petitions.. 13

Nil Reports.. 13

5.3         Joint Letters.. 15

Nil Reports.. 15

6.            Officers' Reports.. 17

6.1         Partnerships, Planning & Engagement.. 17

6.1.1       Planning Scheme Amendment C203- 280 Bridge Inn Road- Exhbition Outcomes.. 17

6.1.2       Planning Scheme Amendment C227- 65W and 70W Regent Street, Mernda- Request for Authorisation.. 27

6.1.3       Planning Scheme Amendment C204- Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan- Panel Report and Adoption.. 37

6.1.4       Amendment to Planning Permit 701889 to allow for the relocation and upgrade of the existing Waste Transfer Station, 24 hour operation of existing Land Fill for commercial customers, revised layout and a new access to Bridge Inn Road at 45-135 Bridge Inn Road, Wollert. 69

6.1.5       REVIEW OF COUNCIL DELEGATION TO STAFF. 83

6.1.6       2018 Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey Report. 299

6.1.7       COUNCIL MEETING SCHEDULE FOR 2019. 307

6.1.8       Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy and Guidelines   311

6.1.9       Communications and Public Comment Policy.. 357

6.1.10    Epping Community Services Hub_Operations Report. 365

6.1.11    Assemblies of Councillors Report - 4 September 2018. 371

6.2         Community Services.. 375

6.2.1       Joint Letter Response - Lalor Recreation Reserve - 22 Sydney Crescent, Lalor.. 375

6.2.2       Active Whittlesea Policy and Strategy.. 379

6.3         City Transport and Presentation.. 411

6.3.1       Response to Petition - All Abilities Play Space, Mill Park   411

6.3.2       Whittlesea Public Gardens Master Plan.. 417

6.4         Corporate Services.. 453

6.4.1       Safety and Wellbeing report. 453

6.4.2       Reappointment of Independent Member to the Audit & RIsk Committee and Proposed Fee Increase.. 459

6.4.3       Part of 30 Girvan Place, South Morang - Road Discontinuance - Committee of Council Recommendation.. 463

6.4.4       Certification of 2017-18 Financial Statements and Unconfirmed Minutes of Audit & Risk Committee Meeting.. 467

6.4.5       2017/18 YEAR END NEW WORKS PROGRAM REPORT. 545

6.4.6       Council Action Plan 2017-18 Achievement Report. 573

6.5         Executive Services.. 581

Nil Reports.. 581

7.            Notices of Motion.. 583

Nil Reports.. 583

8.            Questions to Officers.. 583

9.            Urgent BusineSS.. 583

10.         Reports from Delegates Appointed BY Council TO Other Bodies.. 583

11.         Confidential Business.. 585

11.1       Partnerships, Planning & Engagement.. 585

Nil Reports.. 585

11.2       Community Services.. 587

Nil Reports.. 587

11.3       City Transport and Presentation.. 589

Nil Reports.. 589

11.4       Corporate Services.. 591

11.4.1    Business Implications of Withholding Membership Fee Payments.. 591

11.5       Executive Services.. 593

11.5.1    MEETINGS OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER 30 July to 24 August 2018. 593

11.6       Notices of Motion.. 595

Nil Reports.. 595

12.         Closure.. 597

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

 

Note:

At Council’s discretion, the meeting may be closed in accordance with Section 89 of the Local Government Act 1989. The provision which is likely to be relied upon to enable closure is set out in each item. These reports are not available for public distribution.

 

 

Question Time:

During the meeting, Council will answer questions from residents and ratepayers. Questions should be submitted in writing no later than 3pm on the day of the ordinary Council Meeting unless this unreasonably prevents or hinders you from participating. A Question Time form can be downloaded from Council’s website and copies of the form are available at the meeting. Refer: https://www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au/about-us/council/council-meetings/

 

Council is committed to ensuring that all residents and ratepayers of the municipality may contribute to Council’s democratic process and therefore, if you have special requirements, please telephone the Governance Team prior to any Council Meeting on 9217 2294.

 

 

Large Attachments:

Where large attachments form part of the Report, due to the size of the attachments – a copy has not been provided in the Agenda document

Copies of these attachments are available for inspection by the public at the following locations:

a)      Council offices at 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang; and

b)      Council’s internet site – http://cam.whittlesea.vic.gov.au/

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

1.         Opening

1.1       MEETING OPENING AND PRAYER

The Chief Executive Officer will open the meeting with the reading of the prayers:

 

Almighty God, we humbly beseech thee, to vouchsafe thy blessing upon this council.  Direct and prosper its deliberations to the advancement of thy glory and the true welfare of the people of the Whittlesea City Council.

 

Our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive them that trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever.

 

Amen

 

1.2       ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT

The Mayor will read the following Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners Statement.

 

On behalf of the Whittlesea City Council I recognise the rich Aboriginal heritage of this country and acknowledge the Wurundjeri Willum Clan as the traditional owners of this place.

 

1.3       Present

2.         Apologies

3.         Declarations of Interest

4.         Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting

Ordinary Meeting of Council held 7 August 2018

5.         Questions, Petitions and Joint Letters

5.1       Questions To Councillors

5.2       Petitions

Nil Reports

5.3       Joint Letters

Nil Reports   


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.         Officers' Reports

6.1       Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

6.1.1    Planning Scheme Amendment C203- 280 Bridge Inn Road- Exhbition Outcomes

Attachments:                        1        Subject Site

2        The Proposal   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Senior Strategic Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

It is recommended that Council;

1.       Adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C203 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme;

2.       Request the Minister for Planning approve Amendment C203 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

3.       Advise the landowners of Council’s resolution regarding 1. and 2. Above.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    Amendment C203 applies to the land at 280 Bridge Inn Road, Mernda and seeks to facilitate the use and development of their site for the purposes of a vineyard, winery, function centre, and residential development.

·    The proposed Planning Scheme Amendment will facilitate the transfer of 64.1 hectares of land to Council for the purposes of the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland.    

·    Following substantial review from the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, the Amendment was exhibited from 19 June 2018-16 August 2018.

·    No submissions were received in relation to the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment.

·    It is recommended that Council Adopt the Planning Scheme Amendment C203 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme and request the Minister for Planning to approve the amendment.

 

Report

Background

Council resolved at its meeting on 27 June, 2017 to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit Amendment C203 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

Amendment C203 applies to the land at 280 Bridge Inn Road, Mernda (Attachment 1-Subject Site) and seeks the use and development of their site for the purposes of a vineyard, winery, function centre and residential estate.

The amendment was publicly exhibited between 19 June - 16 August 2018 following a substantial review of the proposal by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning. 

The purpose of this report is to consider the outcomes of the public exhibition process and provide for the next steps.

PROPOSAL

The landowner of 280 Bridge Inn Road, Mernda has lodged a request for a Planning Scheme Amendment in order to facilitate the use and development of their site for the purposes of a vineyard, winery, function centre and residential estate. Specifically, the proposed Amendment C203 seeks to:

·        Rezone part of 280 Bridge Inn Road, Mernda from a Farming Zone (FZ) to a General Residential Zone (GRZ1);

·        Delete the Environmental Significance Overlays (ESO1 and ESO5) from part of the site;

·        Apply a Development Plan Overlay (DPO) consistent with DPO Schedule 27 to the land rezoned GRZ1;

·        Apply a Vegetation Protection Overlay (VPO1) to the land rezoned GRZ1;

·        Introduce a site specific control at Clause 52.03- Specific Sites and Exclusions, and an Incorporated Document at Clause 81.01- Incorporated Documents to allow the subdivision of the land into three lots and the use and development of the lot with an area of approximately 30.0 hectares for a vineyard, winery and function centre with an associated liquor license.

·        No changes to the location of the Urban Growth Boundary are proposed.

·        The proposal will result in the transfer of land to Council for the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland.  

Attachment 2- The Proposal shows the proposed location of the use and development on the northern boundary of the subject with frontage to Bridge Inn Road.

The total area of the site is approximately 110 hectares.  The proposal provides as follows:

·    15 hectares of the site within the Urban Growth Boundary to be rezoned to enable residential development;

·    64.1 hectares transferred to Council for the purposes of the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland outside of the Urban Growth Boundary; and

·    30 hectares for the winery development outside of the Urban Growth Boundary. 

 The vineyard component of the application includes:

·    Vineyard

·    Wine production

·    A cellar

·    Café/restaurant

·    Visitor Parking

A total of approximately 94.1 hectares (park and vineyard) are affected by a Green Wedge Zone and are located outside of the Urban Growth Boundary. From a technical perspective the Planning Scheme Amendment seeks to introduce a site specific control to this land, in order to allow for the subdivision to create various parcels (which are less than the minimum lot size of 40 hectares allowable under the zone), and for the development and use of the site as envisaged. In order for this to occur the Planning Scheme Amendment will need to be ratified by Parliament. 

NOTIFICATION AND SUBMISSIONS

Amendment C203 was placed on public exhibition between19 June - 16 August 2018 to affected landowners, prescribed Ministers and relevant government authorities. A notice appeared in the Whittlesea Leader on 20 February, 2018 and Government Gazette on 22 February, 2018. Letters were sent to affected and surrounding owners and occupiers.

A total of three written submissions were received, however, no submitters objected to the proposal. Details of the submissions are provided in the table below.

 

Referral Authority

Submission/Issues

Officer’s Response

Melbourne Water

· No objection to the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment.

· Originally sought amendments to the Development Plan Overlay- Schedule 27 to include a range of detailed requirements associated with the requirement to prepare a Drainage and Stormwater Strategy for land inside the Urban Growth Boundary.

 

 

· Noted.

· It was explained that the Development Plan Overlay- Schedule 27 applies to many sites in the Mernda Western Strip, it is not appropriate to amend the Development Plan Overlay for the purposes of dealing with drainage for one site.

· The Development Plan Overlay- Schedule 27 requires the preparation of a Stormwater Management Plan and Drainage Strategy as part of any Development Plan submission. The preparation of the Development Plan will allow for any of the issues raised to be addressed appropriately.

· In the interim, it was agreed that the proponent is notified of Melbourne Water’s submission.

Action:

·                No changes are required to the proposed Amendment.

·                Provide the landowner with a copy of Melbourne Water’s submission for their information.

 

Environmental Protection Authority Victoria

·                No objection to the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment.

·                Noted that the Winery use requires the landowner to complete a Pathways Application Form under the Environment Protection (Scheduled Premises and Exemptions) Regulations 2017 (The Regulations).

·                Supported the inclusion of a requirement for the submission of an environmental assessment report as part of the preparation of a Development Plan as it will ensure that the land is not contaminated.

·                Requested that two further conditions be added to the Incorporated Document relating to:

 

1-  The management of potential surface water contamination; and

2-  The appropriate distances between the Vineyard and Winery and any future residential development on the eastern portion of the site.

· Noted.

· The submission has been provided to the applicant, with additional advice directing them to complete a Pathways Application Form for the Winery component of the proposal prior to the commencement of the use and development of the site.

· Support the inclusion of 2 conditions in the Incorporated Document which address:

o    Dealing with any potential contamination of surface water.

o    The required separation distances between the Vineyard and Winery and the residential development to the east in order to manage any potential impacts from pesticide spraying and day to day horticultural operations.

Action:

·                Update the Incorporated Document to include two additional Planning Permit Conditions as outlined above in consultation with the EPA.

VicRoads

· No objection to the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment.

· Requested that any future residential development that requires access from Bridge Inn Road considers the ultimate alignment of Bridge Inn Road.

·                Noted.

·                The preparation of a Development Plan for the residential development will ensure that matters associated with road access to Bridge Inn Road are appropriately considered and consulted with VicRoads. 

Action:

· No further changes are required to the Amendment.

DISCUSSION

The proposed Planning Scheme Amendment presents a positive net community benefit that has been developed through a highly collaborative approach with the landowner and their planning consultant.

A total of three written submissions were received in relation to the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment. None of the submissions sought to object to the proposal. The Environmental Protection Authority of Victoria sought to include two additional Planning Permit Conditions to the exhibited Incorporated Document.

The requested changes seek to address:

1.    The management of potential surface water contamination; and

2.    The appropriate buffer distances between the Vineyard and Winery and any future residential development on the eastern portion of the site.

It is considered that the additional conditions are appropriate, regulatory in nature and should be included into the Incorporated Document, prior to submitting the document to the Minister for Planning for approval.

The proposal will transfer a total of 64.1 hectares to Council for the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland that will be accessible to residents who are situated in the Mernda West area and beyond. This total represents a large portion of land that will bring the total of Quarry Hills Regional Parkland now in Council ownership or under legal agreement for transfer to Council, to more than 65% of the total 1100 hectares that has been identified.

The introduction of a vineyard, winery and function centre to the subject property represents a unique economic and tourism opportunity for the municipality and is considered to provide a strong synergy with the uses that will be located within the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland.

DEVELOPMENT CONTRIBUTIONS

Whilst there is no Development Contributions Plan Overlay affecting the site, the standard Section 173 Agreement entered into for the purposes of transferring land within the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland, facilitates the rezoning of the land, and provides for a local development contribution. In addition, the agreement also requires a Growth Area Infrastructure Contribution equivalent payment.

referral

Prior to exhibition, the amendment documentation for C203 was referred to Council’s Development Assessment team as the Incorporated Document will form the Planning Permit for the use and development of the subject site.

Following a further internal review prior to the exhibition of the document, additional minor wording changes were made to the Incorporated Document in order to clarify aspects of the document and specify additional detailed conditions pertaining to the submission of plans to Council for endorsement.

The changes will ensure that Council receives all of the information that it will require in order to endorse the permit plans, and ensure that the landowner is clear on the extent of information that they will be required to submit following the approval of the Planning Scheme Amendment.

All changes were undertaken in conjunction with the landowners and their consultants and were considered to be reasonable and in keeping with usual permit conditions that would be applied to any use and development application.

Policy strategy and legislation

The proposed Planning Scheme Amendment will provide for the orderly future planning for the use and development of the subject site.

It is considered that the proposal addresses the policy objectives of Clause 12- Environmental and Landscape Objectives, and Clause 17- Economic Development of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. The proposal will ultimately allow for the creation of a use and development which is appropriate and in keeping with the vision and intention of the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland, while also facilitating an increase in tourism to the area and the expansion of the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland and the protection of this important landscape feature.

Having regard to the residential development that will be facilitated through the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment, it is considered that the proposal meets the objectives of Clause 11- Settlement, Clause 21.04- Settlement and Clause 21.09- Housing as it will allow for an increase in a well located and diverse housing stock.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Planning our space

Strategic Objective              Urban design helps build our connection to place, the natural environment and the community

 

The proposal will provide for an extension to abutting/adjacent residential development which is located within close proximity of the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland. Residents of the future residential portion of the site will be afforded with direct access to this open space asset, along with convenient access to local facilities and retail offerings. As such, it is considered that the proposal will meet the direction of creating places and spaces for people to connect, and that the plan has also utilised the principles of good urban design in order to create a place which helps the existing and future community to connect with each other and their surrounds.

Further, the proposal will also provide for the creation of a use and development which will provide a point of interest and a meeting place for the local and surrounding community, allowing for greater social interactions.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Amendment C203 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme has been prepared and exhibited in accordance with Councils resolution from 27 June, 2017.

The Amendment seeks to facilitate the use and development of their site for the purposes of a vineyard, winery, function centre and residential estate, and will facilitate the transfer of 64.1 hectares into public ownership for the purposes of the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland.

Amendment C203 was publicly exhibited from 19 June - 16 August 2018. Three submissions were received in relation to the proposal. None of the submissions objected to the proposal. The Environmental Protection Authority of Victoria sought minor additions to the Incorporated Document which will insert two further conditions relating to managing potential surface water contamination and buffer distances. These are considered reasonable and will ensure that the use and development of the land is in line with current best practice. 

The proposal is one that will introduce a range of social, environmental and economic benefits to the municipality.

Noting the above it is therefore recommended that Council resolve to adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C208 and forward to the Minister for Planning requesting approval.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Incorporate conditions proposed by the Environmental Protection Authority of Victoria relating to surface water contamination and buffer distances into the Incorporated Plan forming part of this amendment;

2.       Adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C203 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme with the changes outlined in 1. above;

3.       Request the Minister for Planning approve Amendment C203 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme; and

4.       Advise the landowners of Council’s decision.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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6.1.2    Planning Scheme Amendment C227- 65W and 70W Regent Street, Mernda- Request for Authorisation

Attachments:                        1        Subject Sites

2        Zoning Plan   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Senior Strategic Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

The report recommends that Council resolve to:

1.       Seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit an amendment to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme that seeks to rezone Council properties located at 65W and 70W Regent Street as follows:

a)      apply the General Residential Zone to the site at 70W Regent Street;

b)      apply the General Residential Zone to part of the property at 65W Regent Street located within the UGB;

c)      apply a Development Plan Overlay  (Schedule 37) to 65W Regent Street, Mernda and Vegetation Protection Overlay to the land where the General Residential Zone is to apply;

d)      remove the Significant Landscape Overlay from land where the General Residential Zone is to apply;  

2.       Advise the affected stakeholders of the above.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

The purpose of this report is to seek Council approval to request authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit a Planning Scheme Amendment to rezone two Council owned properties at 65W and 70W Regent Street, Mernda.

·    65W Regent Street, Mernda is currently zoned Rural Conservation Zone, while 70W is currently zoned Public Parks and Recreation Zone.

·    The subject properties are currently being used by the Findon Pony Club. The rezoning will not require the club to leave the site in the short term.

·    The subject properties are located inside the Urban Growth Boundary and abut existing and currently developing properties. A small portion of 65W is located within the footprint of the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland.

·    The sites are considered to be surplus to Council’s needs and the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment  will provide Council with flexibility in considering its future planning for the sites.

 

Report

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this report is to discuss proposed Planning Scheme Amendment C227 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. The amendment proposes to rezone land at 65W and 70W Regent Street, Mernda and is expected to facilitate the development of land in the UGB and considered surplus to open space needs.

BACKGROUND

Site Context

The subject sites are a total of approximately 5.4 hectares, and are located on opposite sides of Regent Street (Attachment 1- Subject Sites). The sites are located within the Mernda West Precinct which comprises existing and emerging residential areas developed as part of the Mernda Strategy Plan.

The sites are adjacent to each other and are split by Regent Street. 70W is located on the northern side of Regent Street, while 65W is located on the southern side of Regent Street. It is noted that sites were set aside as a reserve or town square as part of the historical Separation Township.

65W Regent Street, Mernda

The property at 65W Regent Street is located on the southern side of Regent Street. It comprises approximately 2.6 hectares of land inside the Urban Growth Boundary, and approximately 190 square metres that are located outside of the Urban Growth Boundary and within the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland footprint.

The site was brought into the Urban Growth Boundary in 2009 as part of the work undertaken for the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland. The site directly abuts existing residential development to the east and the west, and a future development area at 55 Regent Street to the south east of the site.

The site is currently within a Rural Conservation Zone (Attachment 2- Zoning Plan) and is affected by the Significant Landscape Overlay- Schedule 2.

70W Regent Street, Mernda

70W Regent Street, Mernda is located on the northern side of Regent Street and is bound by Ragusa Terrace to the north, and existing and proposed residential development to the east and west.

The site is currently partially affected by the General Residential Zone (described as a buffer of approximately 17 metres around the northern, eastern and western boundary of the site), and the Public Parks and Recreation Zone (Attachment 2- Zoning Plan). The site is affected by the following overlays:

·    Development Contributions Plan Overlay- Schedule 8.

·    Development Plan Overlay-Schedule 8.

·    Incorporated Plan Overlay- Schedule 1.

·    Vegetation Protection Overlay- Schedule 1.   

The site is currently occupied by several outbuildings, stables, and horse jumping equipment that is associated with the Findon Pony Club who lease both 65W and 70W Regent Street, from Council.

Both sites contain some established native vegetation. The type and quality of the vegetation is not currently known. 

PROPOSAL

The Planning Scheme Amendment proposes to rezone the subject sites to a General Residential Zone, and apply the Development Plan Overlay Schedule 37 to part of the site at 65W Regent Street.

The proposed amendment will also remove the Significant Landscape Overlay from 65W Regent Street, as the Vegetation Protection Overlay is considered to be the more relevant control to apply to land which is likely to be the subject of development proposals.

The Vegetation Protection Overlay in particular is able to ensure that adequate regard is given to the preservation of remnant vegetation in a development context.

No changes are proposed to the overlays applying to the site at 70W Regent Street.

In essence the amendment will result in the application of statutory controls that are consistent with the controls applying to the development areas which adjoin the subject sites. The proposed rezoning is the first step in facilitating the future development of the parcels. Detailed planning of the site will then be required to be undertaken prior to any application to subdivide the land. The existing Development Plan Overlay (Schedule 8) that applies to 70 W Regent Street, and the application of the Development Plan Overlay (Schedule 37) to 65W Regent Street will provide the framework under which the more detailed planning will be undertaken at a future point in time.  

DISCUSSION

The proposed Planning Scheme Amendment seeks to rezone land that is located inside the Urban Growth Boundary for the purposes of residential development. The amendment will provide Council with greater flexibility in considering the future use and development of the subject sites.

The subject sites were part of the historical subdivision known as the Separation Township which identified the properties. The sites have remained undeveloped (with exception of basic facilities associated with the Findon Pony Club) with only minor maintenance undertaken as part of Council’s usual maintenance regimes.

The sites have been identified by Council officers as being surplus to Council’s Open Space requirements, with the potential for the site to be considered for other uses.

The following matters have also been considered in identifying the strategic opportunity for the sites to be rezoned.

Reserve status of the land

Both of the subject sites are still identified as Council Reserves.

Should the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment be supported, prior to the development of the land, the reserve status would need to be removed and standard lots created. This process can be undertaken either prior to the development of the sites, or in conjunction with the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment.

The removal of the reserve status on the sites will require notification to be provided to the community. This will need to be undertaken by Council. 

Findon Pony Club

The Findon Pony Club is currently operating at the sites with a Clubhouse and associated amenities located at 70W Regent Street, Mernda. The club has been leasing the sites from Council for many years.

During this time, the context of the Regent Street area has transformed from a rural environment with current and proposed residential development surrounding the sites. This context will make it increasingly difficult for the pony club to conduct its activities on the site.

These factors are acknowledged as ones that make the running of the club’s events, and the future viability of the club in this location, somewhat tenuous.

The importance of the club to the local community is acknowledged and it is therefore  considered important to assist the club in finding a permanent site that will remain buffered  from encroaching urban development and provide the opportunity to protect the long term viability of the club.

Officers have commenced this process, with several strategic Council owned sites around the municipality being investigated for the use of a pony club, and potentially by other clubs operating within the municipality.

It is important to note that Council officers have engaged with the Findon Pony Club in order to advise the club that a Planning Scheme Amendment is currently being considered for the site in order for Council to form a position on the future use of the site.

The club has also been advised that the Planning Scheme Amendment, should it be supported, will not require the club to relocate from the site in the short term.

NOTIFICATION

Should authorisation to prepare the amendment be granted by the Minister for Planning, the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment C227 will be required to undergo a standard exhibition process, including a 28 day notification period to potentially affected landowners, prescribed Ministers and State Referral Authorities.

DEVELOPMENT CONTRIBUTIONS

Whilst there is a Development Contributions Plan Overlay affecting 70W Regent Street, no Development Contributions Plan applies to 65W Regent Street. As with all other sites associated with the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland, any future purchaser of the site  at 65w Regent Street will be required to enter into a Section 173 Agreement for the purposes of paying a local development contribution. In addition, the agreement also requires a Growth Area Infrastructure Contribution equivalent payment.

referral

The proposal has been discussed at length with all relevant internal and external stakeholders including Council’s Property Rates and Valuations and Leisure and Community Facilities teams, and the Findon Pony Club. All stakeholders understand and are supportive of the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Planning our space

Strategic Objective              We have neighbourhoods defined by attractive, well connected streets and public spaces

The proposed amendment will contribute toward the strategic objective of the Council Plan to use Urban Design in order to build connection to place and the community as will facilitate the future development of land that is well located and supported by facilities and uses that will create vibrant and connected communities. It will also contribute towards the strategic objective to establish the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland through the securing of a small amount of land outside of the Urban Growth Boundary for the purposes of the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The proposed amendment will facilitate the development of land located inside the Urban Growth Boundary that is considered to be surplus to Council’s open space needs, and is in line with the existing and future plans for the Mernda West Precinct and the Quarry Hills Regional Parkland.

The planning controls which are proposed to apply to the subject sites as part of the proposed amendment are the most appropriate controls to guide the future planning of the land within the subject area. The Planning Scheme Amendment is the first step in the planning process that will need to be undertaken for the subject properties.

The proposed Planning Scheme Amendment has considered the existing uses on the site, to ensure that the Findon Pony Club can continue to operate at the site until such time as Council decides what it will do with the properties. 

Noting the above, it is considered that the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment is one that is appropriate and will provide Council with greater flexibility in considering the future of the sites.

It is recommended that Council seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit an amendment to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme in order to facilitate the rezoning of its land located at 65W and 70W Regent Street, Mernda. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit an amendment to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme to:

a)      apply the General Residential Zone to the site at 70W Regent Street;

b)      apply the General Residential Zone to part of the property at 65W Regent Street;

c)      apply a Development Plan Overlay  (Schedule 37) to 65W Regent Street, Mernda and Vegetation Protection Overlay to the land where the General Residential Zone is to apply;

d)      remove the Significant Landscape Overlay from land where the General Residential Zone is to apply;  

2.       Advise affected stakeholders of the above and any decision of the Minister for Planning.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                         Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.1.3    Planning Scheme Amendment C204- Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan- Panel Report and Adoption

Attachments:                        1        Final Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan (distributed separately - refer to p.7)

2        Final Plenty Valley Town Centre Parking Precinct Plan   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Senior Strategic Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Adopt Amendment C204 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, the Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan and Plenty Valley Town Centre Parking Precinct Plan in line with the Officer recommendations in Tables 2, 3 and the discussion section of this report.

2.       Submit Amendment C204, together with Council’s response to the Panel’s recommendations and the Panel Report, to the Minister for Planning for approval.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    The purpose of this report is to consider the Panel Report arising from the Hearing held on the 25 and 27 June, 2018 in relation to Amendment C204 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. Amendment C204 proposes changes to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme to implement the Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan.

·    The Panel Report summarises:

“Council’s extensive consultation process leading to the Amendment, and its ability to listen and respond to issues, resulted in a well-prepared Structure Plan and relatively small number of unresolved issues at the time of the Hearing….the Amendment is well founded and strategically justified, and the Amendment should proceed.”

·    The Panel Report subsequently makes five recommendations. Four of the recommendations accord with Council’s formal position on the amendment adopted at the 1 May, 2018, Council meeting and subsequent submissions to the Panel.

·    The Panel concluded that, Council’s proposed requirement in the planning scheme for Public Transport Victoria to provide a minimum 800 commuter parking spaces near the South Morang Train Station, is not strategically supported.

·    This report recommends that Council adopts the Panel recommendation but that the strategy to provide a minimum 800 commuter parking spaces be included in the final Structure Plan and Parking Precinct Plan.

·    This report recommends Council’s adoption of Amendment C204 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, the Structure Plan and the Parking Precinct Plan as per the officer recommendations to each of the Panel’s recommendations. Council’s position on the amendment, the Panel’s recommendations, and the Panel Report will then be submitted  to the Minister for Planning for approval.

 

Report

BACKGROUND

The Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan (the Structure Plan) is an important strategic planning project which was identified in the Council Plan Year 1 Action Plan 2017/18.

The Structure Plan applies to the Plenty Valley Town Centre and provides a framework for the development of the Town Centre over the next 20 plus years. The plan aims to make the Town Centre a more vibrant, attractive and accessible place and identifies a number of transformative projects to deliver upon the vision.

The plan is the product of extensive background reporting and consultation with the community over a number of stages.

A key aim of the Structure Plan and Amendment C204 is to consolidate the existing range of planning controls and documents applying to parts of the Town Centre into an overarching statutory framework to provide for a consistent vision and co-ordinated approach to development in the Town Centre.

Amendment C204 was publicly exhibited from 30 June, 2017 to 7 August, 2017. The content of the submissions received and officer responses were outlined in the report presented to the 21 November, 2017, and 1 May, 2018, Council meetings.

Council resolved at its meeting on 6 February, 2018 to request appointment of an independent planning panel to hear the unresolved submissions. The Minister for Planning appointed the Panel which was held on the 25 and 27 June, 2018.

The purpose of this report is to consider the Panel Report arising from the Panel Hearing held in relation to Amendment C204 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

PROPOSAL

Amendment C204 proposes changes to the Planning Scheme to enable the Structure Plan to be implemented into statutory planning controls in order to guide the future development of the area. The final Structure Plan is included at Attachment 1 to this report.

The Amendment proposes to rezone land in the Town Centre to Activity Centre Zone and introduces a new schedule (Schedule 2 to the ACZ) which outlines the land use and development controls for the Town Centre. The proposed schedule recognises the different precincts outlined in the Structure Plan and provides for specific land uses and development guidance for each precinct.

The Amendment also introduces a Development Contributions Plan Overlay to facilitate contributions towards infrastructure required to support the Town Centre and a Parking Overlay to implement the Plenty Valley Town Centre Parking Precinct Plan (the Parking Precinct Plan) and effectively manage parking in the Town Centre. The Parking Precinct Plan is included at Attachment 2 to this report.

The exhibited Amendment also seeks to remove existing planning controls such as the Development Plan Overlays, Schedule 7 to the Design and Development Overlay and Clause 22.15 (South Morang Major Activity Centre Policy) where they are redundant or conflict with the new provisions.

Overall, the Amendment will provide for a consistent and co-ordinated vision for development, greater certainty and clarity for investment, and facilitate additional housing and employment opportunities in the Plenty Valley Town Centre.

NOTIFICATION AND CONSULTATION

Amendment C204 was placed on public exhibition between 30 June, and 7 August, 2017, to affected landowners, prescribed Ministers and relevant government authorities. Ten submissions to the Amendment were received.

Council resolved at its meeting on 21 November, 2017, to undertake further community consultation. This consultation was undertaken between 25 January and 23 February, 2018.

The outcomes of the consultation and submissions were outlined in the report presented to the 1 May, 2018, Council meeting where Council resolved a position in respect to the Amendment and submissions received.

Whilst the majority of issues raised in the submissions were resolved in negotiation with the submitters, a number of issues remained unresolved and a number of submissions were not fully withdrawn. These submissions were required to be referred to the independent Planning Panel for consideration. Four submitters made submissions to the Planning Panel.

panel hearing 

In line with Council’s request, the Minister for Planning appointed a Panel to consider unresolved submissions to Amendment C204.

A Directions Hearing to deal with scheduling and administrative matters was held on 6 June 2018. The Panel Hearing was held on the 25 and 27 June, 2018. Site inspections were also conducted by the Panel on 6 June 2018 (unaccompanied) and 28 June 2018 (accompanied).

The Panel provided its formal recommendation on the amendment and submissions within a Panel Report received on 27 July 2018. All submitters were notified of the Panel Report which was publicly released on 24 August, 2018.

PAnel Report summary

In summary the Panel Report concluded:

Council’s extensive consultation process leading to the Amendment, and its ability to listen and respond to issues, resulted in a well-prepared Structure Plan and relatively small number of unresolved issues at the time of the Hearing.

The Panel has considered written submissions made in response to the exhibition of the Amendment, observations from site visits, and submissions, evidence and other material presented to it during the Hearing.

The Amendment has faithfully translated the Structure Plan’s strategies, objectives and supporting guidance into the proposed provisions. The Amendment is supported by, and implements, the relevant sections of the State and Local Planning Policy Framework and is consistent with the relevant Ministerial Directions and Practice Notes.

The Amendment is well founded and strategically justified, and the Amendment should proceed subject to addressing the more specific issues raised in submissions.

The key issues discussed at the Hearing and the summary response of the Panel is detailed below in Table 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: Amendment C204 Panel Hearing: Summary of Key Issues

Key Issue

Council Submission

Panel Summary

Officer Response

Precinct 5 (Employment Precinct) land uses

 

Precinct 5 should be an employment precinct without accommodation.

Precinct 5 should be an employment precinct without accommodation. There is insufficient strategic planning to understand the effect on existing and future commercial and industrial land uses. Without proper strategic planning, there is likely to be conflict and interface issues between residential and industrial land uses.

Supported.

The Panel response is consistent with Council’s submission to the Panel.

Development Contributions Plan Schedule 18

The Development Contributions Plan Schedule 18 provisions are appropriate and should apply. The Structure Plan would benefit from a note in section 4.3 (Infrastructure) which clarifies that status of infrastructure.

The exhibited Development Contributions Plan Schedule 18 provisions are appropriate and should apply. The Structure Plan would benefit from a note in section 4.3 (Infrastructure) which clarifies that status of infrastructure.

Supported.

The Panel response is consistent with Council’s submission to the Panel.

Commuter Car Parking

The exhibited policy direction in the parking Overlay should be replaced with the following strategy in Clause 21.13: “Support the provision of adequate car parking (minimum 800 parking spaces) and infrastructure encouraging sustainable transport, for commuters at the South Morang Train Station”.

 

A number of documents were provided to the Panel which highlighted the existing parking issue at the South Morang Train Station.

The Panel supported that the policy direction in the Parking Overlay be replaced with a strategy at Clause 21.13. In respect to the reference to ‘minimum 800 parking spaces’, the Panel concluded:

 

There is no strategic support to specify 800 car parking spaces in Parking Overlay Schedule 2 or Clause 21.13.

 

The Panel recommended that Clause 21.13 to include the following strategy:

 

Support the provision of adequate car parking and infrastructure encouraging sustainable transport, for commuters at the South Morang Train Station.

Refer to commentary in Discussion section of report below.

 

Form and content of the Amendment

A number of changes are required to Activity Centre Zone Schedule 2 which seeks to improve the schedule’s operation. 

The Panel supports Council’s post-exhibition changes to Activity Centre Zone Schedule 2 which seek to improve the schedule’s operation.

 

Supported.

The Panel response is consistent with Council’s submission to the Panel.

PAnel Report Recommendations

The Panel made five recommendations which are outlined in the Panel Report. In summary, the Panel supported “most of the proposed changes which were considered resolved before the Hearing commenced” and four of the recommendations accord with Council’s formal position on the amendment adopted at the 1 May, 2018 Council meeting submissions to the Panel.

Table 2 outlines each of the Panel Report recommendation, Councils position and the Panel Hearing and officer’s recommended final position.

Table 2: Amendment C204 Panel Recommendations and Officer Response

Issue

Panel Report Recommendation

Officer Response and Recommendation

1.  Commuter Car Parking (strategy)

1.    Amend Clause 21.13 to add the following Plenty Valley Town Centre strategy:

Support the provision of adequate car parking and infrastructure encouraging sustainable transport, for commuters at the South Morang Train Station.

Refer to discussion in Discussion section of report below.

 

2.  Schedule 2 to Activity Centre Zone matters

2. Amend Activity Centre Zone Schedule 2 to, as shown in Appendix C, to:

a) delete Clause 9.0 (Advertising signs) so that Town Centre land is retained in signage Category 1

b) delete Clause 10.0 (Other provisions of the scheme)

c) update maps to incorporate additional elements from the Structure Plan

d) change the last paragraph of Clause 4.4 under the heading “Building Height” to: “Where a building is less than the preferred minimum building height the structure of the building should be designed so as to be able to accommodate additional building structure and height

e) change the Precinct Map at Clause 5.3-1 to show other internal pathways and to reference a ‘Public realm focal point’

f) change the Precinct Map at Clause 5.4-1 to relocate the Gateway location on the subject land closer to McDonalds Road

g) change dot point 5 in Clause 5.4-4 to read generally in accordance with: “A landscaping strip is to be provided for development in front-setback areas along McDonalds Road to create an attractive streetscape

h) make other drafting changes that improve its operation, and align with the Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan and existing development plans.

i) change land use terminology and conditions to reflect what was intended and to improve its operation.

The Panel Report recommendations accords with Council’s position to the Planning Panel.

 

Officer Recommendation:

Adopt the Panel Recommendation

3.  Commuter Car Parking (Parking Overlay)

3.   Abandon the proposed Parking Overlay requirement in Clause 2.0 for Public Transport Victoria to provide a minimum 800 commuter parking spaces near South Morang Train Station.

Council’s position is that the strategy should be moved from the Parking Overlay to Clause 21.13 which accords with the Panel Report recommendation.

 

Officer Recommendation:

Adopt the Panel Recommendation

4.  Incorporated Document

4.   Abandon changes to the Clause 81.01 Schedule so that the Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan is no longer incorporated into the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

The Panel Report recommendations accords with Council’s submission to the Planning Panel.

Officer Recommendation:

Adopt the Panel Recommendation

5.  Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan matters

5.    Revise the Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan to:

a) add an additional section to provide clarity on how to interpret the document for decision making (Figure 7) Landscape Plan - redraw the map that shows "RRG Retained in Open Space and Integrated with Development" to reflect the 360 McDonalds Road Development Plan 2017 endorsed by the Council on 28 June 2017

b) change Figure 21 (Road Network and Intersection Plan) to redraw the map to reflect the 360 McDonalds Road Development Plan 2017 endorsed by the Council on 28 June 2017

c) change Figure 23 (Residential Development Density) to redraw the map to reflect 360 McDonalds Road Development Plan 2017 endorsed by the Council on 28 June 2017 in terms of both layout and density

d) change Figure 28 (Central Shopping Illustrative Precinct Plan) to:

• provide for loading and service areas along the McDonalds Road frontage to the Centre

• correct anomalies in the application of frontage destinations

• redesignate the parking area in the south-west corner of the site from ‘parking above/underground’ to ‘parking and servicing’.

e) change Figure 29 (Live and Work Illustrative Precinct Plan) to:

• remove the tree shown on Reserve 8 adjacent to the railway reserve

• show only four trees to be retained in Reserve 1 • relocate the key gateways to Plenty Valley to incorporate the three marker sites at the south-east corner of the proposed Lots A, B and D

f) delete the alternative Tram 86 Extension along Civic Drive so that the preferred route is along Bush Boulevard, McDonalds Road and Ferres Boulevard

g) change the proposed connections of Peyton Drive and Stillman Drive with the Civic Drive extension to be restricted to a pedestrian and cycle connection only.

h) add in section 4.3 (Infrastructure):

The list and location of projects are indicative and subject to a further process of assessment as to need, scope, timing, responsibility and cost apportionment (if applicable) when future town planning approvals are sought.

The Panel Report recommendations accords with Council’s submission to the Planning Panel.

 

Officer

Recommendation:

Adopt the Panel Recommendation

At the Panel Hearing there were also a number of other matters which were discussed and subject to Council submission, but were not subject to discussion or recommendations in the Panel Report. These are outlined in Table 3 below. It is proposed that the officer recommendations will be incorporated into the final Amendment C204 documentation which will be submitted to the Minister of Planning for approval.

Table 3: Other matters discussed at Panel Hearing and Officer Response

Issue

Discussion at Panel Hearing

Officer Response and Recommendation

Residential properties in employment precinct at 841 Plenty Road, South Morang.

At the Hearing an anomaly was identified in the planning controls in respect to land at 841 Plenty Road, South Morang.

At this site there are ten existing dwellings located within the Employment Precinct. The amendment as exhibited would rezone the land to Activity Centre Zone which would prohibit ‘accommodation’ uses on the land and therefore make the use of these dwellings a ‘non- conforming’ land use. This is not considered to be a satisfactory outcome for the owners and residents of the existing properties.

The Panel was advised that the inclusion of a site specific document which permits for the continuing use of these properties for the purpose of a dwelling would be an appropriate response. Since the Hearing, Amendment VC148 has come into effect which as made changes in respect to the use of site specific documents and therefore, the most appropriate tool to address this issue will need to be implemented subject to further discussed with the Department of Environment, Land Water and Planning (DEWLP).

 

Officer Recommendation:

Incorporate a document into the Planning Scheme at 51.01: Specific Sites and Exclusions or make other changes to Amendment C204 documents to as appropriate which permits the use of land at 841 Plenty Road, South Morang for the purpose of dwelling.

Scentre Group submission to Panel

At the Hearing, the Scentre Group presented a number of minor changes to the General built form guidelines and Precinct 3 objectives and guidelines in Schedule 2 to the ACZ (Document 46). The changes related to wording of guidelines in respect to pedestrian links and activation of streets in Precinct 3.

These changes were discussed and supported by Council at the Hearing however were not reflected in the Panel report or included in Appendix C to the Panel Report.

 

Officer Recommendation:

Make further minor changes to guidelines in respect to pedestrian links and activation of streets in Precinct 3 in Schedule 2 to the ACZ.

DISCUSSION

From a statutory perspective, Council is required to consider the Panel report, provide a formal position on each of the Panel’s recommendations, and the Amendment as a whole.

The Panel report and Council’s position will be forwarded to the Minister for Planning as part of the request for approval of the Amendment. Whilst the Minister for Planning will seriously consider the recommendations of the Panel and Council in his decision-making, it is important to note that the Minister for Planning is not bound by these recommendations, and as such, can determine the amendment as he deems appropriate.

As highlighted in Table 2 above, four of the five recommendations in the Panel Report accord with Council’s formal position on the Amendment. Recommendation 1 which relates to commuter car parking differs from Council’s submission.

Commuter Car Parking- strategy (Recommendation 1)

In respect to this matter, Council submitted that the exhibited policy direction in the

Parking Overlay should be replaced with the following strategy in the planning scheme at Clause 21.13:

Support the provision of adequate car parking (minimum 800 parking spaces) and infrastructure encouraging sustainable transport, for commuters at the South Morang Train Station.

The Panel upon considering submissions from Transport for Victoria and Council, supported Council’s submission for the policy direction in the Parking Overlay to be replaced with a strategy at Clause 21.13. However, in respect to the reference to ‘minimum 800 parking spaces’, the Panel concluded that:

·    Commuter car parking demand at South Morang Train Station may decline when an additional 1,495 car park spaces are available at three other stations along the Mernda rail extension in September 2018.

·    State planning policy, including Plan Melbourne, encourages sustainable transport such as the strategy proposed for Clause 21.13.

·    There is no strategic support to specify 800 car parking spaces in Parking Overlay Schedule 2 or Clause 21.13.

The Panel recommended that the strategy included at Clause 21.13 read as follows:

Support the provision of adequate car parking and infrastructure encouraging sustainable transport, for commuters at the South Morang Train Station.

The planning scheme is a statutory instrument and policy must be strategically justified and consistent with State Planning Policy. As it was deemed by the Panel that the requirement is inconsistent with State Planning Policy, it is recommended that the Panel recommendation in relation to the removal of the reference to 800 car parking spaces in the planning scheme be adopted.

However, to ensure that the strategy to provide a minimum 800 car parking spaces at the South Morang Train Station be appropriately reflected in local strategy, it is recommended that it be retained in the adopted Structure Plan and Parking Precinct Plan.

The Structure Plan and Parking Precinct Plan will be adopted Council strategies which outline Council’s vision and objectives in the Town Centre and Council’s actions and advocacy to achieve this vision. Therefore, it is considered appropriate to include a strategy to support Public Transport Victoria to provide a minimum 800 car parking spaces at the South Morang Train Station in these Council documents. These documents will be reference documents to the Activity Centre Zone and the Parking Overlay in the planning scheme

Officer Recommendation

1.       Adopt the Panel Report recommendation 1 to amend Clause 21.23 to add the following Plenty Valley Town Centre strategy:

          Support the provision of adequate car parking and infrastructure encouraging sustainable transport, for commuters at the South Morang Train Station.

2.       Include the following strategy in the final Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan and Plenty Valley Town Centre Parking Precinct Plan:

Support the provision of additional commuter parking by Public Transport Victoria (minimum 800 parking spaces) in proximity to the South Morang Train Station.

CRITICAL DATES

Date

Key Milestone

2013

Commencement of Project

May - June, 2014

Stage 1 Consultation

August, 2015

Background Report finalised

February, 2016

Draft Structure Plan endorsed for consultation

March - April, 2016

Stage 2 Consultation

February, 2017 

Council resolve to note updated Structure Plan and commence Amendment C204

June - August, 2017

Exhibition of Amendment C204

October, 2017

Council meeting to consider submissions

November, 2017

Council meeting to consider submissions

January - February, 2018

Further consultation with residents

February, 2018

Council resolution to appoint planning panel

February, 2018

Independent planning panel appointed

6 June, 2018

Amendment C204 Directions Hearing

25 and 27 June, 2018

Amendment C204 Panel Hearing

24 August, 2018

Panel Report publicly released

Policy strategy and legislation

The Amendment implements the following Council policies and strategies:

·        Council Plan - Shaping Our Future

·        Economic Development Strategy

·        Social and Affordable Housing Policy and Strategy

·        Environmental Sustainability Strategy

·        Open Space Strategy.

The Amendment also implements State and Local planning policies and strategies in respect to Activity Centre planning and the development of the Plenty Valley Town Centre (South Morang Activity Centre). In particular, the Amendment implements the objective to:

To establish Plenty Valley Town Centre as a higher order centre servicing the existing and future population growth in the south-eastern half of the City.

The Amendment is consistent with Plan Melbourne 2017-2050. Plenty Valley is identified as an activity centre (South Morang) in this plan. The implementation of the Structure Plan supports a number of policies identified in Plan Melbourne 2017-2050 including:

·        Policy 1.2.1 Support the development of a network of activity centres linked by transport

·        Policy 1.2.2 Facilitate investment in Melbourne’s outer areas to increase local access to employment

·        Policy 2.1.2 Facilitate an increased percentage of new housing in established areas to create a city of 20-minute neighbourhoods close to existing services, jobs and public transport

·        Policy 2.5.2 Provide a range of housing types in growth areas

·        Policy 3.2.1 Improve roads in growth areas and outer suburbs

·        Policy 3.2.2 Improve outer-suburban public transport

·        Policy 3.3.1 Create pedestrian-friendly neighbourhoods

·        Policy 3.3.2 Create a network of cycling links for local trips

·        Policy 4.3.1 Promote urban design excellence in every aspect of the built environment

·        Policy 5.1.1 Create mixed-use neighbourhoods at varying densities

·        Policy 5.1.2 Support a network of vibrant neighbourhood activity centres.

The Amendment is supportive of State and local policies and strategies in respect to Activity Centre planning and the development of the Plenty Valley Town Centre (South Morang Activity Centre).

The Amendment has been prepared in accordance with State Government requirements for activity centre planning. The planning scheme controls have been prepared in accordance with the State Government Planning Practice notes which are designed to provide ongoing advice about planning schemes, as well as a range of planning processes and topics.

In particular, the Structure Plan and amendment is consistent with the requirements of:

·        PPN5: The Parking Overlay

·        PPN4: Writing a Municipal Strategic Statement

·        PPN56: Activity Centre Zone

·        PPN58: Structure Planning for Activity Centre Zone

·        PPN60: Height and Setback Controls for Activity Centres.

In accordance with Section 27 (1) of the Planning and Environment Act, the planning authority must consider the panel's report before deciding whether or not to adopt the Amendment.

In accordance with Section 30 1(a) of the Planning and Environment Act a Planning Scheme Amendment lapses if no decision is made two years after the date public notice was given of the Amendment (being July 2020).

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Planning our space

Strategic Objective              Urban design helps build our connection to place, the natural environment and the community

The Structure Plan and Amendment C204 provides a strategic plan consistent with the objectives of the Council Plan to guide the development of the Town Centre over the next 20 years including additional retail, employment and housing. The plan aims to improve the design and amenity of the Town Centre and provide the infrastructure required to support it. Features such as River Red Gums, viewlines to Quarry Hills, open space areas and civic spaces are incorporated into the plan to build the connection to place and community. The plan focuses on using good urban design to improve the public realm and to create places where people want to live, work and visit.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan project is an important strategic planning project which has been subject to a comprehensive development and consultation process over a number of years.

Council resolved at its meeting on 6 February, 2018 to request the appointment of an independent Planning Panel to hear unresolved submissions and resolved its position to submit to the Panel its meeting on 1 May, 2018.

The Hearing was held on 25 and 27 June, 2018 and the Panel Report has subsequently been released.

The report found that “Council’s extensive consultation process leading to the Amendment, and its ability to listen and respond to issues, resulted in a well-prepared Structure Plan and relatively small number of unresolved issues at the time of the Hearing….the Amendment is well founded and strategically justified, and the Amendment should proceed.”

From a statutory perspective, Council is required to consider the report, provide a formal position on each of the Panel’s recommendations, and the Amendment as a whole.

The report made five recommendations of which four accorded with Council’s formal position on the amendment adopted at the 1 May, 2018 Council meeting and subsequent submissions to the Panel. Recommendation 1 made in respect to a reference to 800 parking spaces at the South Morang Train Station did not support Council’s submissions in its entirety.

As outlined in the body of this report, it is recommended that Council adopt all the Panel recommendations including Recommendation 1. Whilst, it is recommended that the Panel recommendation to remove the reference to 800 parking spaces from the planning scheme be adopted, it is considered appropriate for the reference to be included in the adopted Structure Plan and Parking Precinct Plan documents.

Specifically, it is recommended that Council resolve to adopt Amendment C204 in line with the officer recommendations contained in Table 2, Table 3 and the Discussion section of this report and forward the amendment and Panel report to the Minister for Planning for approval.

Further, it is recommended that the final Structure Plan included at Attachment 1 and Parking Precinct Plan included at Attachment 2 be formally adopted by Council.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1          Adopt Amendment C204 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, the Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan and Plenty Valley Town Centre Parking Precinct Plan in line with the Officer recommendations in Tables 2 and 3 of this report and a) and b) below:

a)      Adopt the Panel Report Recommendation 1 to amend Clause 21.13 to add the following Plenty Valley Town Centre strategy:

                                    Support the provision of adequate car parking and infrastructure encouraging             sustainable transport, for commuters at the South Morang Train Station.

b)      Include the following strategy in the final Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan and Plenty Valley Town Centre Parking Precinct Plan:

Support the provision of additional commuter parking by Public Transport Victoria (minimum 800 parking spaces) in proximity to the South Morang Train Station.

2          Submit Amendment C204, together with Council’s response to the Panel’s recommendations and the Panel Report, to the Minister for Planning for approval.

3          Advise submitters of the above.

 


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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.1.4    Amendment to Planning Permit 701889 to allow for the relocation and upgrade of the existing Waste Transfer Station, 24 hour operation of existing Land Fill for commercial customers, revised layout and a new access to Bridge Inn Road at 45-135 Bridge Inn Road, Wollert

Attachments:                        1        Locailty Maps

2        Development Plans   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Principal Planner   

 

APPLICANT:                         Hanson Landfill Services Pty Ltd

COUNCIL POLICY:              22.08     Material Recycling Centres Policy

ZONING:                               Green Wedge Zone

OVERLAY:                            Environmental Significance Overlay

Rural Floodway Overlay

Heritage Overlay

Public Acquisition Overlay

REFERRAL:                          EPA

OBJECTIONS:                      Eight objections received

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to approve the Application to Amend Planning Permit No. 701889 and issue a Notice of Decision to Grant an Amendment to a Permit for the proposed extension of hours relative to the landfill operation for commercial customers only and for the relocation and upgrading of the existing Waste Transfer Station subject to additional conditions.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    The Wollert quarry and landfill site obtained approval as a landfill in 1994.  The proposal seeks to amend the existing Permit to allow 24-hour operation of the land fill operations for commercial customers (no change to public use hours) and relocate and upgrade the existing waste transfer station.

·    The current landfill is of state significance due to its capacity and proximity to metropolitan Melbourne.

·    The landfill operates from 7am to 6pm weekdays, 7am to 6pm Saturdays and 8am to 6pm Sunday/Public Holidays.  It also allows 3am to 6pm Monday to Sunday for commercial customers.

·    Eight objections have been received, predominantly raising concerns mainly relating to the proposed 24 hour operation for the landfill.

·    The extension in hours for commercial vehicles only (between 6pm and 3am) is considered appropriate for a State significant landfill provided additional management conditions are imposed to provide a higher level of restriction and control.  Approval is recommended on that basis.

 

Report

SITE AND SURROUNDING AREA

The site is located to the north-east of the intersection of Epping Road and Bridge Inn Road, being on the north side of Bridge Inn Road bounded by Masons Lane and Epping Road.  It has an area of 346 Hectares.  The quarry is being progressively filled as a land fill and the site also contains a transfer station and other buildings.

There is two existing access points to Bridge Inn Road.  The western access is for the landfill activity, while the eastern access provides access to the existing waste transfer station, which is located in the central part of the site.

existing uses

The refuse disposal and transfer station uses are currently permitted by Planning Permit 701889, which was issued in 1994.

The existing Transfer Station is located in the central part of the site, with access from the eastern access point from Bridge Inn Road.  It is a main element of Hanson's resource recovery functions and provides for disposal of domestic waste.

At present, customers enter the site at the eastern access point from Bridge Inn Road and continue about 400m north along an internal road to the weighbridge.  Vehicles continue about 725m further north along an internal road connecting to the waste disposal point.

The transfer station conducts sorting and recycling of engine oil (domestic quantities), car batteries, truck and car tyres, cardboard, plastic bottles and cans, all metals, electronic waste and mattresses.

The landfill accepts waste from both private and commercial operators including both small and large vehicles and carries out the sorting and recycling of materials.  Materials deemed non-recyclable are transported to the individual landfill pods located further west of the transfer station.

Condition 3 of the Permit allows for only specific categories of waste to be deposited on the site and Condition 4 outlines wastes that are prohibited from being deposited (including soluble chemical wastes, hazardous wastes, liquid wastes, domestic grease trap waste and wastes specified by the Environmental Protection (Prescribed Waste) Regulations 1987

Condition 5 of the Permit allows for 'the receipt of rubbish and waste and recyclable material' between the following hours:

·    Monday to Friday: 7am to 6pm

·    Monday to Friday: 3am to 6pm (commercial customers only)

·    Saturday: 7am to 6pm

·    Sundays & Public Holidays: 8am to 6pm

restrictions and easements

The land is contained within 18 Certificates of Title.  There are no restrictions on title that affect the proposed amendment to Permit.

Proposal

Replacement of existing Waste Transfer Station

The proposal seeks to replace the current transfer station with a new and upgraded waste transfer station towards the Bridge Inn Road frontage.  Specifically, the proposal includes:

·    A relocated and modernised transfer station located at the south-eastern portion of the site closer to the Bridge Inn Road frontage and east of the existing vehicle access point.

·    The removal of native vegetation to facilitate the new facility.

The proposed waste transfer station comprises a building of 40m by 65m (2,600 m2) and maximum height of 12.68m.  It is situated 25m from the Bridge Inn Road frontage, and situated east of the Bindts Road alignment (which runs off the south side of Bridge Inn Road opposite the site).

The application initially proposed an additional access to the east of the existing access for use by vehicles exiting the transfer station.

During the course of the application, the applicant has advised that it is prepared to reconfigure the internal access to the proposed waste transfer station to avoid the need for an additional access to Bridge Inn Road.  This would retain both entry and exit from the existing eastern access point to Bridge Inn Road, thus retaining the status quo for access to and from the waste transfer station.

The applicant has also altered the proposed landscaped bund wall along the south side of the proposed transfer station and proposes a more effective screen of planting between the proposed building and the Bridge Inn Road frontage.

Proposed 24 hour use of the land fill

The extension of operating hours to 24 hours for the landfill relates to commercial customers only.  Due to recent large infrastructure projects located throughout Victoria, the application seeks to extend the operating hours for commercial customers only to a continuous 24 hour basis.

At present, Condition 5 of the Permit limits the hours of use, including relative to commercial customers.  It is proposed to revise that condition to extend commercial customers to a 24 hour basis.

council plan

The proposed upgraded waste transfer station would replace the existing basic drop pad area located in the middle of the site.  This existing facility has been identified as being “inadequate” for residential use within Council’s recent Service Review of Waste Management Services due to its location, lack of dedicated collection bins, and its exposure to the elements.  The new proposal offers a modern undercover facility with direct access off Bridge Inn Road, eliminating the need for users to enter the active landfill area.  Other benefits for the community include the potential for weekend operation (the landfill site is currently closed for residential use on Sundays), the provision for the disposal of recyclable e-waste, mattresses and batteries, and facilities for the disposal of hazardous materials such as asbestos, paint products and chemicals.

The proposal aligns with an action detailed within the Council Plan 2017-21 (Shaping our Future) which seeks to facilitate waste recovery service improvements for the community through the development of a high quality transfer station.  While the initial action detailed within the Council Plan proposed that officers develop an options paper for consideration by Council, Hanson have taken it upon themselves to progress the development of a proposal that, based on an assessment of the details within this application, would achieve the intent of the Council Plan action item.

Public Notification

The application was advertised to a large number of surrounding properties (some 49 properties), by a notice in the public notice section of the local paper and on Council’s website.  Advertising of the application has resulted in eight objections being received.  The grounds of objection can be summarised as follows:

1.    Loss of amenity and adverse impact from the proposed 24-hour landfill, including by the following:

·    Due to the location will impact on residents including by noise and light spill

·    It notes that at present at 3.00am every morning, Hanson Landfill Lights are turned on and already disturbs residents and that increasing hours will increase this disturbance.

·    Increase in noise, visual pollution and odour.

·    A history of complaints over several years relating to noxious odours, noise, dust and other matters seen as existing contraventions of existing permits.

2.    Objection to additional traffic, noise (including reversing beepers) associated with the proposed transfer station.  Noise is more accentuated at night and early morning hours.

3.    Additional in general terms, the following issues:

·    The roads around the site are inadequate for any increase in traffic.

·    The operation has been the subject of previous complaints.

Discussion and Comments on Grounds of Objection

Loss of amenity and adverse impact from the proposed 24-hour landfill.

The proposed 24 hour operation will allow an increase in the current hours, with otherwise no change in use.  While there have been complaints in the past arising from this aspect of the operation, the extension in hours for commercial vehicles only (between 6pm and 3am and including those hours on Saturday and Sunday) is appropriate for a State significant landfill provided additional management conditions are imposed to provide a higher level of restriction and control.

Additional traffic, noise, associated with the proposed transfer station.

The proposed Transfer Station replaces the existing transfer station located further north on the site, and would utilise the existing (eastern) access point from Bridge Inn Road.  In discussions with the applicant, it has been agreed that the initially proposed additional access point to Bridge Inn Road (even though it was proposed exit only) would not be pursued, with the existing access point being retained as the sole access for the transfer station which is the way the current waste transfer station operates.

The proposed additional hours do not relate to the proposed relocated, upgraded waste transfer station, with the existing hours to be retained in that respect.

The facility itself is not anticipated to attract significant additional usage by its relocation and upgrade, other than natural growth that would occur in any event, and the possibility of additional usage due to the greater visibility of the facility and improved accessibility once on the site.

Therefore the effect of the proposed relocation of the Transfer Station is not expected to result in any significant increase in external impacts such as traffic or noise. 

The improved facility would improve the operation and its relocation would make it more accessible to the public.

Additional grounds

In terms of existing road conditions, discussions have been held with the operator regarding possible road improvements at the access points to the site.  These discussions are being undertaken outside the planning permit process, as the present proposal does not alter any existing access points or trigger the need for road or intersection works.

The operator is prepared to undertake or contribute to road improvements either individually or in conjunction with Council to improve one or both existing access points to Bridge Inn Road.  Discussions will continue to determine the form and extent of road improvements.  It is noted that as natural growth to the landfill and waste transfer station occurs, access will become more difficult regardless of the proposed 24 hour operation.

In terms of previous complaints, the operator have recently taken steps to seek to address issues raised, and on that respect commissioned an acoustic report to reduce noise emission.  It has already had reversing beepers using the landfill altered to a low pitched “croak” (instead of “beep”) and other measures are being investigated.

Other Matters

The native vegetation proposed to be removed has been minimised and will be appropriately offset.

The relocation and upgrade of the transfer station will remove the public from entering deep into the site where interaction with quarry operations is currently occurring creating safety concerns.

The proposed structure, although large, will provide a contemporary transfer station building that will be both appropriate for its context and intended purpose, whilst clearly identifying the transfer station/landfill use of the site.

EPA referral and response

The application was referred to the Environment Protection Authority Victoria (EPA).  The EPA has responded that it has no objection to Council issuing a planning permit (amendment) subject to the following conditions being included, in addition to existing conditions of permit:

1.   Nuisance dust and/or nuisance airborne particles must not be discharged or emitted beyond the boundaries of the premises.

2.   All development and use of the premises involving the emission of dust and other air quality indicators must comply with the State Environment Protection Policy (Air Quality Management).

3.   Effective noise levels from the use of the premises must comply with the requirements of the State Environment Protection Policy (Control of Noise from Commerce, Industry and Trade) No. N-1.

4.   Odours offensive to the senses of human beings must not be discharged, emitted or released beyond the boundaries of the premises.

5.   Surface water discharge from the premises must not be contaminated with waste.

6.   Pollution control devices must be installed to prevent the transportation of waste to the environment and stormwater system.

7.   A secondary containment system must be provided for liquids which if spilt are likely to cause pollution or pose an environmental hazard, in accordance with the EPA Publication 347.1 Bunding Guidelines 2015 or as amended.

8.   The permit holder must not contaminate land or groundwater.

9.   The following areas must be constructed of impervious, concrete or some other durable material, to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority:

• vehicle paths and parking

• loading and unloading

• recycling operation

• storage

10. Combustible recyclable and waste material, as defined in the guideline Management and Storage of Combustible Recyclable and Waste Materials, EPA publication 1667 or as amended, must only be stored for transfer, sale, sorting, reuse, recycling, reprocessing or energy recovery.

11. All recyclable and waste material must be managed and stored on site in a manner that minimises risks to human health and environment from fire and in accordance with the guideline Management and Storage of Combustible Recyclable and Waste Materials, EPA Publication 1667, or as amended.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

While there have been objections raised principally to the 24 hour operation of the landfill operation, the site is one of few landfill facilities available to assist in facilitating large metropolitan infrastructure developments.

The additional hours proposed, in effect seek approval for the hours of 6pm to 3am and it is not anticipated that any traffic during these hours would be significant, other than associated with large infrastructure projects.

The proposed improvement to the waste transfer station and its relocation closer to the Bridge Inn Road frontage is not considered to have any net change to the present operation of the existing waste transfer station.

Approval is therefore recommended, with appropriate changes to the Permit preamble and conditions to manage any amenity issues associated with the change in operation for commercial customers.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to approve the Application to Amend Planning Permit No. 701889 and issue a Notice of Decision to Grant an Amendment to a Permit for the proposed extension of hours relative to the landfill operation for commercial customers only and for the relocation and upgrading of the existing Waste Transfer Station in accordance with the endorsed plans and subject to the following amendments:

1.       The permit preamble revised to include the use “Waste Transfer Station”.

2.       Inclusion of the following (additional) conditions as required by the EPA Victoria (inserted after the existing conditions of permit):

39.     Nuisance dust and/or nuisance airborne particles must not be discharged or emitted beyond the boundaries of the premises.

40.     All development and use of the premises involving the emission of dust and other air quality indicators must comply with the State Environment Protection Policy (Air Quality Management).

41.     Effective noise levels from the use of the premises must comply with the requirements of the State Environment Protection Policy (Control of Noise from Commerce, Industry and Trade) No. N-1.

42.     Odours offensive to the senses of human beings must not be discharged, emitted or released beyond the boundaries of the premises.

43.     Surface water discharge from the premises must not be contaminated with waste.

44.     Pollution control devices must be installed to prevent the transportation of waste to the environment and stormwater system.

45.     A secondary containment system must be provided for liquids which if spilt are likely to cause pollution or pose an environmental hazard, in accordance with the EPA Publication 347.1 Bunding Guidelines 2015 or as amended.

46.          The permit holder must not contaminate land or groundwater.

47.     The following areas must be constructed of impervious, concrete or some other durable material, to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority:

•    vehicle paths and parking

•    loading and unloading

•    recycling operation

•    storage

48.     Combustible recyclable and waste material, as defined in the guideline Management and Storage of Combustible Recyclable and Waste Materials, EPA publication 1667 or as amended, must only be stored for transfer, sale, sorting, reuse, recycling, reprocessing or energy recovery.

49.     All recyclable and waste material must be managed and stored on site in a manner that minimises risks to human health and environment from fire and in accordance with the guideline Management and Storage of Combustible Recyclable and Waste Materials, EPA Publication 1667, or as amended.

3.       The inclusion of the following further conditions:

50.     The internal access to and from the relocated Waste Transfer Station must utilise the existing access point to Bridge Inn Road for both entry and exit to and from Bridge Inn Road.  There must be no additional access provide to or from Bridge Inn Road.

51.     In order to offset the removal of native vegetation (patch, scattered trees or re-vegetation)  approved as part of this permit, the applicant must provide a native vegetation offset that is in accordance with the Guidelines for the removal, destruction or lopping of native vegetation (DELWP 2017) and the native vegetation gain scoring manual Version 2 (DELWP 2017).  The offset must also contribute a gain of the required general habitat units to be located within the boundary of the Whittlesea municipality or the Port Phillip and Westernport Catchment Management Authority area, and have a strategic score of at least 80 per cent of the removal site.  Before any native vegetation is removed, evidence that an offset has been secured must be provided to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

52.     Before the commencement of 24 hour operations, the permit holder must prepare an Operational Management Plan to be submitted to and approved by the Responsible Authority.  The plan must include:

(a)     Measures to communicate to the public the mechanism for making a query or complaint; including telephone number and email contact for complaints, telephone number and email address (where available) for complaints and queries made to Council.

(b)     Measures for the tabular recording of complaint information in a register of complaints for each complaint received, including the complainant’s name and address, a receipt number for each complaint which is to be communicated to the complainant, the time and description of the complainant’s concerns.

(c)     The processes of investigation to resolve the complaint and remediation measures and outcomes as to how the complaint was resolved.

(d)     The complaint information recorded be provided to the Responsible Authority at its request when such information is reasonably required for enforcement of the conditions of this permit.

(e)     A report including a reference map of complaint locations, and outlining complaints, investigation and remediation actions is to be provided to the Responsible Authority on an annual basis and must be to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

The plan must be implemented for the duration of the 24 hour operation of the landfill function and the operation of the Waste Transfer Station.

4.       The amendment of Condition 5 of the permit to read as follows:

5.       Without the prior written consent of the Responsible Authority, the receipt of rubbish and waste and recyclable material in both the landfill and transfer station shall only be between the following hours:

·     Monday to Friday: 7am to 6pm

·     Monday to Sunday: 24 Hours (commercial customers only)

·     Saturday: 7am to 6pm

·     Sunday & Public Holidays: 8am to 6pm.

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.1.5    REVIEW OF COUNCIL DELEGATION TO STAFF

File No:                                  .

Attachments:                        1        Instrument of Delegation to Members of Council Staff - Revisions Marked Up

2        Instrument of Delegation to Members of Council Staff   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Team Leader Governance   

 

recommendation summary

That Council resolve to:

1.   Delegate to the members of Council staff holding, acting in or performing the duties of the positions referred to in the attached Instrument of Delegation to members of Council staff, the powers, duties and functions set out in that Instrument;

2.   Commence operation of the instrument immediately upon the common seal of Council being affixed to the instrument;

3.   Revoke all previous delegations to members of Council staff (other than the Chief Executive Officer) on the coming into force of the instrument; and

4.   Require the duties and functions set out in the instrument to be performed, and the powers set out in the instruments to be executed, in accordance with any guidelines or policies of Council that may from time to time be adopted.

key facts and/or issues

·    This Instrument of Delegation deals with Acts and Regulations that require a direct delegation to officers including the Planning and Environment Act 1987, Domestic Animals Act 1994, Environment Protection Act 1970, Food Act 1984 and Road Management Act.

·    The Instrument does not include delegations from Council to the Chief Executive Officer. This Instrument was reviewed by Council on 3 April 2018.

·    Most of the amendments relate to the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and were prompted by the Planning and Environment Amendment (Public Land Contributions) Act 2018.

·    The updated delegations will facilitate Council's decision making processes by ensuring that Council officers are delegated appropriate powers to effectively carry out their duties.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Report

Background

As a legal entity, Council can exercise its powers by resolution of the whole Council at a Council meeting or through members of Council staff acting on its behalf.

Effective functioning of Council would not be possible if all decisions of Council were made at Council meetings.  Delegating specific functions to staff members enables Council decisions to be made more speedily and ensures that Council meetings are not tied down by procedural and administrative matters.

It also enables Council to utilise the technical knowledge, training and experience of staff members to achieve the best possible outcome.  In practice, most of Council’s decision-making occurs through delegations.  Effective delegation also enables Council to focus more on strategic policy issues and less on day to day administrative or operational matters.

Where Council acts through others, this is formalised through written "instruments of delegation" and the Local Government Act 1989, as well as other legislation and makes express provision for the appointment of delegates to act on behalf of Council.  A decision of the delegate, once made, is for all legal purposes a decision of the Council.

The delegations affected by this review are delegations made directly by Council to members of Council staff and do not include delegations from Council to the Chief Executive Officer which were reviewed by Council on 3 April 2018.  

Proposal

Certain Acts and Regulations do not contain a specific power of sub-delegation and, in these instances, Council must delegate directly to members of Council staff. The Domestic Animals Act 1994, Environment Protection Act 1970, Food Act 1984, Planning and Environment Act 1987 and Road Management Act 2004 fall within this category.

The Instrument of Delegation from Council to members of Council staff deals with Acts and Regulations that require a direct delegation to officers.  This Instrument was last reviewed by Council on 19 September 2017 when minor changes were made to delegations relating to the Planning and Environment Act

The revised Instrument includes legislative amendments up to 26 June 2018.  A copy of the Instrument showing revisions is attached. (Refer Attachment 1).  A clean copy of the updated Instrument is also attached. (Refer Attachment 2).

Summary of Legislative Amendments

The main changes are summarised below:

·    the conditions and limitations column for s41A(1) in the Domestic Animals Act 1994 has been updated to reflect the new language of the Domestic Animals Act;

·    the Heritage Act 1995 has been replaced by the Heritage Act 2017 and the relevant provision for Councils has now changed from s84(2) to s116;

·    there have been extensive changes to the Planning and Environment Act 1987, prompted by the Planning and Environment Amendment (Public Land Contributions) Act 2018. These changes commenced on 2 July 2018, and include, for the purposes of this Instrument, the:

(a)    removal of ss46GF- 46GI(5), 46GL, 46GM and 224(8);

(b)    insertion of ss46GI(2)(b)(i), 46LB(3) and 172C - 1720(2), which are provisions conferring powers, and functions, and imposing duties, on Council acting in one or more of the following capacities:

(i)       collecting authority;

(ii)      development authority;

(iii) municipal council;

(iv) planning authority; and

(c)    amendment of ss 62(5)(a) and 62(6)(a).

·    further changes to the Planning and Environment Act have been made by the Planning and Environment Amendment (Distinctive Areas and Landscapes) Act 2018, which include the insertion of ss46AW-46AZK. These provisions have already commenced and apply where Council is a 'responsible public entity'.

Delegation Protocols

The revised Instrument will ensure that officers are delegated appropriate powers to carry out their duties and that those delegations are made to the lowest competent level in the organisation to streamline decision making processes while ensuring accountability.

In some instances, delegated powers have limitations and conditions which are recorded in the Instrument.  Council also has the option of putting in place policies and guidelines under which certain delegations are exercised.

It should be noted that delegations are to positions and not to individuals. This ensures that delegations do not become obsolete or ineffective in the event of a staff member leaving the organisation or being absent on leave. In these instances, their delegated powers are automatically transferred to staff acting in their position.

It should also be noted that a Councillor must not direct, or seek to direct, a member of Council staff in the exercise of a delegated power, or the performance of a delegated duty or function of the Council. 

Conflict of Interest Disclosures by Delegates

The Local Government Act 1989 imposes obligations on members of Council staff who have delegated powers to act impartially and with integrity including avoiding conflicts of interest. 

A Council delegate is prohibited from exercising a Council power, duty or function if they have a conflict of interest in the matter and must disclose the type and nature of the interest to the Chief Executive Officer.

Consultation

No public consultation was required in relation to this administrative instrument.

Financial Implications

The cost of amending this instrument of delegation is included within relevant budgets.

Critical Dates

It is proposed that the revised Instrument comes into force once the common seal is affixed to the Instrument.

Policy strategy and legislation

This review is carried out in accordance with section 98 of the Local Government Act 1989.


 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

COUNCIL PRIORITY           Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council explores and adopts best practice models

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that the revised Instrument of Delegation be adopted by Council. The updated delegations will facilitate Council's decision making processes by ensuring that Council officers have the appropriate powers to effectively carry out their duties.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council, in accordance with section 98(1) of the Local Government Act 1989 and the other legislation referred to in the attached instrument of delegation, resolve to:

1.   Delegate to the members of Council staff holding, acting in or performing the duties of the positions referred to in the attached Instrument of Delegation to Members of Council staff, the powers, duties and functions set out in that Instrument;

2.   Commence operation of the instrument immediately upon the common seal of Council being affixed to the instrument;

3.   Revoke all previous delegations to members of Council staff (other than the Chief Executive Officer) on the coming into force of the instrument; and

4.   Require the duties and functions set out in the instrument to be performed, and the powers set out in the instrument to be executed, in accordance with any guidelines or policies of Council that may from time to time be adopted.

 

 


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6.1.6    2018 Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey Report

Attachments:                        1        2018 Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey: Full Report (distributed separately - refer to p.7)

2        2018 Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey: Summary findings   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Team Leader Research and Engagement   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to note this report which presents the key findings of the 2018 Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey (LGV CSS).

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

The Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey (LGV CSS) was conducted by telephone with a sample of 400 residents during February and March 2018 by JWS Research.

·        The survey measured the community’s perceptions of Council’s performance in key areas.

·        In 2018, Council extended the scope of questions asked in the survey to include importance and satisfaction ratings for a further 22 Council services.

·        Overall, the perceived importance and performance scores varied across Council services, with community rating some services more favourably than others. 

·        The survey recorded a decline in the scores for the seven core performance measures for the City of Whittlesea compared to 2017. However, the 2018 scores for the City of Whittlesea were all reported to be similar or higher compared to State-wide average performance scores.

·        The best performing core measure for the City of Whittlesea related to Customer Service. Emergency and Disaster Management was rated as Council’s most important and highest performing service area.

·        The City of Whittlesea Corporate Leadership Team will be meeting in September to have a detailed workshop on the survey findings and prepare actions to address the themes raised in the survey.

 

Report

Background

The Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey is commissioned by the Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) and was undertaken by JWS Research. The survey provides data regarding the community’s perspective on the importance and performance of key Council services and can be used to identify areas where Council is performing well and areas for improvement, including trends over time. Performance can also be benchmarked against the average results for Victoria and Interface Councils.

 

The 2018 LGV CSS involved a randomly-selected, stratified sample of residents in the municipality. 400 residents across all age groups (above 18 years) and ward areas were interviewed via mobile and landline telephones using a suite of standardised questions approved by DELWP.

A set of core questions are provided by DEWLP and are compulsory for all participating Councils. In 2018, the City of Whittlesea extended the scope of questions to include importance and satisfaction ratings for a further 22 Council services; these were additional optional questions that Councils can select from. The additional questions can be benchmarked against other Councils that chose to include performance questions for these service areas.

Proposal

The full suite of findings are provided in the report produced by JWS Research (refer to Attachment 1). A brief summary has also been prepared by the Research and Engagement team (refer to Attachment 2).

 

A summary of the key findings are presented below:

·        Overall, the 2018 LGV CSS recorded a decline in all of the core performance measures for the City of Whittlesea compared to 2017.

·        While reporting a slight decline in core performance measures, Council’s scores were all reported to be higher or the same as State-wide average performance scores.

·        Council’s best performing core measure was Customer Service, with community rating the performance as ‘good’.

·        Community considered Emergency and Disaster Management to be the most important service delivered by Council; this was also rated as Council’s strongest area of performance across all measures. Art centres & Libraries and Family Support Services were Council’s next top performing services.

·        Council’s performance in Advocacy (lobbying on behalf of the community) rated well and measured significantly higher than State-wide scores.

·        Other areas of performance that rated significantly higher than State-wide average were: Local Streets and Footpaths; Town Planning; Planning and Building Permits; Slashing and Weed Control; Sealed Local Roads; and Business and Community Development.

·        The bottom three performing service areas for Council were Traffic Management; Community Decisions; and Waste Management.

 

The City of Whittlesea Corporate Leadership Team will be meeting in September to have a detailed workshop on the survey findings and prepare actions to address the themes raised in the survey.

Council will be delivering a separate, more detailed community satisfaction survey in the second half of 2018 to generate a greater understanding about why community feels the way they do about specific Council services. This separate survey will cover a larger sample of residents to enable more detailed analysis by demographic characteristics and geographic differences. Following reflection on the results from the 2018 LGV CSS, this separate survey will cover aspects such as community participation and engagement, decision making, communications and advocacy.

Consultation

In planning for the 2018 LGV CSS, Councillors and all relevant Council officers were consulted and invited to review the proposed additional questions for inclusion in the survey. The final suite of survey questions were presented to a random selection of 400 residents in the municipality via a telephone interview. The survey sample reflected the demographic profile of the municipality ensuring a representative sample.

 

Critical Dates

The 2018 LGV CSS was conducted during February and March 2018.

The findings presented in the report will be used to inform a further investigation into community satisfaction with Council services, particularly community consultation and engagement, advocacy, decision making and communications. This will be conducted from October until December 2018 via a community survey, with findings being made available early 2019.   

Financial Implications

The 2018 LGV CSS cost Council $17,900 (incl. GST). This was for a maximum 15 minute telephone interview with 400 residents (the minimum sample size).

Policy strategy and legislation

It is a requirement for Victorian Councils to report on a set of core performance measures: Community Consultation and Engagement; Making Community Decisions; and Sealed Local Roads. The LGV CSS provides data for Council’s annual reporting against these three mandatory Local Government Performance Reporting Framework (LGPRF) indicators reported on the Know Your Council website: https://knowyourcouncil.vic.gov.au/

Furthermore, in line with Council’s priority of organisational sustainability, it is essential that Council monitors and evaluates operations to continually improve performance of service delivery to community.   

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations

 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Overall, performance scores varied across Council services, with community rating some services more favourably than others. A copy of the full report (Attachment 1) will be uploaded to Council’s public website by the end of September 2018.

The separate community satisfaction survey will be delivered in the second half of 2018 to explore community satisfaction with Council services, particularly aspects of community participation and engagement, decision making, communications and advocacy.  

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to note this report, which presents the key findings of the 2018 Local Government Victoria Community Satisfaction Survey (LGV CSS).

 

 


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6.1.7    COUNCIL MEETING SCHEDULE FOR 2019  

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Governance Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt the Ordinary Council Meeting schedule for 2019 as follows:

5 February                 

6 August

5 March

3 September

2 April

1 October

7 May

12 November

4 June

10 December

2 July

 

2.       Set the commencement time of Ordinary Council Meetings at 6.30pm and the venue as the Council Chamber, Council Offices, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang unless otherwise determined by Council resolution;

3.       Schedule a Special Council Meeting for 6pm Tuesday, 26 March 2019 for the purpose of advertising the 2019-2020 proposed Council Budget and Council Action Plan;

4.       Schedule a Special Council Meeting for 6pm Tuesday, 11 June 2019 for the purpose of adopting the 2019-2020 proposed Budget and Council Action Plan;

5.       Schedule a Special Council Meeting for Thursday, 7 November 2019 at 7pm for the election of the Mayor and Deputy Mayor; and

6.       Give public notice of the adopted Council Meeting schedule.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    The dates for Council meetings proposed for 2019 have taken account of public holidays and other sector specific events such as major conferences.

·    The Act requires the Mayor to be elected after the fourth Saturday in October but not later than 30 November in each year. 

 

Report

Introduction

To adopt the Council Meeting schedule for 2019, noting that it is proposed to continue with a monthly Council meeting cycle.

Proposal

The proposed Council Meeting schedule for 2019 is set out below allowing for public holidays and conferences.  It is proposed that meetings continue to be held monthly on the first Tuesday of the month with the exception of November and December when the meeting will be held on the second Tuesday.

Unless otherwise determined by Council, Ordinary Council Meetings will commence at 6.30pm in the Council Chamber at the Council Offices, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang.

The following dates for Council meetings are proposed for 2019 and take account of public holidays and other sector specific events such as major conferences:

5 February                 

6 August

5 March

3 September

2 April

1 October

7 May

12 November

4 June

10 December

2 July

 

It should be noted that the dates for the ordinary Council meetings in November and December have moved to the second Tuesday of the month due to the Melbourne Cup Public Holiday in November and in December to account for Christmas and New Year holiday period when the first meeting of 2020 is likely to be early February. 

In addition, the following dates for Special Council meetings are proposed:

·    Tuesday, 26 March 2019 at 6pm for the purpose of advertising the 2019-2020 proposed Budget and Council Action Plan;

·    Tuesday, 11 June 2019 at 6pm for the purpose of adopting the 2019-2020 proposed Budget and Council Action Plan; and

·    Thursday, 7 November 2019 at 7pm for the election of the Mayor and Deputy Mayor.

Critical Dates

The Local Government Act requires Council to give public notice of Council meeting dates.

The Act also requires the Mayor to be elected after the fourth Saturday in October but not later than 30 November in each year. 

Financial Implications

Costs associated with holding Council Meetings are covered in existing budgets.  

 


 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Community  centred operations

Strategic Objective              Our Council services are transparent, equitable and accessible

Council will work to build a stronger sense of community within neighbourhoods and across the municipality, and create new opportunities for social networks and civic engagement.

Conducting Council meetings throughout the year gives the community an opportunity to become involved in Council’s decision making process on issues that affect the community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that the proposed meeting dates be adopted and advertised to the public.  The schedule of meeting dates will facilitate Council's decision making processes by ensuring that regular meetings are held.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.         Adopt the Ordinary Council Meeting schedule for 2019 as follows:

5 February

6 August

5 March

3 September

2 April

1 October

7 May

12 November

4 June

10 December

2 July

 

2.       Set the commencement time of Ordinary Council Meetings at 6.30pm and the venue as the Council Chamber, Council Offices, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang unless otherwise determined by Council resolution;

3.       Schedule a Special Council Meeting for 6pm Tuesday, 26 March 2019 for the purpose of advertising the 2019-2020 proposed Council Budget and Council Action Plan;

4.       Schedule a Special Council Meeting for 6pm Tuesday, 11 June 2019 for the purpose of adopting the 2019-2020 proposed Budget and Council Action Plan;

5.       Schedule a Special Council Meeting for Thursday, 7 November 2019 at 7pm for the election of the Mayor and Deputy Mayor; and

6.         Give public notice of the adopted Council Meeting schedule.

 


ITEM 6.1.8      Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy and Guidelines

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement 

Also in attendance:              Team Leader Governance 

Attachments:                        1        Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy

2        Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy - General Guidelines - Marked Up

3        Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy - General Guidelines

4        Councillor Resources and Facilities - Expense Reimbursement Forms

5        Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy - IT Guidelines - Marked Up

6        Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy - IT Guidelines     

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to adopt the revised Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy and supporting Procedural Guidelines as attached.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

Council must adopt and maintain a policy in relation to the reimbursement of expenses for Councillors under section 75B of the Local Government Act

·    The Policy prescribes the types of Councillor out-of pocket expenses that may be reimbursed and that they must be reasonable and bona fide expenses.  The Policy also sets out procedures to guide Councillors when making a reimbursement claim for out-of-pocket expenses.

·    Councillors considered this matter at Forum meetings on 1 August 2017 and 24 July 2018 and provided feedback on proposed amendments to the Policy and Guidelines.

·    This report proposes that the revised Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy and Procedural Guidelines be adopted.

·    The revised Policy will provide greater clarity on the assistance and support available to Councillors to carry out their duties and will more clearly prescribe the procedures to be followed in relation to the reimbursement of out-of-pocket expenses.   

 

Report

Background

Council must adopt and maintain a policy in relation to the reimbursement of expenses for Councillors under section 75B of the Local Government Act.  Council adopted a Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy and supporting Guidelines in 2014.  The Policy has been reviewed by Councillors and amended accordingly. 

The Policy regulates the payment of or reimbursement of expenses as well as the provision of resources, facilities and other support to the Mayor and Councillors to enable them to perform their duties as a Councillor. It prescribes the types of Councillor out-of pocket expenses that may be reimbursed and sets out procedures to guide Councillors when making a reimbursement claim for out-of-pocket expenses.

The determining test that Councillors should apply when considering whether to make a claim is “If I was not a Councillor, would I have incurred this expense?”  The response to this question will determine whether or not a claim for reimbursement should be made.

Proposal

The purpose of this report is to adopt the revised Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy and associated Procedural Guidelines.

The amended Policy and Guidelines will provide greater clarity on the assistance and support available to Councillors to carry out their duties and sets out procedures in relation to the reimbursement of out-of-pocket expenses.   

Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy

The Policy Statement has been rewritten using the standard Policy template so that the objectives of the Policy are clearly stated.  Otherwise, the general intent of the Policy Statement remains the same.  Refer Attachment 1.

 

Councillor Resources and Facilities Guidelines – General

The General Guidelines provide a broad overview of how Council will provide assistance and support to the Mayor and Councillors in carrying out their role and official duties as Councillors. They acknowledge the significant demands and expectations placed on the Mayor and Councillors and provides for appropriate resourcing and facilities to be available to Councillors to help them successfully fulfil their role.

They Guidelines have been reviewed and details on the substantial amendments are discussed below under relevant sections of the Guidelines. The proposed changes are shown in Attachment 2.  A clean copy of the revised General Guidelines is also attached. Refer Attachment 3.

Purpose and General Principles

This section has been added to the Guidelines to provide context to the Policy by explaining the purpose of the Guidelines and the general principles relating to their application.

The revised Guidelines require Councillors to provide original receipts and documentation to support a claim where practicable. Scanned copies of originals are acceptable. It is proposed that all claims for reimbursement of expenses be made on the claim forms included in the appendix to the Guidelines and in accordance with the procedures set out for each type of claim.  The intent is to move to electronic submission of claims and for claims to be made as close to the time the expense was incurred as possible, primarily to provide more accurate public reporting of expenses.

Any costs incurred by a Councillor which are not covered specifically within the Guidelines will not be reimbursed unless the Councillor has received prior authorisation from Council or, if delegated to do so, from the Chief Executive Officer.

The Guidelines propose to formalise the current practice that quarterly reports are provided to Councillors on any expenses they have incurred or received reimbursement for and these details will be published on the Council’s website on a quarterly basis.

The Guidelines also confirm existing practice of publishing prescribed Councillor expenses in Council’s Annual Report in accordance with the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014. The Regulations prescribe five expense categories: Travel, Car Mileage, Childcare, Information & Communication and Conference & Training. 

Duties of a Councillor

A new section is included to clarify the ‘duties of a Councillor’.  The Local Government Act defines Councillor duties as those duties performed by a Councillor that are necessary or appropriate for the purposes of achieving the objectives of a Council having regard to any relevant Act, Regulations, Ministerial Guidelines or Council policies.

Based on relevant legislation and Council’s Policy, the duties of a Councillor include:

·    Attendance at meetings of the Council or its committees;

·    Attendance at briefing sessions, meetings, workshops and civic events or functions convened or scheduled by Council, the Mayor or a senior member of Council staff;

·    Attendance at conferences, workshops or training programs approved by Council or the Chief Executive Officer;

·    Attendance at meetings of community groups, organisations or service authorities to which a Councillor has been appointed as Council representative;

·    Attendance at a meeting, function or event as the official representative of Council; or 

·    Attendance at site inspections in relation to a Council approval process or Council project.

·    Meetings with residents, community groups and other stakeholders, site visits and the like.

Office Facilities (Section 2.3)

Councillor Room

Councillors provided feedback that there was no need to provide details of the Councillors room in the document(s).  The view was that providing such a space was essentially an entitlement and did not need to be spelt out. Clause 2.3.1 has been removed.

Travel, Accommodation and Meals (Section 2.6)

Myki Cards

MYKI cards are available for Councillor use, on request.

Taxi Fares

In light of feedback from the 2017 Forum, Cabcharge vouchers were discontinued and replaced with Cabcharge Cards which are issued to Councillors upon request.

Council Vehicles

The cost associated with the use of the Council vehicle is currently not recorded and it was proposed that this cost would be recorded as a Councillor expense and calculated at ATO rates.

Councillors wishing to use a Council pool vehicle for Council business must request this in writing (email is sufficient) and prior to making their first booking in the system, provide their licence details, consistent with the practice that applies to staff.  Details of the date and purpose of the travel must also be provided at the time of booking and these details will be recorded against the booking. 

Private vehicle

Councillors may use their own private vehicle when performing duties of a Councillor.  Details of the date and purpose of the travel must be provided when claiming reimbursement of any costs associated with use of a private vehicle for Council business.  ATO rates will apply.

Accommodation (Section 2.6.3)

It is proposed that this section be amended to also restrict any other expenses paid by Council such as taxi fares and meals to one night before and one night after the event being attended.  Where accommodation is requested beyond dates reasonably required to attend the event, Councillors will be required to make their own accommodation booking and seek reimbursement of relevant costs from Council. These amendments will promote greater accountability in relation to travel-related expense claims.

Civic Entertainment (Section 2.7)

A new Section 2.7.2 has been added to provide for the Mayor (or a Councillor representing the Mayor) to attend an event or function to which he or she has received a formal invitation and for Council to pay or reimburse any costs associated with the Mayor’s attendance at the event or function.

Feedback from the 2017 Forum indicated that the proposed new sections intended to clarify the circumstances where Council would pay for the costs associated with Councillors other than the Mayor were too onerous and should be removed.  Councillors suggested that if they receive an invitation to attend an event, then that invitation is sufficient as a trigger for the Council to pay the costs associated with such attendance.  Therefore, a new clause 2.7.3 has been added and clause 2.7.4 has been removed.

An additional section was proposed to deal with the purchase of wreaths and other commemorative items.  It was proposed that such items can be purchased on behalf of the Mayor if they relate to ANZAC Day, Remembrance Day or the 2009 Bushfires.

Training and Professional Development (Section 2.11)

An annual limit of $10,000 per Councillor is imposed in relation to training and professional development to encourage Councillors to undertake the training and professional development they require.  Additional funds are available through Council resolution.

Online Presence (Section 2.12)

A new provision is included in relation to the support provided to Councillors on Council’s webpage and with social media training which reflects current practice. 

Claims (Section 4.1)

This section originally proposed to require reimbursement claims to be submitted within 30 days of the expense being incurred instead of the current six months.  Feedback suggested 30 days was unreasonable and Councillors suggested 12 months.  The rationale for a shorter claim timeframe was to ensure that the reporting of expenses is current and will assist with the regular reporting of expenses back to Councillors, however, the proposed Guidelines allow 12 months.

Appendix

The Appendix contains procedures guidelines in relation to each expense category to assist Councillors when making claims.  The guidelines clarify which expenses are paid for directly by Council and which are paid by Councillors and then reimbursed.

A copy of the claim form for each prescribed category of expense is provided. Refer Attachment 4.

Publication of expense data

Quarterly expenses have been published on Council’s website since the October-December 2017 period and will continue to be published quarterly.

Councillor Resources and Facilities Guidelines – Information Technology

This Guideline document has been updated to reflect recent changes to the provision of ICT resources to Councillors.  The proposed changes are shown in red or strikethrough. Refer Attachment 5.  A final clean copy of the IT Guidelines is also attached. Refer Attachment 6.

Consultation

No public consultation was required or carried out in relation to the proposal.Critical Dates

The Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014 require details of all payments, including reimbursement of prescribed expenses, made to Councillors for a financial year to be disclosed in Council’s Annual Report. 

Financial Implications

Councillor expenses are covered in Council’s recurrent Budget. 

Policy strategy and legislation

Public reporting of Councillor expenses increases the transparency of governance arrangements and provides an opportunity for the community to see how public funds are used to support Councillors when carrying out their Council duties.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council explores and adopts best practice models

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.


 

Conclusion

The revised Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy will ensure accountability and transparency in relation to expenses claimable by Councillors while providing resources, facilities and other support to the Mayor and Councillors to enable them to effectively perform their Council duties.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to adopt the revised Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy and Guidelines as attached.

 


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6.1.9    Communications and Public Comment Policy

Attachments:                        1        Communications and Public Comment Policy   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Manager Advocacy, Communications & Economic Development   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

To adopt the Communications and Public Comment Policy which is in general accordance with existing customs and practices for public comment, media relations and social media.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    A Communications and Public Comment Policy for Councillors has been drafted, which was presented to Councillors at a Forum on Tuesday 24 July 2018.

·    The policy generally outlines existing customs and practices for public comment, media relations and social media.

·    Formal organisation policies exist for staff to guide public comment in the media, social media and other public forums.

·    It is considered good governance and risk management practice to have a formally adopted policy to guide public comment of government bodies, particularly for social media.

 

 

Report

Background

The City of Whittlesea has regular contact with the media and daily engagement with the community through social media channels including Facebook.

To ensure a professional and coordinated approach to managing media and social media engagement there are policies in place for Council staff to guide media and social media processes and public comment.

These guidelines also serve to ensure the most authoritative voice on a particular issue delivers the information in a clear, timely and consistent manner.

It is considered good governance that Councillors adopt a policy to appropriately guide public comment, particularly in social media. A policy has been developed for Councillors to adopt which draws on existing custom and practice and corporate policies.

The adoption of this policy will also formally endorse appropriate delegations for dealing with the media.

Proposal

It is proposed Council adopt a Communications and Public Comment Policy, which generally outlines existing customs and practices and the endorsed corporate media delegation guidelines that are in place for staff.

Council has contact with local media outlets on a weekly basis.  A corporate media policy exists for staff, which outlines who has authority to speak to the media. The policy states that:

·    The Mayor is the official spokesperson on behalf of Council on matters of public interest, particularly those of a whole of Whittlesea context such as public policy, budget advocacy and political matters. The Mayor may delegate to the Deputy Mayor, another Councillor or the CEO.

·    The Chief Executive Officer and Directors are the official media spokespersons for Council operations, including staffing and organisation structure, and issues relating to day to day operations.

Current organisation media relations are managed in accordance with the above.

A social media policy also exists for staff to clearly outline appropriate use and responsibilities of social media channels. This policy also serves to protect the organisation and staff from inappropriate use of social media. 

Council has generally operated in accordance with existing policy guidelines. The Communications and Public Comment Policy serves to formalise existing practices and media delegation processes.

Consultation

The development of the Staff Social Media Policy followed engagement with other Councils and the MAV to adopt consistent protocols across the local government sector.  The draft policy draws on this work.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications in relation to adopting this policy.

Policy strategy and legislation

It is considered good governance and risk management practice to have a formally adopted policy to guide public comment of government bodies, particularly for social media.

This policy has strong links to and is consistent with:

·    Code of Conduct for Councillors

·    Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy

·    Local Government Act 1989

·    Acceptable use policies for email, internet, digital equipment, electronic communications.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council explores and adopts best practice models

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The draft policy generally outlines existing customs and practices for public comment, media relations and social media. Formal organisation policies exist for staff to guide public comment in the media and social media. It is considered good governance and risk management practice to have a formally adopted Council policy.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Communications and Public Comment Policy which is in general accordance with existing customs and practices for public comment, media relations and social media.

 

 


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6.1.10  Epping Community Services Hub Operations Report

Attachments:                        1        Epping Community Services Hub Partner Organisation List   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Social Policy and Projects Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council note the findings of the Epping Community Services Hub Operations Report for 2016/17-2017/18 as presented in this Council report.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

The Epping Community Services Hub (the Hub) has been operational for two years. In line with the Head Lease, the Brotherhood of St Laurence has provided the strategic leadership and operational management of the Hub and this is the first Report to Council, covering 16/17-17/18. The key findings from the report over the two years are:

·        23 partner organisations now providing services to the community (see attachment).

·        21 of the partner organisations are new to the municipality.

·        70% increase in community members accessing services.

·        35% increase in enquiries directly to the Hub from the community (i.e. not through the partner agencies).

·        Partner organisations at the Hub report a significant increase in the level of collaboration and integration of services.

·        Financially sustainable model established - BSL has forecast a surplus in 2018/19 following two years of deficit.

·        The surplus will be directed back into Hub operations and will be managed by the Leadership and Strategy Governance Group comprising senior officers of the services represented at the Hub.

 

Report

Background

In September 2014, Council entered into an Expression of Interest (EOI) process for the Council owned property at 713 High Street, Epping (the site), with the intention of establishing a Community Services Hub to facilitate the expansion of much needed service provision to the municipality, and attract best practice collaborative governance and service models.

Council sought interest from agencies to, firstly take on the role of lead agency and lead tenant, to manage the facility and to facilitate a collaborative environment, and secondly, to partner with other agencies that would like to be accommodated within the building as sub tenants. On 24 February 2015, Council resolved to endorse BSL as the lead agency and lead tenant and lease the site to BSL for a five year period: “... BSL will take on the lease for the facility for a five year period and with the consent of Council, will sub lease to appropriate services providers” (Council Report 24/02/15, p1).

Proposal

The Epping Community Services Hub – Progress Report presents the achievement and activities of the Hub since its commencement in 2016. Success is evidenced by the increased numbers of community services organisations physically located within the City of Whittlesea, resulting in substantial growth of new services and programs, increasing numbers of participants accessing services and continuing new enquiries from the broader community. Since the Hub commenced operation in 2016 with 7 partner organisations/sub tenants;

·        an additional 16 partner organisations have joined, resulting in a total of 23 partner organisations operating from the Hub.  21 of the 23 organisations did not have a service location within the municipality prior to commencement at the Hub. These organisations currently provide 50 individual services and programs to the community. Desk occupancy, within the facility has increased from 32 to 101.

 

·        the co-location of community services organisations within the one facility has enabled improved cooperation and coordination between organisations resulting in increased integration of services for participants;

·        the number of participants accessing the Hub increased by 70% from 3948 in the first year (2016-2017) to 6789 (2017-2018);

·        new enquiries increased by 35%. The Hub received 727 new enquiries in the first year, this increased to 985 in 2017-18;

·        as was anticipated, BSL operated the Hub at a deficit for the first two years and it is forecast to achieve surplus at year three (2018-19) based upon a breakeven financial model of 85% occupancy. This represents the achievement of a financially sustainable model of operation. The surplus will be directed back into Hub operations and will be managed by the Leadership and Strategy Governance Group comprising senior officers of the services represented at the Hub.

Key achievements highlighted across three key communities identified in the Hub’s Service Model include:

1.       The Collaborative Community - comprising of all not for profit partner organisations co-located and operating from the Hub. Achievements and activities in this area include;

·        Increased number of service providers, programs delivered and levels of service integration

·        Governance model including Leadership and Strategy Group

·        Networking events and activities such as Market Place and Interviews

·        Collaborative projects and events such as cultural events and Engaging Vulnerable Families Project

·        Internal communications and operational systems.

2.       The Engaged Community- comprising of participants accessing and attending services, programs and activities operating from the Hub. Achievements and activities in this area include;

·        Increased number of participants accessing programs and services

·        Chancez Café, Araluen Art Connections Gallery

·        Information points and Community computer lab

·        Family friendly spaces

·        Warm referral pathways

3.       The Connected Community - comprising of local residents, businesses, and service providers. Achievement and activities in this area include;

·        Increased number of new enquiries received

·        1000 Voices Aspirational Conversations Project

·        Emerge in the North Art Festival

·        Christmas Toy Shop

·        Epping Community Services Hub Website

·        Stepping Stones Marketplace

The Hub has enabled partner organisations to work together for increased community impact, responsiveness and enhanced services; and the well-designed community spaces have reduced stress and anxiety for participants improving engagement with services. BSL and the partner organisations have achieved this increase of reach, collaboration and impact through the effective strategic leadership and operational management of the Hub.

Consultation

The Epping Community Services Hub – Progress Report was prepared by Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) in consultation with the Leadership and Strategy Governance Group at the Hub. Council officers are represented on this group.

Critical Dates

There are no time critical dates.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications for Council in this report.

The current model at the Hub, endorsed by Council on 24 February 2015, involves a lead agency (BSL) leasing the building from Council and then developing sub-leases with individual agencies (subject to Council approval).

Policy strategy and legislation

·        Council Plan ‘Shaping Our Future’ 2017-2021

·        Epping Central Structure Plan (2011),

·        South Morang Civic Precinct Community Infrastructure Analysis (2013)

·        Human Services Needs Analysis (2014 and 2017)

The Hub is intended to respond to gaps in service provision and infrastructure and is consistent with Council priorities and plans. The Epping Central Structure Plan (2011), the South Morang Civic Precinct Community Infrastructure Analysis (2013), the Human Services Needs Analysis (2014 and 2017) and the Council Plan identify substantial demand for additional infrastructure and community services in the municipality. The Hub provides an opportunity to meet the current needs of the community and respond to the evidence of significant population growth.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Health and Wellbeing

Future Direction                   Health and wellbeing

Theme                                   Healthy community

Strategic Objective              Health and human services are accessible and responsive to the needs and aspirations of all people

 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Hub has been operational for two years. The Brotherhood of St Laurence has provided the strategic leadership and operational management of the Hub and this is the first Report to Council, covering 16/17-17/18. The report highlights the expansion and enhancement of human services, facilitated by the Hub, for the local community.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council note the findings of the Epping Community Services Hub Operations Report for 2016/17-2017/18, as presented in this Council Report.

 


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6.1.11  Assemblies of Councillors Report - 4 September 2018  

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Author:                                  Governance Officer   

 

recommendation summary

That Council note the record of the Assemblies of Councillors meetings as set out in the table in the report.

key facts and/or issues

To report to Council the records of Assemblies of Councillors in accordance with Section 80A(2) of the Local Government Act.


 

Report

Background

The Local Government Act 1989 requires records of Assemblies of Councillors to be reported to an ordinary Council meeting and recorded in the minutes of that meeting.

A meeting is an assembly of Councillors if it considers matters that are likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a Council delegation and the meeting is:

·    A planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and a member of Council staff; or

·    An advisory committee of Council where one or more Councillors are present.

A record must be kept of an assembly of Councillors which lists the Councillors and members of Council staff attending, the matters discussed, disclosures of conflict of interest and whether a Councillor left the meeting after making a disclosure.

Proposal

Assemblies of Councillors records not previously reported to Council are detailed in the following table:-

Assembly Details

Councillor attendees

Officer attendees

Matters discussed

Council Forum

10 July 2018

Cr Pavlidis

(Mayor)

Cr Alessi

Cr Cox

Cr Joseph

Cr Kirkham

Cr Kozmevski

Cr Monteleone

 

CEO

DCRS

DCS

DCTP

DPE

MPRV

MSPD

SPO

TE

ULIP

 

1.     Council Priorities Review June 2018

2.     Local Area Traffic Management and Streetscape Improvement Plan, Thomastown

3.     CEO and Councillor Time

Nil disclosures

Council Forum

17 July 2018

Cr Pavlidis

(Mayor)

Cr Sterjova

(Deputy Mayor)

Cr Alessi

Cr Cox

Cr Desiato

Cr Kirkham

Cr Kozmevski

Cr Monteleone

CEO

DCRS

DCTP

DPE

MCBP-A

TLR

PEA

 

1.     Review of the Approval Process for Using External Consultants for Participation and Engagement

2.     Huskisson Reserve Lalor Master Plan

3.     Whittlesea Public Gardens Master Plan

4.     CEO and Councillor Time

Nil disclosures

Council Forum

24 July 2018

Cr Pavlidis

(Mayor)

Cr Alessi

Cr Cox

Cr Joseph

Cr Kirkham

Cr Kozmevski

Cr Monteleone

CEO

DPE

MACED

MG

TLG

1.     Procedural Matters Local Law – Go Live

2.     Community Council Meeting 2018

3.     Communications and Public Comment Policy

4.     Trial of Live Streaming Council Meetings

5.     Councillor Resources and Facilities Policy and Guidelines

6.     Review of Council Agenda (7 August) Contents

Nil disclosures

Council Forum

31 July 2018

Cr Pavlidis

(Mayor)

Cr Alessi

Cr Cox

Cr Kozmevski

Cr Monteleone

CEO

DCS

DCRS

DCTP

DPE

MCAP

MCBP

MDA

MLCF

MSPD

SPPO

TLCPI

 

1.     Epping Community Services Hub – Operations Report 2016/2017-2017/2018

Externals in attendance:

·      Tim Nayton, Acting Group General Manager, BSL

·      Deborah De Rossi, Senior Manager, Epping Community Services Hub

·      Andrew Rush, Drummond Street Services

·      Pat O'Leary, Austin CYMHS

2.     The Nous Group Service Reviews 2017 – Finalisation Report

3.     Draft Active Whittlesea Policy and Strategy

4.     Briefing on Planning and Major Projects for Council Meeting on 7 August

5.     Councillor questions for upcoming Council Meeting

6.     CEO and Councillor Time

Nil disclosures

CEO Employment Matters Advisory Committee (CEMAC)

31 July 2018

Cr Pavlidis

(Mayor)

Cr Alessi

Cr Cox

Cr Monteleone

Ms Agata Jarbin (Independent Member)

CEO

MG

1.     CEO KPI 2017/2018 Annual Performance Report

2.     Options to provide feedback to the CEO – including 360 degree feedback processes

Nil disclosures

 

* Note that CEMAC has Ms Agata Jarbin as the Independent Non-Councillor Member

The table below represents an Index of Officer titles:

Initials

Title of Officer

Initials

Title of Officer

CEO

Chief Executive Officer – Simon Overland

MLCF

Manager Leisure & Community Facilities – Benjamin Waterhouse

DCS

Director Community Services – Russell Hopkins

MPRV

Manager Property, Rates & Valuations – Gino Mitrione

DCRS

Director Corporate Services – Helen Sui

MSPD

Manager Strategic Planning & Design – George Saisanas

DCTP

Director City Transport and Presentation– Nick Mann

PEA

Participation & Engagement Advisor – Louise Bannister

DPE

Director Partnerships and Engagement – Liana Thompson

SPPO

Social Policy and Projects Officer – Karen Greer

MACED

Manager Advocacy, Communications & Economic Development – Sean McManus

SPO

Senior Property Officer – Greg Phippen

MCAP

Manager Corporate Accountability and Performance – Frank Joyce

TE

Traffic Engineer – Justin Ridgeway

MCBP-A

Acting Manager Community Building & Planning – Joanne Kyrkilis

TLCPI

Team Leader Corporate Planning and Improvement – Robert Kisgen

MCBP

Manager Community Building & Planning – Belgin Besim

TLG

Team Leader Governance – Angelo Mamatis

MDA

Manager Development Assessment – Julian Edwards

TLR

Team Leader Research – Kerryn Adams

MG

Manager Governance – Michael Tonta

ULIP

Unit Leader Infrastructure Projects – Anthony Kyrkou

Consultation

Consultation has taken place with internal Council Officer representatives of each of the meetings and committees that qualify as an Assembly of Councillors.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Policy Strategy and Legislation

Section 3C(2)(g) of the Local Government Act 1989 provides that one of Council’s facilitating objectives is to have regard to ensuring transparency and accountability in Council decision making.

Accordingly, section 80A of the Local Government Act 1989 requires that the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that the written record of an assembly of Councillors is, as soon as practicable:-

    (a)        reported at an ordinary meeting of the Council; and

    (b)        incorporated in the minutes of that Council meeting.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority          Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction         Good Governance

Theme                          Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective     Our Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations

The provision of this report is in line with the Council Priority – Organisational Sustainability - Good Governance of Council’s Council Plan by ensuring Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

That Council note the record of the Assemblies of Councillors meetings in the table set out in the report.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council note the record of the Assemblies of Councillors meetings in the table set out in the report.

 

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.2       Community Services

6.2.1    Joint Letter Response - Lalor Recreation Reserve - 22 Sydney Crescent, Lalor 

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Manager Leisure & Community Facilities   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

·        Continue the trial closure of the car-park access gate between 8.00pm and 7.00am for 3 months, and commence a master planning process for Lalor Recreation Reserve.

·        Work in partnership with Victoria Police to increase community safety and address anti-social issues at Lalor Recreation Reserve

·        Write to all Clubs located at the Lalor Recreation Reserve and all signatories on the Joint Letter advising them of Council’s decision

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·       At its meeting of 5 June 2018, Council considered a Joint Letter from residents of Gordon Street, Lalor, regarding anti-social behaviour at Lalor Recreation Reserve.

·       The Joint Letter builds on a history of complaints and issues relating to Lalor Recreation Reserve. Since January 2013 there have been 28 customer enquiries received by Council about anti-social behaviour at Lalor Recreation Reserve.

 

·       Victoria Police crime statistics report that from April 2012 to March 2018, there have been 25 offences at Lalor Recreation Reserve.

 

Report

Introduction

At its 5 June 2018 meeting, Council considered a Joint Letter from four residents expressing concern regarding anti-social behaviour at Lalor Recreation Reserve (the Reserve). These concerns support recent customer enquiries regarding anti-social behaviour and Victoria Police crime statistics specific to the Reserve.

Background

Lalor Recreation Reserve, located at 22 Sydney Crescent, Lalor is a 4.2-hectare park classified as a Municipal Open Space, the second highest classification of open space (after Regional Open Space) within the municipality.

The Reserve caters primarily for structured sporting use. Sporting clubs based at the Reserve include:

·    Lalor Bowling Club

·    Lalor Warriors Cricket Club

·    Lalor Football Club

·    Lalor Tennis Club

The sporting facilities available at the reserve include:

·    Two bowling greens and club rooms

·    Shared cricket and football oval, cricket nets and club rooms.

·    Six tennis courts and club rooms.

Unstructured recreational facilities within the Reserve include play equipment, barbeque facilities, a shelter and seating. In recent years several capital expenditure projects have been undertaken by Council at the Reserve, focusing on structured sporting facilities, these works include;

·    2014 - Tennis court upgrade

·    2015 - Cricket net replacement

·    2016 - Tennis pavilion construction

·    2016 - Bocce pitch upgrade

·    2017 - Tennis court upgrade

·    2017 - Cricket/football oval vehicle circulation upgrade.

During the same timeframe, minimal works have been undertaken on the informal recreation assets of the Reserve.

Between January 2013 and June 2018, Council received a total of 67 customer enquiries relating to the Reserve of which 42 per cent (28) related to anti-social behaviour. Such behaviour included vandalism, dumped rubbish, issues around vehicles having access into the Reserve, and fires being intentionally lit.

Victoria Police crime statistics report that from April 2012 to March 2018, there were 25 offences at the Reserve including crimes against person, property and deception offences and public order and security offences.

At its June 5 meeting, Council received a Joint Letter (attachment one) from four residents outlining residents’ concerns regarding anti-social behaviour at the Reserve. The key issues included in the Joint Letter relate to the following.

·    24 hour car park access

·    Misuse of the existing coaches’ boxes

·    Reoccurrence of anti-social behaviour.

In response to the Joint Letter, a Project Working Group inclusive of Council Officers and representation from Victoria Police has been established. Key actions in addressing the Joint Letter already undertaken include:

·    The overnight closure of the main gate, outside of structured sporting use, for a trial period, in an effort to reduce anti-social behaviour associated with vehicle access;

·    Development of a masterplan for the Reserve.

Proposal

The Joint Letter, combined with previous customer service complaints, and Victoria Police crime statistics demonstrate the necessity for Council to work with local residents to increase the community safety of the Reserve through a range of short and longer-term actions.

As such, to address this matter, it is proposed to:

1.       Continue the trial closure of the car-park access gate between 8:00pm and 7:00am daily for 3 months.

2.       Explore the possibility of installing boundary soccer target goals on the oval to prevent the misuse of the coaches’ boxes.  It is not feasible to remove the existing structures which are typical of those provided at sporting grounds across the municipality and provide seating and shelter from the elements for sports clubs and casual users.

3.       Work with Victoria Police to consider the management and prevention of anti-social issues at the Reserve.

4.       Commence a master planning process for the Reserve.

Consultation

Council Officers have written to the Joint Letter lead signatory and will convene a meeting with local residents to discuss any short or longer-term objectives for the Reserve once the matter is considered by Council. As part of the proposed master planning process extensive community participation and engagement would be undertaken.

Critical Dates

Nil

Financial Implications

Costs associated to the proposed short-term actions or proposed master planning process can be delivered within current operational resources.

Policy strategy and legislation

Any potential actions resulting from the Joint Letter are aligned to the strategic objectives of Shaping Our Future Whittlesea 2030 Strategic Community Plan, Places and Space to connect people, Leisure and Recreation; ‘We can access recreation facilities and open spaces that reflect and respond to local need’.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Leisure and recreation

Strategic Objective              We can access recreation facilities and open spaces that reflect and respond to local need

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The proposed actions will make progress towards addressing the key issues identified in the joint letter, however fundamental urban design issues of the Reserve that relate to anti-social behaviour will require further consideration. The proposed comprehensive master planning process for the Reserve will identify long-term actions for further consideration.

Council Officers will continue to work collaboratively with Victoria Police and local residents throughout a proposed master planning process to ensure the Reserve is a safe and connected open space that complies with the principles of Council’s Open Space Strategy.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Continue the trial closure of the car-park access gate between 8.00pm and 7.00am daily for 3 months.

2.       Explore the feasibility of installing boundary soccer target goals on the oval to prevent the misuse of the coaches’ boxes

3.       Commence a master planning process for the Lalor Recreation Reserve.

4.       Work in partnership with Victoria Police to increase community safety and address anti-social issues at Lalor recreation Reserve.

5.       Write to all Clubs located at the Lalor Recreation Reserve advising them of Council’s decision.

6.       Write to all signatures on the Joint Letter advising them of Council’s decision

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.2.2    Active Whittlesea Policy and Strategy

Attachments:                        1        Active Whittlesea Policy

2        Active Whittlesea Strategy 2019-2028   

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Senior Leisure Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to adopt the Active Whittlesea Policy (Attachment 1) and Active Whittlesea Strategy 2019-2028 (Attachment 2).

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    The City of Whittlesea Recreation Strategy 2012-2017 has been completed and a new strategy is required to foster physically active communities.

·    The percentage of Whittlesea residents with preventable diseases (e.g. heart disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis) is higher than the State average, and there is an increasing rate of adult obesity.

·    In addition, the City of Whittlesea has the second highest percentage of sedentary residents (who do no physical activity per week) in Victoria.

·    Participation trends demonstrate a movement away from structured sport.

·    There is also a high level of open space provision within the municipality but low levels of usage and multiple and simultaneous barriers are impacting residents’ ability to be physically active.

·    The Active Whittlesea Policy and Strategy will provide strategic direction to address these barriers and aims to increase the number of residents being physically active by 10 per cent to ’75 per cent of residents participating in one or more hours of physical activity per week by September 2028’.

Report

Background

Local Councils are required under the Local Government Act (1989) “to improve the overall quality of life of people in the local community” (Section 3C 2c). In response, Council developed the City of Whittlesea Recreation Strategy 2012-2017. This strategy had a strong focus on the planning and delivery of infrastructure for structured sport and recommended the development of the Major Leisure and Aquatics Strategy, Soccer Strategy, Tennis Strategy, Multiple Sports Strategy, Sports and Indoor Sports Stadia Feasibility Study - all of which have been endorsed by Council over the last five years.

With the completion of the Recreation Strategy 2012-2017, Council’s Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan (Action 5.1) recommended the development of a new Recreation Strategy with a focus on under-represented groups.

Between November 2017 and June 2018 Council Officers developed a new Recreation Strategy, titled Active Whittlesea 2019-2028. In developing this Strategy, a comprehensive community participation and engagement process and literature review was undertaken. This process identified the following key findings, trends and barriers to participation:

Key Findings and Trends

·    Physical activity delivers health, economic and social cohesion benefits to communities

·    There is an international and national focus on improving physical literacy (physical competence, knowledge and understanding for engaging in physical activities for life)

·    There is a recent movement away from structured sport

·    The City of Whittlesea has a high level of open space provision but low usage levels

·    The percentage of Whittlesea residents with preventable diseases (e.g. heart disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis) is higher than the State average, and there is an increasing rate of adult obesity

·    The City of Whittlesea has the second highest percentage of sedentary residents (who do no physical activity per week) in Victoria and 35% of the population is doing less than one hour of physical activity per week

·    Female participation in recreation (walking, non-competitive sport, dance, personal exercising) is greater than male participation

·    Female participation in traditional sport (soccer, cricket, tennis etc.) is half of that of males.

Barriers to Participation

·    Built and Natural Environment: Lack or inappropriate infrastructure, need for greater transport options, perceptions of safety

·    Economic Environment: High cost of participation, long travel times, cost of equipment and apparel

·    Social Environment: Gender, social and cultural norms, language, prioritisation of physical activity.

The research and participation and engagement process also identified that multiple barriers can simultaneously impact a resident’s ability to be physically active.

ACTIVE WHITTLESEA 2019-2028

In addressing these trends and barriers, the Active Whittlesea Strategy aims to increase the number of residents being physically active by 10 per cent to achieve Council’s overall goal of:

75 per cent of residents participating in one or more hours of physical activity per week by September 2028

Council’s goal is set in line with recent findings from the Victorian government which indicate that increasing the rate of physical activity by 10 per cent can reduce physical-inactivity-related deaths by 15 per cent per year and new cases of physical-inactivity-related disease by 13 per cent per year. This has particular importance for Whittlesea communities, as the percentage of residents with preventable diseases is higher than the state average, and there is an increasing rate of adult obesity. Furthermore, as 35 per cent of residents are currently doing less than one hour of physical activity per week, the Strategy provides a challenging yet realistic goal for the community.   

To achieve this goal, Council will implement three key directions, consistent with community feedback and grounded in evidence-based practice:

·    Key Direction 1: Communications and Promotion – increasing the physical literacy and community awareness of inclusive participation opportunities

·    Key Direction 2: Responsive Programs and Partnerships – programs that respond to local needs and partnerships that share skills, knowledge and resources to generate positive community outcomes

·    Key Direction 3: Open Space / Infrastructure - ensuring local communities have access to places and spaces that are safe, inclusive, accessible and meet their needs.

To deliver the three directions, 12 priority actions have been formulated.  These priority actions will form the basis of biennial implementation plans that will operationalise the Active Whittlesea Strategy. The Active Whittlesea Strategy will sit as the overarching plan for sport, recreation and physical activity in the municipality with other specific plans, policies and guidelines such as the Netball Plan or Sports Lighting Policy falling under this strategy.

Proposal

This report seeks Council’s consideration of the Active Whittlesea Policy and Active Whittlesea Strategy 2019-2028.

Consultation

In developing the Active Whittlesea Policy and Active Whittlesea Strategy an extensive multi-technique participation and engagement process was undertaken. The project team engaged residents through online consultation platforms; Social Pinpoint and Social Media.

To supplement the online engagement a more traditional face-to-face process was also undertaken that encompassed residents, community networks and established groups such as Seniors Groups, Whittlesea Disability Network and Multicultural Advisory Group, Whittlesea Reconciliation Group, government agencies and industry stakeholders; preliminary findings from Council’s extensive Whittlesea 2040 participation and engagement process where also included.

Critical Dates

Nil

Financial Implications

Any actions of the Active Whittlesea Strategy that require resourcing will be costed and presented for Council’s consideration as part of the annual budget process.

Policy strategy and legislation

The development of the Active Whittlesea Policy and Strategy is closely linked with Shaping our Future: Whittlesea 2030 Strategic Community Plan; and is Action 5.1 within Council’s Health and Wellbeing Partnership Plan.

The Active Whittlesea Policy and Strategy have also been developed in line with Council’s responsibility under the Local Government Act (1989) “to improve the overall quality of life of people in the local community” (Section 3C 2c).

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Leisure and recreation

Strategic Objective              We can access recreation facilities and open spaces that reflect and respond to local need

 

The Active Whittlesea Policy and Strategy continues Council’s strong commitment to enhancing the quality of life for all residents. It recognises the valuable contribution that sport, physical activity and recreation make to community health and wellbeing.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is evident some residents are not getting the necessary benefits of physical activity as they are not physically active enough and may be facing multiple barriers to participation. In response, the Active Whittlesea Policy and Strategy have been developed to address these barriers and create opportunities for people within the municipality to become more physically active and live healthier lives.

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Active Whittlesea Policy and Active Whittlesea Strategy 2019-2028.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                         Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                         Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.3       City Transport and Presentation

6.3.1    Response to Petition - All Abilities Play Space, Mill Park   

Responsible Officer:           Director City Transport & Presentation

Author:                                  Team Leader Parks Development   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Continue with the development of the All Abilities Play Space at Mill Park Recreation Reserve;

2.   Consider concerns raised in the petition relating to community safety in the design of the play space and its surrounds; and

3.   Write to the petitioners advising them of Council’s decision on this matter.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    This report responds to the petition received in July from 59 residents requesting all work including planning and tendering are stopped immediately and a review of the proposed location and size of the All Abilities Play Space in Mill Park is conducted. 

·    The petition expressed concerns regarding traffic congestion, anti-social behaviour and noise levels in the local area and suggests the proposed play space be relocated to Mernda.

·    Council has previously resolved to locate the All Abilities Play Space at Mill Park Recreation Reserve (Morang Drive) through the adoption of the Open Space Strategy (2016). 

·    The Mill Park Recreation Reserve remains as the preferred location for the development of the All Abilities Playspace due to its central location within the municipality, its positioning on an arterial road and pathway network, and the reserves size, existing infrastructure and landscape features.

·    The proposal for the All Abilities Play Space is to create a park that is one of the features of the city’s open space network, and due to its size and quality will attract visitation from across the municipality.  This is consistent with the Open Space Strategy.

·    Council Officers conducted extensive community consultation about the proposed All Abilities Play Space during March to May 2018 and plan to further consult and engage with the local community and key stakeholders through September and October 2018.

 

Report

Introduction

At the Council Meeting on 7 August 2018, Council resolved to receive the petition from 59 residents objecting to the proposed location and size of the Mill Park Reserve All Abilities Play Space.  Council resolved to have a report investigating the petition be prepared for the following Council meeting.

The petition raised the following concerns:

·    The level of consultation with immediate residents regarding the proposed play space to date was not adequate.

·    Increase of traffic congestion and noise levels in the local area as a result of the All Abilities Play Space.

·    Antisocial behaviour resulting from increased youth activity in the upgraded play space.

·    The appropriateness of developing a large playground in a residential area with an older population cohort.

Background

In 2015 and 2016 the Open Space Strategy explored the open space provision of large ‘regional’ sized parks and play spaces in the established areas of the municipality.  The Open Space Strategy identified the need for four major community parks to be developed in the established areas.  Mill Park Recreation Reserve was identified in the Strategy as the location for a major community park and in particular, the development of the City of Whittlesea’s first All Abilities Play Space.   Council adopted the Open Space Strategy in 2016. 

Play is one of the ways children learn about themselves and the world around them.  Interaction and engagement with the outdoor world is essential for every child's development.  Children and young people with moderate, severe or profound physical, sensory, intellectual and/or emotional disabilities require a different design response to what would conventionally be considered in the provision of play spaces.  The All Abilities Play Space will provide that design response within the City of Whittlesea.   

All children have the same developmental needs regardless of whether they have a disability or not; however, children with a disability experience barriers to both receiving and responding to external stimuli that other children take for granted, so their needs are even greater. The design and implementation of the All Abilities Play Space provides designed play experiences in a safe outdoor environment that can give opportunities to individuals that they are not likely to get at local or neighbourhood parks. 

It will offer the following health and social benefits:

·    A play space for all abilities and all ages;

·    Early childhood education foundations;

·    Inter-generational play;

·    Social inclusion of people from different cultures, of differing abilities and from different residential areas such as the growth/rural communities;

·    Diverse and engaging opportunities for physical exercise;

·    A communal location for social gatherings;

·    Enhance the character of the neighbourhood; and

·    Increase the community’s sense of civic pride.

The development of the All Abilities Play Space will also allow for the provision of a wide range of educational, environmental and economic benefits to the community.

These benefits are especially important across a rapidly growing region such as the City of Whittlesea, where families can be disadvantaged by social isolation, long commutes, and in established areas of the city poor access to large, high quality play spaces.

Overall, the design places strong emphasis on access and inclusion to all activity areas for children and adults of all abilities and all ages.

Proposal

A number of potential sites were identified as possible locations for an All Abilities Play Space within the municipality during the course of the Open Space Strategy process.  Mill Park Recreation Reserve was identified as being the most suitable location due to the following attributes:

·    Mill Park Recreation Reserve is centrally located within the existing City of Whittlesea population, and can be easily accessed as it is located on an arterial road.

·    The site is connected via a number of walking/bicycle trails that link to surrounding residential areas. The Reserve has several bus stops on the periphery and is in close proximity to South Morang train station.

·    The site has multiple entry points and includes two existing car parks along Morang Drive

·    The site is also in close proximity to community and educational facilities including the Mill Park Leisure Centre, Salvation Army, Westfield Plenty Valley, Mill Park Heights Primary School and Mill Park Secondary School.

·    There is the potential to leverage off existing infrastructure, landform and significant vegetation at the reserve. 

·    There is sufficient land available to accommodate the play space and associated increased levels of visitation that will result.

Although Mill Park is not projected to experience significant population growth when compared to growth areas to the north, Mill Park has a well-established residential population and is in close proximity to other well established residential suburbs in the municipality. Whilst there has been significant open space and play space development in the growth areas to the north, there has been a shortfall in the provision of new and upgraded play spaces in the more established suburbs. The development of the All Abilities Play Space at Mill Park Recreation Reserve, will create one of the city’s feature parks within an established suburb, helping to address the imbalance of open space quality that exists within the municipality.

With respect to concerns raised in the petition regarding traffic congestion and anti-social behaviour:

·    While there will be significantly increased visitation at the reserve associated with the proposal, access to the park will be via Morang Drive, which can accommodate the associated increase in traffic volumes. 

·    Increased visitation will result in more people being at the reserve more often. Passive surveillance will increase, and the development is therefore not expected to result in an increase in anti-social behaviour at the reserve.  Lighting, open sight lines and other design measures will be included within the All Abilities Play Space development to mitigate the risk of anti-social behaviour.    

Consultation

A range of activities relating to the development of an All Abilities Play Space at Mill Park Recreation Reserve have occurred since 2008.  The idea was first conceptualised after the project was identified as the number one priority by the Best Start committee, a local community group funded by the Victorian Government to identify projects that would have a major impact on children’s early development. 

In more recent times, consultation has comprised:

·    Letter drops, surveys and pop up sessions in 2015 and 2016 to discuss the Open Space Strategy, which provides an open space framework for the whole municipality and identified Mill Park Recreation Reserve as the site for the All Abilities Play Space; and 

·    An online survey, a stall at the 2018 Community Festival, letter drop of 300 properties immediately around the site, meetings with multiple stakeholders and several pop up sessions at the reserve in April 2018 to inform the design of the Play Space.

Now that the concept plan has evolved and incorporates feedback received during the first round of consultation in early 2018, a second round of consultation is proposed, including:

·    A flyer that will be distributed to 11,000 Mill Park residents. 

·    Pop up session at Mill Park Library to display the concept plan, artist impressions and discuss the project with community. 

·    Letter to the 300 properties immediately around the All Abilities Play Space including the concept plan and invitation to pop up sessions at the Mill Park Library, Salvation Army and at the site.

·    Signboards erected on site to display the concept plan and show timing of project.

·    One on one meetings with key project stakeholders and users groups such as Norparrin, Concord, Plenty Valley Club House and Northern School of Autism.

·    An interactive Social Pin Point webpage for the community to provide direct feedback and comment.

Financial Implications

The development of the playspace is estimated to cost $4 million.

Council resolved to apply for Growing Suburbs Funding, through which Council successfully received $1 million. An additional $3 million is scheduled in Council’s 2019/20 and 2020/21 budgets. 

Critical Dates

To adhere to the State Government Growing Suburbs Grant funding agreement timelines, construction of the carpark is scheduled to commence in September 2018.  Construction of the balance of the play space is scheduled to commence in 2019, following consultation on the play space design.

Policy strategy and legislation

The design for the All Abilities Play Space is consistent with the following policies and strategies:

·    Open Space Strategy (2016)

·    Disability Action Plan (2017-2021)

·    Shaping Our Future Whittlesea 2030 Strategic Community Plan

·    Recreation Strategy 2012-2017

·    Play Space Planning Framework and Policy 2013-16

·    Spaces 8 to 12+: Creating Engaging Places for Young People

·    Multiple Sports Strategy 2017-2026

·    Natural and Built Shade Policy

·    River Red Gum Protection Policy

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Open space

Strategic Objective              We have open spaces that are welcoming and safe for public gathering

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

This report responds to the petition received from 59 residents. The location for the All Abilities Play Space was investigated and nominated through Council’s Open Space Strategy (2016).   Mill Park Recreation Reserve is an appropriate location for the development of Council’s primary All Abilities Play Space.

Council Officers will continue to work with leading industry Landscape Architects and Open Space Planners to ensure concerns relating to safety will be comprehensively considered in the design of the play space and its surrounds. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Continue with the development of the All Abilities Play Space at Mill Park Recreation Reserve;

2.   Consider concerns raised in the petition relating to community safety in the design of the play space and its surrounds; and

3.   Write to the petitioners advising them of Council’s decision on this matter.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.3.2    Whittlesea Public Gardens Master Plan

Attachments:                        1        Attachment 1 - WPG Master Plan Report

2        Attachment 2 - WPG Urban Design Analysis   

Responsible Officer:           Director City Transport & Presentation

Author:                                  Team Leader Parks Development   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the Whittlesea Public Gardens master plan;

2.       Write to the lead petitioner advising that Council has adopted the master plan, including the recommendation to address safety through the development of  residential lots along the Downs Road Reserve; and

3.       Note that the Urban Design Guidelines for the development of Downs Road address some of the petitioner’s concerns.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    Whittlesea Public Gardens is one of four major community parks identified for the City in Council’s Open Space Strategy (2016).

·    The objectives of the master plan (Attachment 1) are to significantly increase the community’s use of the reserve, through improving a wide range of park facilities and the landscape quality of the park.

·    Community consultation has been undertaken on the draft master plan.  Strong support was provided for all recommendations, except for the proposal to create new housing facing the park along the Down Road reserve, where mixed feedback was received. 

·    Addressing the poor sense of safety that exists in the park is critical to generating increased community use, and fully realising the community benefits of this major park.

·    The master plan recommends developing residential lots on the Downs Road road reserve, which adjoins the park, to address the poor sense of safety through creating improved passive surveillance.  Revenue generated from this initiative will also assist funding the re-development of the public gardens.

·    Council received a petition in July opposing the development of residential lots along Downs Road to improve passive surveillance in the reserve.

 

 

Report

Background

The Whittlesea Public Gardens is located in the south western pocket of the City of Whittlesea in Lalor and immediately adjacent to the Hume freeway. In recent years, the boundary of the 14.78 hectares of public open space has become more defined as residential development increases.  

The Whittlesea Public Gardens is one of the largest parcels of public open space in the south of the municipality and is set aside for passive recreation.  The gardens are linked to the Merri Creek via the existing pedestrian and cycle overpass to the Hume Freeway and act as the main visitor access point to the Merri Creek Marran Baba parklands. 

Existing facilities within the Gardens are designed for regional visitation, however the reserve is under-utilised.  Facilities are tired, there is a need to improve the landscape setting of the reserve and, due to inactive edges surrounding the parkland, users experience a sense of isolation which results in a poor perception of safety.

The City of Whittlesea Open Space Strategy (2016) identifies Whittlesea Public Gardens as one of four Major Community Parks within the municipality.  These parks will be the flagships of the city’s open space network, and be developed to a level that draws a regional catchment.  The Strategy suggests that the following issues should be addressed through a master planning process for the Reserve:

·    Improvement to the landscape character and quality to broaden the appeal and use of the gardens;

·    Continue to seek State Government funding of facilities for the regional visitors and;

·    Improvement to the visibility and safety by way of upgrading the eastern interface to the park.

The existing reserve suffers from poor perceptions of safety, with reserve users feeling isolated because of the inactive reserve edges.  Utilisation of the reserve could be significantly improved by addressing this issue.   The master plan seeks to increase passive surveillance and establish a greater level of ownership over the public open space by the surrounding community. 

A key to this concept is to develop additional housing that faces the eastern edge of the park on land which is a Council owned road reserve.   The road reserve is not used as public open space and is separated from Whittlesea Public Gardens via a 1.8 metre high cyclone mesh fence.  The road reserve, which was created through the initial subdivision of the adjoining residential estate, is no longer required for the purposes of a road.  Key to this concept is directing any funds generated through the subdivision of the road reserve into the redevelopment of local open space.

An Urban Design Analysis was conducted to explore options around the potential residential development – refer Attachment 2.   The concept suggests 33 new residential lots within the Downs Road reserve fronting into Whittlesea Public Gardens with a laneway between Sarissa Street and Benaroon Drive. 

The standard density development proposes lots that are single dwellings with potential townhouse typologies requiring a shared wall.  The proposed road would be a local road with a standard cross section of 14.5m and includes a nature strip and a 1.5m wide footpath.  Dwellings would be two storeys in height with all dwellings fronting Whittlesea Public Gardens.  The proposal attached encompasses lots which have 12.5m wide frontages and 20-21m lot depths (approx. 260m2 lots). 

The Urban Design Analysis also explored options for additional residential development along the northern edge of Whittlesea Public Gardens.  The outcome was that this would not result in good urban design practice as the existing properties on Rotino Crescent already provide passive surveillance. 

Proposal

The Whittlesea Public Gardens master plan project was undertaken to review the existing conditions and functions of the public open space and to guide the future development and management while providing a vision for the major community park.

The key recommendations of the master plan are to:

·    Establish new road and residential housing facing onto the gardens along Downs Road road reserve to improve passive surveillance in the reserve.

·    Upgrade the path networks and install new lighting and public furniture.

·    Thin and selectively remove existing thick vegetation to improve sightlines and passive surveillance.

·    Realign the entry road and promote access to and from other neighbouring public open space such as RGC Cook Reserve.

·    Replace the existing public toilets to an all abilities public toilet that accommodates an increased number of visitors.

·    Improvements and upgrades to the dog off leash area, irrigation systems, playground and recreation areas, shelters and BBQ areas, identification and way finding signage, public art and car parking provision.

·    Reinstate the southern end of the lake (to create a smaller sized lake with stormwater harvesting/recirculation system utilising the existing wetlands).

·    Establish two new multi-use hard courts with night lighting within the northern section of the existing lake.

·    Support continued use of the gardens for festivals and major events.

·    Advocate for re-routing of the 554 and 557 bus service on Barry Road to include the Gardens to improve links to Thomastown and Lalor Railway Stations.

The above recommendations are detailed within Attachment 1 – master plan report.

Consultation

To inform the development of a draft master plan, community consultation was undertaken which included a hardcopy and online survey asking the community how they currently use Whittlesea Public Gardens and what could be improved.  A key stakeholder workshop with community groups and other non for profit organisations was conducted at the Lalor Library and an information stall was set up at the Whittlesea Community Festival held at Whittlesea Public Gardens.  A total of 214 surveys were completed and the information collected provided direction on the draft master plan.

The Whittlesea Public Gardens draft master plan was exhibited for public display to obtain community comment and feedback on the 20 recommendations. This included:

·    Letter drop including a copy of the draft master plan to 1,400 properties within a 1km radius of Whittlesea Public Gardens.

·    Letter or email including a copy of the draft master plan issued to 55 community groups or organisations.

·    Social media posts on various platforms (incl. targeting video content).

·    Inclusion in the weekly leader Council Column.

·    Presence on the City of Whittlesea – Have Your Say website.

·    Interactive map via Social Pin Point to allow specific comments on key recommendations.

·    A pop-up session with Council Officers on 19th May at the reserve between 11am and 1pm.

·    Sign boards erected at the entrances to the reserve.

In general, the feedback received from the community demonstrated support for the proposed recommendations.  The exception was that there were mixed views relating to the proposal to create new residential development along the Downs Road road reserve frontage, with both strong support and opposition expressed for this recommendation.

A targeted community meeting was held in April 2018 at Barry Road CAC to discuss the Downs Road road reserve ideas and concepts with residents who either live near or adjacent to the Downs Road road reserve. The invitation was issued to 150 properties and a total of 20 people attended.  The scope of the engagement was to provide the Downs Road road reserve community with information on the Whittlesea Public Gardens master plan project while also seeking comment and feedback on proposed concepts.   The scope of the engagement was focused primarily on the Downs Road road reserve however conversations regarding the broader Whittlesea Public Gardens were also discussed. At this meeting the notion of residential development fronting the reserve was not supported, because of the loss of privacy and interface with open areas for existing lots.      

RESPONSE TO PETITION

At the Council Meeting on 7th August 2018, Council resolved to receive a petition from 97 residents and 9 non-residents requesting Council reject recommendation 11 of the Draft Whittlesea Public Gardens Master Plan, which is to establish a new road and residential housing facing onto the gardens along Downs Road to improve passive surveillance in the reserve. 

The petition raised the following concerns:

·    Residents don’t want to be affected by any potential future neighbour that may be situated adjacent to their property.

·    Residents paid a premium to obtain the land and homes on the basis that there was no further housing planned behind Killara Street and Network Drive, Lalor.

The 20m x 420m parcel of land behind Killara Street and Network Drive, Lalor is known as the Downs Road road reserve and does not currently form part of the existing Whittlesea Public Gardens property boundary. The road reserve is fully fenced with 1.8m high cyclone mesh and has no historic strategic intention to become public open space.   

While it is recognised that the development of lots along Downs Road will change the immediate setting for adjoining properties, this recommendation is key to addressing the issues of poor perceptions of safety at the reserve, and to ensure that the community realises the full benefit of the Whittlesea Public Gardens.

Urban Design Guidelines and planning controls will be developed to guide the proposed lot development, and will provide protection to existing residents in regards to the perception of over shadowing, overlooking and property height controls which could impact adjacent properties.   The guidelines will require well designed and attractive housing.

For the reasons stated in the Background Section, Proposal Section and Attachment 1 of this report, Council Officers recommend all 20 recommendations, including recommendation 11 be endorsed as part of the Whittlesea Public Gardens Master Plan. 

Financial Implications

The estimated budget required to implement the master plan recommendations is subject to further design development; however initial estimates places the cost at $5.0 to $5.8 million.

The residential development opportunities not only improve the overall safety of the site, it creates potential revenue options which can be used to offset the expenditure to deliver the master plan recommendations. 

Opportunity exists to seek State Government funding from grants such as the Growing Suburbs Fund and Sports and Recreation Victoria for specific draft master plan recommendations. 

Policy strategy and legislation

The Whittlesea Public Gardens draft master plan is consistent with Council’s Open Space Strategy 2016 in providing a major community park and will promote a welcoming and safe public open space for the Lalor and broader community.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Open space

Strategic Objective              We have open spaces that are welcoming and safe for public gathering

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Following extensive consultation with the community, the master plan has been prepared to guide and provide direction for the future development of the Whittlesea Public Gardens.  It responds to the issues emanating from the reserve including poor perception of safety and sets out a plan for high quality public open space to create an attractive environment for the broader community. 

For the reasons stated in the Background Section, Proposal Section and Attachment 1 of this report, Council Officers recommend all 20 recommendations, including the recommendation to create residential lots along Downs Road which is opposed by the petition, be endorsed as part of the Whittlesea Public Gardens Master Plan. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the Whittlesea Public Gardens master plan;

2.       Write to the lead petitioner advising that Council has adopted the master plan, including the recommendation to address safety through the development of  residential lots along the Downs Road Reserve; and

3.       Note that Urban Design Guidelines will be developed to guide residential lot development on the Downs Road road reserve to address some of the petitioner’s concerns.

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                         Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.4       Corporate Services

6.4.1    Safety and Wellbeing report

Attachments:                        1        Workcover data - Confidential

Confidential in accordance with Section 89(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 1989 as it contains details relating to personnel matters.    

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Manager Corporate Accountability and Performance   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council note the report.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    Council has over 1150 employees undertaking a diverse range of roles in various locations within the community.

·    Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) management systems and processes are in place to meet the requirements of Council under the OHS Act 2004.

·    Council’s OHS Roadmap sets the strategic direction, actions and measures to improve safety performance.  This is updated and reported to the Executive Leadership Team quarterly.

·    Six priority safety risks have been identified and a process is in place to review these and determine actions to mitigate the risks.

·    There has been a significant reduction in the number of lost time injuries following implementation of the OHS Roadmap which has included significant training, documentation and prioritising safety and wellbeing initiatives.

·    There have been no lost time injuries for the period April – July 2018.

·    Council’s WorkCover premium is increasing due to large claim costs in previous years, however the number of claims and claim costs for 2018 at this stage is tracking well with reduced claim numbers and costs.

 

 

Report

Introduction

Council has over 1150 employees undertaking a diverse range of roles in various locations.  This includes staff working in the community in such areas as aged services, maternal and child health, youth, community development, roads, parks, school crossing, local laws as well as office based employees and professionals.  Council has a duty of care to comply with legislation and to take reasonable steps to provide a safe environment for Councillors, staff, contractors, volunteers and members of the public.

As ‘Officers’ under the OHS Act 2004, Council has a responsibility to take reasonable steps to acquire knowledge, make decisions and verify performance to be comfortable that Council is meeting the OHS responsibilities.

Background

A Council forum was held on 15 May 2018 where Barry Sherriff, Lawyer and OHS Consultant presented “Effectively managing health and safety – leadership, risk management and compliance”.  This included outlining responsibilities for Council as senior officers under the OHS Act 2004.

Regular reports will be provided to Council to provide an overview of Council’s safety performance and initiatives to build a wellbeing culture and effectively manage safety risks.

Proposal

For Council to note the information in the report in relation to safety and wellbeing management at Council.

Council has an Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) management system, policy, procedures and guidelines in place to meet the requirements of the OHS Act 2004.  A proactive approach to managing safety and reducing hazards and risks has been implemented through Council’s OHS Roadmap which supports the People Strategy (developed 2017) which includes ‘Wellbeing’ as one of five key focus areas. 

OHS Roadmap

Council’s OHS Roadmap includes 23 actions to be achieved during 2018 over 12 elements.  All actions are on track or have been achieved. The key elements and status of the actions are summarised below.

Roadmap Element

# Actions

Status

1

Develop leadership, capability and accountability of frontline supervisors / team leaders / managers

4

Achieved

2

Ensure caring focus of support for ill and injured staff

1

In progress - on track

3

Implementation of targeted mental health and wellbeing programs

3

Achieved

4

Implementation of an OHS business partner model

1

Achieved

5

Implementation and training of the Risk Management Safety System (Online OHS management system)

4

Achieved

6

Each business will identify their key OHS risks and implement an Action Plan to mitigate each key risk area

2

In progress - on track

7

Conduct an audit of the current OHS management systems

2

Achieved

8

Implement simplified OHS systems and tools

1

In progress - on track

9

Procurement include OHS systems in contracts

1

In progress - on track

10

Contractors participate in annual OHS management audits

2

In progress - on track

11

Benchmarking with external industries demonstrating excellence in OHS culture

1

In progress - on track

12

Wellbeing awards are held

1

In progress - on track

Priority Risks

As part of the People Plan Wellbeing actions, priority safety risks have been identified for review and to ensure suitable actions are put in place to mitigate these risks.

The identified risks and the timeframes for these reviews are listed below:

Review timeframe

Priority Risks

Jul

2018

Aug

2018

Sep

2018

Oct

2018

Nov

2018

Dec

2018

Jan

2019

Feb

2019

Occupational Violence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working Alone or in Isolation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emergency Management/Response

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Psychological Wellbeing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manual Handling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contractor Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is ongoing review of hazards and risks embedded into the OHS Management system and reporting system.

Lost time injuries

Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) is a standard and indicative measure for safety performance.  LTIFR refers to the number of lost time injuries (a work injury that results in a full day or full shift away from work) within a given period relative to the number of hours worked in that period.  Council use a rolling 12 months as the period.

A key focus on the OHS Roadmap is to reduce our lost time injury frequency rate (LTIFR) by 20% each year. 

Since implementing Council’s Roadmap in February 2018, our LTIFR has decreased from 22.5 to 16.3 which is an excellent result and better than target.  This is due predominantly to no lost time injuries occurring between April and July 2018.

Workcover Premium

Council’s WorkCover premium has increased significantly over the past few years, predominantly due to a number of large claims that occurred from 2015 – 2017 (and also in considering our increasing remuneration).  There has been a focus on early intervention and early and sustained return to work over the past 12 months which has resulted in a reduction of WorkCover claims and early return to work of injured employees.  This will impact on the premium in future years, however will not occur in the short term as WorkCover premiums are based on claims costs for the previous three-year period.

Information about Council’s WorkCover premium is attached.

Consultation

Monthly reporting is provided to the Executive Leadership Group and Council has an OHS Committee which meets bimonthly to review all safety data and the OHS Roadmap implementation.

Critical Dates

The OHS Roadmap is reviewed and updated annually.  The 2019 Roadmap will be prepared for Executive Leadership endorsement by December 2018.

Financial Implications

WorkCover premium costs are allocated in the budget.  Good OHS practices can lead to reduced absenteeism and reduced lost time injuries resulting in a reduced WorkCover premium.

Policy strategy and legislation

Safety and wellbeing of staff is directly linked with Council’s People Plan key focus area of ‘Wellbeing’ and Council’s Value of ‘Wellbeing’.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council explores and adopts best practice models

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Safety and wellbeing are a priority as outlined in the People Plan and Council Values.  The OHS Roadmap has been successfully implemented with all actions achieved or on track for completion.  Whilst Council’s WorkCover premium is increasing there has been a significant decrease in lost time injuries with no lost time injuries occurring between April and July 2018. 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to note the report.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.4.2    Reappointment of Independent Member to the Audit & RIsk Committee and Proposed Fee Increase  

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Internal Compliance Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to:

 

1.       Reappoint Mr Michael Ulbrick as an independent member to the City of Whittlesea’s Audit & Risk Committee commencing 1 October 2018 for a three year term ending 30 September 2021, in accordance with the terms of reference contained in the Audit & Risk Committee Charter.

 

2.       Set the fee per Audit & Risk Committee meeting, effective from 1 October 2018, to $1,410 for the Chair and $1,120 for the other independent members.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

In accordance with the City of Whittlesea Audit & Risk Committee Charter, Council is required to appoint independent external representatives to the Audit & Risk Committee. 

This report seeks Council’s approval to reappoint Mr Michael Ulbrick as an independent member to the Committee, as his current term concludes on 30 September 2018.  This report is also seeking Council’s consideration of an increase in fees paid to independent members of the Committee.

 

 

Report

Background

At its meeting on 9 August 2016, Council resolved to appoint Mr Michael Ulbrick as an independent external representative to the Audit & Risk Committee for a two year term ending 30 September 2018. In accordance with the Audit & Risk Committee Charter, independent representatives can be reappointed for up to three additional three year terms, subject to Council approval.

The Audit & Risk Committee Charter also states that the remuneration paid to independent members for attendance fees is to be reviewed annually by Council.  The current fee of $1,385 per meeting for the Chair and $1,100 per meeting for the other independent members was last reviewed by Council at the 31 October 2017 Council meeting. 

Proposal

Reappointment of Independent Committee Representative

To ensure that all skills, knowledge and expertise are maintained on the Committee and that no two members’ terms end simultaneously, a staggered approach to Committee appointments was introduced in 2015.

To implement a staggered approach to Committee member appointments, Mr Ulbrick’s most recent appointment to the Committee was for a two year term ending 30 September 2018. The current terms of the other two independent members of the Committee, Ms Theresa Glab and Mr Geoff Harry, conclude on 30 September 2019 and 30 September 2020 respectively.

Mr Ulbrick is considered to be a valuable member of the Audit & Risk Committee and has expressed a strong desire to continue with the City of Whittlesea to further enhance the role and importance of the Audit and Risk Committee.  It is recommended to Council that Mr Ulbrick be reappointed to the Audit & Risk Committee for an additional term of three years commencing 1 October 2018.

 

Proposed Fee Increase for Independent Committee Representatives

The role and responsibility of Audit & Risk Committee members is ever increasing, particularly in this time of increased focus and scrutiny over matters of compliance, audit, risk management and prudent financial management.  From 1 October 2018, it is proposed to increase remuneration to independent members from $1,100 to $1,120 per meeting and the Chair from $1,385 to $1,410 per meeting. 

This represents a 2% increase, which is comparable with the most recent increase in Mayoral and Councillor Allowances, as set by the Minister for Local Government.  This increase also recognises the time, commitment, responsibilities and level of business knowledge required by Audit & Risk Committee members.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority          Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction         Good Governance

Theme                          Continuous Improvement

Strategic Objective     Our Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations.

The establishment of the Audit & Risk Committee and the reports it receives are reflective of Council’s commitment to the implementation of good governance principles.  The Committee provides advice to Council to assist with fulfilling its oversight responsibilities for the financial and non-financial reporting process, internal controls, the audit process, risk management and Council’s process for monitoring compliance with legislation and regulations and the Code of Conduct.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

In accordance with Council’s Audit & Risk Committee Charter, three independent external members of the Committee must be appointed by Council to the Committee.  To allow for staggering of Committee member appointments, and as one of the Committee member’s current terms is due to expire, Council is required to make a further appointment. It is recommended that Mr Michael Ulbrick be reappointed to the Committee for an additional three year term.

Additionally, Council is required to consider the fee paid to independent members of the Committee on an annual basis.  The proposed fee increase of 2% is reflective of the Committee members’ responsibilities and duties and is comparable with the most recent increase in Mayoral and Councillor Allowances.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to:

 

1.       Reappoint Mr Michael Ulbrick as an independent member to the City of Whittlesea’s Audit & Risk Committee commencing 1 October 2018 for a three year term ending 30 September 2021, in accordance with the terms of reference contained in the Audit & Risk Committee Charter.

2.       Set the fee per Audit & Risk Committee meeting, effective from 1 October 2018, to $1,410 for the Chair and $1,120 for the other independent members.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.4.3    Part of 30 Girvan Place, South Morang - Road Discontinuance - Committee of Council Recommendation   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Senior Property Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.   Note that no public submissions were received in response to the proposed discontinuance and transfer of road (120m2) to the adjoining landowner at 30 Girvan Place, South Morang.

2.   Formally discontinue and transfer a section of road to the adjoining landowner at 30 Girvan Place, South Morang for the purposes of servicing a new residential subdivision (34 lots) under the Girvan Place / Martin Close Development Plan (under planning permit 716954).

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·        The discontinuance will allow Council to transfer the section of road reserve (being 120m2 in total) to the adjoining landowner at 30 Girvan Place, South Morang.

·        The land, which is not considered essential for road purposes in its present form, would be discontinued and sold for the purposes of servicing a new residential subdivision (34 lots) under the Girvan Place / Martin Close Development Plan (under planning permit 716954).

·        The Applicant has agreed to purchase the land at a market value of $48,000 (plus GST) and bear all costs associated with the transfer (i.e. surveying and advertising).

·        No submissions were received at the close of the advertising period (8 August 2018).  A memo was sent to the Committee of Council on Wednesday 8 August 2018, advising that no public submissions were received and the Committee of Council hearing would not be required.

 

 

Report

Background

Council, at its meeting held on 3 July 2018, formally resolved to discontinue a section of road reserve (120m2) and transfer it to the adjoining landowner at 30 Girvan Place, South Morang. 

The land (being 120m2 in total), which is not considered essential for road purposes in its present form, would be discontinued and sold for the purposes of servicing a new residential subdivision under the Girvan Place / Martin Close Development Plan.

The land presently links to the existing driveway of 30 Girvan Place but will no longer be required, following the proposed realignment of the future road network under planning permit 716954.

Proposal

To seek Council’s final recommendation in consideration of the public submissions received (none) in relation to the discontinuance and transfer of a section of road to the adjoining landowner at 30 Girvan Place, South Morang for the purposes of servicing a new residential subdivision under the Girvan Place / Martin Close Development Plan.

committee of council

A Committee of Council, comprising of Cr Emilia Lisa Sterjova, Cr Ricky Kirkham and Cr Tom Joseph, was appointed to consider any written submissions received in response to Council’s public notice advertised in the Whittlesea Leader on Tuesday 10 July 2018.

No submissions were received at the close of the advertising period (8 August 2018, 12 noon).  A memo was sent to the Committee of Council on Wednesday 8 August 2018, advising that no public submissions were received and the Committee of Council hearing would not be required.

Financial Implications

The land has been valued and an agreement reached (by both parties) on the proposed sale price of $48,000 (plus GST).

All additional costs associated with the purchase, i.e. surveying, advertising and transfer, will also be borne by the Applicant (approximately $5,000).

Policy strategy and legislation

Council has sought public submissions on the proposed discontinuance under Section 206 and 223 of the Local Government Act 1989.  Submissions were invited for a period of no less than 28 days and referred on to an appointed Committee of Council for consideration.  The appointed Committee has been advised that no submissions were received.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Accessibility in, out and around our City

Theme                                   Built environment

Strategic Objective              Our neighbourhoods are designed to be well-connected and create cohesive communities

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The proposed discontinuance and sale of land (being 120m2 in total) will be undertaken for the purposes of servicing a new residential subdivision (34 lots) under the Girvan Place / Martin Close Development Plan (under planning permit 716954).

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note that no public submissions were received in response to the proposed discontinuance and transfer of road to the adjoining landowner at 30 Girvan Place, South Morang.

2.       Formally discontinue and transfer a section of road to the adjoining landowner/applicant at 30 Girvan Place, South Morang, for the purposes of servicing a new residential subdivision (34 lots) under the Girvan Place / Martin Close Development Plan (under planning permit 716954), at the agreed purchase price of $48,000 (plus GST), with the applicant to bear all costs associated with the transfer (i.e. surveying and advertising).

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.4.4    Certification of 2017-18 Financial Statements and Unconfirmed Minutes of Audit & Risk Committee Meeting

Attachments:                        1        2017-18 Draft Financial Statements

2        2017-18 Draft Performance Statement

3        Unconfirmed Minutes of the Audit & Risk Committee Meeting Held on 23 August 2018   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Manager Finance & Assets   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Note the Minutes of the Audit and Risk Committee Meeting held on 23 August 2018.

2.   Approve in principle the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

3.   Authorise the Principal Accounting Officer to make minor amendments to the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018 to meet the Victorian Auditor General’s (VAGO) requirements.

4.   Authorise Audit & Risk Committee Councillor representatives, Cr Alessi and Cr Kozmevski to sign-off on the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

5.   Authorise the Chief Executive Officer and Principal Accounting Officer to sign-off on the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

6.   Authorise the final audited Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018 to be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government as part of the Annual Report by 30 September 2018.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    Council is required to submit its audited financial statements and performance statement to the Minister for Local Government by 30 September each year under the Local Government Act 1989 section 131 and the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014.

·    The Financial Statements and Performance Statement have been reviewed by the Audit and Risk Committee and Council’s external auditor at the Audit and Risk Committee meeting held on 23 August 2018 with no audit qualification or high risk issues identified.

 

 

Report

Introduction

This report seeks Council approval for adoption in principle of the City of Whittlesea Annual Financial Statements (Attachment 1) and Performance Statement (Attachment 2) for the year ended 30 June 2018 and authorisation of two Councillors to sign the certifications included in the Reports.

As required under Council’s Audit and Risk Committee Charter, this report also presents the Unconfirmed Minutes of the Audit and Risk Committee meeting held on 23 August 2018 (Attachment 3).

Background

The Financial Statements and Performance Statement are required to be certified by Council’s Chief Executive Officer, Principal Accounting Officer and two Councillors on behalf of Council prior to Council’s auditor signing the audit certifications.

The draft Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for 2017/2018 are firstly presented to Council’s Audit and Risk Committee for review and recommendation for adoption by Council.  The review focuses on:

·    Accounting policies and practices, including any changes to accounting policies and practices

·    Compliance with accounting standards and other reporting requirements

·    Significant adjustments to the financial report (if any) arising from the audit process

·    Significant variances from prior years.

aUDIT and RISK cOMMITTEE MEETING 23 AugUst 2018

The Audit and Risk Committee discussed and reviewed the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement with a representative of Council’s external auditor, Phil Delahunty (RSD).

The Committee recommended a number of minor amendments which have been incorporated, and are reflected in the attached Draft Financial Statements and Performance Statement. 

Comprehensive result

The Comprehensive Income Statement includes an amount after the total surplus (deficit) that represents the net revaluation increase of all property and infrastructure assets.  Therefore, the total comprehensive result for 2017/2018 is $405.024M.

Council measures its underlying operational result to assist in the determination of whether it is operating in a sustainable fashion or not.  The underlying result is an important indicator of Council's long-term financial sustainability.  Whilst an underlying deficit in one financial year is not significant, the continued recording of deficits over a sustained period from Council's operations gradually erodes the net assets of Council.

The underlying result from operations excludes a number of transactions which are either 'non-recurring' or not operational in nature.  These items are frequently unpredictable and typically can change from one year to the next.  The best examples of these items are assets (roads, footpaths, drains, land reserves, etc) that are given to Council by developers once a new subdivision is completed.  There are also other accounting adjustments for when existing assets are revalued.

The aim of an underlying result is to determine whether Council's operational costs/income result is a surplus or deficit outcome.  In this way, Council can, in long-term financial planning, aim for an outcome where pure operational outcomes assist Council in achieving a sustainable organisation.

The table below shows the underlying operational result for the year ended 30 June 2018.

Comprehensive Result from Standard Comprehensive Income Statement

$405.024M

Less Other Comprehensive Income:

 

Asset revaluation increment (decrement)

308.612M

Net result for the year from Comprehensive Income Statement

$96.412M

Less Non-operating Income and Expenditure

 

Grants – capital

12.710M

Contributions - capital

1.324M

Contributions – cash (developer contributions)

18.433M

Contributions - Non-monetary assets

47.921M

Underlying surplus (deficit)

$16.024M

While showing a total comprehensive result of $405.024M, the table above shows that the City of Whittlesea’s underlying operating result for 2017/2018 is a surplus of $16.024M. 

Financial sustainability indicators

The Victorian Auditor-General’s Office publishes Council’s result against a range of indicators used to assist in measuring performance and financial sustainability.  The estimated result of the 2017/2018 indicators are presented in the table below.

 

RATIO

17/18

COMMENTS

Net Result

(Net result / total revenue)

33.25%

Green

This ratio measures Council’s ability to fund operations and asset renewal.  Operating deficits cannot be sustained in the long term.

A less than -10% (deficit) is deemed high risk (red) and a positive result is desirable (green).

 

Adjusted underlying result

(Adjusted underlying

surplus (or deficit) /

Adjusted underlying revenue)

12.22%

Indicator of the broad objective that an adjusted underlying surplus should be generated in the ordinary course of business. A surplus or increasing surplus suggests an improvement in the operating position.

 

A result of less than 0% is deemed as high risk (red) and a result higher than 5% is desirable (green).

Liquidity

(Current assets / current liabilities)

3.64

Green

This ratio measures Council’s ability to pay existing liabilities in the next 12 months.

A result of less that 0.75 is deemed as high risk (red) and a result higher than 1 is desirable (green).

 

Internal financing

(Net operating cash flows / net capital expenditure)

195%

Green

This ratio measures Council’s ability to replace assets using cash generated from operations.

A result of less than 75% is deemed as high risk (red) and a result higher than 100% is desirable (green).

 

Indebtedness

(non-current liabilities / own-sourced revenue)

9.4%

Green

This ratio measures Council’s ability to cover its non-current liabilities with its own sourced revenue.

A result of more than 60% is deemed as high risk (red) and a result lower than 40% is desirable (green).

 

Capital replacement (Cash outflows for property, plant and equipment / Depreciation)

1.81

Green

Comparison of the rate of spending on infrastructure with its depreciation.

A result lower than 1 is deemed high risk (red) and a result higher than 1.5 is desirable (green).

 

Renewal gap

Renewal and upgrade expenditure / depreciation)

1.04

Green

 

Comparison of the rate of spending on existing assets through renewing, restoring and replacing existing assets with depreciation.

A ratio lower that 0.5 is deemed high risk (red) and a result higher than 1 is desirable (green).

 

Overall assessment for long-term financial sustainability

 

Green

The City of Whittlesea remains low risk (green) for its long term financial sustainability.

Proposal

It is proposed that Council:

1.   Note the Minutes of the Audit and Risk Committee Meeting held on 23 August 2018.

2.   Approve in principle the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

3.   Authorise the Principal Accounting Officer to make minor amendments to the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018 to meet the Victorian Auditor General’s (VAGO) requirements.

4.   Authorise the Audit & Risk Committee Councillor representatives, Cr Alessi and Cr Kozmevski, to sign-off on the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

5.   Authorise the Chief Executive Officer and Principal Accounting Officer to sign-off on the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

6.   Authorise the final audited Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018 to be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government as part of the Annual Report by 30 September 2018.

Consultation

Consultation has been conducted with the relevant Council departments and external service providers as necessary through the course of the audit.

Critical Dates

Council is required to submit its audited financial statements to the Minister for Local Government by 30 September each year.

Financial Implications

The cost of the annual audit by VAGO is included within Council’s annual budget.

Policy strategy and legislation

Local Government Act 1989 section 131 and the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Resource management

Strategic Objective              Our Council strives to achieve long term financial sustainability

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Unconfirmed Minutes of the Audit and Risk Committee meeting held on 23 August 2018, (Attachment 3) are presented for information.

The Financial Statements and Performance Statement have been reviewed by the Audit and Risk Committee and Council’s external auditor at the Audit and Risk Committee meeting held on 23 August 2018 with no audit qualification or high risk issues identified.

Two Councillors are required to sign the certification of the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement once clearance is obtained from the Victorian Auditor-General and after the Principal Accounting Officer has signed his certification.  In accordance with usual practice, it is proposed that the Councillors on the Audit and Risk Committee be authorised to sign the certification on behalf of Council after the necessary clearance has been obtained. 

In the event that there may be some late changes made to the Annual Financial Statements or Performance Statement, it is also proposed that the approval given to the Councillors be extended to enable them to sign the certification after the necessary changes have been made.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the Minutes of the Audit and Risk Committee Meeting held on 23 August 2018.

2.       Approve in principle the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

3.       Authorise the Principal Accounting Officer to make minor amendments to the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018 to meet the Victorian Auditor General’s (VAGO) requirements.

4.       Authorise Audit & Risk Committee Councillor representatives, Cr Alessi and Cr Kozmevski, to sign-off on the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

5.       Authorise the Chief Executive Officer and Principal Accounting Officer to sign-off on the Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018.

6.       Authorise the final audited Annual Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018 to be forwarded to the Minister for Local Government as part of the Annual Report by 30 September 2018.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                         Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                         Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                         Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.4.5    2017/18 YEAR END NEW WORKS PROGRAM REPORT

Attachments:                        1        Financial Summary

2        Project Progress Report

3        Carry Forward Funding

4        Project Surplus

5        Project Status Photos

6        Planning and Feasibility Status Report   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Business Support Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.      Note the 2017/18 Year End New Works Program report; and

2.      Approve the proposed funding of carry forward projects totalling $17,373,594 and;

3.      Approve the transfer of surplus of $2,967,403 to the Infrastructure Reserve and $281,180 to the Technology Reserve

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

This report provides an overview of the financial performance and status of the New Works Program at the end of the 2017/18 financial year with the following key points

·    Value of work completed $41,807,356.

·    Adjusted delivery rate of 90% after consideration of abnormal items.

·    Carry forward of $17,373,594.

 

Report

Introduction

This report provides an overview of the financial performance and status of the New Works Program at the end of the 2017/18 financial year and the proposed funding to be carried forward to the 2018/19 New Works Program.

The approved budget for the 2017/18 New Works Program is $59,824,214. The value of work completed is $41,807,356. The adjusted delivery rate is 90%; after taking into consideration abnormal items such as net surplus, unbudgeted income (e.g. grants) and unavoidable delays. 

The proposed carry forward funding into 2018/19 is $17,373,594.  A full list of projects recommended for carry forward is included in Attachment 3.

The net surplus from the 2017/18 New Works Program is $3,248,583 and is a result of projects being completed under budget or projects being delivered by other authorities. 
It is recommended to transfer $2,967,403 to the Infrastructure Reserve and $281,180 to the Technology Reserve.  These funds are to be utilised in funding major infrastructure investments, as determined through the ordinary Council budget consideration and approval process. A list of project surplus is included in Attachment 4.

The fourth quarter was a period when many projects progressed to completion or substantially near completion.  In particular the following key projects have achieved significant milestones throughout the year:

Completion of:

·    Project ID 484 - Refurbish building; Wollert Hall, Epping.

·    Project ID 1884 - Queenscliff Road and Michigan Terrace intersection drainage issue.

·    Project ID 2056 - Epping Services Hub; upgrade of 713 High Street, Epping.

·    Project ID 2078 – Traffic Signals Yan Yean/Cookes Road, Doreen intersection.

·    Project ID 2116 – Concrete Deck Overlay; Findon Road Bridge/Darebin Creek.

·    Project ID 2124 – Concrete Deck Overlay; Findon Road Bridge/Findon Creek.

·    Project ID 2163 – Ball Catching Fencing – HR Uren Recreation Reserve.

·    Project ID 2168 – Black Length Glenburnie Road.

·    Project ID 2169 – Construct Oakbank Boulevard Playground and Township Link.

·    Project ID 2171 – Construct Pedestrian Crossing; Findon Road (east of creek).

·    Project ID 2137 – Construct Roundabout Rockfield Street and Redding Rise.

·    Project ID 2138 – Construct Roundabout Lyndarum Drive and Great Brome Avenue.

Commencement of:

·    Project ID 696 – Construct Soccer Pitches and Pavilion Lalor West Reserve (Mosaic).

·    Project ID 703 – Construct Soccer Pitches and Pavilion Doreen South Reserve (Painted Hills).

·    Project ID 2214 – May Road Lalor CCTV Project.

·    Project ID 1589 – Redevelop Mill Park Leisure and Service Centre.

Ongoing delivery of:

·    Project ID 76 – Local Road Resurfacing Works.

·    Project ID 77 – Local Road Reconstruction/Rehabilitation.

·    Project ID 118 – Renewal of Playgrounds and General Landscape Improvements.

·    Project ID 1914 – Energy Efficiency Program.

Background

Council adopted the 2017/18 New Works Program on 6 June 2017 with a budget of $47,979,270 plus $11,844,944 carry forward providing a total budget of $59,824,214.

Consultation

External stakeholder consultation and engagement is undertaken in relation to individual projects and programs.  This occurs throughout the financial year.

Financial Implications

The 2017/18 budget includes $59,824,214 for the New Works Program (including carry forward funding).  The year-end value of work completed is $41,807,356.  A summary of the program performance by asset group can be found below, whilst a list of all projects with their current status has been included in Attachment 2.

Financial Status of the New Works Program by Group:

Group

Year End Actuals

$

Year End Budgets

$

Year End Variance

$

Annual Budget   

$

Buildings

12,829,190

17,783,904

4,954,714

17,783,904

The Buildings Group has an expenditure underspend of $4,954,714 compared to the year-end budget.  The key projects contributing to the variance are:

·    Project ID 1324 Construct Pavilion and Car Park at Harvest Home Road, Epping.
Inadequate tender submissions have resulted in the works being retendered with a view to awarding a tender in July 2018.

·    Project ID 1589 Redevelop Mill Park Leisure and Service Centre.
Delays in the design phase have resulted in the construction tender and subsequent construction contract award being delayed until July 2018.

·    Project ID 1915 Refurbish Building at Whittlesea Aquatic Facility.
Delivery of this project spans two financial years to enable works to be undertaken during the off season.

Group

Year End Actuals

$

Year End Budgets

$

Year End Variance

$

Annual Budget

$

Drains

1,066,631

1,039,245

(27,386)

1,039,245

Planning & Feasibility

303,607

330,000

26,393

330,000

Drains – Additional expenditure of $27,386 is attributed to excess rock excavations required for Project ID 1884 – Queenscliff Road and Michigan Terrace Intersection Drainage Upgrade (approved by Council on 29/08/2017).

Planning and Feasibility – Over 90% expenditure of this program.  Refer to Attachment 6 for a detailed report.

Group

Year End Actuals

$

Year End Budgets

$

Year End Variance

$

Annual Budget

$

Open Space

10,291,129

17,560,873

7,269,744

17,560,873

The Open Space group is showing an underspend of $7,269,744.  The key projects contributing to this variance are:

·    Project ID 696 Construct Two Soccer Pitches and Pavilion, Lalor West Reserve (Mosaic). The first stage of work includes the drainage works and has been completed.  The second stage of work includes construction of the pitches and pavilion.  The tender approval was delayed, with works commenced in February 2018.

·    Project ID 703 – Construct Two Soccer Pitches and Pavilion Doreen South Reserve (Painted Hills). The first stage of work includes the car park construction and has been completed.  The tender for the second stage of work includes the pitches and pavilion and was delayed due to Melbourne Water approval requirements of the local flood plain levels.  The tender for construction was awarded in August 2018.

·    Project ID 1142 Upgrade Tennis Courts and Pavilion at TH Hurrey Reserve.  Delays were encountered due to extensive approval delays from VicRoads for the intersection required to the site.

·    Project ID 1627 Upgrade Tennis Courts and Pavilion Lalor Tennis Club.  This is a multi-year project and is now almost complete. 

 

Group

Year End Actuals

$

Year End Budgets

$

Year End Variance

$

Annual Budget

$

Plant & Equipment

1,646,164

3,470,384

1,824,220

3,470,384

Transport

1,908,894

2,482,672

591,428

2,482,672

The Plant and Equipment group is showing an underspend of $1,824,220.  The variance is mainly due to Project ID 104 Replacement of Council fleet where the timing to replace vehicles has been delayed for to achieve optimum plant replacement outcomes.  A number of IT projects have also been delayed whilst the IT Strategy is finalised.

The Transport group is underspent by $591,428.  This is mainly attributed to Project ID 2039 -  Signalise Intersection Ferres Boulevard/Findon Road due to the tender period being extended to the end of June 2018.

Group

Year End Actuals

$

Year End Budgets

$

Year End Variance

$

Annual Budget

$

Roads & Paths

13,761,741

17,157,136

3,395,395

17,157,136

The Roads and Paths group is underspent by $3,395,395 due to the following projects:

·    Project ID 1677 – Construct Bridge and Shared Path Plenty Road (Wealthiland Drive)
Confirmation was received during the year that VicRoads will deliver this project in Stage 2 of the Plenty Road Upgrade Project.  This budget is now surplus.

·    Project ID 2072 – Streetscape Improvements Program: Lalor High Street Shops. The preliminary package of works was retendered several times due to the lack of suitable tender submissions.

·    Project ID 2142 – 480 Cooper Street Fire Main. Delays encountered through negotiations with key stakeholders to ensure a suitable outcome.

Planning and Feasibility Program Update

The Planning and Feasibility Program is designed to allow for adequate planning, scoping, budgeting and scheduling of future projects.  This ensures that projects are correctly scoped and ready for delivery in future years and provides the opportunity to take advantage of grant funding as it becomes available.  Forward planning also ensures that sufficient feasibility work and thorough project briefs and business cases are prepared for future projects.

The 2017/18 New Works Program provides a budget of $330,000 for the planning and feasibility of future projects.  Attachment 6 provides an update on the status of the Planning and Feasibility Program for 2017/18.

Forecast

A number of projects will be continuing into the 2018/19 financial year with significant expenditure expected within the first six months of the new financial year.  In particular, the commencement of works at Mill Park Leisure and Service Centre and construction works at Lalor West Reserve (Mosaic) and Doreen South Reserve (Painted Hills) soccer pitches and pavilions.

It is proposed to carry forward into 2018/19 funding of $17,373,594.  Key items to be carried forward include multi-year projects which have funding allocations across multiple financial years.  A full listing is contained in Attachment 3 of this report.

Policy strategy and legislation

The business case associated with individual projects identifies the respective policy to which they relate.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council explores and adopts best practice models

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

This report provides a summary of the year-end status of the 2017/18 New Works Program.  A continuous improvement program is being implemented to enhance systems, processes and practices to improve the planning and delivery of the New Works Program.

The adjusted delivery rate is 90% after taking into consideration abnormal items such as net surplus, unbudgeted income (grants) and unavoidable delays.  The total number of projects for the 2017/18 New Works Program was 163. Of this, 105 projects have been completed and 58 are ongoing or multi year.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the 2017/18 Year End New Works Program report.

2.       Approve the proposed funding of carry forward projects totalling $17,373,594. (As per Attachment 3) and;

3.       Approve the transfer of surplus of $2,967,403 to the Infrastructure Reserve and $281,180 to the Technology Reserve. (As per Attachment 4)

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                         Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.4.6    Council Action Plan 2017-18 Achievement Report

Attachments:                        1        Council Action Plan 2017/18 - Achievement Report   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Manager Corporate Accountability and Performance   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to note the report.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

The Council Action Plan 2017/18 concludes with the following key highlights:

·    Council achieved 25 of the 31 major initiatives, an achievement rate of 81 per cent, including:

·    Land acquisitions made along the Epping/Wollert rail corridor will facilitate future public transport delivery by the State Government.

·    New shared pathways along McDonalds Road, Darebin Creek Reserve, Roslyn Way and the South Morang Pipe Track will improve how commuters and recreational users travel across the City.

·    The Gambling Strategy and Action Plan is on-track with strong support from the community, having received over 1400 signatures in over a month calling for the State to introduce reforms and stop the harm from poker machines.

·    Major events delivered under the Multicultural and Reconciliation Action Plans are raising awareness, inclusion and celebrate Whittlesea’s rich cultural diversity.

·    Neighbourhood and Town Centre renewals commenced at Lalor, Thomastown and South Morang will improve streetscape, local amenity and community safety in these key areas of the City.

·    The Mernda Town Centre Development Plan has been adopted to create a vibrant, well-connected new town centre in the City’s north.

·    The Mill Park Leisure Centre redevelopment is on-schedule and will deliver world-class facilities including fully accessible pools and water play features, enlarged gym and fitness program areas, outdoor fitness, family play and BBQ areas. The project is expected to be complete by mid-2020.

·    Construction commenced for new soccer pitches and recreational facilities in Lalor, Doreen and Epping will enable our community to have better access to sporting facilities and open space.

·    New park upgrades in Epping, Thomastown and Whittlesea together with over 1,500 new trees planted will continue to improve the City’s landscape, open space and liveability.

·    A Major Initiative achievement rate improvement of 5 per cent over last year’s rate of 76 per cent.

·    The remaining six major initiatives from 2017/18 will be completed during the current 2018/19 financial year.

 

Report

Background

Council adopted the ‘Shaping our Future’ Council Plan 2017-21 and Council Action Plan 2017/18 on 30 May 2017.  The Council Plan is the key strategic document providing direction over the Council term.  The Council Action Plan is developed annually as an accompaniment to the Council Plan and includes the major initiatives that are to be achieved each year.

Introduction

The Council Action Plan 2017/18 contains 31 major initiatives. The summary of the Council Action Plan final results for 2017-18 are graphed below under each Council priority.

Graph 1 – 2017/18 Council Action Plan | Full year summary

Overall, Council achieved 25 of the 31 major initiatives in the 2017-/18 Council Action Plan, which equates to an achievement rate of 81 per cent. The remaining six major initiatives will be completed in the 2018-19 financial year as follows:

 

Major Initiative

Expected completion date

Comments

Construction of Findon Road extension
(Land acquisitions and design)

Design will be complete by November 2018. Further update will be provided in Quarter 1 2018-19.

Negotiations remain ongoing in relation to the land acquisition process with the Developer further east along Findon Road (towards Plenty Road). Disagreement over the valuation of the Melbourne Water land at 135 Williamsons Road resulted in unexpected delays in the project.

Investment Development Framework
(Economic Development Strategy)

March 2019

The Investment Development Framework was put on hold pending the release of the Investment Attraction Strategy for Melbourne's North (NORTH Link), an opportunity which will inform Council’s strategy.

Plenty Valley Town Structure Plan
(Planning Scheme Amendment)

November 2018

Additional consultation requested affected the original timeframe to deliver this Major Initiative. Council will consider recommendations and seek to adopt the amendment in Quarter 2, 2018/19.

Mernda Town Centre and Rail Extension

Timing of finalisation of the Agreement is dependent on the proponent, expected by December 2018.

Draft planning permit finalised. A planning permit may be issued once the proponent and Council have entered into an agreement relating to development contributions.

Recreation Strategy (Active Whittlesea)

4 September 2018

Suitable resources unavailable, resulting in project delays. Project now scheduled to be completed by September 2018.

 

Municipal Biodiversity Action Plan development

Draft to be presented at Council Forum by the end of Quarter 3 2018-19

Suitable resources to develop the action plan were unavailable within the 2017/18 year. This project now features in the 2018/19 Council Action Plan as ‘Endorse and implement Council’s ‘Biodiversity Strategy & Action Plan’.

Although the initiatives mentioned above were considered ‘Not Achieved’ at the end of the financial year as a result of not meeting their original deadline, Council is committed to completing these projects and ensuring they are delivered.

Please refer to Attachment 1 for detailed reporting of the Council Action Plan 2017/18.

Comparison with 2016/17

Council achieved 76 per cent of Major Initiatives (31 out of 41) in 2016/17. Of the outstanding 10 initiatives, 9 have been completed successfully, and 1 initiative is expected to be completed by October 2018.

Consultation

The Council Action Plan 2017/18 was developed by Council, included consultation with community from 4 April 2017 to 5 May 2017 and was endorsed by Council on 30 May 2017.

Financial Implications

There are no direct financial implications as a result of this report.

Policy strategy and legislation

This report is provided in accordance with the Local Government Act 1989 and the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014 to enhance Council’s transparency and accountability regarding the delivery of the Council Action Plan 2017/18.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Eighty-one per cent of the Council Action Plan 2017/18 major initiatives have been achieved with the remaining 19 per cent expected to be completed by June 2019.  The Executive Leadership Team will continue to monitor these initiatives on a quarterly basis until they reach completion.  This increases transparency and accountability to ensure all major initiatives are delivered in accordance with the Council Action Plan 2017/18.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to note the report.

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                               Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

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Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

6.5       Executive Services

Nil Reports 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

7.         Notices of Motion

Nil Reports 

8.         Questions to Officers

9.         Urgent BusineSS

10.       Reports from Delegates Appointed BY Council TO Other Bodies


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

11.       Confidential Business

11.1     Partnerships, Planning & Engagement

Nil Reports

11.2     Community Services

Nil Reports

11.3     City Transport and Presentation

Nil Reports


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

11.4     Corporate Services

11.4.1  Business Implications of Withholding Membership Fee Payments

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Manager Finance & Assets

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(h)       Any other matter which the Council or special committee considers would prejudice the Council or any person

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

11.5     Executive Services

11.5.1  MEETINGS OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER 30 July to 24 August 2018

Responsible Officer:           Chief Executive Officer

Author:                                  Executive Assistant to Chief Executive Officer

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(h)       Any other matter which the Council or special committee considers would prejudice the Council or any person

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                            Tuesday 4 September 2018

 

11.6     Notices of Motion

Nil Reports

12.       Closure