Logo_Primary_BlackWhite%20(JPG)

Agenda

 

OF Ordinary
COUNCIL MEETING

HELD ON

Tuesday 6 March 2018

AT 6.30pm

summons

 

You are advised that a Meeting of Council has been called by the Chief Executive Officer on Tuesday, 6 March 2018 in Council Chamber, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang at 6.30pm for the transaction of the following business.

 

S OVERLAND

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

 

 

COUNCILLORS

 

KRIS PAVLIDIS                               MAYOR, SOUTH WEST WARD

LAWRIE COX                                   SOUTH WEST WARD

STEVAN KOZMEVSKI                   SOUTH WEST WARD

CAZ MONTELEONE                       SOUTH WEST WARD

EMILIA LISA STERJOVA               DEPUTY MAYOR, NORTH WARD

TOM JOSEPH                                  NORTH WARD

RICKY KIRKHAM                            NORTH WARD

SAM ALESSI                                    SOUTH EAST WARD

ALAHNA DESIATO                         SOUTH EAST WARD

NORM KELLY                                  SOUTH EAST WARD

MARY LALIOS                                 SOUTH EAST WARD


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

 

 

SENIOR OFFICERS

 

 

SIMON OVERLAND                          CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

RUSSELL HOPKINS                         DIRECTOR COMMUNITY SERVICES

STEVE O’BRIEN                                DIRECTOR PLANNING AND MAJOR PROJECTS

NICK MANN                                       DIRECTOR CITY TRANSPORT & PRESENTATION

HELEN SUI                                        DIRECTOR CORPORATE SERVICES

LIANA THOMPSON                          DIRECTOR PARTNERSHIPS & ENGAGEMENT

MICHAEL TONTA                              MANAGER GOVERNANCE

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                   Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

 

ORDER OF BUSINESS

 

The Chief Executive Officer submits the following business:

1.            Opening.. 11

1.1         MEETING OPENING AND PRAYER.. 11

1.2         ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT.. 11

1.3         Present.. 11

2.            Apologies.. 11

3.            Declarations of Interest.. 11

4.            Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting.. 11

5.            questions to councillors, Petitions and Joint Letters.. 13

5.1         Questions to councillors.. 13

5.2         Petitions.. 13

Nil Reports.. 13

5.3         Joint Letters.. 13

Nil Reports.. 13

6.            Officers' Reports.. 15

6.1         Planning and Major Projects.. 15

6.1.1       Planning Scheme Amendment C218 - 150 Epping Road Rezoning - Exhibition Outcomes.. 15

6.1.2       Planning Scheme Amendment C127 - Integrated Water Cycle Management planning policy - Exhibition Outcomes and Adoption.. 25

6.1.3       Planning Scheme Amendment C212 - Cooper Street Employment Area Planning Controls - Exhibition Outcomes and Adoption   35

6.1.4       Planning Scheme Amendment C223 - Child Care Centre Local Planning Policy - Authorisation.. 59

6.1.5       2017/18 Second Quarter New Works Program Report. 73

6.2         Community Services.. 105

6.2.1       PROVISION OF HACC DELIVERED MEALS SERVICE - CONTRACT NO. 2014-192 - CONTRACT EXTENSION.. 105

6.3         City Transport and Presentation.. 109

6.3.1       2017-164 Darebin Creek Trail Wayfinding sign installation   109

6.4         Corporate Services.. 113

6.4.1       Retirement Village Property Rates - Response to Petition   113

6.4.2       Financial Performance Report for the period ended 31 December 2017 and 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review... 121

6.4.3       Contract Finalisation Report - Presented Quarter 3, 2018  149

6.4.4       Council Action Plan 2017/18 - Quarter 2 Progress Update   153

6.5         Partnerships & Engagement.. 161

6.5.1       Bundoora Square Shopping Centre Marketing and Business Development Special Rate Renewal - Notice of Intent. 161

6.5.2       Thomastown Shopping Centre Marketing and Business Development Special Rate - Notice of Intent. 171

6.5.3       Participation and Engagement: Approval of projects proposing the use of external consultants (Quarter 3) 181

6.5.4       Interstate Conferences.. 193

6.5.5       Assemblies of Councillors Report 6 March 2018. 197

6.5.6       The City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering Policy   201

6.6         Executive Services.. 209

Nil Reports.. 209

7.            Notices of Motion.. 211

7.1           Notice of Motion 852 - RESCISSION OF COUNCIL RESOLUTION ITEM 6.3.1 - PROPOSED ROUNDABOUT: BETULA AVENUE / BELMONT WAY, MILL PARK made at the Council Meeting on 6 February 2018. 211

8.            Questions to Officers.. 212

9.            Urgent BusineSS.. 212

10.         Reports from Delegates Appointed BY Council TO Other Bodies.. 212

11.         Questions to CouncillorS will be considered at 5.1. 212

12.         Confidential Business.. 213

12.1       Planning and Major Projects.. 213

Nil Reports.. 213

12.2       Community Services.. 215

12.2.1    Sporting Club Debtors Report. 215

12.3       City Transport and Presentation.. 217

12.3.1    Growling Frog Golf Course Business Strategy.. 217

12.4       Corporate Services.. 219

Nil Reports.. 219

12.5       Partnerships & Engagement.. 221

Nil Reports.. 221

12.6       Executive Services.. 223

12.6.1    MEETINGS OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER 22 January 2018 to 23 February 2018. 223

12.6.2    CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER EMPLOYMENT MATTERS - CEO KPIs   225

12.6.3    CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER EMPLOYMENT MATTERS ADVISORY COMMITTEE (CEMAC) REPORT OF ACTIVITIES 2018. 227

13.         Closure.. 229

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

 

Note:

At Council’s discretion, the meeting may be closed in accordance with Section 89 of the Local Government Act 1989. The provision which is likely to be relied upon to enable closure is set out in each item. These reports are not available for public distribution.

 

 

Question Time:

During the meeting, Council will answer questions from residents and ratepayers subject to the provisions set out in the Procedural Matters Local Law.  Questions should be submitted in writing before the start of the meeting unless this unreasonably prevents or hinders you from participating. A Question Time form can be downloaded from Council’s website and copies of the form are available in the Council Chamber prior to the start of the meeting.

 

Council is committed to ensuring that all residents and ratepayers of the municipality may contribute to Council’s democratic process and therefore, if you have special requirements, please telephone the Governance Team prior to any Council Meeting on 9217 2294.

 

 

Large Attachments:

Where large attachments form part of a Report, due to the size of the attachments – a copy has not been provided in the Agenda document

Copies of these attachments are available for inspection by the public at the following locations:

a)      Council offices at 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang; and

b)      Whittlesea City Council’s internet site – www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                   Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

1.         Opening

1.1       MEETING OPENING AND PRAYER

The Chief Executive Officer will open the meeting with the reading of the prayers:

 

Almighty God, we humbly beseech thee, to vouchsafe thy blessing upon this council.  Direct and prosper its deliberations to the advancement of thy glory and the true welfare of the people of the Whittlesea City Council.

 

Our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive them that trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever.

 

Amen

 

1.2       ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT

The Mayor will read the following Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners Statement.

 

On behalf of the Whittlesea City Council I recognise the rich Aboriginal heritage of this country and acknowledge the Wurundjeri Willum Clan as the traditional owners of this place.

 

1.3       Present

2.         Apologies

3.         Declarations of Interest

4.         Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting

Ordinary Meeting of Council held 6 February 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

5.         questions to councillors, Petitions and Joint Letters

5.1       Questions to councillors

5.2       Petitions

Nil Reports

5.3       Joint Letters

Nil Reports   

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.         Officers' Reports

6.1       Planning and Major Projects

6.1.1    Planning Scheme Amendment C218 - 150 Epping Road Rezoning - Exhibition Outcomes

File No:                                  195790

Attachments:                        1        Site Locality & Zoning Plan

2        Proposed Zoning Map - 150 Epping Road   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Strategic Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.   Adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C218 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

2.   Request the Minister for Planning approve Amendment C218 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

3.   Advise the proponent and submitters of Council’s resolution regarding the above.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·   Amendment C218 proposes to rezone 2.032ha of Farming Zone land to the General Residential Zone – Schedule 1 at 150 Epping Road, Epping, in accordance with approved strategic planning frameworks.

·   Amendment C218 was first reported to Council in October 2017 requesting Ministerial Authorisation to prepare and exhibit the Amendment under Section 20(2) of the Planning & Environment Act 1987.

·   The exhibition was undertaken between January and February 2018. No objecting submissions were received.

·   It is recommended that Council adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C218 and forward the Amendment to the Minister for Planning for approval.


 

Report

BACKGROUND

The purpose of this report is to discuss the outcomes of the statutory exhibition process for Whittlesea Planning Scheme Amendment C218, including, a summary of submissions received and recommendations to finalise the Amendment.

In 2017, Council received an application on behalf of landowners at 150 Epping Road to rezone the land from Farming Zone to General Residential Zone – Schedule 1 (see Attachment 1).

As reported to Council on 31 October 2017, the current zoning of the land as Farming Zone is inconsistent with the applicable strategic frameworks which nominate the site for residential development, namely the Harvest Home Local Structure Plan (HHLSP) and Epping North Development Plan (ENEDP).

The site was omitted from Amendment C81 (Part 2) in 2007, which would have rezoned the site, due to outstanding VCAT matters relating to the illegal removal of native vegetation.

To rectify the enforcement matters, a Section 173 Agreement under the Planning & Environment Act 1987 between Council and the landowner was executed. This Agreement sets out the requirements of the landowner to allocate 0.15ha of land for open space on the site, where the trees once stood, as well as paying native vegetation offsets to Council at the time the land becomes available for development. Amendment C218 seeks to allow for the rezoning to enable the outcomes of the strategic planning frameworks and Section 173 Agreement to be realised.

NOTIFICATION PROCESS

Given the nature of Amendment C218 and the fact that it is bringing the site in line with the intended purpose of the HHLSP and ENEDP, at its meeting of 31 October 2017, Council resolved to request the Ministerial authorisation to prepare and exhibit the Amendment via Section 20(2) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. Amendments considered under Section 20(2) provide a level of exemption and review requirements, for Amendments deemed to be procedural in nature.

Notification under Section 20(2) is limited to the prescribed Ministers under the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and any authorities the Minister for Planning requires notification to be given to. As the Amendment adjoins Epping Road (Road Zone - Category 1), the Minister required notification of Amendment C218 be made to Vic Roads and Transport for Victoria in addition to the prescribed Ministers.

In accordance with Section 20(2), and the direction of the Minister for Planning, Amendment C218 was placed on exhibition between 11 January 2018 and 2 February 2018. Notice of the amendment was also placed within the Victorian Government Gazette.

At the conclusion of the exhibition period, two submissions were received. The submissions received were from Vic Roads and Transport for Victoria, who both did not object to the Amendment. These are summarised in the table below with accompanying officer responses as relevant.


 

SUBMISSIONS

Key Submission Points

Officer Response

Agency

VicRoads

VicRoads understands that the rezoning of the subject site will facilitate the process to set aside land for the eventual duplication of Epping Road. On this basis VicRoads does not object to Amendment C218, subject to no direct access being provided from this land to Epping Road in the interim or ultimate scenario.

Noted. VicRoads will be provided the opportunity to comment on any future subdivision application in accordance with Section 55 of the Planning & Environment Act 1987.

Transport for Victoria (TfV)

TfV understands the current zoning does not reflect the strategic intent of the land. Furthermore TfV acknowledges the reasoning behind the property not being rezoned originally as part of Amendment C81 (Part 2) in 2007. TfV has no objection to Amendment C218.

Noted.

CRITICAL DATES

·    September 2002 – Approval of the Harvest Home Local Structure Plan.

·    January 2005 – Approval of the Epping North East Development Plan.

·    July 2005 – Fifteen river red gum trees are illegally removed from the site.

·    August 2005 – Council resolved to initiate prosecution and enforcement proceedings.

·    December 2006 – Enforcement Orders are made by VCAT.

·    February 2007 – Council resolves to exclude 150 Epping Road from Amendment C81 (Part 2).

·    October 2007 – Amendment C81 (Part 2) approved to rezone land adjacent to the subject site from Farming Zone to Residential 1 Zone.

·    2007 to 2017 – Various matters relating to enforcement proceedings and VCAT hearings are undertaken.

·    July 2017 – Enforcement and compensation matters between Council and the new landowner are resolved.

·    September 2017 – Request received to consider the rezoning of 150 Epping Road.

·    October 2017 – Amendment C218 reported to Council requesting Ministerial Authorisation to prepare and exhibit the Amendment.

·    January/February 2018 – Amendment C218 placed on exhibition.

DISCUSSION

Planning Scheme Amendment C218 has been subject to an exhibition process under Section 20(2) of the Planning & Environment Act 1987. At the conclusion of this period no objecting submissions were received.

The residential designation of 150 Epping Road, Epping, was first identified in 2002 following the approval of the HHLSP. The matters associated with the removal of the fifteen River Red Gums in 2005 have ultimately prohibited the residential development of the site. The resolution of these matters via the executed Section 173 Agreement has now enabled the site to be rezoned as originally intended under Amendment C81 (Part 2).

Given the approval of two strategic planning documents which identify the site for residential development and the construction of infrastructure connections (including street, drainage and power) from adjoining properties, it is the expectation of residents and state agencies that the site will be developed. Furthermore the rezoning is important as it will also allow for land to be set aside for the future widening of Epping Road.

It is therefore considered appropriate to rezone the site for residential purposes as it better reflects the context of the area and the intended strategic outcome.

POLICY STRATEGY AND LEGISLATION

Amendment C218 meets the objectives of several Council policies.

The notable Housing Diversity Strategic Objectives the Amendment responds to include:

·    Provide housing opportunities in close proximity to services and facilities thereby creating opportunities for reduced car use.

·    Foster healthy communities through development of ‘walkable’ communities.

·    A more efficient use of existing infrastructure and investment.

The Amendment is consistent with the Municipal Strategic Statement and Local Planning Policy Framework. Housing is identified 21.02-3 under Key Issues, to address the lack in provision of housing opportunities, as it is an objective of the municipality to support housing in areas that already have the capacity to accommodate new development opportunities. The Amendment addresses this issue by providing housing adjacent to a key arterial road that already has access to public transport and is within walking distance to a number of community facilities.

The Amendment is also consistent with Clause 21.09 – Housing, as it directs housing growth in established suburbs of the municipality and will provide the opportunity for a broad range of housing types to be developed. These build upon the strategies and objectives of the State Government’s key Metropolitan Planning Strategy Plan Melbourne 2017-2050.

In particular:

·    Direction 2.1 – Manage the supply of new housing in the right locations to meet population growth and create a sustainable city.

·    Direction 2.2 – Deliver more housing closer to jobs and public transport.

·    Direction 5.2 – Create neighbourhoods that support safe communities and healthy lifestyles.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Planning our space

Strategic Objective              Urban design helps build our connection to place, the natural environment and the community

 

The proposed Amendment C218 will provide more housing opportunities in an area that is easily connected to active and passive open space, and community facilities. As such, it is considered that the Amendment will meet the objective to ‘help build our connection to place, the natural environment and the community’.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The rezoning of 2.032 hectares of land at 150 Epping Road, Epping, will accurately reflect the intent of the site to be developed for residential purposes, as envisaged within the Harvest Home Local Structure Plan and Epping North Development Plan.

With the resolution of outstanding VCAT enforcement orders relating to the removal of significant vegetation, the rezoning of the land can now be progressed.

Given the procedural nature of the Amendment, Amendment C218 has been subject to a limited notification process in accordance with Section 20(2) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. No submissions opposing Amendment C218 were received as part of the exhibition process. Therefore, it is recommended that Council resolve to adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C218 as exhibited and forward to the Minister for Planning requesting approval.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C218 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

2.       Request the Minister for Planning approve Amendment C218 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

3.       Advise the proponent and submitters of Council’s resolution regarding the above.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.1.2    Planning Scheme Amendment C127 - Integrated Water Cycle Management planning policy - Exhibition Outcomes and Adoption

File No:                                  195287

Attachments:                        1        Clause 22.03 Integrated Water Cycle Management (IWCM) local planning policy   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Senior Strategic Policy Planner   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to adopt Amendment C127 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme as exhibited and forward to the Minister for Planning for approval.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    Amendment C127 proposes to introduce a new Integrated Water Cycle Management local planning policy into Clause 22.03 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme.

·    The Amendment was exhibited for four weeks between 23 November and 22 December, 2017. No submissions were received during the exhibition period.

·    In line with statutory requirements Council must make a decision within 60 business days of the closing date of submissions being 23 March, 2018.

·    It is recommended that Council approve Amendment C127 and submit the amendment to the Minister for Planning for approval.


 

Report

Background

The purpose of this report is to seek adoption of Planning Scheme Amendment C127 to introduce an Integrated Water Cycle Management (IWCM) local planning policy at Clause 22.03 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. 

The IWCM project was commenced to fulfil key actions contained in Council’s Stormwater Management Plan (2012-2017), in addition to meeting sustainable water management actions outlined in Council’s Environmental Sustainability Strategy (2012-2022) and Green Wedge Management Plan (2011-2021). The policy is also required to assist Council in meeting the requirements of the State Environment Protection Policy (Waters of Victoria) legislation.

The primary aim of the policy is to improve sustainable water management in the City of Whittlesea through the planning and development process. The policy applies to land within the urban growth boundary and seeks to:

·    Fill a gap in the State Planning Policy Framework which does not require new buildings, works, or commercial and industrial subdivision to meet industry accepted best practice standards;

·    Strengthen the implementation of Clause 56.07 (Integrated Water Management) relating to residential subdivision in line with Council objectives;

·    Address the cumulative impacts of stormwater pollutants caused by urban development that has resulted in critically poor river health conditions in the City of Whittlesea;

·    Deliver a net community benefit through improvements to environmental conditions, liveability, and water security; and

·    Reduce the burden of rising water bills for residents and business through the implementation of rainwater and stormwater capture and reuse systems on site.

The introduction of this policy will ensure that stormwater and potable water alternatives are considered at the time of planning approval for new development and subdivisions so as to minimise costs and ensure optimal outcomes. Currently, IWCM is either not considered at all or left to the building approvals stage when it is more costly to implement IWCM due to design and layouts being fixed. 

A total of twelve other metropolitan Councils have already introduced Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) stormwater local planning policies. The aim of the proposed policy is to build on this existing work while tailoring the objectives to the City of Whittlesea context and including a whole-of-water cycle approach.

The IWCM local planning policy has been developed with the input of Melbourne Water and nine departments across Council, and has also been peer-reviewed by an external expert to ensure alignment with industry and planning best practice.

Council resolved on 29 August, 2017, to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit Planning Scheme Amendment C127, which implements the IWCM policy into the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. Authorisation was subsequently granted and the amendment was exhibited for four weeks between 23 November and 22 December, 2017. No submissions were received during the public exhibition period.


 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT

The IWCM local planning policy (Attachment 1 – Clause 22.01 Integrated Water Cycle Management) seeks to improve the way that development responds to, and incorporates, three key elements of the water cycle: potable water (drinking water and alternate water supply), wastewater, and stormwater.

The policy applies to all land in the urban growth boundary and will only be considered in instances where a planning permit is already required. The following planning permit types will be assessed against the IWCM policy:

·    New buildings and works

·    Extensions to existing buildings that are 50 square metres in floor area or greater

·    Subdivisions

A number of exemptions are outlined at the outset of the policy (Attachment 1) to ensure the policy is not applied in inappropriate circumstances.

The policy includes specific policy statements, objectives, decision guidelines and application requirements that seek to address IWCM at initial planning and design stages. Key policy objectives include:

·    To achieve an acceptable level of stormwater quality performance across a range of land uses, in accordance with the Urban Stormwater Best Practice Environmental Management Guidelines, CSIRO 1999 (BPEM);

·    To ensure urban stormwater meets the requirements of State Environment Protection Policy (Waters of Victoria) legislation; and

·    To reduce pressure on the potable water supply, mitigate flooding and improve downstream river health.

Applicants will be required to submit an IWCM response that demonstrates how their development meets best practice standards for stormwater and considers potable water alternatives. The policy allows for flexibility in meeting the objectives, and a fit-for-purpose solution will be sought in each individual application.

Decision guidelines are included to demonstrate how Council will give specific consideration to a particular issue, and provide further information on how Council will exercise its discretion when considering an application.

A number of support materials have been created by Design Flow Consultants including step-by-step instructions on how to develop an IWCM response, sample responses and case studies, and a deemed-to-comply assessment tool for simple applications.

EXHIBITION OF THE AMENDMENT

Amendment C127 was placed on public exhibition from 23 November and 22 December, 2017.

Notification packages were sent to Melbourne Water and prescribed Ministers. The notification packages contained the regular statutory amendment documents.

Notices were placed in the Victorian Government Gazette and the Whittlesea Leader newspaper. Information about the Amendment was also uploaded to Council’s website.

No submissions were received as part of the Amendment process. Melbourne Water lodged a letter of support for the Amendment prior to the commencement of the exhibition process outlining their support for the policy and commending the City of Whittlesea for the work completed to date.

In line with statutory requirements, Council must make a decision within 60 business days of the closing date of submissions being 23 March, 2018.

DISCUSSION

Interaction with Proposed Environmentally Sustainable Development (ESD) Policy

The Strategic Planning and Design Department, in partnership with other internal departments, has been progressively implementing a number of environmentally focussed planning policies in line with actions contained in Council strategies.

Planning Scheme Amendment C224 is currently underway and proposes to introduce a new Environmentally Sustainable Development (ESD) Local Planning Policy into the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. Council considered the ESD policy at the 6 February, 2017, meeting, where it was resolved to seek authorisation from the Minister for planning to prepare and exhibit the Amendment.

The IWCM and ESD policies contain similar overarching objectives to improve water sustainability at the City of Whittlesea, however the IWCM policy includes more detailed considerations for a wider range of development including multi-lot subdivisions.

Additionally, the IWCM policy has a stronger focus on whole-of-water cycle treatments, potable water alternatives, and innovative outcomes in larger developments and subdivisions.

It is important to note that the policies have been designed to complement each other. Several other Victorian Councils have successfully introduced both ESD and sustainable water local planning policies and are implementing them concurrently through their Planning Schemes.

Financial Implications

It is envisaged that statutory planning staff will take up the assessment of smaller applications utilising the deemed-to-comply assessment tool. Training and up-skilling will be provided for statutory planners and other interested Council staff.

Additional resourcing will be required to handle more complex IWCM responses. This staff resource will ideally have a stormwater management skill set to lead the assessments of larger and more complex IWCM responses and provide advice to applicants and planners.

It is proposed that this staff resource would also look after referrals under the ESD policy, and would have a shared responsibility for providing advice for larger and more complex applications under both policies.

The requirement for an ESD officer was originally flagged in Climate Ready Whittlesea, Council’s adaptation plan (formally adopted in November 2017). A budget request for the ESD position, as outlined in Climate Ready Whittlesea, has been made as part of the upcoming budgeting process. The ESD position, together with the up-skilling and training of staff, will enable the most appropriate response to applications under the IWCM policy.

CRITICAL DATES

The policy project was commenced in February 2014 when Council received grant funding from Melbourne Water’s Living Rivers program.

If Amendment C127 is adopted by Council, a request to approve the amendment will be sent to the Minister for Planning. If Amendment C127 is approved by the Minister for Planning it is likely that it will be Gazetted before the end of the financial year.

In line with statutory requirements, Council must make a decision within 60 business days of the closing date of submissions being 23 March, 2018.

Policy strategy and legislation

State Strategy, Legislation and Guidelines

The following legislation and guidelines support and inform the Amendment:

·    State Environment Protection Policy (SEPP) is a statutory policy under Section 16 of the Environment Protection Act 1970.

·    Water for Victoria is a recent strategic water plan developed by the State Government that recognises the impact of population growth, climate change, and reducing water storage to the Victorian community.

·    Urban Stormwater Best Practice Environmental Management Guidelines (CSIRO, 1999).

Local Plans, Policies and Strategies

·    City of Whittlesea Stormwater Management Plan (SWMP) (2012-2017) the SWMP outlines a program of action to mitigate the threats posed by urban stormwater runoff to the City’s waterways.

·    City of Whittlesea Environmental Sustainability Strategy (2012-2022) (ESS) The ESS sets overarching policy directions and approaches to environmental sustainability across seven priority areas: water, land, climate change, biodiversity, urban land development and the built environment, waste management and resource recovery, and change strategies.

·    City of Whittlesea Green Wedge Management Plan (2011-2021) (GWMP) The document provides specific direction in relation to water to ensure protection through appropriate land management, planning scheme action, and utilising WSUD.

Whittlesea Planning Scheme

·    Municipal Strategic Statement

Clause 21.05 (Environmental and Landscape Values).

·    State Planning Policy

Clause 14.02-1 Catchment Planning and Management which seeks to assist the protection and, where possible, restoration of catchment, waterways, water bodies, groundwater, and marine environment.

Clause 14.02-2 Water Quality which seeks to protect water quality.

Clause 56.07 Integrated Water Management is contained with the residential subdivision Clause 56 of the Victoria Planning Provisions. Clause 56.07 requires all new residential subdivisions to meet current BPEM objectives through the design and management of stormwater systems. Clause 56.07 replies to residential subdivision only.

·    Rescode for residential subdivision Clause 56.07-4 Integrated Water Management/ Urban run-off management.  

 


 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Environmental Sustainability

Future Direction                   Living sustainably

Theme                                   Sustainable city

Strategic Objective              We reduce water use and improve the health of our waterways

Amendment C127 is consistent in meeting the objectives set out in the Council Plan goal to “have a sustainable and healthy city, effectively managing our environmental impacts over the long term”. A new IWCM local planning policy will contribute to this goal by encouraging the consideration of a whole-of-water cycle approach at the outset of the planning and development process.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Planning Scheme Amendment C127 supports Council’s recognised commitment to protecting its waterways and addressing the issues identified in the Stormwater Management Plan (2012-2017), the Environmental Sustainability Strategy (2012-2022), and the Green Wedge Management Plan (2011-2021). The introduction of the policy will also help the City of Whittlesea meet its statutory obligation under the State Environmental Planning Policies (SEPPs).

The policy has been designed to improve sustainable water performance in the City of Whittlesea and requires that applicants meet industry accepted best practice standards for stormwater, and consider the implementation of potable water alternatives on site.

A number of support tools have been developed to assist proponents at the outset of the application process and ensure a fit-for-purpose solution is sought for each site. 

The policy has been undertaken with significant input from relevant council departments, Melbourne Water, and a consultant peer review.

The IWCM policy provides an invaluable pathway for the City of Whittlesea to improve the Planning Scheme that currently contains limited tools to enable stormwater improvements and potable water alternatives in new developments. It will assist in future proofing the municipality against an uncertain climate future, in addition to improving liveability for current and future residents.

Amendment C127 was exhibited for four weeks between 23 November and 22 December, 2017 and no submission were received. Therefore, it is recommended that Council adopt the amendment as exhibited and forward to the Minister for Planning for approval.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to adopt Amendment C127 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme as exhibited and forward to the Minister for Planning for approval.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.1.3    Planning Scheme Amendment C212 - Cooper Street Employment Area Planning Controls - Exhibition Outcomes and Adoption

File No:                                  194010

Attachments:                        1        Locality Map

2        Land Ownership of Submitters

3        Issues Table

4        CDZ2 Post Exhibition

5        Development Plan Post Exhibition    

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Senior Strategic Policy Planner     

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Adopt Amendment C212, subject to post-exhibition changes to Schedule 2 to the Comprehensive Development Zone and to the proposed Cooper Street Employment Area Development Plan as outlined in Attachments 3 and 4.

2.       Submit Amendment C212 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme as proposed in 1. above to the Minister for Planning for approval.

3.       Advise all submitters of the resolutions above.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·        Amendment C212 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme revises the existing planning controls that apply to the Cooper Street Employment Area, to streamline and remove unnecessary duplication.

·        Following public exhibition of the Amendment, two submissions were received.  Post-exhibition changes are recommended to resolve the issues raised by the submitters and avoid referring to an independent Planning Panel.

·        The post-exhibition changes do not materially affect the original intent of the Amendment.

·        In line with statutory requirements, Council must make a decision within 60 business days of the closing date of submissions, being 22 March 2018.

 


 

Report

BACKGROUND

Cooper Street Employment Area (CSEA) is an employment precinct of State significance, providing for a diverse range of industrial and commercial uses. The precinct is zoned for industrial purposes and is bounded by the Hume Freeway to the west, O’Herns Road to the north and Cooper Street to the south. The land on the eastern boundary of the precinct is zoned for industrial and activity centre purposes, and includes the Epping Central Structure Plan area (refer Attachment 1).

It is ten years since the introduction of the CSEA planning framework, and the precinct has been subject to significant demand for employment land. The purpose of the CSEA planning framework is to provide a sound basis for the delivery of local and regional development infrastructure, and to establish the Cooper Street Employment Area as a major industrial complex whilst ensuring that development would be of the highest possible quality. 

While the controls have served their purpose and delivered extremely good outcomes on the ground to date, a review of the planning controls identified significant benefits in amending the planning scheme to streamline the controls. This would ensure that positive outcomes on the ground could be maintained whilst also making sure that processing times of planning permit applications could be reduced to ensure timely development.

In September 2017, Council resolved to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit an amendment to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, pursuant to Section 20(2) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, to update and revise the planning controls as follows:

1.       Cooper Street Employment Area Design and Use Guidelines:

·    Revised and updated to reflect contemporary planning practice, urban design and construction methods.

·    Removal of the land use guidance as it conflict in parts with what is allowed in the zone.

2.       Comprehensive Development Zone Schedule 2 (CDZ2):

·    Increased transparency in relation to the preferred location of uses.

·    Revised to reflect the discretionary nature of the renamed Cooper Street Employment Area Design Guidelines and to reinforce their role in encouraging high standards of urban design and landscaping.

3.       Cooper Street Employment Area Comprehensive Development Plan (CDP) and Cooper Street Employment Area Development Plan (DP) updated to reflect major road connections (constructed or approved) and the layouts re-aligned.

Amendment C212 received authorisation from the Minister for Planning on 1 November 2017 and was subsequently placed on exhibition from 20 November to 22 December, 2017.

AMENDMENT AND STATUTORY EXHIBITION OUTCOMES

The public exhibition process involved notification of Amendment C212 to landowners and occupiers within the precinct, as well as adjacent landowners/occupiers on the eastern boundary of the precinct.

Two submissions were received from precinct landowners following exhibition of the Amendment. The addresses of land in the ownership of, or under contract to, submitters are listed below:

·    96A, 122, 126, and 145A Gateway Boulevard, Epping; and

·    58 Legacy Road, Epping.

Lots that are under contract for purchase by submitters:

·    Proposed Lot 614 (within 145A Gateway Boulevard, Epping); and

·    165-195 O’Herns Road, Epping.

The relevant lots are shown at Attachment 2.

Council officers considered the submissions, which included meeting with submitters with a view to resolving submissions where possible.

Subsequently, minor post-exhibition changes to the documents have been prepared in order to resolve the submissions. Council officers have received confirmation that the submissions have been withdrawn, subject to Council resolving to adopt the Amendment with the changes.

The key issues from submissions have been summarised below. A more detailed account of the issues raised in submissions, the officer response, and any changes proposed to the Amendment, has been provided at Attachment 3.

It is recommended that Council adopt Amendment C212 subject to the post-exhibition changes as recommended below and as shown in Attachments 4 and 5.

Key issues raised in the submissions 

The following issues have resulted in post-exhibition changes to the Amendment:

·   Concerns that the amendment prohibits uses which do not comply with the locational requirements of the Cooper Street Employment Area Development Plan.

Officer Response:

The specific concern relates to changes proposed to Section 2 and Clause 2.0 of Schedule 2 to the Comprehensive Development Zone (CDZ2).

The intention behind the exhibition version of CDZ2 was to make it easier to identify the preferred location of uses than is the case in the existing controls. Previously, the controls applying to the location of uses were documented in three places and had contradictory requirements, which raised an element of doubt about the policy intent. The removal of this ambiguity appears to be a cause for concern from submitters.

In order to resolve submissions, the wording of CDZ2 has been examined for opportunities to make the location of some uses that relate to industry, transport, logistics and storage more clearly subject to Council discretion.

A revision to the Section 2 condition for ‘Industry’, ‘Service Industry’, ‘Transport Terminal’ and ‘Warehouse’ uses is proposed, that would allow for circumstances where Council will have discretion, where appropriate, to approve these types of uses in a location that is contrary to the layout of the Comprehensive Development Plan.

The changes are being proposed in response to submissions, and are not strictly policy neutral but provide Council with the ability to negotiate a land use and development outcome that is compatible with adjoining uses, generates employment, and that complies with the Cooper Street Employment Area Design Guidelines.

The exhibition version of CDZ2 has been updated with the recommended post-exhibition changes (refer Attachment 4).

·   Concerns that changes to the updated Development Plan are not appropriately justified or explained.

The submission raises concerns about the following changes to the DP:

a)           Additional/new/relocated shared paths;

b)           New road access restrictions for some properties with frontage to O’Herns Road;

c)           New traffic lights on O’Herns Road, at the junction with Edgars Creek.

Officer Response:

In drafting the proposed Development Plan (DP) the intention was to reflect elements that have been constructed, as well as existing subdivision permit approvals and approved landscape plans. However, subdivision proposals for one site have recently changed and the proposed DP does not accurately reflect this change. As such, it is appropriate to review and make corrections to the plan.

In response to the specific concerns raised above, the following officer response is provided:

a)      Additional/new/relocated shared paths (which could imply an infrastructure requirement):

Officers note that the pedestrian and bicycle links shown on the exhibited DP largely reflect what has already been constructed or approved within the precinct. Although these pedestrian and cycling links were not previously included in the DP layout, the development approval process has delivered pedestrian and cycling facilities to suit the local development context whilst maintaining regional transport connections.

The CDP identifies higher order path infrastructure, some of which is funded by the Development Contributions Plan (DCP) for the precinct.  The concern from submitters appears to be that the identification of local pedestrian and cycle linkages on the exhibited DP implies that there is a new infrastructure requirement under the DCP. This is not the case.

In order to resolve submissions, it is recommended that the DP layout be revised to align with what is shown on the CDP. Notwithstanding this change, existing development approvals will still deliver proposed pedestrian and cycling infrastructure and Council’s ability to require pedestrian and cycling links in future development approvals will not be compromised (refer Attachment 5).

 

b)      New road access restrictions for some properties with frontage to O’Herns Road:

The existing DP imposed a restriction of access along part of O’Herns Road. The exhibited DP expands the length of that restriction of access to reflect the consistent approach of both Council and VicRoads, and to provide transparency for prospective land purchasers. This approach will continue to be reflected in Council’s development approvals, regardless of whether the proposed layout is retained in the DP.  In order to resolve submissions, it is recommended that the exhibited DP revert to the existing layout (refer Attachment 5).

 

c)      New traffic lights on O’Herns Road, at the junction with Edgars Creek:

The signalised intersection in this location does not accurately reflect the latest subdivision proposal. The exhibited DP has been revised to delete the signalised intersection (refer Attachment 5).

CRITICAL DATES

Amendment C212 received authorisation from the Minister for Planning on 1 November 2017 and was subsequently placed on limited exhibition from 20 November to 22 December, 2017.

In accordance with Ministerial Direction No. 15 (The Planning Scheme Amendment Process):

Council must make a decision within 60 business days of the closing date of submissions, being 22 March 2018.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The adoption of the Amendment as recommended will have no significant impact on resources and administrative costs for Council.

Policy strategy and legislation

Plan Melbourne 2017-2050

Amendment C212 is supported by Policy 1.1.6 from Plan Melbourne 2017-2050. Plan Melbourne identifies five State Significant Industrial Precincts, one of which is the Northern Industrial Precinct which includes the Cooper Street Employment Area. The policy states:

Melbourne’s major industrial areas have become more attractive through recent investments in Victoria’s transport network and hubs.  Unlike many other cities, Melbourne is well positioned to absorb additional growth near major transport gateways and freight terminals.

State Planning Policy Framework

The proposed Amendment is generally consistent with:

·        Clause 17.01-1 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, which seeks to provide outlets of trade-related goods or services directly serving or ancillary to industry and which have adequate on-site car parking.

 

·        Clause 17.02-1 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, which seeks to protect and carefully plan existing industrial areas to, where possible, facilitate further industrial development.

Local Planning Policy Framework (including the Municipal Strategic Statement)

The Amendment is also consistent with the objectives and strategies set out in Clause 21.10 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme relating to employment and economic development.

Relevant strategies include:

·    maximise retention of as much of the local resident industrial owner occupier market as possible in the short term;

·    attract the maximum number of local industries to service the growing local population;

·    substantially increase the range and quality of sites and the quality of services to them; and

·    differentiate future large scale industrial estates based on local conditions and other comparative advantages.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Jobs and Investment

Future Direction                   Growing our economy

Theme                                   Employment

Strategic Objective              We have access to local employment opportunities

 

Amendment C212 is supported by the Council Goal: “We grow our economy by attracting jobs and investment” and the following Strategic Objectives:

·    We have access to local employment opportunities.

·    New business and investment are attracted to our city.

The Amendment will improve the application and assessment process, increase transparency, and reduce the time taken to make decisions on permit applications. This will positively contribute to the level of investment and job creation. 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Amendment C212 seeks to amend the Whittlesea Planning Scheme to revise and update the existing planning controls for the Cooper Street Employment Area. Two submissions were received following limited exhibition of the Amendment in November/December 2017.

Minor post-exhibition changes to the proposed planning controls are recommended in order to resolve the issues raised in the submissions. A table detailing the changes is provided at Attachment 3 and the revised planning controls are shown at Attachments 4 and 5.

It is recommended that Council adopt the Amendment in line with the changes recommended in Attachments 4 and 5.

The submissions have been withdrawn, subject to Council resolving to adopt the Amendment with the changes.  In the event that Council adopts Amendment C212, all submitters should be advised of Council’s resolution.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt Amendment C212, subject to post-exhibition changes to Schedule 2 to the Comprehensive Development Zone and to the proposed Cooper Street Employment Area Development Plan as outlined in Attachments 4 and 5.

2.       Submit Amendment C212 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme as proposed in 1. above to the Minister for Planning for approval.

3.       Advise all submitters of the resolutions above.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.1.4    Planning Scheme Amendment C223 - Child Care Centre Local Planning Policy - Authorisation

File No:                                  195242

Attachments:                        1        Draft Child Care Centre Policy   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Team Leader Strategic Planning Policy   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

THAT Council resolve to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to commence Amendment C223 to update Clause 22.05: Child Care Centre Local Planning Policy of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, as detailed in Attachment 1.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

Amendment C223 proposes to replace the existing Clause 22.05 Child Care Centre Local Planning Policy of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme with an updated policy.

·    There is a perception that as a growth area, there is a demand for child care centres, which has led to a substantial increase in the number of applications, many of which are speculative applications in inappropriate locations. This has led to an oversupply, with 6702 existing/proposed child care places, while only 3408 places are needed in the municipality.

·    The current policy is dated and lacks the guidance necessary to assist in the preparation and assessment of applications. The updated policy outlines Council’s expectations regarding the location and design of child care centres to manage any adverse impacts.

·    The policy seeks to direct child care centres into appropriate locations to ensure positive community outcomes.

·    Despite concerns about an oversupply, the policy provides for flexibility and discretion where a child care centre is located in or adjacent to an activity centre or sited on a collector road that avoids extra generation of traffic on residential streets. In this way, the policy does not constrain competition, which is not a valid planning consideration under the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

 


 

Report

Background

The purpose of this report is to obtain Council approval to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to commence Planning Scheme Amendment C223 to replace Clause 22.05 Child Care Centre Local Planning Policy of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme with an updated policy.

Council has an existing Child Care Centre (CCC) Local Planning Policy (LPP) at Clause 22.05 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme (WPS).  The current policy comprises limited policy content and is over 15 years old.

The municipality is experiencing a substantial increase in the number of child care centre proposals, both in the established suburbs and the growth areas. This increase has raised concerns that proposals are often speculative, sought in inappropriate locations and contain flawed siting and design responses. The key concerns are summarised below:

·        The number of CCC’s exceeds the level of demand in many areas of the municipality;

·        Inappropriate co-location proposals e.g. next to service stations, convenience restaurants  or car washes;

·        Locating centres on roads with very high traffic volumes, raising safety concerns;

·        Poor designs that make these often large centres look like oversized dwellings, leaving insufficient space for the provision of car parking;

·        Designs that provide poor solar access to playspaces; and

·        Proposals that do not adequately consider waste management and collection in their design.

The current policy requires additional guidance to adequately address or provide a framework to respond to these issues.

An internal Working Group was established with cross-Council representation to identify and workshop the issues to inform the drafting of the revised policy. 

A Local Planning Policy only applies in instances where a planning permit application is already required by the Planning Scheme. Its sole purpose is to guide decision making when considering a planning permit application. 

This report was presented to Council on 6 February 2018, at which time it was resolved “THAT Council resolve to defer the item to a subsequent meeting”. The issues raised at the Council meeting include:

·    A tracked changes version of the policy was not available to highlight the changes to the existing policy; and

·    Whether the inclusion of need/demand for child care centres in the policy will impact competition and competitive pricing.

A copy of the draft policy with tracked changes, is included in Attachment 1 to this report. The issue of need and competition is discussed further in the next section of the report.

DISCUSSION

The purpose of Amendment C223 is to update the existing Clause 22.05 CCC Policy which has been developed in accordance with the State Government planning practice note ‘Writing a Local Planning Policy (PPN08)’, and in consultation with the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP).  The policy comprises the following sections: policy application, policy basis, objectives, specific policy provisions, decision guidelines and reference documents.

The policy outlines the City of Whittlesea local context and the need for the policy. This includes a rapidly increasing population, in conjunction with unprecedented numbers of applications, where supply greatly exceeds demand. It also highlights the need for the location and built form outcomes of CCC’s to make a positive contribution to the community in order to satisfy broader land use and development objectives for the municipality. 

The policy sets out what Council is trying to achieve to address the issues arising from current CCC applications.  In particular, it seeks to ensure proposals:

·        Satisfy a demonstrated need for the local community;

·        Prioritise Activity Centre or appropriate non-residential/community hub locations;

·        Discourage locations near roads with, or planned to have, high traffic volumes;

·        Ensure the siting and design of centres positively contribute to the appearance of the surrounding context;

·        Provide separation of pedestrian and vehicular/waste collection access and movement through the site; and

·        Ensure CCC’s do not adversely impact residential amenity.

Decision guidelines are included to highlight the criteria Council officers will review any proposal against, when considering CCC applications. The criteria reinforce the content contained in the revised policy. Relevant supporting documents are listed as reference documents in the policy to assist when preparing and/or deciding on a proposal.

Practical implementation of the policy

The policy will apply to all CCC applications proposed in the municipality, and only where a planning permit is already required by the WPS. This includes CCC’s in both the established and the establishing areas of the municipality, as well as both private sector and Council facilities (i.e. kindergartens providing sessional programs). The policy itself will not trigger for the need for a permit. The proposed policy will provide guidance for applicants in understanding Council’s expectations for the location and design outcomes for CCC’s.

Key elements of the policy

Key elements of the revised policy are discussed below.  

Need and preferred location

The foremost concern with proposals being received by Council is that they are in inappropriate locations, including in areas that are already well serviced by CCC’s.  Further, many are proposed to be co-located with inappropriate non-residential uses, and/or are sought on roads that carry very high traffic volumes. CCC’s in inappropriate locations do not meet wider land use and community building objectives, as identified within the Council Plan and various State and Local Planning Policy directives. 

The municipality has 6702 existing/proposed child care places, while only 3408 places are needed. As a result there is an oversupply of 3,294 child care places (existing/proposed). A recently released Productivity Commission Report, Childcare and Early Learning – Productivity Commission Inquiry Report Vol.1, No.73, 31 October 2014 has found that an oversupply of places leads to cost cutting, centres employing less qualified staff, providing lower quality services, not maintaining the buildings/site, and impacts to competition within the local area. The cumulative impact of this is detrimental to the municipality with lower quality services and poor choices for the community.

To address this, the policy encourages applicants to:

·    Demonstrate that a need for the CCC exists for the local community in the location sought. This will ensure the viable operation of the proposed application and avoid poor community outcomes. It is important to note that need is different to competition, which is not a valid planning consideration under the Planning and Environment Act;

·    Locate the CCC in an Activity Centre or identified non-residential/ community use location or hub well serviced by public transport, bicycle and pedestrian networks. Proposals are encouraged to locate within a 400m walkable distance of an Activity Centre or recognised cluster of community uses, and within 200m walkable distance of an existing or future planned public transport stop or train station. Both distances are to be measured by the shortest route reasonably accessible by foot;

·    Child care centres are encouraged on a suitable scale of road, in particular collector roads are preferred over arterial roads or local streets. Associated traffic is not compatible with a local street environment, while traffic volumes and speeds on higher order roads (arterial roads) do not provide a safe environment for parents with small children. Positioning on a collector road provides a safer environment for vehicles, adults and children when accessing and exiting a site. This reflects the Department of Education’s position to not support new schools on arterial roads. It is noted that Vic Roads also limit property access to arterial roads to maintain safety and traffic flow; and

·    Non-compatible co-location options are identified and include uses such as service stations, car washes and convenience restaurants.

While applicants are required to demonstrate there is a local need, as a local planning policy, the primary aim is to direct these facilities into appropriate locations where they best serve the broader needs of the community and provide for positive outcomes. On this basis, despite oversupply concerns, the policy provides for flexibility and discretion where a centre is located in or adjacent to an activity centre or sited on a collector road that avoids extra generation of traffic on residential streets. In this way, the policy does not seek to constrain competition, which is not a valid planning consideration under the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

Siting and design

Built form and siting outcomes are also key concerns with many current CCC applications.  Car parking is usually provided at the front of the site, requiring the CCC building to be set back behind the car parking. This often results in building setbacks and built form that is out of character with the surrounding neighbourhood, particularly when sought as a stand-alone proposal and/or located in residential areas. These setbacks also limit opportunities for passive surveillance and connection with the street. With CCCs becoming larger enterprises, and with the abovementioned Activity Centre/co-location outcomes sought, CCC’s should encompass a design response that better reflects their non-residential, essential community use purpose.

Urban design principles are incorporated into the policy to overcome these concerns. They promote the non-residential/community support role provided by CCCs and enhance the presentation of the building within its setting, as well as the overall appearance of the municipality. These include:

·    Adopting front setbacks consistent with surrounding front setbacks and locating car parking areas at the side or rear of the building or within an undercroft;

·    Providing building entries that address the street, are easily recognisable and are a design feature of the building;

·    Providing well designed and interesting facades that use a variety of quality finish materials, (including transparent glazing), materials that age well and positively contribute to the character of the surrounding neighbourhood;

·    Avoiding high and solid front fencing treatments;

·    Encouraging front fencing treatments that integrate with the overall design and presentation of the CCC building;

·    Seeking a ‘statement’ built form response for centres on corner sites; and

·    Seeking a variety of quality landscaped outcomes, improved solar access to play spaces, north facing where practicable, with natural shade options.

Pedestrian and vehicular accessibility

Given the nature of CCCs, that very young children and vehicles need to access and exit the site, car parking areas and the building safely, the policy provides guidance on how these areas should be designed and presented on-site. Pedestrian movement throughout a site is encouraged to be prioritised. 

Waste collection

Waste collection, in particular, is often an afterthought for many proposals.  Most centres rely on private collection services. It is Council policy that private services cannot collect from the kerb, instead waste must be collected from within the site. As collection requirements have usually not been considered, the only area available for collection on-site is usually in the car parking area. This causes obvious conflicts especially during peak pick-up and drop-off times. To address this, the policy encourages waste collection areas to be appropriately located in a manner which facilitates the collection vehicle entering and leaving the site in a forward direction to minimise vehicular and pedestrian conflict.

Off-site amenity impacts

Safeguarding the amenity of residential properties is important, particularly in the establishing areas covered by Development Plans (DPs) and Precinct Structure Plans (PSPs), where CCC proposals are usually exempt from Public Notification.  Common amenity concerns with CCC’s include visual impacts, overlooking, noise and location of playspaces, odour from waste storage areas and traffic impacts.

The policy supports the sensitive siting and design of proposals that include locating storage areas and playspaces away from sensitive residential spaces, to limit noise impacts. It also seeks to ensure appropriate provision is made for waste collection facilities to minimise their negative impacts both on and off site in terms of noise and vehicle movement/access.

CONSULTATION

Extensive internal consultation has been undertaken to inform development of the policy, including a cross-Council Working Group with representatives from a range of departments. 

Officers have also consulted DELWP on the content of the proposed LPP. The key issue has been in fitting in with the content and style requirements of DELWP. There has been ongoing discussion to refine the drafting of the policy, which has informed this final version.

CRITICAL DATES

If authorisation from the Minister for Planning is granted, it is likely that exhibition of the Amendment will commence in March for 4 weeks.

Council officers will report to Council on the results of the exhibition process. If submissions are received and remain unresolved, then Council Officers will request a Planning Panel Hearing be established.

Financial Implications

Minor fees will be incurred as part of the normal Planning Scheme Amendment process.  No other significant financial impost is expected to Council.

Policy strategy and legislation

The development of the policy is supported by the following:

State Planning Policy Framework

The following sections of the State Planning Policy Framework (SPPF) support the policy:

·    Clause 11 Settlement – that land use planning recognises and contributes towards a high standard of urban design and amenity, accessibility and land use and transport integration.

·    Clause 11.03-2 Activity centre planning – which seeks to encourage the concentration of uses into activity centres that provide a variety of land uses that are highly accessible to the community and that meet local needs.

·    Clause 15.01-1 Urban design and Clause 15.01-2 Urban design principles – whereby planning should achieve high quality urban design and architectural outcomes that contribute positively to local urban character and sense of place, and minimises detrimental impacts on neighbouring properties.

Local Planning Policy Framework

The following clauses of the Local Planning Policy Framework (LPPF) support the policy:

·    Clause 21.04-1 Activity Centre Planning – seeks to incorporate a mix of retail, commercial and community facilities within an activated street based environment.

·    Clause 21.08-1 Urban Design, which seeks to utilise urban design principles to inform built form outcomes including:

Ø To utilise urban design principles to support built outcomes which encourage connection to place and the community,

Ø To avoid visually dominant car parks in new developments,

Ø To create walkable neighbourhoods defined by a 400-800m walk to facilities.

·    Clause 21.12 Infrastructure – builds on Clauses 21.04-1 & 21.04-2 to co-locate community based facilities and maximise beneficial relationships between compatible uses, including to:

Ø Co-locate facilities close to other community assets including retail precincts, arts facilities and libraries to maximise accessibility and convenience to users.

Develop hubs and precincts with the aim of facilitating an integrated service provision.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Planning our space

Strategic Objective              Urban design helps build our connection to place, the natural environment and the community

 

The revised policy builds on objectives in the Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS) of the WPS, which seek to utilise urban design principles to inform built form outcomes. This is relevant for non-residential buildings, including CCC’s, to help build a connection to place.

Council Priority                     Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                    Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                    Built environment

Strategic Objectives            Our neighbourhoods are designed to be well-connected and create cohesive communities

The CCC Policy builds on the MSS objectives supporting co-location of retail, commercial and community uses in a walkable catchment and connected to public transport.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The revised Child Care Centre Policy is a substantial and extensive update of the current policy. It will enable officers to more effectively implement wider ranging land use and planning objectives for the municipality. The updated policy clearly sets out Council’s expectations for proposals and provides greater guidance regarding the development of child care centres.

The municipality has an oversupply of child care places, which evidence shows results in poor community outcomes and can impact competition within the local area.

The policy does not seek to constrain competition, which is not a valid planning consideration, rather it seeks to direct child care centres into appropriate locations to ensure positive community outcomes.

It is recommended that Council resolve to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to formally prepare and exhibit Amendment C223 to update Clause 22.05: Child Care Centre Local Planning Policy of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, as detailed in Attachment1 of this report.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to formally commence Planning Scheme Amendment C223 to update Clause 22.05: Child Care Centre Local Planning Policy of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, as detailed in Attachment 1 of this report.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.1.5    2017/18 Second Quarter New Works Program Report

File No:                                  192600

Attachments:                        1        Financial Summary

2        Project Progress Report

3        Project Status Photos

4        Planning and Feasibility Status Report

5        Mid-Year Review Summary   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Team Leader Business Support   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Note the report;

2.       Approve the revised program of works in the Planning and Feasibility Program (as contained in Attachment 4); and

3.       Approve the project adjustments as identified in the Mid-Year Review (as contained in Attachment 5).

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

This report provides an overview of the financial performance and status of the New Works Program at the end of the second quarter of the 2017/18 financial year with the following key points:

·        Value of work completed at the end of the second quarter is $15,716,174 compared to the year-to-date budget of $20,809,574;

·        The underspend is due to a number of projects being delayed due to design issues, however the warmer months should see projects progress and completed within the anticipated timeframes;

·        As at 31 December 2017 a further thirty projects have been completed; and

·        There are contracts and purchase orders committing another $28,827,373 as at
31 December 2017, which shows a good level of delivery preparedness for the remainder of the financial year.


 

Report

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This report provides an overview of the financial performance and status of the New Works Program at the end of the second quarter of the 2017/18 financial year.  The report outlines the following:

·    Financial Summary of the 2017/18 New Works Program to 31 December 2017 indicating that 26.3% of the annual budget has been expended plus another 48% of the annual budget committed in contracts to-date;

·    Detailed progress report on individual projects within the New Works Program;

·    Photos on the progress of some significant projects;

·    An update on the status of the Planning and Feasibility Program for 2017/18 with proposed amendments within the allocated budget; and

·    A summary of the mid-year budget review and amendments as required within the net allocated budget for the 2017/18 New Works Program.

The second quarter includes many projects that have been finalised from the previous financial year as well as the commencement of design and construction of new projects in the 2017/18 financial year.  A summary of the financial status of the Program can be found in Attachment 1. 

For a detailed progress report on significant projects refer to Attachment 2.  Photos on the progress of some significant projects can be found in Attachment 3.

Background

Council adopted the 2017/18 New Works Program budget on 6 June 2017 with a budget of $47,979,270 plus $11,844,944 carry forward budget providing a total New Works Program budget for 2017/18 of $59,824,214.

Consultation

External stakeholder consultation and engagement is undertaken in relation to individual projects and programs.  This occurs throughout the financial year.

Financial Implications

The 2017/18 budget includes $59,824,214 for the New Works Program (including carry forward funding).  The value of work completed for the year-to-date is $15,716,174 compared to the year-to-date plan of $20,809,574.  Further commitments (contracts and purchase orders) to the value of $28,827,373 have been generated.  A summary of progress of projects by Group can be found below whilst a description on key projects has been included in Attachment 2.

Financial details for contracts within each project are provided through tender and contract closure reports to Council.

Financial Status of the New Works Program by Group:

 

Group

Year To Date Actuals

$

Year To Date Budgets

$

Year To Date Variance

$

Annual Budget   

$

Buildings

6,312,001

7,786,807

1,474,806

17,783,904

The Buildings category is currently showing expenditure underspend of $1,474,806 compared to the Year To Date budget.

Key project updates:

·    Animal Welfare Facility has been completed and opened for operation by the RSPCA;

·    Barry Road Community Activity Centre Redevelopment has been completed and re-opened for operational activity;

·    Conversion of the Janefield School Building into Community Facility – This project is tracking behind the planned budget due to the longer than expected design and permit approval process.  Works have commenced and the project is due for completion by the end of the financial year; and

·    Civic Precinct HVAC & Refurbishment - This project is tracking behind the planned budget due to unexpected structural and utility issues identified during the works.  This project is scheduled for completion by the end of the financial year.

 

Group

Year To Date Actuals

$

Year To Date Budgets

$

Year To Date Variance

$

Annual Budget

$

Drains

1,048,233

940,245

(107,988)

1,039,245

Planning & Feasibility

86,278

170,000

83,722

330,000

 

Drains - The Queenscliff Road and Michigan Terrace Intersection Drainage project has been completed.  Additional expenditure at the end of the second quarter is due to the additional work that was required for excess rock excavation at the site. 

Planning and Feasibility – Year to date expenditure behind budget, however projects are progressing well with commitments in place for planning and feasibility assessments for future projects within the four year New Works Program.

 

Group

Year To Date Actuals

$

Year To Date Budgets

$

Year To Date Variance

$

Annual Budget

$

Open Space

3,031,385

3,645,494

614,109

17,560,873

 

The Open Space category is currently showing an underspend of $614,109 compared to the Year To Date budget.

Key project updates:

·    The A.F Walker Reserve Sportsfield Lighting project has been completed;

·    Renewal of Playgrounds Program is ahead of schedule with four playgrounds completed and opened to the public; and

·    Construction of two soccer pitches and pavilion at Lalor West Reserve (Mosaic) and Doreen South Reserve (Painted Hills Road) – Early works have commenced at both sites.


 

 

Group

Year To Date Actuals

$

Year To Date Budgets

$

Year To Date Variance

$

Annual Budget

$

Plant & Equipment

566,020

1,054,703

488,683

3,470,384

Transport

682,403

798,444

116,042

2,482,672

 

The Plant and Equipment category is currently showing an underspend compared to the Year To Date budget.  This is mainly due to the timing for the replacement of motor vehicles and delays in the upgrading of the Human Resource Information System (HRIS) Software.

The Transport category is currently showing an underspend compared to the Year To Date budget. Key project updates:

·    LATM Schemes Treatment – The Program of Works has been approved by Council and works have commenced to deliver the Program by the end of the financial year.

 

Group

Year To Date Actuals

$

Year To Date Budgets

$

Year To Date Variance

$

Annual Budget

$

Roads & Paths

3,989,854

6,413,881

2,424,027

17,157,136

 

The Roads and Paths category is currently showing an underspend compared to the Year To Date budget.  However, further contracts and commitments of $6,839,458 indicate that this category has a high degree of preparedness for delivery in the coming warmer months.

Key project updates:

·    The Deck Overlay on Findon Road Bridge across Darebin Creek and Findon Creek has been completed;

·    The Roundabout Modifications at Centenary Drive/Hinkler Dve and Centenary Drive/Bradley Drive has been completed;

·    Construct Shared Path McDonalds Rd North Side – Contract has been awarded and is on track for completion in the third quarter;

·    Missing Footpath Links Program – Contractors have been appointed.  Warmer weather will enable acceleration of the works in the third quarter;

·    Traffic Signals – Yan Yean/Cookes Road Intersection – Project has been delayed due to some design difficulties with services at the intersection.  Issues have been resolved and contractor has commenced works on-site; and

·    Glenburnie Road Black Length Project – Tracking behind the planned budget with works due for completion in the third quarter.

Planning and Feasibility Program Update

The 2017/18 New Works Program provides a budget of $330,000 for the planning and feasibility of future projects.  Attachment 4 provides an update on the status of the Planning and Feasibility Program for 2017/18.


 

Infrastructure Grants Update

Proactive targeting of external grant programs has resulted in additional funds secured for priority projects in the New Works Program.  The projects listed below have been successful in received grant funding for 2017/18 that is in addition to the Council approved budget:

·    Mill Park Library Refurbishment – Grant from Living Libraries Infrastructure Program Grant (Department of Environment Land Water and Planning) for $559,493 for new library shelves, improvements to program spaces, and upgrade to the heating/cooling systems controls.

·    Laurimar Primary School Netball Courts Lighting and Shelter – Grant from Shared Facilities Fund (Department of Education and Training) for $225,000 for a shelter and sports lighting over an existing netball court at Laurimar Primary School.

·    Edgars Creek Education Community Precinct – Grant from Shared Facilities Fund (Department of Education and Training) for $4,703,595 for the provision of a double court indoor stadium at Edgars Creek Secondary School.

Mid-Year Budget Review

There have been a number of changes to the New Works Program over the course of the first half of 2017/18 due to unbudgeted Grant funding being received and budget amendments being approved via Reports to Council.  These budget amendments are summarised in Attachment 5 and are funded within the total net budget allocation for the 2017/18 New Works Program.

Additional projects included in the proposed budget amendment are listed in Attachment 5.  This includes the supplementary heating units for the Hazel Glen Family and Children Centre following extensive consultation and monitoring of the current system.  This will provide improved responsiveness to the occupants for heating during unusually cooler mornings during the year.  The other project is the installation of new furniture and power points for the provision of additional study areas at the Whittlesea Library and Community Activity Centre.  This proposed budget can be accommodated from current surpluses in the New Works Program.  Refer to Attachment 5.

Forecast

Progress of works in the third quarter will accelerate as contracts are awarded and weather conditions improve for construction.

Policy strategy and legislation

The business case associated with individual projects identifies the respective policy to which they relate.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Organisational Sustainability

Future Directions                 Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council explores and adopts best practice models

 

CONCLUSION

This report provides a summary of the status of the 2017/18 New Works Program.  A continuous improvement program is being implemented to enhance systems, processes and practices to improve the planning and delivery of the New Works Program.  Overall the New Works Program is on track and is providing much needed community infrastructure across the municipality.

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the report;

2.       Approve the revised program of works in the Planning and Feasibility Program (as contained in Attachment 4); and

3.       Approve the outcome of the 2017/18 New Works Program Mid-Year Budget Review (as contained in Attachment 5) and agree that at 2017/18 financial year end, realised savings be transferred as resolved in the separate Mid-Year Financial Review report.

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator



Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator



Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator



Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.2       Community Services

6.2.1    PROVISION OF HACC DELIVERED MEALS SERVICE - CONTRACT NO. 2014-192 - CONTRACT EXTENSION

File No:                                  193934

Attachments:                        1        CONFIDENTIAL ATTACHMENT - PROVISION OF HACC DELIVERED MEALS SERVICE - Confidential    

The attachment is presented to Council as a confidential document on the basis that it contains details relating to contractual matters, in accordance with Section 89(2)(d) of the Local Government Act 1989.

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Quality and Contracts   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

It is recommended that contract number 2014-192 for Provision of Home and Community Care (HACC) Delivered Meals Service is varied by $464,060 to a new contract sum of $1,895,424 and extended to 4 July 2019.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    This contract was awarded to Moreland City Council Food Services for three years commencing 5 July 2015 with an option to extend for a further two one-year periods.

·    The contract has been performed satisfactorily and extension options are available to
4 July 2020.

·    This report recommends a one year contract extension rather than the permissible two one-year extensions.  This is due to current uncertainties with Commonwealth Government changes to Aged Care and the accompanying changes to funding for aged care services including Delivered Meals.

 


 

Report

Background

Council delivers cooked heated, chilled and frozen meals to eligible clients as part of the Home and Community Care Program for Younger People (HACC PYP) and Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP).

·    Volunteer drivers deliver meals to clients’ homes. Most clients pay Council a fee of $9.45 per meal however this may be varied in circumstances of financial stress.

·    Meals consist of soup or sandwiches, main course, dessert and juice. The contract requires meals to be prepared in accordance with HACC PYP and CHSP nutritional standards and food safety standards.  A contractor is currently engaged to provide the meals.

·    This Contract commenced 5 July 2015 with Moreland City Council Food Services, herein referred to as Moreland, for the Provision of Delivered Meals Service to eligible clients of Council’s HACC Services.  The contract provided for an option to extend the initial three year period for a further two one-year periods at Council’s sole discretion.

·    City of Whittlesea acted as agent for Nillumbik Shire Council for this contract and the two previous contracts for these services to potentially have greater purchasing power.

VARIATION AND/or EXTENSION

A Client Satisfaction Survey, with 84 responses from 145 clients, conducted in September 2017 provided excellent feedback regarding the taste, quality, size, variety, nutritional value and cultural appropriateness of meals.

In addition to the above client feedback, other key performance indicators including number of clients, delivery times, accuracy of orders, packaging of meals, service planning and development and compliance with food safety standards and nutritional guidelines have all been very satisfactorily met.

The current contractor provides a high quality service to Council.  It has a proven track record of delivering high quality meals at a competitive rate which our clients rate very well.  It is very responsive and willing to develop new ways of doing things.

A variation of $464,060 is now required for a one-year extension.  Further details of the requested variation are provided in the confidential attachment.

The contractor’s prices have been checked and are considered competitive and it is recommended to extend the contract term to 4 July 2019.

Given current uncertainty regarding Commonwealth Government changes to Aged Care, other service models may develop in the near future.  A one year contract extension will ensure the right balance of continuity of service while other options of service delivery are identified and considered and the funding and service models proposed by the Commonwealth Government become clear.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good Governance

Theme                                   Continuous Improvement

Strategic Objective              Council explores and adopts best practice models

The current service model of delivering meals to the homes of eligible clients and to the Social Support Group ensures that residents who have been assessed as being at nutritional risk are able to receive high quality meals.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

Variation and extension of the contract is sought in accordance with the contract’s terms and conditions and Council’s applicable policy and procedures.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve, in relation to Contract No. 2014-192, for Provision of HACC Delivered Meals Service to:

1.       Approve a variation of $464,060 (excluding GST) making a revised contract sum of $1,895,424 (excluding GST).

2.       Note the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

3.       Approve extension of the contract end date to 4 July 2019.

 

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.3       City Transport and Presentation

6.3.1    2017-164 Darebin Creek Trail Wayfinding sign installation

File No:                                  191621

Attachments:                        1        2017-164 Confidential attachment - Confidential    

The attachment is presented to Council as a confidential document on the basis that it contains details relating to contractual matters, in accordance with Section 89(2)(d) of the Local Government Act 1989.

Responsible Officer:           Director City Transport & Presentation

Author:                                  Senior Projects Engineer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

It is recommended that Contract Number 2017-164 – Darebin Creek Trail Wayfinding Sign Installation be awarded to Fermin Navascues Project Management for the lump sum price of $225,178 (excl GST)

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

The tender evaluation panel advises that:

·    Five tenders were received

·    The recommended tender was the highest ranked and demonstrated appropriate capability and capacity to successfully fulfil the requirements under the Contract.  As such, Fermin Navascues Project Management is considered best value.

 

 


 

Report

Background

The purpose of this contract is to manufacture, supply and install wayfinding signs along the Darebin Creek Trail between Holt Parade, Bundoora and Heyington Avenue, Epping.

Tenders for the contract closed on 13 December 2017.  The tendered prices and a summary of the evaluation are detailed in the confidential attachment.

EVALUATION

No member of the Tender Evaluation Panel declared any conflict of interest in relation to this tender evaluation.

A Tender Probity & Evaluation Plan was designed specifically for this tender process and it was authorised prior to this tender being advertised.  All tenders received were evaluated in accordance with that plan.  The evaluation involved scoring of conforming and competitive tenders according to these pre-determined criteria and weightings:

Criteria

Weighting

Price

60%

Capability

10%

Capacity

20%

Impact

10%

The weightings reflect the relative importance of each element to this particular contract.  They were determined as being most appropriate after considering numerous factors including (but not restricted to) the time, quality, risk and contract management requirements which were likely to have the most impact on the achievement of best value.

Only tenders that were conforming and competitive were fully scored.  Tender submissions that were evaluated as non-conforming or not sufficiently competitive were set aside from further evaluation.  In cases where this occurred the reasons for that outcome are detailed in the confidential attachment.

The evaluation outcome was as follows:

TENDERER

CONFORMING

COMPETITIVE

SCORE

RANK

Tenderer A
Fermin Navascues Project Management

Yes

Yes

86.7

1

Tenderer B

Yes

Yes

83.5

2

Tenderer C

Yes

No

NA

 

Tenderer D

Yes

No

NA

 

Tenderer E

Yes

No

NA

 

Refer to the confidential attachment for further details of the evaluation of all tenders.


 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Roads, Access and Public Transport

Future Direction                   Good Governance

Theme                                   Continuous Improvement

Strategic Objective              We can cycle safely

The purpose of this contract is for the supply and installation of way finding signage to be installed along the Darebin Creek Trail.  Works will include the manufacture of all required signs, Map Based Signs, Directional Signs, Trail Markers, construction of footings, poles and fittings, traffic management, labour, reinstatement of grassed areas and any other associated works.  This will aid the community in utilising the Trail infrastructure and navigating Council’s off roads path network.

 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

The tender from Fermin Navas was determined to be best value and it is considered that this company can perform the contract to the required standards. 

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to:

1.         Accept the tender submitted by Fermin Navascues Project Management for the sum of $225,178 (excluding GST) for the following contract subject to the following conditions:

Number:    2017-164

Title:          Darebin Creek Trail Wayfinding Sign Installation

Subject to the following conditions:

a)    Tenderer to provide proof of currency of insurance cover as required in the tender documents.

b)    Price variations to be in accordance with the provisions as set out in the tender documents.

c)    Tenderer to provide contract security as required in the tender documents.

2.         Approve the funding arrangements detailed in the confidential attachment.

3.         Sign and seal the Contract documents.

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.4       Corporate Services

6.4.1    Retirement Village Property Rates - Response to Petition

File No:                                  .   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Manager Property, Rates & Valuations   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.   Write to the retirement village unit residents that have signed the petition and advise them that the statutory valuation process is a legislative independent process that Council cannot influence. 

2.   Further advise the residents that Council does understand the issues that they have raised in relation to the level of municipal rates and will examine the possibilities of introducing differential rates in the 2021/22 financial year, when The State Government passes a new Local Government Act introducing compulsory Capital Improved Value rating.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    A petition was tabled by Cr Joseph at the Council meeting held on the 21 November 2017 addressed to the Mayor and Councillors of the Whittlesea City Council signed by 702 retirement village unit residents.

·    The residents are requesting a fairer approach to the rating valuation of their units as well as a more equitable municipal rating assessment of their units.

·    The statutory valuation process is embedded in legislation and is an entirely independent process.

·    State Government is proposing a new Local Government Act that will make capital improved value rating compulsory by 2021/22.

·    Differential rates can be considered with capital improved value rating, which potentially could include a lower rate for retirement village unit residents.


 

Report

Background

A petition was tabled at the Council meeting held on the 21 November 2017 addressed to the Mayor and Councillors of the Whittlesea City Council signed by 702 residents from the Arilla Retirement Village (65 Gordons Road, South Morang); the Mernda Retirement Village (89 Galloway Drive, Mernda) and the Plenty Valley Retirement Village (208 McDonalds Road, Epping).  The residents are requesting a fairer approach to the rating valuation of their units as well as a more equitable municipal rating assessment of their units.

There are currently 922 retirement village units within the municipality, made up of the following developments:

Address

Village Name

No of Units

100 Janefield Drive, Bundoora

Bundoora Retirement Village

242

208 McDonalds Road, Epping

Plenty Valley Retirement Village

204

89 Galloway Drive, Mernda

Mernda Retirement Village

215

65 Gordons Road, South Morang

Arilla Retirement Village

202

804 & 806 Plenty Road, South Morang

-

13

877 Plenty Road, South Morang

-

46

 

 

922

The “Specialist Property Guidelines for Aged Care and Private Health Care Facilities” developed by the Valuer General Victoria in conjunction with the Municipal Group of Valuers, defines retirement villages as  “  … a housing development designed specifically to cater to the needs and lifestyle of the over 55s who are retired from full-time employment.  Retirement villages can be classified into two different categories, resident funded and donor funded villages (not for profit).  Accommodation is in the form of Independent Living Units (ILUs) for residents who can look after themselves and Serviced Apartments (SAs) designed for residents whose needs fall between independent self-care and some nursing care.

The majority of retirement village unit transactions occur via a “Loan/Lease or Loan/Licence” – where a resident pays an in-going contribution to the owner of a sum (lease premium or interest-free loan) equal to the market value of the unit.  Residents are granted a long-term lease or licence of a unit (generally for a period of 99 years).  Upon termination or surrender of the lease or licence, the owner is obliged to make a payment to the resident (or representative) equivalent to the original ingoing contribution (appreciated with market growth) less any DMF (deferred management fee) and refurbishment obligations set out in the original licence or lease agreement.

Of the 922 retirement village units, 682 units (74%) are receiving the rates pensioner rebate of $273.80.  There are approximately 13,845 properties registered as receiving the pensioner rate rebate within the Whittlesea municipality.  The current average municipal rate for the 922 retirement village units is $1,316 as compared to the average rate for a pensioner(s) owned property at $1,483 and the average residential rate of $1,478 - excluding the pensioner rebate in any of these figures.


 

Proposal

The petition signed by the retirement village residents requested the following:

Address the issue of rates and the present unfair treatment of retirement village residents by

1.   Establishing a fair property valuation process that extends comparison beyond the village into the general community and which takes into account:

a.   The significant disparity between leaseholders and owner’s rights,

b.   Information from the Valuer General’s Office that in respect of Retirement Villages requires Councils to compare unencumbered freehold sales (outside of the village) against residents leaseholds and also to consider the impact of Deferred Management Fees (DMF) or separation fees where that fee when combined with the costs of refurbishment significantly reduces the net potential return to residents on the sale of the villa.  Currently the only comparison made is within the village and is based on what we pay for the lease.

2.   Changing the Council property rate calculation system to CIV rather than the current NAV thereby enabling the introduction of a fair and equitable differential rate for residents of retirement villages.

3.   The quantum of the rate reduction sought is 25%.

 

1.         A Fair Valuation Process

The rating valuation requirements for all properties within Victoria are defined within the Valuation of Land Act 1960.  The most important definition is that of the capital improved value, which is defined as being:

capital improved value means the sum which land, if it were held for an estate in fee simple unencumbered by any lease, mortgage or other charge, might be expected to realize at the time of valuation if offered for sale on any reasonable terms and conditions which a genuine seller might in ordinary circumstances be expected to require;

The “Specialist Property Guidelines for Aged Care and Private Health Care Facilities” developed by the Valuer General Victoria in conjunction with the Municipal Group of Valuers, in relation to assessing retirement village unit capital improved value advises:

CIV methodology

The retirement village should be categorised within a municipality based on the following considerations:

·    Accommodation age, size and style

·    Facilities provided and available within the retirement village complex e.g. community facilities, activities, personal services, medical facilities etc.

·    Location and proximity to services, such as transport and shopping facilities and amenities

·    Site design and topography.

Direct comparison is the primary method of valuation for all unit/contract types.  The valuation is assessed on the basis of occupancy assuming a separate rateable property held for an estate in fee simple.

The average transaction for a retirement village unit within the Whittlesea municipality during the 2016 calendar year was approximately $381,000.  The capital improved values for retirement village units within the municipality ranges from $185,000 to $550,000.  Council’s Manager Property, Rates and Valuations, who is responsible for Council’s rating valuations, has confirmed the current assessed statutory values have been completed in accordance with legislative requirements.  The 2016 “Generally True and Correct” certificate was issued by the Minister for Planning, the Hon Richard Wynne MP, to Council on 12 October 2016, which indicates, the State Government’s satisfaction with the valuations of all the rateable and non-rateable properties within the City of Whittlesea.

Council does not have any flexibility or authorisation to alter the valuation process in the way that the petition is suggesting.  The statutory valuation process for rating and taxing purposes is an independent process, where Council’s Valuer takes an oath at every valuation cycle to  “  … solemnly and sincerely declare, pursuant to section 13DH(2) of the Valuation of Land Act 1960 (No 6653) that the valuation and return I make on behalf of the City of Whittlesea will be impartial and true to the best of my judgement.”

It should be noted that each of the retirement village residents has the right to object to their rating valuations.  There is a matter before VCAT currently where a resident has appealed against the assessed 2016 capital improved value of their retirement village unit within the municipality.

2.         Changing the Council property rate calculation system to CIV

The City of Whittlesea has traditionally always utilised the net annual value system for the allocation of municipal rates.  The net annual value can be explained as being either of the following:

For a residential or rural property          -           5% of the capital improved value

For a non-residential property   -           annual rental value

The net annual value rating system generally shifts the rate burden towards the non-residential properties because the assessed rental value is generally greater than 5% of the value of the property as compared to residential properties (fixed at 5%).  The table below demonstrates the effect of the different valuation systems.

 

Vacant Land

House

Shop

Site Value

$300,000

$300,000

$300,000

Capital Improved Value

$300,000

$600,000

$600,000

Net Annual Value

$15,000

(5% of CIV)

$30,000

(5% of CIV)

$50,000

(annual rental)

Rates (on NAV)

$980

$1,960

$3,266

Whilst the City of Whittlesea currently utilises the net annual value rating system, the State Government is introducing a new Local Government Act, proposing an introduction of compulsorily using the capital improved value rating system for all municipalities.  This forced change is being considered for the 2021/22 financial year.

The effect of changing from a net annual value system to a capital improved value system is to increase residential rates by an average of 7% and decrease non-residential rates by an average of 26% - 29%. 

Section 157 of the Local Government Act 1989, allows Council to change its system of valuation earlier than the proposed 2021/22 financial year being contemplated by the State Government, however, Council must allow submissions under section 223 if it proposes such a change.


 

The impact of moving from NAV to CIV rating is summarised in the table below:

Property Class

# of Properties

Current Average Rate $ (NAV)

Average Rate on CIV $

Average % Movement in Rates

Average $ Movement in Rates

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential

75,307

$1,478

$1,583

7.1%

$104

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farm Rate

186

$4,534

$4,865

6.9%

$315

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rural

(Non-Farm)

1,196

$2,589

$2,774

7.1%

$185

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial

2,870

$4,425

$3,266

-29.5%

-$1,708

 

 

 

 

 

 

Industrial

2,615

$5,789

$3,266

-26.2%

-$1,159

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.   The quantum of the rate reduction sought is 25%.

The current 2017/18 municipal rates received from the 922 retirement village units approximates $1,213,236 at an average annual rate amount of $1,316 per unit.  If Council was to grant a 25% reduction to these units, that would equate to an amount of $303,638.

Option 1  -  Introduce CIV Rating in 2021/22 with Differential Rating

As the State Government has proposed the introduction of compulsory Capital Improved Value (CIV) rating from 2021/2022, Council could introduce differential rating from that date onwards, pursuant to section 161 of the Local Government Act 1989.  One of the options available to Council would then be the introduction of a differential rate for retirement village units (e.g. 25% lower than the general rate).  Because this change would be a legislative requirement brought about by the State Government rewriting the Local Government Act 1989, the Section 223 submission process would not be required.  Although a process would be undertaken to fully inform the community of the effect of such a compulsory change in the distribution of the Whittlesea municipal rates. 

Option 2  -  Introduce CIV Rating earlier than 2021/22 with Differential Rating

Whilst the State Government is proposing the introduction of compulsory Capital Improved Value (CIV) rating from 2021/2022, Council could introduce Capital Improved Value (CIV) rating with differential rating, earlier.  The earliest possible date that Council could contemplate a move from Net Annual Value to Capital Improved Value rating system would be 2019/2020, taking into account a reasonable community consultation timeframe together with an adequate time for Council officers to implement system changes.  Council could then consider a differential rate for retirement village units (e.g. 25% lower than the general rate). 

Financial Implications

Moving from NAV to CIV (which is a pre-condition of considering any differential rate apart from farm rate) will result in an average 7% rate increase to 75,000 residential property owners and an average 26%-29% rate reduction for 5,400 non-residential property owners.

If Council was to consider a lower differential rate for retirement villages after moving to CIV, there will be additional rate burden for other property owners, in particular the 75,000 residential property owners who would already have had an average 7% rate increase just from moving to CIV.  As an example, if Council were to grant a 25% reduction to these retirement village residents, that would equate to an amount of $303,638 that would need to be shared by all other property owners.

Policy strategy and legislation

Under Council’s current Net Annual Value rating system there is no possibility of introducing a (lower) differential rate for retirement village unit residents. 

 

Once proposed changes to the new Local Government Act are implemented and Council is legislatively required to use the Capital Improved Value rating system, then differential rating can be considered, including a lower rate for retirement village units.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Council does not have the authority to influence the valuation process in the way being requested by the residents who have signed the petition.  In relation to the 25% rate reduction the residents are requesting for all retirement village units, Council does have options with differential rating when it moves from Net Annual Value to Capital Improved Value rating. 

The move to Capital Improved Value rating can occur either when the State Government is proposing to introduce compulsory CIV rating in 2021/22 or Council could potentially introduce this system of rating as early as 2019/20 considering the process involved to change rating valuation methodology.  Once Council has moved to Capital Improved Value rating, then options for differential rating can be considered.  One of the differential rates could be a rate for retirement village units at a lower rate (e.g. 25%) than the general rate. 

Considering the additional resources and processes required to change rating valuation methodology ahead of the proposed timeframe for compulsory change, which will inevitably cause adverse impact on residential property owners, it is recommended that Council adopt Option 1 and align the change to CIV with the proposed timeframe as described in the Local Government Bill 2018 Exposure Draft (2021/22).

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Write to the retirement village unit residents that have signed the petition and advise them that the statutory valuation process is a legislative independent process that Council cannot influence.

2.       Further advise the residents that Council does understand the issues that they have raised in relation to the level of municipal rates and will examine the possibilities of introducing differential rates in the 2021/22 financial year, when the State Government passes a new Local Government Act introducing compulsory Capital Improved Value rating.

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.4.2    Financial Performance Report for the period ended 31 December 2017 and 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review

File No:                                  146746

Attachments:                        1        Financial Performance Report - December 2017

2        2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review

3        2017/18 New Works Program Mid Year Review   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Management Accounting   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Note the Financial Performance Report for the period ended 31 December 2017.

2.       Note the outcome of the 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review (operating budgets) and agree that at 2017/18 financial year end the actual budget surplus be transferred to the infrastructure reserve for use to fund future capital projects.

3.       Note the outcome of the 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review (new works budget) and agree that at 2017/18 financial year end realised savings be transferred to the infrastructure reserve for use to fund future capital projects and also to bring forward the recommended projects to 2017/18.

4.       Note the uncertainty regarding the recycling industry and the likely imminent adverse financial implications, which can significantly change the estimated 2017/18 year end position; and

5.       Establish a new Permit Conditions non-discretionary balance sheet reserve.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

Report contains three key items:  Q2 Financial Performance Report, outcomes from 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review and a proposal to create a new non-discretionary reserve.

·    Income statement in the Q2 report shows a favourable year to date variance of Council’s underlying surplus of $4.92 million.

·    Favourable income variances have occurred in operating grants ($1.96 million) and capital grants ($1.29 million); favourable expenditure variation is predominately in employee benefits ($296,000) and materials and services ($1.4 million).

·    Mid-Year Budget review has identified savings of $1.95 million ($1.42 million Operating, $0.53 million Capital) after allowing for the purchase of 72 Cooper Street, proposed to transfer this to the Infrastructure Reserve to fund future capital works at the end of the 2017/18 financial year.

·    Proposal to create new Permit Conditions non-discretionary reserve to hold payments which are received as a condition to a permit.


 

Report

Introduction

The Financial Performance Report (Attachment 1) for the period ended 31 December 2017, is presented for consideration by Council, in accordance with the Local Government Act 1989.

In addition, officers undertook a 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review (Attachment 2) to identify major changes that have occurred since budget adoption. 

It is also proposed to create a new Permit Conditions balance sheet reserve to hold payments which are received as a condition to a permit (and are not developer contributions).

Background

Financial Performance Report (Attachment 1)

The Financial Performance Report includes the following financial statements:

·    Comprehensive income statement

·    Balance sheet

·    Statement of cash flows

·    Statement of capital works

·    Summary of reserves

A detailed analysis of income and expenditure in the comprehensive income statement is included in the report.  The statement shows a favourable year to date variance of Council’s underlying surplus of $4.92 million. 

The favourable income variances have occurred in operating grants ($1.96 million) and capital grants ($1.29 million).  The favourable expenditure variation is predominately in employee benefits ($296,000) and materials and services ($1.4 million).

Mid-year budget review (Attachment 2)

In June 2017, Council adopted the 2017/18 Budget, which projected a total operating surplus of $125.6 million (as per the Budgeted Comprehensive Income Statement) and a balanced cash-basis result (rates funded budget) following adjustments for the treatment of capital items (grants and expenditure), non-monetary asset contributions, reserve transfers and loan principal repayment requirements.

Officers have completed a Mid-Year Budget Review for 2017/18 to identify major changes that have occurred since budget adoption.  The review was completed to check that the financial result will be delivered in line with the Adopted Budget at year end, and to address significant budget impacts that have occurred since the original budget was set.

A review of the New Works Program for 2017/18 has also been completed.  The outcome of this review has identified savings in a number of completed projects and also projects which have encountered unforseen delays or have been cancelled (Attachment 3).

Permit conditions reserve

There is an identified need to create a new non-discretionary reserve for payments received as a condition of a permit.  It is proposed to treat this reserve in the same manner as the development contributions reserves as they are very similar in nature.  The point of difference is that the receipt of these payments is not determined by a Development Contribution Plan, but by a specific condition in an issued permit.  Recent examples of the types of payments received include:

·    A cash contribution received from a developer for the cost to remove a service road entry/exit.  The actual works will be completed at a future date.

·    A cash contribution received for future turn lane at an intersection.

·    A cash contribution received from a developer to reinstate a playground at a reserve.

Proposal

It is proposed that the identified savings from the Mid-Year Budget Review be transferred to the infrastructure reserve to be used to fund future capital projects.  It is also proposed that a number of projects be brought forward from the 2018/19 New Works Program to utilise the 2017/18 budgeted funds. These identified projects (Attachment 3) have been selected based on their ability to be delivered prior to the end of the 2017/18 financial year.

Consultation

Consultation with the various departments of Council has been undertaken in preparation of this report.

Financial Implications

Overall, the Mid-Year Budget Review projects a revised cash-basis favourable surplus of $1.95 million after allowing for the purchase of 72 Cooper Street and includes an estimated surplus of $0.53 million from the 2017/18 New Works Program.  It is proposed to transfer the actual surplus at the end of the financial year to the infrastructure reserve to fund future capital projects.

With the uncertainty regarding the recycling industry and the likely imminent adverse financial implications, it is not recommended to reallocate this surplus to other priorities at this time.

Policy strategy and legislation

Section 138 of the Local Government Act 1989 provides that at least every three months, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a statement comparing the budgeted revenue and expenditure for the financial year, with the actual revenue and expenditure to date, is presented to Council.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Resource management

Strategic Objective              Our Council strives to achieve long term financial sustainability

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

For the six month period ending 31 December 2017, Council’s underlying surplus shows a favourable year to date variance of $4.92 million against budget.

The 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review projects a cash-basis surplus of $1.95 million.  At the end of the financial year, it is proposed to transfer the actual surplus to the infrastructure reserve to fund future capital projects.  It is also proposed a number of projects be brought forward from the 2018/19 New Works Program to utilise the 2017/18 budgeted funds.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note the Financial Performance Report for the period ended 31 December 2017.

2.       Note the outcome of the 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review (operating budgets) and agree that at 2017/18 financial year end the actual budget surplus be transferred to the infrastructure reserve for use to fund future capital projects.

3.       Note the outcome of the 2017/18 Mid-Year Budget Review (new works budget) and agree that at 2017/18 financial year end realised savings be transferred to the infrastructure reserve for use to fund future capital projects.

4.       Note the uncertainty regarding the recycling industry and the likely imminent adverse financial implications, which can significantly change the estimated 2017/18 year end position.

5.       Establish a new Permit Conditions non-discretionary balance sheet reserve.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator



Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

PDF Creator



Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.4.3    Contract Finalisation Report - Presented Quarter 3, 2018

File No:                                  171650

Attachments:                        1        Details of Finalised Contracts - Confidential    

The attachment is presented to Council as a confidential document on the basis that it contains details relating to contractual matters, in accordance with Section 89(2)(d) of the Local Government Act 1989.

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Procurement   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

It is recommended that Council resolve to note finalisation of the contracts listed in the recommendation and as detailed in the confidential attachment.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

For all finalised contracts:

·    The data has been consolidated into a single quarterly report.

·    All initial contract totals and any further variations were previously approved in reports presented to Council.

·    The contracts have all reached final completion and there are no outstanding matters.


 

Report

PROPOSAL

This report seeks a Council resolution to note finalisation of a number of contracts from across the organisation.  The financial and other details of those contracts are listed in the confidential attachment.

Background

In the pursuit of continuous improvement the reporting of finalised contracts has been streamlined.  Since July 2017 the data of finalised contracts has been consolidated into a single report that is presented each quarter.

VARIATIONS

On award of each contract Council approved an initial contract sum and funding arrangements.  If any variations were required another report seeking approval of those variations was later presented for Council’s consideration.

On Time / On Budget Reporting

In accordance with Council’s endorsed Procurement Policy the extent of contracts delivered on time and on budget is detailed in the confidential attachment.

Delivery was considered on time if it was within the agreed delivery deadline.  Note that this could be either the original completion date or a later date approved by the contract manager.

The contract was considered delivered on budget if the final cost was within the initially approved total.  In the case of a service contract with extension options, the initially approved total also includes any reported expenditure estimate for a contract extension that was approved by the Council.

FINALISATION

The contracts listed in the confidential attachment have all reached final completion.  Wherever applicable, any remaining security deposit has been returned and the defects liability period has elapsed.  Each Contract Manager has confirmed there are no outstanding matters.

FUNDING

All contract expenditure was funded from operational budgets approved by Council.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good Governance

Theme                                   Continuous Improvement

Strategic Objective              Council explores and adopts best practice models

The efficient review and approval of contract finalisations is an important component of monitoring the effectiveness of contract management.

 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

All contracts listed in the confidential attachment have been completed satisfactorily and all outstanding matters have been addressed.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to note finalisation of the following contracts:

1.   2013-44:  Energy efficient public lighting installation

2.   2014-42:  Provision of labour services

3.   2015-203:  Upgrade and extension works at the Mill Park Lakes Reserve Pavilion, South Morang

4.   CT121366:  Provision of mechanical services maintenance

5.   MAPS 1511-1212:  Debt collection services

6.   SR111207:  Provision of HACC property maintenance services

7.   SR121301:  Provision of grading services

8.   SR121302:  Parks minor works and services

9.   SR121316:  Fire hazard removal services.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

 

6.4.4    Council Action Plan 2017/18 - Quarter 2 Progress Update

File No:                                  NA

Attachments:                        1        Council Action Plan 2017/18 update - Quarter 2   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Manager Corporate Accountability and Performance   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to note the report.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

The Council Action Plan 2017/18 contains 32 Major Initiatives.  Each initiative has milestones developed for each quarter to enable effective monitoring of progress towards achieving the initiative.  The current status for Quarter 1 and 2 milestones is outlined below.

·    Quarter 1 milestones increased from 75 per cent to 90 per cent achieved.

·    Quarter 2 milestones currently at 67 per cent achieved.

Whilst some milestones have not been fully achieved, all 32 major initiatives are expected to be achieved in accordance with the plan by the end of June 2018.

 


 

Report

Introduction

The Council Action Plan 2017/18 contains 32 Major Initiatives.  Each initiative has milestones developed for each quarter to enable effective monitoring of progress towards achieving the initiative.

There are 55 milestones allocated in Quarter 2, of which 37 were achieved (67 per cent) and the majority of the remaining 18 milestones are expected to be completed through the course of Quarter 3.

The current achievement rate from Quarter 1 milestones increased from 75 per cent to 90 per cent, with only 4 milestones remaining to be completed this financial year.

The summary of the Council Action Plan Quarter 2 milestone achievements are graphed below under each Council priority.

Graph 1 – 2017/18 Council Action Plan | Quarter 2 summary.

The current Council Action Plan 2017/18 milestones including comments on the status are detailed in Attachment 1.

Background

Council adopted the ‘Shaping our Future’ Council Plan 2017-21 and Council Action Plan 2017/18 on 30 May 2017.  The Council Plan is the key strategic document providing direction over the Council term.  The Council Action Plan is developed annually as an accompaniment to the Council Plan and includes the major initiatives that are to be achieved each year.

This year is the first year quarterly milestones have been developed for the major initiatives outlined in the Council Action Plan 2017/18.  This enables increased transparency, monitoring and accountability with capacity to report to Council each quarter on the status of each major initiative.

Consultation

The Council Action Plan 2017/18 was developed by Council, included consultation with community from 4 April 2017 to 5 May 2017 and was endorsed by Council on 30 May 2017. Staff have been consulted to provide details and comments to confirm the status of each major initiative milestone.

Financial Implications

There are no direct financial implications as a result of this report.

Policy strategy and legislation

This report is in accordance with the Section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989 and the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014 to enhance Council’s accountability with the community on the delivery of the Council Action Plan 2017/18.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Sixty-seven per cent of the Council Action Plan 2017/18 major initiatives Quarter 2 milestones have been achieved.  The majority of remaining actions are expected to be completed through the course of the 2017/18 financial year.  Council will continue to receive reports each quarter on the status of the major initiatives based on pre-identified quarterly milestones.  This increases transparency and accountability to ensure all major initiatives are delivered in accordance with the Council Action Plan 2017/18.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to note the report.

 



Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.5       Partnerships & Engagement

6.5.1    Bundoora Square Shopping Centre Marketing and Business Development Special Rate Renewal - Notice of Intent

File No:                                  153397

Attachments:                        1        Bundoora Square SC Special Rate Zone   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships & Engagement  

Author:                                  Business Services Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Resolve to renew the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre Special Rate for a period of seven years commencing 1 July 2018, collecting $90,000 plus GST per annum, and indexed by CPI in every subsequent year until 30 June 2025.

2.       Give public notice under Section 163 (1A) of the Local Government Act 1989 of Council’s intentions to declare a Special Rate for the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre.

3.       Establish an advisory Committee of Ward Councillors to consider any written submissions received on the proposal and make recommendations to Council on any such submissions.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    The Bundoora Square Shopping Centre includes 87 commercial premises and services within the commercial precinct inclusive of 25 – 97 Plenty Road, Nickson Street, McLeans Road, Dennison Mall and Daly Place, Bundoora.

·    A Special Rate scheme has been operating for the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre since 2001.

·    The Special Rate is proposed to be renewed for a further seven years as the current scheme is due to expire on 30 June 2018.

·    The purpose of the Special Rate is to improve the viability and drive economic development through marketing and promotional initiatives.

·    Survey responses from businesses have indicated a favourable level of support for a renewal.


 

Report

introduction

The purpose of this report is to recommend that the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre Marketing and Business Development Special Rate (Special Rate) be renewed. The Bundoora Square Traders Association (the Association) has written to Council requesting that the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre Marketing and Business Development Special Rate renewed for a further seven years. The current rate will expire on 30 June 2018.

The proposed Special Rate amount to be collected will increase from $73,200 per annum to $90,000 plus GST per annum and this amount will be indexed by CPI in every subsequent year.

The purpose of the Special Rate scheme is to improve the viability and drive economic development within the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre (the Centre) through marketing and promotional initiatives. The Special Rate scheme involves levying a special rate on each property owner to contribute to a Business Plan to improve commercial viability through marketing and promotional activity. Contribution from property owners varies between $200 and $19,000 per annum.

The special rate originally commenced in 2001 and was renewed in 2006 and 2011.

The purpose of the Special Rate scheme is aligned with Key Direction 2 of the Economic Development Strategy - Foster an environment that encourages the development of a vibrant local economy. Marketing and promotional activities payable by the scheme contribute to the vibrancy of the Centre.

Background

The Bundoora Square Shopping Centre includes 87 commercial premises and services within the commercial precinct inclusive of 25 – 97 Plenty Road, Nickson Street, McLeans Road, Dennison Mall and Daly Place, Bundoora. The Centre hosts a variety of professional and personal services, medical services, cafes and restaurants and food and clothes retailing providing an important and sought after service to cater to the needs of the local community.

The Bundoora Square Traders Association was formed in 2001 with the purpose to advocate on behalf of all business traders within the precinct and work collectively with Council to enhance the Centre. The Association members comprise of local business owners, whom on a voluntary basis work in collaboration with a Centre Co-ordinator and Council.

The Bundoora Square Shopping Centre (the Centre) special rate was introduced with the support of local traders in 2001 collecting $47,000 per annum for five years. The Special Rate was subsequently renewed in 2006 collecting $52,000 and again in 2011, collecting $65,000.

Over the past seven years the special rate proceeds have enabled the ongoing engagement of a Centre Co-ordinator who has worked with the Association in organising a range of marketing and promotional activities.

The combined effect of these activities has contributed to:

·    reduced vacancy rate

·    improved Centre image and branding

·    improved communication with businesses

·    improved patronage

·    ongoing liaison with Council

Since its introduction, the Special Rate has contributed to improving centre image, business performance and customer awareness.

Special Rates are considered an important ingredient for traditional shopping centres to revitalise and maintain ongoing viability with there being more than 50 similar schemes in Melbourne. The Special Rate provides an excellent opportunity for businesses to work collectively in partnership with Council and other parties to bring about positive change.

If renewed, the key initiative is the preparation and implementation of a Business Plan that provides businesses with a collective vision for the Centre and co-ordinates and prioritises initiatives relevant to:

·    business development and attraction

·    marketing and communication

·    communication amongst traders

Proposal

As requested by the Association, it is proposed that the Special Rate for the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre be renewed for a further period of seven years commencing on 1 July 2018 and concluding 30 June 2025 on the condition that a formal Agreement outlining key responsibilities is developed and agreed by both parties.

The Association has requested that the total amount be increased to $90,000 plus GST per annum in order to cover increasing costs of advertising and promotions, special events initiated to compete with other neighbouring shopping centres and overall to achieve the goals of the Business Plan. It is further proposed that the Special Rate raised will be subject to CPI annual increases.

The Special Rate will be assessed on the basis of those properties zoned or used in commercial purposes located in the following areas:

·    Shops 1 – 7 (inclusive) 5 Nickson Street, Bundoora

·    Shops 1 – 9 (inclusive) 25 – 31 Plenty Road, Bundoora

·    33 – 97 (inclusive) Plenty Road, Bundoora

·    2 – 8 (inclusive) Nickson Street, Bundoora

·    2 – 16 (inclusive) McLeans Road, Bundoora

·    Shops 4 – 18 (inclusive) Dennison Mall, Bundoora

·    2 – 3 (inclusive) Daly Place, Bundoora

Attachment 1 provides a map of the area mentioned above.

The proposed Special Rate will be assessed and levied on the basis that the rate in dollar of 0.00090767 be applied to the Capital Improved Value of the property of all rateable land zoned or used for commercial purposes within the geographical area referred to in the paragraph above.

The current and preferred method of collection stated above is considered to be fair and reasonable distribution of the cost as individual contribution varies according to the property value. Proceeds are distributed to the Association in four quarterly instalments per annum.


 

Consultation

The preliminary process has involved the following methods:

·    Agenda items for discussion at trader meetings leading up to the survey process.

·    Presentation at the Annual General Meeting.

·    Direct mail from Council to all business tenants and property owners, prior to the survey.

·    Face to face meetings with individual business operators.

·    Survey to all business tenants in order to give feedback and opinions on past marketing and management activities and suggested activities for the future.

Special Rate renewal survey

The table below provides summarises the survey response rate:

Active businesses

Surveys completed

Response rate

Support of a renewal

87

29

33 per cent

60 per cent

The 40 per cent who indicated they would not support the renewal stipulated they were unsure if they were already paying the levy or were not in a position to make a decision on behalf of the business. Furthermore those that did not support the renewal were invited to confidentially discuss this further with Council’s Economic Development Officer. The majority (70 per cent) declined the offer.

To measure the success of the response rate, a benchmark was conducted with neighbouring councils in Melbourne’s north (Banyule, Darebin and Yarra Councils) and with the City of Boroondara, with similar shopping centres in Melbourne’s east. All councils recorded a similar or less response rate indicating the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre’s survey participation rate is in line with industry standards.

A summary of the key results and issues from the survey included:

·    Overall, a high majority of respondents were aware the Centre has a Traders Association and a Centre Manager that facilitates all marketing, promotions and events for Bundoora Square Shopping Centre.

·    Businesses highlighted the Bundoora Square Street location as warm and welcoming, ease of parking variety of shops and anchors to attract people (i.e. Coles and Woolworths) as positives.

·    Results showed that  activities including the development of the new Bundoora Square website and business directory, advocating to Council on behalf of all business for better infrastructure and celebration in the streets at special times of the year (i.e. Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Easter and Christmas) as very important.

·    There is generally a high awareness of the Association and its collaboration with Council.

·    A vast majority of respondents felt more social media advertising, street entertainment and local newspaper advertising would be most beneficial to their business and the Centre in future.

An analysis of the survey will be provided to the Association and Centre Co-ordinator that will inform the development of a business plan, particularly with initiatives that:

·    Continue to increase awareness and appreciation amongst businesses of the Association’s role and function in relation to the Centre’s ongoing revitalisation.

·    Provide a range of marketing activities appropriate to the range of activities represented in the Centre.

·    Ensure there is ongoing effective management and administration of the Association

·    Provide a range of effective methods that provide for a two-way communication by the Association with all businesses.

·    Provide regular monitoring of the Centre’s performance and feedback from traders.

Critical Dates

Should Council resolve to proceed with the process of renewing the Special Rate, the following will occur:

1.   Public Notice of Council’s intention to declare the Special Rate to be advertised in The Whittlesea Leader and individual notices to be sent to all property owners and tenants who will be made liable for the Special Rate.

2.   A person affected by the Special Rate may object to the proposal or make a written submission (which may include a request to be heard) to the Council within 28 days of the publication of this notice. This will be considered in accordance with Section 223 of the Local Government Act. Submission will be directed to the Chief Executive Officer and referred to a Committee of Council to formally hear and consider all submissions.

3.   Following the Hearing of Submissions a second report will be made to Council when a decision to proceed to adopt, modify or abandon the Special Rate will be made.

4.   If the Special Rate is adopted, notice of the levy will be sent to the businesses and property owners. Property owners then have 30 days to appeal to the Victorian Civil Administrative Tribunal.

It should be noted that Council cannot make the proposed declaration if Council receives objections from a majority of the rateable properties in respect of which the Special Rate would be imposed. If Council resolves that it will not renew the Special Rate, no further action is required however property and business owners will be advised of Council’s decision.

If the Special Rate is implemented, it is intended that the Association would continue to partly utilise the funds to employ a part-time Centre Co-ordinator to organise marketing, management and business development activities funded by the proceeds of the Special Rate as well as liaise with Council on behalf of the Association.

A formal agreement will be entered into between Council and the Association confirming the role of the Association in expending the monies raised by the Special Rate is on the behalf of Council, and is of an administrative nature only and at all times under the direction of and for Council.

Payment of the Special Rate is conditional on the entering into such an agreement.

It is intended that the funds will also be utilised to ensure that the rolling seven year business plan and annual budget be prepared for the Centre. A copy of the business plan, a calendar of annual activities and budget will need to be provided to Council’s Economic Development Team. The agreement will encompass these issues.

Following the approval of the business plan, annual budget and compliance with those other conditions specified in the agreement, Council would provide the Association with the Special Rate proceeds in four quarterly instalments per annum. A key aspect of this arrangement is that the Association is an incorporated entity and acts in accordance with the Associations Incorporation Act 1981.

Financial Implications

Ongoing administration will be carried out as part of the current role of the Economic Development Team.

Policy strategy and legislation

Economic Development Strategy, Growing our economy together 

The proposed Special Rate renewal is supported by Key Direction 2 - Foster an environment that encourages the development of a vibrant local economy. The renewal will allow the continuation of marketing and promotional activities to contribute to the vibrancy of the Centre.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Jobs and Investment

Future Direction                   Growing our economy

Theme                                   Economic development

Strategic Objective              Our local, industrial and regional business communities are supported to thrive in our City

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Bundoora Square Traders Association has requested to renew the Special Rate for a further seven years and increase to $90,000 per annum and indexed annually by CPI. Its purpose contributes to improving centre image, business performance and customer awareness. The Special Rate scheme has long been supported by traders and aligns with Councils Economic Development Strategy. It is therefore recommended that Council resolve to proceed to renew the Special Rate and adopt the recommendations as outlined in this report.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Give public notice under Section 163 (1A) of the Local Government Act 1989 of its intentions to declare a Special Rate for the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre and raise $90,000 per annum for the period commencing 1 July 2018 plus CPI index for every subsequent year until 30 June 2025 advising that:

a)      The following land be specified for which the proposed Special Rate should be declared:

·    Shops 1 – 7 (inclusive) Nickson Street, Bundoora

·    Shops 1 – 9 (inclusive) 25 – 31 Plenty Road, Bundoora

·    33 – 97 (inclusive) Plenty Road, Bundoora

·    2 – 8 (inclusive) Nickson Street, Bundoora

·    2 – 16 (inclusive) McLeans Road, Bundoora

·    Shops 4 – 18 (inclusive) Dennison Mall, Bundoora

·    2 – 3 (inclusive) Daly place, Bundoora

b)      The proposed Special Rate will be assessed and levied on the basis that the rate in the dollar of 0.00090767 be applied to the Capital Improved Value of the property within the geographical area referred to above. This criterion will be referred to in the public notice.

c)      The properties included in the scheme and the Special rates amounts proposed will be subject to general revaluations and supplementary valuations on the same cycles and in the same manner as the City of Whittlesea general municipal rates and charges.

d)      That there will be a special benefit to persons required to pay the proposed Special Rate and the viability of the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre as a commercial area will be enhanced through increased economic activity. The value of the properties included in the scheme, their desirability as letting propositions and their general image and stature will be maintained or enhanced.

e)      If in the event that Council proceeds with the proposed Special Rate:

i)       It will be levied by sending notices to the persons liable to pay the proposed Special Rate.

ii)      Council requires interest to be paid in accordance with Section 172 of the Act on any amounts of Special Rate not paid by the specific dates or dates.

f)       Which persons have the right to object to the proposed declaration, how those persons may object and that objections in writing must be lodged within 28 days of the public notice.

2.       Send a copy of the public notice of the proposed declaration under Section 163 (1C) of the Act to all owners and occupiers of properties who will be liable to pay the proposed Special Rate.

A person affected by the proposed Special Rate may make a written submission in accordance with Section 223 of the Act. Submission will be directed to the Chief Executive Officer and a meeting will be held for a Committee of Council to:

a)      Consider objections and other submissions made in accordance with Section 163 (A) and 163 (B) of the Act: and

b)      Hear persons who wish to be heard in support of all submissions.

3.       Establish an advisory Committee of Ward Councillors to consider any written submission received on the proposal and make recommendations to Council on any such submissions.

4.       Enter into a formal agreement with the Bundoora Square Shopping Centre Traders Association prior to the Special Rate or any part being paid to the Association which, amongst other matters, acknowledges and confirms that the role of the Association in expending the monies raised by the Special Rate on behalf of Council is of administrative nature only and at all times under the direction of and for Council.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.5.2    Thomastown Shopping Centre Marketing and Business Development Special Rate - Notice of Intent

File No:                                  153399

Attachments:                        1        TSC Special Rate Zone   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships & Engagement  

Author:                                  Business Services Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.       Resolve to proceed to renew the Thomastown Shopping Centre Special Rate for a period of seven years commencing 1 July 2018, collecting $60,000 plus GST per annum, and indexed by CPI in every subsequent year until 30 June 2025.

2.       Give public notice under Section 163 (1A) of the Local Government Act 1989 of Council’s intentions to declare a Special Rate for the Thomastown Shopping Centre.

3.       Establish an advisory Committee of Ward Councillors to consider any written submissions received on the    proposal and make recommendations to Council on any such submissions.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    The Thomastown Shopping Centre includes 71 commercial premises and services within the commercial precinct inclusive of 137 – 297 High Street, 4 and 6 Main Road and 2, 2A, 2B and 3 Highlands Road, Thomastown. 

·    A Special Rate scheme has been operating for the Thomastown Shopping Centre since 1997.

·    The Special Rate is proposed to be renewed for a further seven years as the current scheme is due to expire on 30 June 2018.

·    The purpose of the Special Rate is to improve the viability and drive economic development through marketing and promotional initiatives.

·    Survey responses from businesses have indicated a high level of support for a renewal.


 

Report

introduction

The purpose of this report is to recommend that the Thomastown Shopping Centre Marketing and Business Development Special Rate (Special Rate) be renewed. The Thomastown Traders Association (the Association) has written to Council requesting that the Thomastown Shopping Centre Marketing and Business Development Special Rate be renewed for a further seven years. The current rate will expire on 30 June 2018.

The proposed Special Rate amount to be collected will increase from $52,800 per annum to $60,000 plus GST per annum and will be indexed by CPI in every subsequent year.

The purpose of the Special Rate scheme is to improve the viability and drive economic development within the Thomastown Shopping Centre (the Centre) through marketing and promotional initiatives. The Special Rate scheme involves levying a special rate on each property owner to contribute to a Business Plan to improve commercial viability through marketing and promotional activity. Contribution from property owners varies between $209 and $1,700 per annum.

The special rate originally commenced in 1997 and was renewed in 2003, 2008 and 2013.

The purpose of the Special Rate scheme is aligned with Key Direction 2 of the Economic Development Strategy - Foster an environment that encourages the development of a vibrant local economy. Marketing and promotional activities payable by the scheme contribute to the vibrancy of the Centre.

BackgrounD

The Thomastown Shopping Centre includes 71 commercial premises and services within the commercial precinct inclusive of 137 – 297 High Street, 4 and 6 Main Road and 2, 2A, 2B and 3 Highlands Road, Thomastown. The Centre hosts a variety of professional and personal services, medical services, cafes and restaurants providing an important and sought after service to cater to the needs of the local community.

The Thomastown Traders Association was formed in 1997 with the purpose to advocate on behalf of all business traders within the precinct and work collectively with Council to enhance the Centre. The Association members comprise of local business owners, whom on a voluntary basis work in collaboration with a Centre Co-ordinator and Council.

The Thomastown Shopping Centre special rate was introduced in 1997 with the support of local traders, collecting $30,000 per annum for five years. The Special Rate was subsequently renewed in 2003 collecting $35,000, in 2008, collecting $40,000 and again in 2013 collecting $45,000

Over the past five years the special rate proceeds have enabled the ongoing engagement of a Centre Co-ordinator who has worked with the Association in organising a range of marketing and promotional activities.

The combined effect of these activities has contributed to:

·    reduced vacancy rate

·    improved Centre image and branding

·    improved communication with businesses

·    improved patronage

·    ongoing liaison with Council

Since its introduction, the Special Rate has contributed to improving the centre image, business performance and customer awareness.

Special Rates are considered an important ingredient for traditional shopping centres to revitalise and maintain ongoing viability with there being more than 50 similar schemes in Melbourne. The Special Rate provides an excellent opportunity for businesses to work collectively in partnership with Council and other parties to bring about positive change.

If renewed, the key initiative is the preparation and implementation of a Business Plan that provides businesses with a collective vision for the Centre and co-ordinates and prioritises initiatives relevant to:

·    business development and attraction

·    marketing and communication

·    communication amongst traders

Proposal

As requested by the Association, it is proposed that the Special Rate for the Thomastown Shopping Centre be renewed for a further period of seven years commencing on 1 July 2018 and concluding 30 June 2025 on the condition that a formal Agreement outlining key responsibilities is developed and agreed by both parties.

The Association has requested that the total amount be increased to $60,000 plus GST per annum in order to cover increasing costs of advertising and promotions, special events initiated to compete with other neighbouring shopping centres and overall to achieve the goals of the Business Plan. It is further proposed that the Special Rate raised will be subject to CPI annual increases.

The Special Rate will be assessed on properties zoned or used in commercial purposes located in the following areas:

·    140 – 297 (inclusive) High Street, Thomastown

·    2, 2A, 2B and 3 Highlands Road, Thomastown

·    4 and 6 Main Street, Thomastown

·    139 – 157 (inclusive) High Street, Thomastown

Attachment 1 provides a map of the area mentioned above.

The proposed Special Rate will be assessed and levied on the basis that the rate in the dollar of 0.00126436 be applied to the Capital Improved Value of the property of all rateable land zoned or used for commercial purposes within the geographical area referred to in the paragraph above. An exception applies to properties 139 – 157 (inclusive) High Street, Thomastown which will contribute 70 per cent of the aforementioned rate in the dollar, which will be calculated at 0.00088505. The Association is of the view that these properties do not receive the same level of benefit from the rate.

The current and preferred method of collection stated above is considered to be a fair and reasonable distribution of the cost, as individual contribution varies according to the property value. Proceeds are distributed to the Association in four quarterly instalments per annum.

Consultation

The preliminary process has involved the following methods:

·    Agenda items for discussion at trader meetings leading up to the survey process.

·    Presentation at the Annual General Meeting.

·    Direct mail from Council to all business tenants and property owners, prior to the survey.

·    Face to face meetings with individual business operators.

·    Survey to all business tenants in order to give feedback and opinions on past marketing and management activities and suggested activities for the future.

Special Rate renewal survey

The table below summarises the survey response rate:

Active businesses

Surveys completed

Response rate

Support of a renewal

71

25

35 per cent

82 per cent

To measure the success of the response rate, a benchmark was conducted with neighbouring councils in Melbourne’s north (Banyule, Darebin and Yarra Councils) and with the City of Boroondara, with similar shopping centres in Melbourne’s east. All councils recorded a similar or less response rate, indicating the Thomastown Shopping Centre’s survey participation rate is in line with industry standards.

A summary of the key results and issues from the survey included:

·    Overall, a majority of respondents were aware the Centre has a Traders Association and a Centre Manager that facilitates all marketing, promotions and events for Thomastown Shopping Centre.

·    Businesses highlighted the High Street location as a friendly centre with a good mix of businesses and close proximity to Thomastown train station. 

·    Results showed that  activities including Christmas decorations, celebrations in the street at the special times (i.e. Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Easter and Christmas) and increasing social media presence as ‘very important’.

·    There is generally a high awareness of the Association and its collaboration with Council.

·    A vast majority of respondents felt that creating a better atmosphere, more activities on the street, together with more local advertising of the Thomastown Shopping Centre, and distribution to neighbouring areas would be most beneficial to their business and the Centre in future.

An analysis of the survey will be provided to the Association and Centre Co-ordinator and will inform the development of a business plan, particularly with initiatives that:

·    Continue to increase awareness and appreciation amongst businesses of the Association’s role and function in relation to the Centre’s ongoing revitalisation.

·    Provide a range of marketing activities appropriate to the range of activities represented in the Centre.

·    Ensure there is ongoing effective management and administration of the Association

·    Provide a range of effective methods that provide for a two-way communication by the Association with all businesses.

·    Provide regular monitoring of the Centre’s performance and feedback from traders.

Critical Dates

Should Council resolve to proceed with the process of renewing the Special Rate, the following will occur:

1.   Public Notice of Council’s intention to declare the Special Rate to be advertised in The Whittlesea Leader and individual notices to be sent to all property owners and tenants who will be made liable for the Special Rate.

2.   A person affected by the Special Rate may object to the proposal or make a written submission (which may include a request to be heard) to the Council within 28 days of the publication of this notice. This will be considered in accordance with Section 223 of the Local Government Act. Submission will be directed to the Chief Executive Officer and referred to a Committee of Council to formally hear and consider all submissions.

3.   Following the Hearing of Submissions a second report will be made to Council when a decision to proceed to adopt, modify or abandon the Special Rate will be made.

4.   If the Special Rate is adopted, notice of the levy will be sent to the businesses and property owners. Property owners then have 30 days to appeal to the Victorian Civil Administrative Tribunal.

It should be noted that Council cannot make the proposed declaration if Council receives objections from a majority of the rateable properties to which the Special Rate would be imposed. If Council resolves that it will not renew the Special Rate, no further action is required, however property and business owners will be advised of Council’s decision.

If the Special Rate is implemented, it is intended that the Association would continue to partly utilise the funds to employ a part-time Centre Co-ordinator to organise marketing, management and business development activities funded by the proceeds of the Special Rate as well as liaise with Council on behalf of the Association.

A formal agreement will be entered into between Council and the Association confirming the role of the Association in expending the monies raised by the Special Rate is on the behalf of Council, and is of an administrative nature only and at all times under the direction of, and for Council.

Payment of the Special Rate is conditional on the entering into such an agreement.

It is intended that the funds will also be utilised to ensure that the rolling seven year business plan and annual budget be prepared for the Centre. A copy of the business plan, a calendar of annual activities and budget will need to be provided to Council’s Economic Development Team. The agreement between Council and the Association will stipulate these requirements. .

Following approval of the business plan, annual budget and compliance with other conditions specified in the agreement, Council would provide the Association with the Special Rate proceeds in four quarterly instalments per annum. A key aspect of this arrangement is that the Association is an incorporated entity and acts in accordance with the Associations Incorporation Act 1981.

Financial Implications

Ongoing administration will be carried out as part of the current role of the Economic Development Team.


 

Policy strategy and legislation

Economic Development Strategy, Growing our economy together 

The proposed Special Rate renewal is supported by Key Direction 2 - Foster an environment that encourages the development of a vibrant local economy. The renewal will allow the continuation of marketing and promotional activities to contribute to the vibrancy of the Centre.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Jobs and Investment

Future Direction                   Growing our economy

Theme                                   Economic development

Strategic Objective              Our local, industrial and regional business communities are supported to thrive in our City

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The Thomastown Traders Association has requested to renew the Special Rate for a further seven years, collecting $60,000 per annum and indexed annually by CPI. Its purpose contributes to improving the centre image, business performance and customer awareness. The Special Rate scheme has long been supported by traders and aligns with Council’s Economic Development Strategy. It is therefore recommended that Council resolve to proceed to renew the Special Rate and adopt the recommendations as outlined in this report.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Give public notice under Section 163 (1A) of the Local Government Act 1989 of its intentions to declare a Special Rate for the Thomastown Shopping Centre and raise $60,000 per annum for the period commencing 1 July 2018 plus CPI index for every subsequent year until 30 June 2025 advising that:

a)      The following land be specified for which the proposed Special Rate should be declared:

·    140 – 297 (inclusive) High Street, Thomastown

·    2, 2A, 2B and 3 Highlands Street, Thomastown

·    4 and 6 Main Street, Thomastown

·    139 – 157 (inclusive) High Street, Thomastown  

b)      The proposed Special Rate will be assessed and levied on the basis that the rate in the dollar of 0.00126436 be applied to the Capital Improved Value of the property of all rateable land zoned or used for commercial purposes within the geographical area referred to in paragraph (a). An exception applies to properties 139 – 157 (inclusive) High Street, Thomastown which will contribute 70% of the aforementioned rate in the dollar, which will be calculated at 0.00088505. This criterion will be referred to in the public notice.

c)      The properties included in the scheme and the amounts proposed Special Rate payable by them will be subject to general revaluations and supplementary valuations on the same cycles and in the same manner as the City of Whittlesea general municipal rates and charges.

d)      That there will be a special benefit to persons required to pay the proposed Special Rate and the viability of the Thomastown Shopping Centre as a commercial area will be enhanced through increased economic activity. The value of the properties included in the scheme, their desirability as letting propositions and their general image and stature, both separately and severally in the context of the area generally, will be maintained or enhanced.

e)      If in the event that Council proceeds with the proposed Special Rate:

i)       It will be levied by sending notices to the persons liable to pay the proposed Special Rate.

ii)      Council requires interest to be paid in accordance with Section 172 of the Act on any amounts of Special Rate not paid by the specific dates or dates.

f)       Which persons have the right to object to the proposed declaration, how those persons may object and that objections in writing must be lodged within 28 days of the public notice.

2.       Send a copy of the public notice of the proposed declaration under Section 163 (1C) of the Act to all owners and occupiers of properties who will be liable to pay the proposed Special Rate.

A person affected by the proposed Special Rate may make a written submission in accordance with Section 223 of the Act. Submission will be directed to the Chief Executive Officer and a meeting will be held for a Committee of Council to:

a)      Consider objections and other submissions made in accordance with Section 163 (A) and 163 (B) of the Act: and

b)      Hear persons who wish to be heard in support of all submissions.

3.         Establish an advisory Committee of Ward Councillors to consider any written submission received on the proposal and make           recommendations to Council on any such submissions.

4.         Enter into a formal agreement with the Thomastown Shopping Centre Traders Association prior to the Special Rate or any part being paid to the Association which, amongst other matters, acknowledges and confirms that the role of the Association in expending the monies raised by the Special Rate on behalf of Council is of administrative nature only and at all times under the             direction of and for Council.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.5.3    Participation and Engagement: Approval of projects proposing the use of external consultants (Quarter 3)

File No:                                  .

Attachments:                        1        Guidelines for use of External Consultants for Participation and Engagement Projects

2        List of Projects seeking Council Approval   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships & Engagement 

Author:                                  Team Leader Research   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

That Council resolve to approve the use of external consultants for each participation and engagement project as detailed below:

1.   Business Co-working and Incubator Feasibility Study (estimated cost: $25,000-$30,000)

2.   Retail and employment land and market review (estimated cost: $3,000).

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    At the Council meeting on 27 June 2017, Council resolved that approval from Council must be sought for the use of external consultants for participation and engagement activities across the organisation over a twelve month trial period.

·    An internal process and set of guidelines have been established to collate the required information to enable Council to make informed decisions on a case by case basis.

·    This is the third quarterly report provided to Council in response to the Council resolution.


 

Report

Background

The City of Whittlesea’s Participation and Engagement Policy and Framework were adopted by Council on 27 June 2017. At the Council meeting, Council resolved that:

“Council will not use external consultants for community engagement, unless approval is sought from Council on a twelve month trial basis, and a report be provided three months in advance seeking approval of expenditure for a future period.”

An internal process and set of guidelines have been established to collate the required information to enable Council to make informed decisions on a case by case basis. The guidelines specify the context for when approval for use of external consultants applies, noting that the resolution applies only to use of external consultants contracted to undertake internal or community-based participation and engagement activities on behalf, or in support of the City of Whittlesea. It does not apply to the use of consultants for other purposes. The guidelines and process are outlined in Attachment 1.

The first quarter report was provided to Council on 29 August 2017, resulting in five of eleven projects being approved for use of external consultants. In quarter two, no participation and engagement projects were identified requiring use of external consultants. This is the third quarterly report provided to Council in response to the Council resolution.

Proposal

A decision from Council is sought in relation to approval to proceed with engaging external consultants for each of the proposed participation and engagement projects listed in Attachment 2. The information contained in Attachment 2 has been collated by the Partnerships and Engagement directorate, via Council’s Participation and Engagement Advisor, and includes for each project:

·    The project name

·    Approximate timeframes for engagement

·    Department undertaking the engagement

·    Reasons for intended use of external consultants

·    Proposed level of engagement (as per the IAP2 spectrum)

·    Estimated value of the consultants for the engagement component

·    Proposed activities to be undertaken by the external consultants

·    Alternative activities and plan should approval for using external consultants be denied.

Consultation

The information contained in Attachment 2 is based on input provided by relevant Project Managers and Department Managers from across the organisation, in discussion with Council’s Participation and Engagement Advisor.

Critical Dates

The quarter four report seeking Council approval for proposed participation and engagement activities seeking to use external consultants will be provided to Council on 5 June 2018.

A simple evaluation of the process will be undertaken in April / May 2018. This will be discussed with Councillors at the Council forum on 22 May 2018 to determine if this approval process will be extended beyond the initial 12 month trial period due to end on 30 June 2018.

Financial Implications

The use of external consultants for participation and engagement activities can have financial implications for the organisation. It is important to consider the costs, benefits and risks if the organisation does or does not engage external consultants and chooses to use internal resources to undertake the proposed community engagement activities. When determining the appropriateness and financial implications of using external consultants for the proposed projects, the following factors should be considered:

·    Scope and complexity of the proposed activities

·    Timeframes to undertake the activities

·    Staffing (capacity and capability to undertake all elements of the project to the required high standard)

·    Reputation / perception of community

·    Community connection with the organisation and project

·    Ownership and sharing of intellectual property and data.

Policy strategy and legislation

It is a legislative requirement through the Local Government Performance Reporting Framework (LGPRF) that all Councils have a Participation and Engagement Policy. Consistent with the legislation, the intent of the City of Whittlesea’s Policy and Framework is to increase the emphasis on the good practice, transparency, responsiveness and collaborative capacity of councils to engage the community in their decision-making processes. As per the Council resolution from 27 June 2017, the City of Whittlesea’s Participation and Engagement Framework specifies that approval from Council must be sought for the use of external consultants for participation and engagement activities.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Inclusive and engaged community

Theme                                   Community voice

Strategic Objective              Our voice is reflected through inclusive Council decision making processes 

The Participation and Engagement Policy and Framework, and the guidelines for engaging with external consultants, affirms Council’s commitment to open, accountable and responsive decision making, informed by effective engagement with the community. It will also help to ensure the organisation is most effectively and efficiently using our resources to maximise our efforts to involve the community in our decision-making processes.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.


 

Conclusion

This report seeks Council approval for use of external consultants for the proposed participation and engagement activities specified in Attachment 2. It is the third time Council will be considering approval for such activities and the process is in place until 30 June 2018. Project Managers will be notified of the Council decision for each project prior to any external consultants being engaged to commence on the respective projects.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to approve the use of external consultants for each participation and engagement project as detailed below:

1.   Business Co-working and Incubator Feasibility Study.

2.   Retail and employment land and market review.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                       Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.5.4    Interstate Conferences

File No:                                   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships & Engagement  

Author:                                  Governance Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

1.   To authorise the attendance of interested Councillors at the following interstate Conferences:

·   Climate Leadership Conference 15-16 March 2018, Sydney;

·   Australian Local Government Association National General Assembly, 17‑20 June 2018, Canberra; and

·   National Local Roads and Transport Congress, 20-22 November 2018, Alice Springs.

2.   Endorse the process that interested Councillors advise the Office of the Chief Executive Officer as soon as possible of their expected attendance at any of the conferences listed above.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    Council approval is required for any interstate or overseas travel by Councillors.

·    Conferences included in this report have confirmed dates.  Councillors are encouraged to take advantage of early bird conference registration incentives should a Councillor wish to attend a conference.

·    The Federation of Ethnic Communities’ Councils of Australia Conference and the Australian Local Government Women’s Association National Conference are not included in this report as they occur bi-annually and will take place in 2019.

·    The Green Cities Conference is taking place in Melbourne (13-15 March 2018) so Council approval is not required.


 

Report

Background

Council approval is required for any interstate or overseas travel by Councillors.

Proposal

To authorise Councillor attendance at upcoming conferences for which dates are confirmed so that Council can take advantage of early bird conference registration incentives should they be available. 

Critical Dates

The following table lists interstate conferences which Councillors have previously attended and/or expressed an interest in attending:

 

Conference

Registration Fee per person

Climate Leadership Conference
15-16 March 2018, Sydney

$1,195

Australian Local Government Association
National General Assembly,
17-20 June 2018, Canberra

Early Bird until 4 May 2018 – $969

Standard until 1 June 2018 – $1,290

Late after 1 June 2018 –  $1,429

National Local Roads and Transport Congress,
20-22 November 2018, Alice Springs

To be advised

Financial Implications

The cost of attending a conference is the registration fee listed above plus airfare, accommodation and other associated costs. 

 

The cost is included in the budget for Councillor training and development.

Policy strategy and legislation

Council approval is required for any interstate or overseas travel by Councillors.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction                   Good governance

Theme                                   Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective              Our Council explores and adopts best practice models

 

Councillor attendance at conferences provides Councillors with learning and development opportunities to better equip Councillors in undertaking their role, including advocating on behalf of the community.


 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council authorise interested Councillors to attend the interstate conferences listed in the report and that interested Councillors advise the Chief Executive Officer as soon as possible of their expected attendance at any of the conferences.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.   Authorise interested Councillors to attend the following interstate Conferences:

·    Climate Leadership Conference 15-16 March 2018, Sydney;

·    Australian Local Government Association National General Assembly, 17-20 June 2018, Canberra; and

·    National Local Roads and Transport Congress, 20-22 November 2018, Alice Springs.

2.   Endorse the process that interested Councillors advise the Chief Executive Officer as soon as possible of their expected attendance at any of the conferences listed.

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.5.5    Assemblies of Councillors Report 6 March 2018

File No:                                  1881989   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships & Engagement 

Author:                                  Governance Officer   

 

recommendation summary

That Council note the record of the Assemblies of Councillors meetings as set out in the table in the report.

key facts and/or issues

To report to Council the records of Assemblies of Councillors in accordance with Section 80A(2) of the Local Government Act.


 

Report

Background

The Local Government Act 1989 requires records of Assemblies of Councillors to be reported to an ordinary Council meeting and recorded in the minutes of that meeting.

A meeting is an assembly of Councillors if it considers matters that are likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a Council delegation and the meeting is:

·    A planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and a member of Council staff; or

·    An advisory committee of Council where one or more Councillors are present.

A record must be kept of an assembly of Councillors which lists the Councillors and members of Council staff attending, the matters discussed, disclosures of conflict of interest and whether a Councillor left the meeting after making a disclosure.

Proposal

Assemblies of Councillors records not previously reported to Council are detailed in the following table:-

Assembly Details

Councillor attendees

Officer attendees

Matters discussed

Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) General Meeting

10 October 2017

Cr Lalios

HSAO

LPO

MCW

PASO

RC

ROA

TLA

1.     WDN Terms of Reference

2.     Wings Presentation by Guest Speaker: Kara Gandolfo

3.     Reports from Working Groups:

a.      Accessible Parking and Transport

b.      Whittlesea Disability Cluster 

c.       Carers’ Week

d.      International Day of People with Disability

e.      Budget Working Group

f.       ‘Our News’ newsletter

g.      Employment Working Group

Nil disclosures

Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) General Meeting

14 November 2017

Cr Lalios

ACDPO

HSAO

MCW-A

RC

ROA

TLA

WDN Terms of Reference Workshop

Nil disclosures

Greenhills Road and Local Surrounds Parking and Road Safety Working Group Meeting

11 December 2017

Cr Alessi

Cr Lalios

Cr Desiato

DCTP

MCDT-A

TLTE

TTE

Parking, road safety and traffic matters in Tasman Drive, Greenhills Road and local streets off Greenhills Road in Bundoora

Nil disclosures

Whittlesea Disability Network (WDN) Extraordinary Meeting

12 December 2017

Cr Lalios

ACDPO

CEO

LPO

MCW

PASO

ROA

SP

TLA

YDO

1.     Level Crossing Removal Authority, Mernda Rail Extension Project Presentation

2.     Disability Action Plan launch

Nil disclosures

Council Forum

30 January 2018

Cr Pavlidis (Mayor)

Cr Sterjova (Deputy Mayor)

Cr Alessi

Cr Cox

Cr Desiato

Cr Kozmevski

Cr Monteleone

AIDC

CEO

DCS

DCRS

DCTP

DPE

DPMP

MACED

MLCF

MMP

MPOS

TLIP

TLPD

TLSP

 

1.     Establishment of the Melbourne North Food Group

2.     Mernda Aquatic and Indoor Sports Centre Feasibility Study

3.     General Business:

a.      Website Update – Councillor Workshop

b.      Referrals from MyAgedCare

Nil disclosures

The table below represents an Index of Officer titles:

Initials

Title of Officer

Initials

Title of Officer

ACDPO

Access Community Development Project Officer – Aymen Al-Saad

MLCF

Manager Leisure & Community Facilities – Benjamin Waterhouse

AIDC

Aquatic Infrastructure Development Coordinator – Paul Bennett

MMP

Manager Major Projects – Nick Mazzarella

CEO

Chief Executive Officer – Simon Overland

MPOS

Manager Parks & Open Space – Lisa Pittle

DCS

Director Community Services – Russell Hopkins

PASO

Project & Administration Support Officer – Ibrahim Elsoukmani

DCRS

Director Corporate Services – Helen Sui

RC

Respite Coordinator – Marcia Simons

DCTP

Director City Transport and Presentation– Nick Mann

ROA

Records Officer Assistant – Jordan Plowman

DPE

Director Partnerships and Engagement – Liana Thompson

SP

Special Projects – Ivan Peterson

DPMP

Director Planning & Major Projects – Steve O’Brien

TLA

Team Leader Access – Stephen Bell

HSAO

Health Services Administration Officer – Laura Snyman

TLIP

Team Leader Infrastructure Programs – Mark Tomasiello

LPO

Leisure Projects Officer – Teagan Kenny

TLPD

Team Leader Parks Development – Adrian Napoleone

MACED

Manager Advocacy, Communications & Economic Development – Sean McManus

TLSP

Team Leader Strategic Planning – James Lake

MCDT-A

Acting Manager City Design & Transport – Matthew Varcoe

TLTE

Team Leader Transport Engineering – Michael Lamers

MCW

Manager Community Wellbeing – Neville Kurth

TTE

Traffic & Transport Engineer – Jayson Bedford

MCW-A

Acting Manager Community Wellbeing – Philippa McLean

YDO

Youth Development Officer – Rebecca Ferris

Consultation

Consultation has taken place with internal Council Officer representatives of each of the meetings and committees that qualify as an Assembly of Councillors.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Policy Strategy and Legislation

Section 3C(2)(g) of the Local Government Act 1989 provides that one of Council’s facilitating objectives is to have regard to ensuring transparency and accountability in Council decision making.

Accordingly, section 80A of the Local Government Act 1989 requires that the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that the written record of an assembly of Councillors is, as soon as practicable:-

    (a)        reported at an ordinary meeting of the Council; and

    (b)        incorporated in the minutes of that Council meeting.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority          Organisational Sustainability

Future Direction         Good Governance

Theme                          Continuous improvement

Strategic Objective     Our Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations

The provision of this report is in line with the Council Priority 5 – Organisational Sustainability - Good Governance of Council’s Council Plan by ensuring Council monitors and evaluates all of its operations.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

That Council note the record of the Assemblies of Councillors meetings in the table set out in the report.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council note the record of the Assemblies of Councillors meetings as set out in the table in the report.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.5.6    The City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering Policy

File No:                                 

Attachments:                        1        The City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering Policy   

Responsible Officer:           Director Partnerships & Engagement  

Author:                                  Whittlesea Community Futures Project Officer   

 

RECOMMENDATION SUMMARY

To adopt the City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering Policy.

KEY FACTS AND / OR ISSUES

·    The development of this Policy was identified as an action in the 17/18 Council Plan and in the Shaping Our Future - Whittlesea 2030 Strategic Community Plan.

·    The City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering Policy will guide Council’s role as a facilitator, provider and an advocate in building a vibrant volunteer culture.

·    Volunteering is an integral component of the service sector and is vital to the smooth functioning of services including but not limited to education, emergency management, sport and recreation, arts and heritage, environment, and social services.

·    Council also relies on volunteers to varying degrees for its day to day operations and service delivery.

·    Volunteering is highly beneficial to an individual’s health and socio-economic wellbeing. It provides new social connections to isolated community members and provides pathways to employment for various disadvantaged groups.


 

Report

Background

The City of Whittlesea has a long standing history of supporting volunteers and promoting volunteering in the community. Council supports Whittlesea Community Connections (WCC), a local community service organisation, to deliver a local volunteer resource service. It also recognises and celebrates the role of volunteers during National Volunteer Week every year.

Further, it supports many local volunteer-led community groups and clubs through its grants programs. Council also engages local community members as volunteers to support some of its vital services to the community such as Meals on Wheels, Community Festivals, and Welcome Expos.

Many not-for-profit organisations such as WCC, Yarra Plenty Regional Library, Salvation Army, Country Fire Authority, and various community groups rely on volunteers from our community to conduct their operations. Such services may not be able to operate in their current capacity if not for the contributions of volunteers.

For many community members, including people with disabilities, people from migrant and refugee backgrounds, and disengaged young people, volunteering helps to reduce barriers to gaining employment and provides pathways to meaningful employment. The role volunteering plays in ‘community building’ is significant.

Proposal

The City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering Policy will provide the overarching policy direction in building a vibrant volunteering culture in our community; an important step towards realising this vision. It also acknowledges the valuable contribution volunteering makes to the wellbeing of our community and informs and supports Council’s role as a facilitator, provider and advocate in creating a vibrant volunteering culture in the community. This policy replaces the ‘Volunteering Policy’ endorsed in 2005.

The City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering Policy will:

1.       Formalise Council’s recognition and commitment to volunteering and volunteers within the municipality.

2.         Inform Council’s approach to volunteering

The policy will support Council achieve its objectives through a range of measures already under implementation.

·    Council through its existing service contract with WCC, contributes to the operation of the Whittlesea Volunteer Resource Service. This provides a central coordination point for volunteering across the municipality along with relevant training and support for volunteers as well as promoting volunteering in the community.

·    Council through its existing Volunteer Resource Officer position and other project officer positions coordinate the major volunteer-led operations of Council, such as meals on wheels program, volunteer week events, and community festivals.

·    Through its existing community grants programs, Council supports many local volunteer-led community groups and clubs, enabling the creation of further local opportunities for volunteering.

·    Through its exciting advocacy avenues and partnerships, Council will advocate for more local volunteering opportunities to be created.

Consultation

This policy has been developed with the input of volunteer policy reference group which includes responsible staff across a number of Council Departments.

The Whittlesea Community Connections (WCC) staff and their volunteers also have been consulted in the development of this policy.

Financial Implications

There will be no additional financial implications arising from this policy. There are a number of existing financial provisions already made by Council which will support this policy. Some of the major and direct contributions are:

·    WCC Service Contract – Whittlesea Volunteer Resource Service: Approximately $80,000 per annum.

·    Cost of Council Volunteer Resource Officer, Social Support – Approximately $115,000 per annum.

Policy strategy and legislation

All City of Whittlesea policies comply with the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities.

This Policy has clear linkages to a range of codes, charters, legislation and Council documents:

•           Shaping Our Future - Whittlesea 2030 Strategic Community Plan.

•           2017-2021 ‘Shaping Our Future’ Council Plan.

•           Disability Action Plan 2017-2021.

•           Positive Ageing Strategy 2016 - 2025, City of Whittlesea.

•           Community Building Strategy, 2016.

•           National Volunteering Standards – 2015, Volunteering Australia.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Health and Wellbeing

Future Direction                   Inclusive and engaged community

Theme                                   Community connectedness

Strategic Objective              Volunteering in the community is encouraged and supported

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Considering the variety of benefits volunteering brings to our community and in recognition of our community’s aspiration captured through various plans, Council has an active role to play in promoting volunteering. The City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering policy will provide clarity on Council’s role as a facilitator, provider and an advocate in creating a vibrant volunteering culture in the community.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to adopt the City of Whittlesea Community Volunteering Policy set out in attachment 1.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                 Tuesday 6 March 2018

 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

6.6       Executive Services

Nil Reports 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

7.         Notices of Motion

7.1       Notice of Motion 852 - RESCISSION OF COUNCIL RESOLUTION ITEM 6.3.1 - PROPOSED ROUNDABOUT: BETULA AVENUE / BELMONT WAY, MILL PARK made at the Council Meeting on 6 February 2018.

File No:                                   NOM852   

Author:                                  Cr Alahna Desiato

 

Councillor Alahna Desiato of South East Ward has given notice that it is her intention to move the following Motion at the Ordinary Meeting of Council to be held on Tuesday 6 March 2018 at 6:30pm:

 

MOtion

THAT Council resolve to rescind the resolution made at the Council meeting held on 6 February 2018 in relation to item 6.3.1 - Proposed roundabout: Betula Avenue / Belmont Way, Mill Park which reads:

“THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Install a roundabout, as the most appropriate and effective road safety and traffic improvement treatment for the Betula Avenue and Belmont Way intersection in Mill Park.

2.       Proceed with the construction of a roundabout as part of the delivery of the 2018/19 New Works Program, noting that the proposed roundabout design has been amended to respond to petitioners concerns by incorporating:

a)      The provision of two hard stand manoeuvring areas to ensure an improved ease of ingress and egress of the directly affected residents;

b)      The repositioning of the roundabout to minimise parking loss, and maintain nature strip widths and amenity, as much as practicable; and

c)      The investigation of drainage capacity in the surrounding area to mitigate local flooding impacts.

3.       Advise all petitioners and residents in close proximity of Council’s decision on this matter, explaining the road safety improvement reasons for the decision.”

 

  

8.         Questions to Officers

9.         Urgent BusineSS

10.       Reports from Delegates Appointed BY Council TO Other Bodies

11.       Questions to CouncillorS will be considered at 5.1

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

12.       Confidential Business

12.1     Planning and Major Projects

Nil Reports


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

12.2     Community Services

12.2.1  Sporting Club Debtors Report

File No:                                  192916

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Sports Club & Facilities Coordinator

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(h)       Any other matter which the Council or special committee considers would prejudice the Council or any person

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

12.3     City Transport and Presentation

12.3.1  Growling Frog Golf Course Business Strategy

File No:                                  GH6252

Responsible Officer:           Director City Transport & Presentation

Author:                                  Manager Major Facilities

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(d)           contractual matters

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

12.4     Corporate Services

Nil Reports


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

12.5     Partnerships & Engagement

Nil Reports


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

12.6     Executive Services

12.6.1  MEETINGS OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER 22 January 2018 to 23 February 2018

File No:                                  800650

Responsible Officer:           Chief Executive Officer

Author:                                  Executive Assistant to Chief Executive Officer

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(h)       Any other matter which the Council or special committee considers would prejudice the Council or any person

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

12.6.2  CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER EMPLOYMENT MATTERS - CEO KPIs

File No:                                  N/A

Responsible Officer:           Chief Executive Officers Matters Advisory Committee

Author:                                  Chief Executive Officers Matters Advisory Committee

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(a)            personnel matters

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

12.6.3  CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER EMPLOYMENT MATTERS ADVISORY COMMITTEE (CEMAC) REPORT OF ACTIVITIES 2018

File No:                                  .

Responsible Officer:           Chief Executive Officers Matters Advisory Committee

Author:                                  Chief Executive Officers Matters Advisory Committee

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(a)            personnel matters

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                    Tuesday 6 March 2018

 

13.       Closure