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Agenda

 

OF Ordinary
COUNCIL MEETING

HELD ON

Tuesday 8 August 2017

AT 6.30PM

summons

 

You are advised that a Meeting of Council has been called by the Acting Chief Executive Officer on Tuesday, 8 August 2017 in Council Chamber, 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang at 6.30PM for the transaction of the following business.

 

 

L THOMPSON

ACTING CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

 

 

COUNCILLORS

 

RICKY KIRKHAM                            MAYOR, NORTH WARD

JOHN BUTLER                                NORTH WARD

EMILIA LISA STERJOVA               NORTH WARD

NORM KELLY                                  DEPUTY MAYOR, SOUTH EAST WARD

SAM ALESSI                                    SOUTH EAST WARD

ALAHNA DESIATO                         SOUTH EAST WARD

MARY LALIOS                                 SOUTH EAST WARD

LAWRIE COX                                   SOUTH WEST WARD

STEVAN KOZMEVSKI                   SOUTH WEST WARD

CAZ MONTELEONE                       SOUTH WEST WARD

KRIS PAVLIDIS                               SOUTH WEST WARD


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

 

 

SENIOR OFFICERS

 

 

LIANA THOMPSON                          ACTING CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

RUSSELL HOPKINS                         DIRECTOR COMMUNITY SERVICES

STEVE O’BRIEN                                DIRECTOR PLANNING AND MAJOR PROJECTS

NICK MANN                                       DIRECTOR CITY TRANSPORT & PRESENTATION

HELEN SUI                                        DIRECTOR CORPORATE SERVICES

BELGIN BESIM                                  ACTING DIRECTOR PARTNERSHIPS & ENGAGEMENT

MICHAEL TONTA                              MANAGER GOVERNANCE


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                 Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

 

ORDER OF BUSINESS

 

The Acting Chief Executive Officer submits the following business:

1.            Opening.. 11

1.1         MEETING OPENING AND PRAYER.. 11

1.2         ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT.. 11

1.3         Present.. 11

2.            Apologies.. 11

3.            Declarations of Interest.. 11

4.            Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting.. 11

5.            questions to councillors, Petitions and Joint Letters.. 11

5.1         questions to councillors.. 11

5.2         Petitions.. 11

Nil Reports.. 11

5.3         Joint Letters.. 11

Nil Reports.. 11

6.            Officers' Reports.. 13

6.1         Planning and Major Projects.. 13

6.1.1       Amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan   13

6.1.2       Amendment C208- 75 O'Herns and 115 O'Herns Road, and 100B Yale Drive, Epping.. 33

6.1.3       2017-19 Growing Suburbs Fund - Project Applications.. 41

6.1.4       90 Latitude Boulevard, thomastown - Use and Development  of two warehouses and a reduction in car parking requirements.. 45

6.2         Community Services.. 61

6.2.1       City of Whittlesea Community Festival: Relocation and Review    61

6.2.2       City of Whittlesea Multiple Sports Strategy 2017. 85

6.2.3       Code of Conduct as eligibility requirement for Senior Citizens Clubs' Grant. 125

6.2.4       Final Progress report on the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2013-17 (integrated into the Council Plan 2013-17) 133

6.2.5       Closed Circuit Television Policy.. 143

6.3         City Transport and Presentation.. 151

6.3.1       FINDON ROAD / FERRES BOULEVARD / THE LAKES BOULEVARD INTERSECTION OPTIONS.. 151

6.4         Corporate Services.. 167

6.4.1       Epping Cemetery - Abstract of Accounts and Freedom of Information Requests.. 167

6.5         Partnerships & Engagement.. 177

6.5.1       Assemblies of Councillors Report - 8 August 2017. 177

6.6         Executive Services.. 181

Nil Reports.. 181

7.            Notices of Motion.. 181

Nil Reports.. 181

8.            Questions to Officers.. 181

9.            Urgent BusineSS.. 181

10.         Reports from Delegates Appointed BY Council TO Other Bodies.. 181

11.         Questions to CouncillorS will be considered at item 5.1. 181

12.         Confidential Business.. 181

12.1       Planning and Major Projects.. 181

Nil Reports.. 181

12.2       Community Services.. 183

12.2.1    Community Care Home Maintenance Services Contract  183

12.3       City Transport and Presentation.. 185

12.3.1    Provision of Plant Hire Services.. 185

12.4       Corporate Services.. 187

12.4.1    Contract Variation - Contract CT0809107C.. 187

12.5       Partnerships & Engagement.. 189

Nil Reports.. 189

12.6       Executive Services.. 189

Nil Reports.. 189

13.         Closure.. 189

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

Note:

At Council’s discretion, the meeting may be closed in accordance with Section 89 of the Local Government Act 1989. The provision which is likely to be relied upon to enable closure is set out in each item. These reports are not available for public distribution.

 

 

 

Question Time:

During the meeting, Council will answer questions from residents and ratepayers.  Questions should be submitted in writing before the start of the meeting unless this unreasonably prevents or hinders you from participating. A Question Time form can be downloaded from Council’s website and copies of the form are available at the meeting.

 

Council is committed to ensuring that all residents and ratepayers of the municipality may contribute to Council’s democratic process and therefore, if you have special requirements, please telephone the Governance Team prior to any Council Meeting on 9217 2294.

 

 

Large Attachments:

Where large attachments form part of the Report, due to the size of the attachments – a copy has not been provided in the Agenda document

Copies of these attachments are available for inspection by the public at the following locations:

a)      Council offices at 25 Ferres Boulevard, South Morang; and

b)      Whittlesea City Council’s internet site – www.whittlesea.vic.gov.au

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

1.         Opening

1.1       MEETING OPENING AND PRAYER

The Acting Chief Executive Officer will open the meeting with the reading of the prayers:

 

Almighty God, we humbly beseech thee, to vouchsafe thy blessing upon this council.  Direct and prosper its deliberations to the advancement of thy glory and the true welfare of the people of the Whittlesea City Council.

 

Our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive them that trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever.

 

Amen

 

1.2       ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF TRADITIONAL OWNERS STATEMENT

The Mayor will read the following Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners Statement.

 

On behalf of the Whittlesea City Council I recognise the rich Aboriginal heritage of this country and acknowledge the Wurundjeri Willum Clan as the traditional owners of this place.

 

1.3       Present

2.         Apologies

3.         Declarations of Interest

4.         Confirmation of Minutes of Previous Meeting

Ordinary Meeting of Council held 18 July 2017; and

Adjourned Meeting of Council held 25 July 2017.

5.         questions to councillors, Petitions and Joint Letters

5.1       questions to councillors

5.2       Petitions

Nil Reports

5.3       Joint Letters

Nil Reports   


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.         Officers' Reports

6.1       Planning and Major Projects

6.1.1    Amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan

File No:                                  170254

Attachments:                        1        Locality & Zoning Plan

2        Epping North East Development Plan Area

3        Current 2014 Epping North East Development Plan

4        Proposed 2017 Epping North East Development Plan

5        Current Land Use & Proposed Land Use Comparison Plan   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Strategic Planner   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

An amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan has been received for the property at 1A Wolf Road, Wollert, for the purposes of accommodating a Catholic Primary School.

The current Epping North Development Plan nominates the subject site for medium density residential development that incorporates a local road.

The amendment proposes to nominate the land bound by Wolf Road to the north, Unmack Road to the east, Baltrum Drive to the South and north-south green link to the west for a “Catholic Primary School”. The amendment also seeks to update the road network and land use layout to reflect the approved subdivision layout under Planning Permit 711149.

The amended Development Plan was informally exhibited to affected owners and occupiers within the amendment area, adjoining landholdings and relevant stakeholders. Four Government agency submissions were received and no landowner submissions. None of the Government agency submissions objected to the proposal.

Following the Officer’s assessment of the Development Plan, it is recommended that Council support the Development Plan subject to the proposed changes as outlined in the report.

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this report is to discuss the submission prepared by SMEC Consultants on behalf of the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne to amend the Epping North East Development Plan.

The proposal seeks to amend the Development Plan under Schedule 21 of the Development Plan Overlay to provide for a Catholic Primary School for land at 1A Wolf Road.

The subject site incorporates a standalone vacant lot that is bound by Wolf Road to the north-east, Unmack Road to the east, Baltrum Drive to the south and passive open space to the west and north-west. The subject site is also located adjacent to the Epping North Precinct Activity Centre (land at the intersection of Baltrum Drive and Epping Road), which will provide a mix of retail and community services to service the immediate area (see Attachment 1).

The current Epping North East Development Plan nominates the subject site for medium density residential development which is bisected by a local road.

The revised Development Plan has been the subject to a non-statutory consultation process with the surrounding landowners and Government agencies. Through this process, no submissions were received objecting to the proposed Development Plan changes.

This report will discuss the merits of the revised Development Plan in the context of the applicable statutory framework.

BACKGROUND

Epping North East Development Plan area

The Epping North East Development Plan applies to approximately 452.5ha of land within the Epping North-East Corridor, generally bound by Craigieburn Road to the north, Bindts Road and the Quarry Hills Precinct Structure Plan area to the east, Harvest Home Road to the south and the Aurora Precinct to the west (see Attachment 2).

The original Epping North East Development Plan builds upon the high level guidance of the Epping North East Local Structure Plan for this area by identifying potential land uses and local road network, and contains an accompanying written report outlining other development requirements (including public open space contributions, development contributions etc). The Epping North East Development Plan was first considered by Council at its 26 August 2008 meeting, where it was resolved to approve the Epping North East Development Plan subject to a number of minor changes and conditions.

An amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan was approved in February 2014, which represents the current version of the Epping North East Development Plan (see Attachment 3). The amendment in 2014 changed the land use nomination at the corner of Pine Park Drive and Epping Road for a Mixed Use Development. Today this has been developed as the ‘Blue Stone Kitchen’ restaurant.

Subject Site 1A Wolf Road Wollert

The subject site (1A Wolf Road) parcel is 2.84 ha and was created via Planning Permit 711149.

Planning Permit 711149 was issued on 19 June 2009 and allowed for the multi-lot subdivision of the land, whereby 271 lots were created.

The Planning Permit was approved as it was considered to be generally in accordance with the Epping North East Development Plan. There have been some minor changes to the road layout as a result of Planning Permit 711149, these changes were made to better accommodate drainage and topography as a result of more detailed design work.

With the exception of the subject site, the subdivision approved under Planning Permit 711149 has been realised.

PLANNING ASSESSMENT

Epping North East Local Structure Plan

The subject land is included within the Epping North East Local Structure Plan, an incorporated plan in the Whittlesea planning Scheme that guides the future directions of growth within the Epping North growth corridor.

The Local Structure Plan highlights the following key features that are applicable to the subject site:

·        Provision of a conservation area to the north and west of the site to allow for the retention and ongoing protection of significant vegetation and serve as open space;

·        Upgrade of Baltrum Drive to a collector road, connecting the east of the subject land through to Epping Road to the west;

·        Provision of a neighbourhood activity centre at the intersection of Epping Road and Baltrum Drive; and

·        Provision of land for a Community Activity Centre and Primary School.

The Local Structure Plan also sets out the applicable development contributions to be satisfied for infrastructure, community and open space projects. These matters are generally dealt with as conditions of permit at the detailed subdivision stage.

Zoning

The subject land is affected by the General Residential Zone (GRZ) (Clause 32.08), which applies to the entire Epping North East Development Plan area.

The GRZ aims to provide a diversity of housing types and moderate growth in locations offering good access to services and transport, as well as allowing some education, religious, and community uses to serve the local community.

Overlays

The subject land is covered wholly by three planning scheme overlays, which include:

·        Vegetation Protection Overlay – Schedule 2 (Clause 42.02);

·        Development Plan Overlay – Schedule 21 (Clause43.04); and

·        Development Contributions Plan Overlay – Schedule 10 (Clause 45.06).

The Development Plan Overlay Schedule 21 applicable to the subject land requires that a Development Plan be prepared and endorsed by Council prior to formal consideration of any subdivision, use or development of the subject landholdings. The Development Plan must be produced in accordance with the provisions of Schedule 21 and the Local Structure Plan.

The Vegetation Protection Overlay provisions more specifically aim to preserve and maintain significant native vegetation.

The Development Contributions Plan Overlay sets out the requirements to deliver development contributions in accordance with the Local Structure Plan. Development contributions have been satisfied as part of the parent subdivision, therefore are not relevant to this application.

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE EPPING NORTH EAST DEVELOPMENT PLAN

The proposed amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan was received in February 2017 (see Attachment 4) and specifically relates to changes at 1A Wolf Road. The proposed changes include:

·        Change the nomination of the subject land from residential development to Catholic Primary School; and

·        Reconfigure the layout to the balance land.

This amendment is a graphical plan change only, there is no wording change proposed within the written report accompanying the Epping North East Development Plan.

Attachment 5 provides a visual comparison of the current land use designation with the proposed land use change and road network layout.

These changes have been further expanded below.

Proposed Catholic Primary School’ Nomination

The key change that is being proposed as part of this Amendment is the nomination of the whole parcel of land at 1A Wolf Road, Wollert for a Catholic Primary School.

The current Epping North East Development Plan is very specific about the designation of medium residential development. Any future application for a primary school would be deemed generally not in accordance with the Development Plan and refused, hence the need for the proposed amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan.

The site has been chosen on the basis that it is adjacent to passive open space and a mixed-use neighbourhood activity centre.

The applicant anticipates that the school in the ultimate will accommodate 600 students by 2021. A full planning permit application incorporating detail design of the school will be subsequently submitted in order to satisfy the requirements of the zone and overlays.

Revised Road Layout

The applicant has also updated the land use layout of the Epping North East Development Plan to reflect the approved subdivision layout under Planning Permit 711149. This includes the removal of the local road that is to bisect the primary school site.

No other changes are proposed as part of this Development Plan amendment application.

CONSULTATION AND NON-STATUTORY EXHIBITION

Prior to the formal submission of the Epping North East Development Plan amendment proposal in March 2017, there have been numerous discussions with the proponent and relevant Council departments over various iterations of the proposal with specific regard to the future built form of the school, and access to and from the site.

Following these discussions, the Epping North East Development Plan was placed on non-statutory exhibition over a five week period between 19 May 2017 and 23 June 2017.

Whilst there is no statutory requirement to advertise the Epping North East Development Plan document, in accordance with Council practice, a copy of the Epping North East Development Plan was sent to all owners and occupiers of land adjacent to 1A Wolf Road, as well as relevant external authorities for comment as part of the non-statutory process.

At the conclusion of the exhibition period, four submissions were received from referral agencies and no submissions were received from adjacent landowners. None of the submissions received objected to the proposal.

SUBMISSIONS

The following section details the submissions received and the officer response to them.

Key Submission Points

Officer Response

Agency

SP Ausnet

SP Ausnet has no objection to proposed amendment.

Noted.

Country Fire Authority (CFA)

CFA has no objection or comments with regards to the amendment.

Noted.

Transport for Victoria (TFV)

TFV have reviewed the proposed changes and indicate that there are no implications to transport operations, and accordingly no impact.

TFV does not object to the proposed amendment to the Development Plan.

Noted.

VicRoads

VicRoads have reviewed the proposal and have advised they have no objection to the proposal.

Noted.

Stakeholders/Affected Landowners

No submissions were received.

DISCUSSION

The proposed amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan as it relates to 1A Wolf Road is required to allow for the future consideration of a Catholic Primary School. The proposal also makes administrative updates to the Development Plan to reflect the subdivision pattern approved under Planning Permit 711149.

In reviewing the merits of this proposal it is important to look at all of the changes and their net community benefit outcomes.

Prior to seeking this amendment, the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne has assessed the need for a school within the Epping and Wollert growth corridor by studying pupil enrolments and analysis of the area’s demographic profile. Through their assessments, it has been determined that a school is required within this vicinity to meet the community need.

Noting that the Archdiocese has indicated the need for a school within this area, identifying the appropriate location for a school is required. The existing Neighbourhood Activity Centre at the intersection of Baltrum Drive and Epping Road provides an opportunity for the school to co-locate with the Centre.

The above, coupled with the provision of existing built form principles and links to active travel networks ensures that the proposal is looking beyond its site to understand the impact within the Epping North area.

At a site specific level, the above considerations also act as the basis for requirements the School must meet as part of any future development application process. Their purpose being to minimise any potential amenity impacts on existing and future residential development.

To this end, the proposed amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan proposes a high level of detail to support the establishment of a Catholic Primary School, whilst also providing Council Officers the opportunity to review the planning of its location. This is discussed in more detail below.

Primary School ‘Designation’

The amendment to the Development Plan is required, due to the specificity of the current Epping North East Development Plan, which shows medium density residential development where the primary school is proposed.

It is important to note that the purpose of a Development Plan is to identify key land uses and infrastructure requirements at a broad level. This is to give residents and agencies a level of certainty over the type of development likely to be realised. This however does not ‘lock down’ an exact development outcome, but developments must generally accord with what has been outlined within the Development Plan.

The Local Structure Plan is the overarching strategic framework that applies to the Epping North Development Corridor; the plan was developed on a number of key strategic planning principles, of which one was the provision of a dispersed activity centre model. Activity Centres are hubs that provide a range of non-residential uses which are co-located for the convenience of local residents. The activity centres have been strategically located throughout the Epping North Development Corridor to maximise walkability, promote transport connects and most importantly service a local catchment.

Elaborating further, Activity Centres typically provide retail and commercial uses as an anchor, with other non-residential uses such as childcare, schools, active open space and medical centres being located adjacent to complement the retail role of the centre. The co-location of these uses whilst convenient for local residents also provides the opportunity for these uses to minimise their potential amenity impacts on residential developments.

The subject site of this amendment is adjacent to an establishing activity centre, whereby a mix of retail uses are built, as is the provision of open space. The provision of a school in this location would begin the process of diversifying the range of uses within the activity centre and provide an outcome within the Epping North East Development Plan that better reflects the strategic intent of the Local Structure Plan, to provide mix of co-located uses that meets the day-to-day needs of local residents.

Built Form / Layout

Built form and design details of the primary school will be considered as part of the future planning permit application process. The primary school itself is surrounded by roads, open space and the established activity centre, which by its very nature will constrain the amount of land available and sizing of the school.

The Epping North East Development Plan has incorporated number of design principles to foster suitable development outcomes within the area. As the school is to locate within the Activity Centre, it is considered that the ‘built form’ principles as they relate to development within the Activity Centre should apply to the site. These principles have a particular focus on built form; landscape and amenity; and site access and permeability.

The built form principles seek for example to ensure buildings present close to the street to activate major thoroughfares and provide a suitable amount of passive surveillance.

As for its relationship to the streetscape, the school has frontage to two local roads (Wolf Road and Unmack Road) and one collector road (Baltrum Drive). Baltrum Drive serves as the ‘main street’ for the Activity Centre. All established uses within the Activity Centre have a direct frontage to Baltrum Drive. Given the school is intended to support the role of the Activity Centre and Baltrum Drive has been designed to facilitate higher traffic volumes, it is considered that the school should have a frontage to Baltrum Drive.

For the purposes of the Development Plan, it is considered appropriate to include a note on page 57 of Epping North East Development Plan that identifies that the school must have direct street frontage to Baltrum Drive. This will ensure that the built form of the school is consistent with the function and layout of the Activity Centre.

Officer Recommendation

·        Require the Epping North East Development Plan report on page 57 be amended to include that the ‘catholic primary school’ must provide a direct frontage to Baltrum Drive consistent with other development within the Neighbourhood Activity Centre.

Access and Car parking

Given the established road network there are some matters that require resolution relating to the access of the school and carparking.

As mentioned previously, the site is bound by three streets, one higher order collector road (Baltrum Drive to the south) and two lower order access streets (Wolf Road to the north and Unmack Road to the east). The function of the local access streets is to facilitate access to residential lots within the precinct. Given Unmack Road and Wolf Roads are already constructed, the potential for their role to be upgraded is unfeasible.

The role of the collector road to facilitate higher traffic volumes as well as provide frontage for more intensive land uses, such a community or retail uses. Given the frontage of the site to Baltrum Drive it is considered appropriate that all access to/from the school site associated with vehicular movement should be limited to Baltrum Drive. This will also minimise impacts upon the function of Unmack and Wolf Roads.

With respect to car parking, this is a formal consideration for any future planning permit application. It is noted that sufficient car parking spaces must be provided wholly on site to accommodate the school, noting that the Planning Scheme does prescribe the number of spaces required for a school.

For the purposes of the Development Plan, it is considered that a requirement is included that identifies the preparation of a Traffic Impact Assessment with any future planning permit application. This report will need to (but not be limited to) determine traffic levels generated by the school, identify peak traffic times, ingress/egress from the site and identify how the site will accommodate car parking.

Finally as the site is adjacent to a large open space area with connections to a shared path network, it is considered suitable that the Epping North East Development Plan identifies the promotion of active travel associated with this proposal. The promotion of active travel will help to diversify access arrangements to the school through the support of walking and cycling, and reduce the reliance on car based travel. Any future development applications should have consideration of Council’s guidelines/policy on active travel. 

Officer Recommendation

·        Require the Epping North East Development Plan report on page 57 be amended to identify opportunities for additional pedestrian access points to the school to capitalise on the location of the shared path network and open space to facilitate active travel opportunities.

·        Include provision within Epping North East Development Plan on page 57 that before any permit is granted for the subdivision and development of the land at 1A Wolf Road, a Traffic Impact Assessment report must be submitted to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. The report must have particular regard to the nature of the existing and surrounding road network, pick up and drop off peak times and include the provision of all car parking requirements within the subject site. Vehicular access arrangements for the school must be prioritised along Baltrum Drive and seek to minimise impact on the local road network. The assessment must also consider the Engineering Design and Construction Manual and Council’s Standard Drawings.

Open Space and Trees

It is anticipated that the primary school will have frontage to the open space to the north and west. It is considered that this frontage should be activated through appropriate fencing treatments and an entry point that connects to the shared path network. Noting that it is the imperative of the school to ensure the safety of students, any fencing required to delineate the open space from the school land should be transparent. This is considered appropriate to ensure the amenity and view lines of the open space are upheld whilst keeping students safe.

With respect to trees, there are three River Red Gum trees which are protected under a Section 173 Agreement within the boundary of the site. These trees will need to be incorporated into development of the site and the Tree Protect Zone embellished in similar ways to the existing open space to the north and west of the site to discourage activity underneath the canopy of the tree. For any plans lodged as part of a future planning permit application Tree Protection Zones must be clearly identified in accordance with the City Of Whittlesea standards and exclusion treatments nominated.

Officer Recommendation

·        Include provision on page 57 of the Epping North East Development Plan report that any development of 1A Wolf Road must provide transparent fencing to any adjoining public open space and an access point to link to the shared path network.

·        Include provision on page 57 of the Epping North East Development Plan report that the three trees nominated for retention must be wholly accommodated within Tree Protections Zone’s to Council Standard.

Approved Subdivision Layout

Planning Permit 711149 identifies the preferred subdivision of the land affected by the Epping North East Development Plan. The layout approved slightly differs from the layout of the original Epping North East Development Plan as it nominates a local road through the proposed school site. It is considered appropriate to update the Development Plan as part of this amendment to remove the nomination of this road.

Legal Advice – Conditional Approval of Development Plans

It has been standard practice of this Council to approve Development Plans subject to conditions. Recent legal advice from Maddocks has outlined that the previous practice to approve Development Plans subject to conditions is not an approach that is supported at VCAT and should not be continued.  As such, Council recommendations for reports seeking approval of Development Plans subject to conditions will be worded in such a way to ensure that the appropriate changes are made to Development Plans prior to approval in line with the Council report.

Essentially, the recommended process from this point forward is that Council will be asked to note the report as suitable for approval subject to changes and delegate final endorsement to the Chief Executive Officer. This will ensure that the final Development Plan is approved in accordance with the changes highlighted in the Council Report without the need to seek endorsement from Council at a subsequent meeting. In the circumstance where no changes to the Development Plan are recommended by officers, then there will be no change to the standard practices.

This approach still provides for a formal Council position on the Development Plan and ensures certainty to the proponent to advance resolution of the plan without a delay in the process.

CRITICAL DATES

·        August 2008 – EPPING NORTH EASTDEVELOPMENT PLAN reported to and adopted by Council.

·        June 2009 – Planning Permit 711149 approved.

·        February 2014 – The first amendment to the CRDEVELOPMENT PLAN reported to and adopted by Council.

·        February 2017 – Current amendment proposal submitted for consideration.

·        May/June 2017 – 28 Day Non-Statutory Exhibition Period.

 

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Planning our space

Strategic Objective              Urban design helps build our connection to place, the natural environment and the community

 

The proposed amendment will enable the delivery of a Catholic Primary School to service the local residents and build upon the Neighbourhood Activity Centre. The proposal complements the Centre and enhances community activation of the Epping North development area. It is on this basis that the proposal is considered to meet the direction of creating places and spaces.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The proposed amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan allows for a Catholic primary school at 1A Wolf Road (adjacent to a designated Neighbourhood Activity Centre). The relationship of the school adjacent to established retail uses will serve to diversify the services available for local residents and contribute positively to the amenity of the area.

Whilst the proposed change in uses is supported, further design details relating to the built form of the primary school, and car parking are considerations for the planning permit application and need further clarification. The changes recommended in this report provide additional guidance at the planning permit stage to address these concerns.

Legal advice is that the approval of the Development Plan should not be conditioned. Therefore, it is recommended that Council note the 2017 Amendment to the Epping North East Development Plan and delegate approval of the Development Plan to the Chief Executive Officer subject to the following changes:

·        Require the Epping North East Development Plan report on page 57 be amended to include that the ‘catholic primary school’ must provide a direct frontage to Baltrum Drive consistent with other development within the Neighbourhood Activity Centre.

·        Require the Epping North East Development Plan report on page 57 be amended to identify opportunities for additional pedestrian access points to the school to capitalise on the location of the shared path network and open space to facilitate active travel opportunities.

·        Include provision within Epping North East Development Plan on page 57 that before any permit is granted for the subdivision and development of the land at 1A Wolf Road, a Traffic Impact Assessment report must be submitted to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. The report must have particular regard to the nature of the existing and surrounding road network, pick up and drop off peak times and include the provision of all car parking requirements within the subject site. Vehicular access arrangements for the school must be prioritised along Baltrum Drive and seek to minimise impact on the local road network. The assessment must also consider the Engineering Design and Construction Manual and Council’s Standard Drawings.

·        Include provision on page 57 of the Epping North East Development Plan report that any development of 1A Wolf Road must provide transparent fencing to any adjoining public open space and an access point to link to the shared path network.

·        Include provision on page 57 of the Epping North East Development Plan report that the three trees nominated for retention must be wholly accommodated within Tree Protections Zone’s to Council Standard.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Note that the officer’s report indicates that the amended Epping North East Development Plan is prepared in accordance with Schedule 21 to clause 43.04 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme subject to the following changes;

a)      Require the Epping North East Development Plan report on page 57 be amended to include that the ‘catholic primary school’ must provide a direct frontage to Baltrum Drive consistent with other development within the Neighbourhood Activity Centre.

b)      Require the Epping North East Development Plan report on page 57 be amended to identify opportunities for additional pedestrian access points to the school to capitalise on the location of the shared path network and open space to facilitate active travel opportunities.

c)      Include provision within Epping North East Development Plan on page 57 that before any permit is granted for the subdivision and development of the land at 1A Wolf Road, a Traffic Impact Assessment report must be submitted to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. The report must have particular regard to the nature of the existing and surrounding road network, pick up and drop off peak times and include the provision of all car parking requirements within the subject site. Vehicular access arrangements for the school must be prioritised along Baltrum Drive and seek to minimise impact on the local road network. The assessment must also consider the Engineering Design and Construction Manual and Council’s Standard Drawings.

d)      Include provision on page 57 of the Epping North East Development Plan report that any development of 1A Wolf Road must provide transparent fencing to any adjoining public open space and an access point to link to the shared path network.

e)      Include provision on page 57 of the Epping North East Development Plan report that the three trees nominated for retention must be wholly accommodated within Tree Protections Zone’s to Council Standard.

2.       Delegate to the Chief Executive Officer the power to approve the Epping North East Development Plan to the Council officer report under Schedule 21 to clause 43.04 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, upon the Chief Executive Officer being satisfied that the above changes have been made as contemplated by in 1 a)-e) above.

3.       Advise the proponent and submitters of the above.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

Subject Site


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.1.2    Amendment C208- 75 O'Herns and 115 O'Herns Road, and 100B Yale Drive, Epping

File No:                                  190290

Attachments:                        1        Subject Properties

2        Current Zoning Map   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Senior Strategic Planner   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

Whittlesea Planning Scheme Amendment C208 applies to the properties at 75 O’Herns and 115 O’Herns and 100B Yale Drive, Epping. The Amendment proposes to remove the Urban Floodway Zone from a small part of the subject sites and replace it with the Industrial 1 Zone which applies across the balance of the area.

 

It is noted that the Amendment was previously known as, and was previously presented to Council as Amendment C164. This number was required to be changed to Amendment C208 following authorisation.

 

The Amendment was reported to Council on 21 March 2017, where Council resolved to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit the Amendment. Given the procedural nature of the Amendment, exemption was sought from usual notification requirements under Section 20(2) of the Planning Environment Act (1987). Authorisation to prepare the Amendment under Section 20(2) of the Planning and Environment Act (1987) was granted on 23 May 2017.

 

Views of the Prescribed Ministers were sought by giving notice of the Amendment on 27 June 2017 for a period of two weeks. No submissions from Prescribed Ministers were received by the closing date of 12 July 2017.

 

It is recommended that Council adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C208 and forward it to the Minister for Planning for approval.

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this report is to discuss the outcomes of the statutory exhibition process for Whittlesea Planning Scheme Amendment C208 and provide recommendations to finalise the amendment process.

 

The proposed Amendment applies to the properties known as 75 O’Herns and 115 O’Herns and 100B Yale Drive, Epping.

 

The properties at 75 O’Herns Road, and 115 O’Herns Road, Epping, maintain a direct abuttal with O’Herns Road to the north, and are flanked to the east and south by existing industrial and commercial use and development associated with the Cooper Street Employment Area. A mixed use residential development is located along the northern side of O’Herns Road.

(Attachment 1- Subject Properties).

 

The property at 100B Yale Drive, Epping is located directly to the south of 75 and 115 O’Herns Road. The site abuts existing and future employment and commercial uses to the east, south and west.

 

The proposed Planning Scheme Amendment seeks to remove the Urban Floodway Zone from the subject sites as it is considered to be redundant, and no longer required to provide specific controls associated with drainage and stormwater management. No changes are proposed to the Industrial 1 Zone (INZ1), the Development Plan Overlay Schedule 9 (DPO9) and the Land Subject Inundation Overlay which applies to the site. (Attachment 2- Current Zoning Map)

 

While procedural in nature, the Amendment is required in order to remove the redundant Urban Floodway Zone from the subject site.

NOTIFICATION AND SUBMISSIONS

While exemption from the usual notification requirements of 19(2) and 19(3) of Planning and Environment Act (1987) was granted, Council was required to give notice of the preparation of Amendment C208 to prescribed Ministers.

 

Prescribed Ministers were given 2 weeks to respond to the proposed Amendment, with no submissions being received by the specified closing date of July 12 2017.

bACKGROUND/DISCUSSION

To facilitate the future planning and development of the subject sites, the proponent requested a Planning Scheme Amendment be prepared to remove the Urban Floodway Zone from the subject sites, and replace it with the underlying Industrial 1 Zone (INZ1) which covers the remainder of the sites, and is in line with the existing uses on surrounding properties.  

 

In order to inform the request for a Planning Scheme Amendment, the proponent undertook further analysis of the drainage requirements and stormwater management needs for the properties, and reviewed the need for the specific Urban Floodway Zone on the site. This analysis has found that the Urban Floodway Zone is no longer required on the site.

 

Melbourne Water reviewed the Stormwater Management Plan prepared by the proponent and agreed that the Urban Floodway Zone is no longer required on the sites, as the stormwater needs can be accommodated through any future road network and subdivision works.

 

Following the item being heard and supported at Council’s March 21 2017 meeting, Authorisation to prepare and exhibit the proposed Amendment was sought from the Minister for Planning. Authorisation was received on 23 May 2017.  It is noted that the Amendment was initially identified as C164. It was confirmed following authorisation that the Amendment number was required to be changed to Amendment C208.

 

Given the procedural nature of the Amendment, exemption from the usual notification requirements specified under the Planning and Environment Act (1987) was also sought. This request was support by the Minister for Planning on the basis that compliance with the notification requirements was not warranted.

 

Notification of the preparation of the Amendment was provided to the Prescribed Ministers on 27 June 2017. It is noted that at the conclusion of the notification period, no submissions were received from Prescribed Ministers.

 

On the basis that Melbourne Water, as the relevant drainage authority, agree that the control is redundant and are supportive of the proposed Amendment, and that no submissions were received from relevant Prescribed Ministers, it is considered appropriate to progress the Amendment to finalisation.

Policy strategy and legislation

The proposed Planning Scheme Amendment will provide for the orderly future planning for the use and development of the subject sites. The proposal will ultimately allow for the provision of further industrial and commercial land which will complement the uses found through the Cooper Street Employment Area.

 

The proposed removal of the Urban Floodway Zone from the subject sites will facilitate the implementation of several Local and State planning policies including Clause 17- Economic

Development and Clause 21.10-1 Employment Opportunities of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. The proposed amendment will facilitate the implementation of these policies as it will allow for the future use and development of the land which will provide greater employment opportunities in the Cooper Street Employment Area.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Planning our space

Strategic Objective              Urban design helps build our connection to place, the natural environment and the community

 

 

The proposed Planning Scheme Amendment will facilitate the use and development of the land for employment purposes. It is considered that the removal of the Urban Floodway Zone will allow for the preparation of a Development Plan which is well connected to surrounding developments and designed to ensure a safe and pleasant amenity for the community.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 Officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The proposed Amendment which seeks to remove the Urban Floodway Zone from the subject properties and to replace it with the underlying Industrial Zone 1 is considered to be procedural in nature. It is considered the sufficient evidence have been provided to support this request, to  demonstrate that the control is redundant and no longer required by Melbourne Water to manage stormwater and drainage flows for the subject properties and surrounds.

 

Therefore, it is recommended that Council resolve to adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C208 and forward to the Minister for Planning requesting approval.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Adopt Planning Scheme Amendment C208 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme;

2.       Request the Minister for Planning approve Amendment C208 to the Whittlesea Planning Scheme; and

3.       Advise the landowners of Council’s resolution regarding 1. and 2. above.

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 



Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.1.3    2017-19 Growing Suburbs Fund - Project Applications

File No:                                      

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Manager Major Projects   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

Applications for the $50 million 2017 – 2019 Growing Suburbs Fund (GSF) are now open.  It is proposed that Council submits an application for five projects, totalling $7,600,000.  This report seeks Council’s approval to proceed with the GSF application and a priority order for the funding submissions.  The order of priority is a new requirement to enable the funding agency to appreciate the order projects should be removed from our application should full funding not be available for all the projects.

Background

The GSF program is aimed towards funding critical local infrastructure needs to promptly respond to the pressures experienced by interface communities by bringing forward local infrastructure projects. It will support interface councils to better meet the needs of their diverse communities and improve liveability.

The GSF is open to ten interface councils including the City of Whittlesea and will fund a mix of projects across the following broad categories:

·    community health, well-being and social interaction;

·    early education, and learning and training;

·    sport, recreation and leisure;

·    environmental and climate change resilience; and

·    place making, civic amenity and community connecting.

The maximum allocation to any of the 10 eligible councils is 20% of the $50 million fund (i.e. $10 million).  It is important to note that the funding agency, the Department of Water Environment Land and Planning (DWELP) will award the entire $50 million grant in November 2017 and all successful projects must commence construction no later than September 2018.  Construction must be completed within three years of commencement of works.

The key difference from previous rounds of this grant program is the reduced timeframe for grant applications and earlier project commencement requirements (no later than September 2018), which has impacted on the selection of eligible projects.

The GSF guidelines also require that a council resolution be made to support the project applications in priority order.

The GSF will generally not fund:

·    Projects that have already commenced construction;

·    Land acquisition;

·    Infrastructure that is fully scoped and funded through a developer contributions plan;

·    Maintenance works;

·    Recurrent operating costs;

·    Drainage, waste, roads and associated footpaths, as well as public transport infrastructure;

·    Infrastructure that does not have direct community benefit or address an identified community need; and

·    Service connections.

In addition there are specific criteria as listed below:

·    No more than three projects with a maximum construction value of less than $750,000;

·    A council resolution is required to support the project applications in priority order;

·    Bundling of small projects to be itemised; and

·    Return of unspent funds.

Applications for infrastructure funding will be assessed against five criteria:

 

Criterion 1 - Why is the project required? – (25% weighting)

·    Extent to which the project addresses an identified need in the community.

 

Criterion 2 - Who will benefit and how? – (25% weighting)

·    Extent to which the project will deliver benefits to the locality.

 

Criterion 3 - What will be delivered? – (20% weighting)

·    Relationship between project outputs and expected benefits with consideration of environmental sustainable design and universal access design principles.

 

Criterion 4 - How will the project be delivered? – (weighting – 20%)

·    Realistic timeframes for delivery and demonstration that projects are financially viable and value for money.

 

Criterion 5 - Extent of council and community support for the project – (weighting – 10%)

·    Recognised council priority and supported by the community.

Each project must be supported by a business case, concept plan and cost estimates.  These are currently being prepared for the proposed projects.  Applications close on 10 August 2017 and announcement of successful grants are expected in November 2017. 

Proposal

A cross-organisation working group was established to identify opportunities in the New Works Program and shortlist projects that best met the grant guidelines.

Council officers then met with the funding agency, the Department of Water Environment Land and Planning (DWELP) to discuss the shortlisted projects as identified by the working group.  DWELP provided feedback on the likely strength of the shortlisted projects against the grant fund objectives and criteria, which further helped prioritise the list of possible projects. 

The projects listed below were identified as best meeting the grant funding objectives and criteria and are listed in priority order.

 

 

PROJECT

PID

PROPOSED FUNDING

GROWING SUBURBS FUND

COUNCIL MATCHING FUND

Redevelopment of Mill Park Leisure Centre, Mill Park*

·    Currently is design phase

PID 1589

$2,500,000

$2,500,000

All Abilities Playspace, The Stables, Mill Park

·    Additional design required

PID 2192

$2,000,000

$2,000,000

Redevelop Main Street Reserve Sports Pavilion, Thomastown

·    Design contract to be awarded in August/September  2017

PID 1698

$2,500,000

$2,500,000

Renewal of Playspaces

(Pandora Park, Thomastown; Nickson Street Reserve, Bundoora; Willow Park, Whittlesea)

·    Currently is design phase

3 sites

$450,000

$450,000

Energy Efficiency Program

(solar PV for community centres, battery storage and solar pre-heating for some large community centres) – various locations

·    Currently is design phase

PID 1914

$150,000

$150,000

Total

$7,600,000

$7,600,000

*Items identified include reception, café, program rooms, crèche, change rooms, spa, DDA items, external recreation space, portion of the car park and landscaping.  These items will not overlap with the proposed Building Better Pools funding application which Council will submit to Sport Recreation Victoria in September 2017.

To ensure that the All Abilities Playspace project is delivery ready, the original design requires to be updated to meet current DDA and universal design guidelines.  In addition, the incorporation of a toilet amenity and relevant services need to be designed to ensure this project is delivery ready within the grant timeline requirements.

In summary, the proposed five projects listed above amount to a total application of $7,600,000 for Growing Suburbs Fund and an equivalent amount of Council contribution.  No other projects in the New Works Program adequately meet the criteria or will be ready for commencement of construction within ten months of the awarding of grants. 

Consultation

Public consultation is undertaken as part of each specific project.

Financial Implications

The proposed five projects listed above amount to a total application amount of $7,600,000.  Council must contribute a matching amount to the submission to the Growing Suburbs Fund. 

If the grant applications are successful, this will result in these projects being brought forward in the New Works Program.

As explained above, the design for the proposed $4 million All Abilities Playspace project requires review and expansion.  This additional design work is estimated to be $95,000, of which $20,000 is already budgeted in the 2017/18 Planning & Feasibility Program.  An additional $75,000 budget is required to complete the additional design work in 2017/18 to enable the project to be delivery ready.  The source of the budget funding for the additional design work will be identified as part of the First Quarter Report to Council of the New Works Program Budget in October 2018.

Policy strategy and legislation

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Planning and Infrastructure

Future Direction                   Places and spaces to connect people

Theme                                   Planning our space

Strategic Objective              We have neighbourhoods defined by attractive, well connected streets and public spaces

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Applications for the $50 million 2017 – 2019 Growing Suburbs Fund will close on 10 August 2017.  After extensive consideration of the projects currently listed in Council’s New Works Program, five projects were found to best meet the criteria and are recommended for Council approval in the priority order for submission to the grant program.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Approve the submission of the following five projects, listed in priority order to the Growing Suburbs Fund:

a)      Redevelopment of Mill Park Leisure Centre  (PID 1589) for $2,500,000;

b)      All Abilities Playspace (PID 2192) for $2,000,000;

c)      Redevelop Main Street Reserve Sports Pavilion (PID 1698) for $2,500,000;

d)      Renewal of Playspace at 3 sites (PID 118) for $450,000; and

e)      Energy Efficiency Program      (PID 1914) for $150,000.

2.       Approve a budget allocation of $75,000 for the additional design for the All Abilities Playspace project, with the funding required to be identified in the First Quarter Report to Council of the New Work Program Budget in October 2018.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.1.4    90 Latitude Boulevard, thomastown - Use and Development  of two warehouses and a reduction in car parking requirements

File No:                                  716343

Attachments:                        1        Locality Maps

2        Development Plans   

Responsible Officer:           Director Planning & Major Projects

Author:                                  Planning Officer   

 

APPLICANT:                         George E Apted & Associates

COUNCIL POLICY:              22.09     Industrial Development Policy

ZONING:                               Commercial 2 Zone

OVERLAY:                            Design & Development Overlay (Schedule 11)

Development Contributions Plan Overlay (Schedule 3)

REFERRAL:                          AusNet

OBJECTIONS:                      One    

RECOMMENDATION:         That Council approve the application

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

It is proposed to develop and use two warehouses on the vacant commercial lot of 1,250m2 at 90 Latitude Boulevard, Thomastown and reduce the parking requirements of the planning scheme by 2 spaces per warehouse. The warehouses are to be used for storage by a construction company operated by the owner.

 

Advertising of the proposal resulted in one objection being received. The grounds of objection relate to parking and traffic impacts on the area due to the reduction in car parking requirements proposed.

The proposal has been assessed as being appropriate with the provisions of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme and as such, it is recommended that Council approve the application.

SITE AND SURROUNDING AREA

The subject land is located on the southern side of Heyington Avenue, approximately 730m east of High Street, Thomastown (see Attachment 1). The land is described as Lot 13 on PS 609111X and forms part the Meridian Business Park developed by MAB.  Lots within this estate are largely established with industrial/commercial buildings and uses. 

The subject land comprises a vacant, cleared and generally level parcel of land of 1,250m2 with a depth of 50m and a frontage of 25m to Latitude Boulevard.

Currently, the subject site has no constructed crossovers and no significant vegetation.

Background

Planning Permit 711740 was issued under delegation on 10 September 2010 for the construction of four industrial buildings and a reduction in car parking requirements across both the subject site and the neighbouring property to the south (86 Latitude Boulevard).

 

24 car parking spaces were approved for the development (6 per warehouse) which was of similar sized warehouses to that now proposed for the subject site.  An extension of time to the permit for two (2) years was granted on 4 June 2014, requiring the completion of the approved development by 8 September 2016. The development never commenced and the permit subsequently expired.

restrictions and easements

Covenant AM610917R affects the subject land and restricts:

·    subdivision of the land into more than two lots;

·    particular types of land use relating to food, drinks and a number of industrial type uses; and

·    site maintenance to ensure that it doesn’t become unsightly.

 

The restrictive covenant does not preclude Council from making a decision on the proposal for two warehouses.

Proposal

It is proposed to construct an 865m2 building on the land comprising of two warehouses with internal access door and associated car parking of 12 spaces (6 per warehouse), separate vehicle access and landscaping (see Attachment 2).  Each warehouse will contain an ancillary office and staff amenities (at ground and mezzanine levels).  Vehicle access is proposed via two crossovers (to the north and south ends of the frontage). 

A single loading bay for each warehouse is provided internally within the main entrance, whilst a 3.0m landscape setback is proposed along the frontage of the site with smaller landscape strips along side boundaries within the car park area.

The warehouse is proposed to be used by a construction company operated by the owner of the site.

Public Notification

Advertising of the application has resulted in one objection being received.  The grounds of objection relate to traffic and parking concerns.

PLANNING ASSESSMENT

The application is generally consistent with the State and Local Planning Policy Frameworks.  The following sections of the State and Local Planning Policy Frameworks are relevant to this application:

State and Local Planning Policy Framework

Clause 17.02 - Industry

This Clause sets out State planning policy provisions relating to industrial land development and design.  Relevant strategies seek to ‘protect and carefully plan existing industrial areas to, where possible, facilitate further industrial development.’

The objective of this clause is to encourage developments which meet community’s needs for retail, entertainment, office and other commercial services and provide net community benefit in relation to accessibility, efficient infrastructure use and the aggregation and sustainability of commercial facilities.

The development of two new warehouses within an area supporting other similar uses and buildings is considered consistent with the intent of the area and it will ensure the proper use of the site.

 

Clause 17.02-1 – Industrial Land Development

The proposal is considered to comply with the strategies and objectives which seek to facilitate the sustainable development and operation of industry and research and development activities, as the development of the new warehouses will occupy an area set aside for warehousing as approved in the Development Plan for the area,

Clause 18.02-5 Car parking

The objective of this clause is to ensure an adequate supply of car parking that is appropriately designed and located. This use will have a number of car parks available to use and the number of car parks is considered appropriate for the proposed use.

Clause 21.10 Economic Development

 

The objective of this clause is to provide for employment opportunities and encourage job diversity. The subject site is located within the Meridian Business Park and the development of new warehouses within this precinct is considered to support the objectives of this clause and will create the opportunity for a new business to be located within the precinct.

 

Clause 22.09 Industrial Development Policy

 

This Clause sets out the importance of industrial design to attract new investment.  Relevant policies seek to encourage appropriate design and landscape outcomes that enhance and approve the appearance of industrial areas.

 

The development is consistent with the policy set out in Clause 22.09 Industrial Development; noting that the development provides satisfactory opportunities for landscaping, utilises appropriate materials for the cladding of the development and makes appropriate provision for car parking.

 

Zoning and Overlay Provisions

 

Clause 34.02 – Commercial Zone (Schedule 2)

 

Pursuant to Clause’s 34.02-1 and 34.02-4, a planning permit is required for the use and development of the site with two warehouses.

 

The purpose of the Commercial 2 Zone is to encourage commercial areas for offices, appropriate manufacturing and industries, bulky goods retailing, other retail uses, and associated business and commercial services, as well as ensuring that uses do not affect the safety and amenity of adjacent and nearby more sensitive uses.

 

The proposal is consistent with the zoning of the land where commercial uses of this nature are encouraged.  The site is within 30m of a residential area and therefore the use requires approval, however it is noted that less than 0.5m further and the use would not require consideration.  Notwithstanding this, storage uses are low impact and do not typically create unreasonable noise levels.  Moreover, the warehouses will not generate large vehicle or visitor rates as they will be used solely by a construction business for storage and as an office.

 

Clause 43.02 – Design and Development Overlay (Schedule 11)

 

The site is affected by the Design and Development Overlay (Schedule 8) which seeks to:

·    Enhance the appearance of the business park by encouraging quality commercial architecture and urban design outcomes.

·    Physically integrate development on the site with the surrounding established urban areas.

·    Minimise amenity impacts at the interface between industrial/commercial and residential activity along Heyington Avenue;  and

·    Encourage high quality built form with frontages that address public parks, reserves and adjoining streets where appropriate.

 

Pursuant to Clause 43.02-2, a permit is required to construct a building or carry out works.

The Meridian Park Planning and Design Guidelines (November 2007) and Schedule 11 lists design response criteria that has to be considered as relevant. 

The proposal provides a building setback greater than that recommended by the overlay, will ensure plant and equipment are appropriately screened, makes provision for landscaping and also proposes coloured concrete with variations to create visual interest to the building.  The office location at the front also ensures passive surveillance of the street and activation.

Fencing is currently proposed on the front boundary which is not consistent with the preferred location outlined within the overlay control.  A condition of permit will require its location to behind the proposed landscaping areas within the frontage.

The proposed development also has support from the Meridian Business Park Committee of Management which is required as part of the Meridian Park Planning and Design Guidelines (November 2007).

 

Clause 45.06 – Development Contributions Plan Overlay (Schedule 3)

The site is affected by the Development Contributions Plan Overlay.  Pursuant to Clause 45.06 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, the Development Contributions Plan Overlay enables the levying of contributions for the provision of works, services and facilities prior to development commencing.  Schedule 3 to the overlay requires contributions for drainage infrastructure for commercial development at a current rate of $4.02 per square metre of impervious floor area. This requirement must be included as a condition on any planning permit that is issued.

Particular Provisions

Clause 52.06 – Car Parking

Clause 52.06 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme prescribes the rate and design standards for car parking spaces required on site.  Pursuant to this clause the following car spaces are required:

Warehouse No.

Clause 52.06 rate

Net Floor Area

Car spaces required

Car spaces provided

Complies

1

2 + 1.5/100m2 of Net Floor Area

439m2

8

6

No

2

2 + 1.5/100m2 of Net Floor Area

439m2

8

6

No

 

The proposal falls 4 spaces short of the car parking required for the development. In this particular instance, the reduction is considered acceptable as the applicant has indicated that the warehouses will be used largely for storage by the end user (owner/operated/occupied) and that only a maximum of four people will be on site at any given time.  This ensures that an oversupply is being provided under the current owners/occupiers.

 

In the event that the warehouses are sold or the business moves out, there is more than adequate availability of parking within the surrounding street network and most of the business park has now been built out.

 

In addition to this, a previous approval that allowed for a similar reduction was granted as part of Planning Permit 711740 and in their referral response, Council’s City Design & Transport Department has indicated that they are comfortable from a traffic engineering perspective with the reduction being sought.

 

Council’s City Design and Transport Department also raised concern with the proposed vehicle crossing locations due to the location of existing assets such as a pram crossing, street tree, drainage pits, and an electrical pit.  There are minimum engineering standards as well as setback from vegetation that need to be achieved (i.e. 2.5m from a tree, 2.0m from a pram crossing and 1m to drainage pits).

 

To address the above, a suggestion to provide a central driveway was made to assist in minimising the impacts on assets within the road reserve, however this is likely going to necessitate a redesign of the front of the building to centralise the vehicle access doors and shift the office components to the outside (side boundaries).

 

It is also possible that the applicant may seek to relocate the assets to suitable locations at their cost and as such, it is recommended that a condition of permit be included that requires this matter to be addressed to Council’s satisfaction and the permit applicant can investigate which option is pursued.

 

Clause 52.07 – Loading and Unloading of Vehicles

 

This clause sets out the requirements for the loading and unloading of commercial vehicles and aims to prevent loss of amenity and adverse effect on traffic flow and safety.  The proposal complies with the requirements of this provision.

 

REFERRAL

As the subject site is within a Transmission Line Referral Area, the application was referred to AusNet under Section 55 (determining authority) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. AusNet had no objections to the proposal, subject to the inclusion of conditions on any permit issued.

Comments on Grounds of Objection

The objector had concerns of precedence being set for a reduction of parking to each premise within the estate and the potential impacts that this could have. The Meridian Business Park is a largely developed industrial estate with only minimal land left to be developed. Council’s City Design & Transport Department have not raised any concern regarding the reduction in parking proposed and did not state that this will have a detrimental impact on the surrounding road network or the manoeuvrability of large vehicles.  Additionally, the nature of the use does not create a demand for additional parking, whilst any overflow in the future, should it arise, can be absorbed within the surrounding street network.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The application has been assessed against the planning zone provisions and other relevant planning provisions, including the State and Local Planning Policy Frameworks of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme, particularly Schedule 11 to the Design and Development Overlay, and is considered to be consistent with the relevant policies and strategies of the Planning Scheme.  It is considered that the proposal is consistent with surrounding uses and development in the surrounding area and achieves a quality design that is envisaged to be contributory to the Meridian Business Park.  Therefore, it is recommended that a Planning Permit be issued, subject to appropriate conditions.

Recommendation

THAT Council resolve to approve Planning Application No. 716343 at 90 Latitude Boulevard, Thomastown and issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for the construction of two warehouses and a reduction in car parking requirements, in accordance with the endorsed plans and subject to the following conditions:

1.       Prior to the endorsement of the plans required under this permit, the permit holder must pay to Council a contribution for drainage pursuant to Clause 45.06 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme (this amount will be subject to the Consumer Price Index at the time of payment).

 

2.       Before the development hereby permitted starts, three copies of amended plans to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority must be submitted to and approved by the Responsible Authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and will then form part of this permit. The plans must be generally in accordance with the plans dated 24/10/2016 and prepared by George E Apted & Associates Pty. Ltd. but modified to show:

 

(a)        The proposed front fence to be a minimum of 75% transparency and located behind the front landscape setback with a maximum height of 1.8m.

 

(b)       Details showing either:

 

•           The proposed new relocated location of assets within the road reserve at the developers costs to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority; or

•           An alternative layout comprising of a central shared accessway in lieu of the two proposed crossovers or revised location of two crossovers to minimise the impact on assets within the road reserve.

 

3.       Before the development hereby permitted commences, three copies of a landscape plan prepared by a suitably qualified landscape designer to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority must be submitted to and approved by the Responsible Authority. When approved, the plan will be endorsed and will then form part of this permit. The plan must show:

 

(a)        The relocated fence location;

 

(b)       The area or areas set aside for landscaping;

 

(c)        A schedule of all proposed trees, shrubs/small trees and ground cover;

 

(d)       The location of each species to be planted and the location of all areas to be covered by grass, lawn or other surface material;

 

(e)        The provision of two small-medium canopy trees within the front landscape setback area of the buildings.

 

4.       Before the release of the Endorsed Plans, a $1,250 cash bond or bank guarantee must be lodged with the Responsible Authority to ensure the completion and maintenance of landscaped areas and such bond or bank guarantee will only be refunded or discharged after a period of 13 weeks from the completion of all works, provided the landscaped areas are being maintained to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

 

5.       Before the use and development hereby permitted starts, a Waste Management Plan must be prepared to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. Once satisfactory, such a plan will be endorsed and must be implemented to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. The Plan must provide the following details of a regular private waste (including recyclables) collection service for the subject land including:-

 

·          The type/s and number of waste bins.

·          Screening of bins.

·          Type/size of trucks.

·          Frequency of waste collection.

·          The provision and use of a bin-tugThe bin-tug must be maintained in an operational state at all times;

·          Hours of collection (to comply with EPA Regulations).

To the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. The endorsed Waste Management Plan must not be amended without prior written consent of the Responsible Authority.

 

6.       Before any works start, including works required by other authorities, three copies of a site management plan must be submitted to and approved by the Responsible Authority. When approved, the Site Management Plan will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The Site Management Plan must:

 

(a)   Include separate parts describing relevant matters of occupational health and safety, traffic management and delivery times and methods.

(b)   Include proposed location of car parking for construction workers’ private vehicles if they are not to be parked on site.

(c)   Include the proposed route for construction vehicle access to the site including a program for the upgrade and maintenance works required along this route while any works are in progress.

(d)   Include means by which foreign material will be restricted from being deposited on public roads by vehicles associated with building and works on the land to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

The developer must keep the Responsible Authority informed in writing of any changes to the Site Management Plan. If in the opinion of the Responsible Authority the changes represent a significant departure from the approved Site Management Plan then an amended Site Management Plan must be submitted to and approved by the Responsible Authority. The approved measures must be carried out and completed to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

7.       Before the development starts, a signage and line marking plan which shows all line markings and signs must be submitted to and approved by the Responsible Authority. The use and installation of all devices must be in accordance with all relevant standards, including Council standard drawings, VicRoads, Australian Standards and AustRoads Guides. This must also include the signage and line marking for the disability parking space and internal parking layout.

 

8.       The development allowed by this permit and shown on the plans and/or schedules endorsed to accompany this permit shall not be amended for any reason without the consent of the Responsible Authority.

 

9.       Once the development has started it must be continued and completed to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

 

10.     Before the use of the development allowed by this permit starts, landscaping works shown on the endorsed plan must be completed and then maintained to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

 

11.     Before the use of the development starts, the car parking areas and access ways must be drained, and fully sealed and constructed with asphalt, interlocking paving bricks, coloured concrete or other similar materials and may only be used for their intended purpose to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

 

12.     In areas set aside for car parking, measures must be taken to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority to prevent damage to fences or landscaped areas.

 

13.     External lighting must be designed, baffled and located so as to prevent any adverse effect from light spill on adjoining land to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

 

14.     All external plant equipment must be appropriately screened from view from any public area to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

 

15.     Vehicular access to the site must be by way of a vehicle crossing constructed in accordance with Council’s Vehicle Crossing Specifications to suit the proposed driveway(s) and the vehicles that will be using the crossing(s).  The location, design, and construction of the vehicle crossing(s) must be approved by the Responsible Authority.  Any existing unused or redundant crossing(s) must be removed and replaced with concrete kerb, channel and naturestrip to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.  All vehicle crossing works are to be carried out with Council supervision under a Road Opening Permit.

 

16.     Before starting any buildings or works, engineering plans showing a properly prepared design (with computations) for the internal drainage and method of disposal of stormwater from all roofed and sealed areas must be submitted to Council for approval.  These internal drainage works must be completed to Council’s satisfaction prior to using or occupying any building on the site.

 

17.     Discharge of stormwater from the land will be required by means of an underground pipe drainage system designed to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority and discharging into an approved outlet in a street or an underground pipe drain to the requirements of the Responsible Authority. In this regard no water shall be discharged from any pipe or paved area onto the surface of any adjacent land.

 

18.     Before the use of the development commences, reticulated (water, sewerage, gas and electricity) services must be constructed and available to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

 

19.     The permit holder shall be responsible to meet all costs associated with reinstatement and/or alterations to Council or other Public Authority assets deemed necessary by such Authorities as a result of the development.  The permit holder shall be responsible for obtaining prior specific written approval for any works involving the alteration of Council or other Public Authority assets.

 

20.     At all times during the construction phase of the development, the permit holder shall take measures to ensure that pedestrians are able to use with safety any footpath along the boundaries of the site.

 

21.     Upon completion of all buildings and works authorised by this permit the permit holder must notify the Responsible Authority of the satisfactory completion of the development and compliance with all relevant conditions.

 

22.     Any litter generated by building activities on the site shall be collected and stored in an appropriate enclosure which complies with Council’s Code of Practice for building/development sites.  The enclosures shall be regularly emptied and maintained such that no litter overspills onto adjoining land.  Prior to occupation and/or use of the building, all litter shall be completely removed from the site.

 

23.     During the construction phase, a truck wheel washing facility or similar device must be installed and used to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority so that vehicles leaving the site do not deposit mud or other materials on roadways. Any mud or other materials deposited on roadways as a result of construction works on the site must be cleaned to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority within two hours of it being deposited.

 

AusNet Conditions

 

24.     Enter in an agreement with AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD for supply of electricity to each lot on the endorsed plan.

 

25.     Enter into an agreement with AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD for the rearrangement of the existing electricity supply system.

 

26.     Enter into an agreement with AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD for rearrangement of the points of supply to any existing installations affected by any private electric power line which would cross a boundary created by the subdivision, or by such means as may be agreed by AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD.

 

27.     Provide easements satisfactory to AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD for the purpose of “Power Line” in the favour of “AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD” pursuant to Section 88 of the Electricity Industry Act 2000, where easements have not been otherwise provided, for all existing AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD electric power lines and for any new power lines required to service the lots on the endorsed plan and/or abutting land.

 

28.     Obtain for the use of AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD any other easement required to service the lots.

 

29.     Adjust the position of any existing AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD easement to accord with the position of the electricity line(s) as determined by survey.

 

30.     Set aside on the plan of subdivision Reserves for the use of AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD for electric substations.

 

31.     Provide survey plans for any electric substations required by AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD and for associated power lines and cables and executes leases for a period of 30 years, at a nominal rental with a right to extend the lease for a further 30 years.  AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD requires that such leases are to be noted on the title by way of a caveat or a notification under Section 88 (2) of the Transfer of Land Act prior to the registration of the plan of subdivision.

 

32.     Provide to AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD a copy of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification that shows any amendments that have been required.

 

33.     Agree to provide alternative electricity supply to lot owners and/or each lot until such time as permanent supply is available to the development by AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD. Individual generators must be provided at each supply point. The generator for temporary supply must be installed in such a manner as to comply with the Electricity Safety Act 1998.

 

34.     Ensure that all necessary auditing is completed to the satisfaction of AUSNET ELECTRICITY SERVICES PTY LTD to allow the new network assets to be safely connected to the distribution network.

 

Time Limits

 

35.     In accordance with the Planning and Environment Act 1987 a permit for the development expires if:

 

a.   the approved development does not start within 2 years of the date of this permit; or

b.   the approved development is not completed within 4 years of the date of this permit and/or

c.   the approved use is not commenced within two years of the completion of the development or is discontinued for a period of two more years.

 

The responsible authority may extend the periods referred to above if a request is made in writing.  This request must be made before or within 6 months after the permit expiry date where the development has not yet started and within 12 months after the permit expiry date where the development allowed by the permit has lawfully started before the permit expires.

 

NOTES:

Advanced Trees

An advanced tree under this permit shall generally constitute the following:

Evergreen – minimum container size 45 litre spring ring, calliper at ground level 50mm.

Deciduous – minimum calliper at ground level 65mm, minimum height 2 metres.

Building Over Easements

Any building or works to occur within an easement must be carried out to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. In addition, the following will apply:

(a)          Access to any drainage pit in the easement is to be maintained.

(b)       Council reserves the right to excavate, lay, repair or replace pipes within the easement.

(c)        Council is not liable for any damage from such works and that reinstatement shall be the owner's responsibility and at the owner's expense.

(d)       Prior to a building approval being issued, any drain(s) existing in the easement are required to be shown on the plans, with a detailed sketch indicating any pier and beam footings required to span these public assets.

(e)        Building approval must be obtained prior to the commencement of the works.

Street Numbering Note

Please note that property addresses and numbering is allocated by Council.  This is usually formalised at the time of the subdivision, however it is Council’s intention to number the proposed premises/tenancy as follows:

Warehouse 1 -  92 Latitude Boulevard, Thomastown

Warehouse 2 -  90 Latitude Boulevard, Thomastown

Please check with Council’s Subdivision Department to verify all street numberings.

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.2       Community Services

6.2.1    City of Whittlesea Community Festival: Relocation and Review

File No:                                  195512

Attachments:                        1        Relocating City of Whittlesea Community Festival: Feasibility Study   

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Arts, Heritage and Events    

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

An assessment has been undertaken of four sites (McDonalds Road, Findon Road, Civic Centre and Mill Park Recreation Reserve) to assess their suitability for accommodating the relocated City of Whittlesea Community Festival. The detailed Feasibility Study and site audit can be found in Attachment 1.  The assessment concludes that the most suitable site is the Civic Centre site at South Morang and proposes that the City of Whittlesea Community Festival be relocated there from 2018.

Introduction

The City of Whittlesea Community Festival relocation feasibility study was developed in response to Council’s resolution of 19 December 2016, which read:

THAT Council relocate the City of Whittlesea Community Festival from Barry Road, Thomastown to South Morang, including consideration of a day/night street festival to be run in either February or March;

1.    Investigate the following locations;

a.    Option 1 - McDonalds Road between Ferres Boulevard and South Morang Central; and

b.    Option 2 - Findon Road between Mill Park Lakes Boulevard and the Great Eastern Way.

c.    Investigate other locations.

2.    Event planning will be for 2017/18 financial year implementation.

3.    Begin discussions with Westfield regarding a partnership that will have regard to:

a.    Parking and stall locations;

b.    Working in conjunction with affected businesses; and

c.    Possible sponsorship and commercial support.

4.    Regularly report back to Council on the progress.

 

 

Background

The City of Whittlesea Community Festival is Council’s largest outdoor cultural event. It showcases and celebrates the City of Whittlesea’s diverse community. The festival, established in 1997, is held annually in March at the City of Whittlesea Public Gardens, Lalor, and attracts up to 15,000 visitors each year. The event hosts a rich cultural mix of both residents and visitors, creating a unique opportunity to connect with people from outside their usual social/ familial/ cultural experience. The program provides a wide range of family-focused entertainment and participatory activities.

The event provides distinct areas enabling the event to appeal to multiple audiences: e.g. youth, children, diverse cultural groups with activities of local environmental and cultural interest. This program is complemented with fairground rides, international food options and fireworks to conclude the event.

The Community Festival provides valuable community cultural development opportunities with the Arts, Heritage and Events team working with local schools, community and cultural groups and clubs developing festival projects. These projects may include art installations, presentation of activities, running of workshops, art projects and/or performances; they may be day-long activities or shorter activities such as a parade or a finale. Such opportunities create legacy for the community and takes the impact of the festival beyond one day of entertainment each year.

The Community Festival also provides an accessible space for Council, businesses, developers, service providers, community and cultural groups and clubs to connect and consult with community and to promote their services, opportunities and programs directly to local people.

At the 18 July 2017 Council meeting a petition to Beautify the Whittlesea Gardens and a Joint Letter with a second petition to Improve the Whittlesea Gardens were tabled.  The petition to Beautify the Whittlesea Gardens received 97 signatures from residents and 11 from non-residents, and requested Council improve the Whittlesea Gardens through beautification of the park, make it more family friendly, and retain the annual Whittlesea Community Festival at the Gardens.

A Joint Letter from 8 residents together with a petition signed from 101 residents, requested Council to improve the Whittlesea Public Gardens by doing the following:

1.   Install lights to increase safety at night for those attending the park in the evening (including the dog park);

2.   Resurrect the lake at the gardens and also build a duel walking/bike track around the lake;

3.   Plant a variety of attractive trees that will provide shade in the future, for example a boulevard of palm trees;

4.   Upgrade current playground to a fenced all-abilities playground with equipment to stimulate play and creative fun for a wide range of ages;

5.   Provide shade over the all-abilities playground equipment to protect children from harmful UV rays; and

6.   Retain the gardens as the venue for the Whittlesea Community festival to promote community adhesion and well-being among residents in this geographical area in Whittlesea.

It was resolved that a report be prepared for Council.

This Report addresses the issue of the location of the Community Festival raised in the petitions. The other matters are being addressed by Council’s Parks and Open Space Department and will be the subject of a future report to Council.

Analysis of sites

There are key considerations when choosing any festival site; the space should lend itself to the creation of an ambience aligned with the focus and the ‘vibe’ of the festival, the environs should be able to provide a safe, accessible space with sufficient room to accommodate the program, interactive activities, food provision and areas to gather and relax. Additionally there should be an understanding of the capacity of the site – how many attendees it can accommodate - this is critical in planning for crowd management and provision of safe evacuation procedures.  Each of the proposed sites has been assessed against criteria examining physical suitability, compatibility with OHS legislation, accessibility, and local impact (audit is attached as Attachment 1).

Site Audits – summary

Option 1: McDonalds Road

Of the sites which were audited this is the least suitable site. While it has the benefit of excellent public transport connections it is a very small site surrounded by roads and car parks which presents a high level of risk to the public. Mitigation of risk, along with mitigation of disruption to road users would be very costly. 

Key Strengths

·    There is a large area of hard surface enabling heavy infrastructure to be placed onsite without damage. This surface is also beneficial when creating pathways for those with disabilities.

·    Central location, close to public transport.

Key Challenges

·    The proposed site footprint is significantly smaller than the current site.

·    Thirty-six hour road closure, traffic management and supporting infrastructure including public notification systems will be required prior to, during and post-event leading to an additional substantial budget requirement of $80,000 - $100,000.

·    Unable to evacuate site safely.

·    Overnight working will impact staff costs – may require an external production team.

·    Overnight working will have cost implications for infrastructure tenders.

·    The site is an urban environment with no shade.

·    Westfield – access and egress will be significantly reduced.

Option 2: Findon Road

This site is an attractive site with a good mixture of grass and hard surfaces. Road closures here would not disrupt local traffic significantly although this may change with increased development in the area. There are concerns around the level of risk to the public associated with large bodies of water present on the site and also landlord permissions (Melbourne Water) to conduct festival activities on environmentally sensitive wetlands. 

Key strengths

·    No local businesses or residents to be affected.

·    Mixed site – Greenfield and hard standing.

·    Good infrastructure access.

Key challenges

·    The area contains multiple water bodies presenting a significant risk. This would need to be mitigated with fencing and other infrastructure.

·    Consultation and liaison with external landowner.

·    Potential environmental site constraints associated with wetlands.

Option 3: Alternative location 1: Civic Centre

This site is a tried and tested successful event site which does not provide any significant risks to the public.  It has the potential to become a central site which is at the ‘heart’ of the municipality and community.  It is close to public transport and, as Council owns the land, there are no challenges around negotiating permissions.

Key Strengths

·    Council’s Event team are experienced at delivering successful events on this site within a risk management framework.

·    Council-owned land, no need to negotiate with partners or landowners.

·    Opportunity to utilise Council facilities (e.g. PRACC) provides the possibility of a more dynamic approach to programming.

Key Challenges

·    Grassy environment creates difficulties for those with access requirements, infrastructure would be required.

·    Event set-up during office hours causing disruption.

·    Managing crowd turnover, including pedestrian management.

Option 4: Alternative location 2: Mill Park Recreation Reserve

This site has the potential to be an excellent festival site. It is an attractive park well-designed to include discrete areas edged with trees, multiple walkways and shaded areas to sit. The site is large enough to host the festival without concern for crowd capacity and there is the potential to use the adjacent softball area for fireworks. Parking options are available but there would need to be careful management of the residential areas surrounding the north part of the park. The local community living in these roads may have objections to the festival being re-located to this park and consultation would need to be a priority. The site presents no major operational risk elements.

Key Strengths:

·    Attractive surrounds with lots of shade.

·    Significant parking options available adjacent to the site in Morang Drive.

·    The design of the park lends itself to the creation of discrete areas supporting an effective festival layout.

Key Challenges:

·    Proximity of the park to residents.

·    Possibility of re-development into an ‘all-abilities play space’ if funding is found.

Proposal

The site which most positively addresses the key requirements for a festival site is the Civic Centre South Morang.  It is therefore proposed to relocate the City of Whittlesea Community Festival to the Civic Centre site in South Morang.

Consultation

Council has consulted with Vic Roads, Victoria Police and with other emergency service providers to seek advice on the safety and suitability of each site. In addition data generated from ongoing monitoring and evaluation of events and findings from the annual Household Survey and the Satisfaction Survey were reviewed.

Critical Dates

A decision regarding the festival site is required to allow sufficient lead time for the planning and preparation in establishing the Community Festival at the new site. Should the decision be deferred the 2018 event will be delivered at the Barry Road site.

Financial Implications

McDonalds Road:

Additional operational costs for this site will include:

·    Traffic management services including 24 hour traffic controllers.

·    Extensive fencing and barricading of site including water filled barriers.

·    Probable Vic Roads permit fee for road closure.

·    Provision of multiple electronic messaging boards for at least 2 weeks, informing road users of traffic disruption.

·    Public notices in local papers and possibly Metropolitan papers.

·    Increase in staff costs due to overnight set-up.

Findon Road:

It is anticipated that running the Community festival on Findon Road and the abutting parkland may require a small additional budget allocation.

These may include:

·    Additional costs or requirements from the landowner (Melbourne Water) for water and ground protection and reparation.

·    Increase in staff costs due to overnight set-up.

 

Civic Centre:

Depending on the program for the Community Festival and the use of buildings and indoor spaces such as the Great Hall and PRACC, it is not anticipated that the use of this site will have budget implications.

Mill Park Recreation Reserve:

It is anticipated that the use of this site would be accommodated within current budget allocation.

Policy strategy and legislation

‘Shaping Our Future’ Whittlesea 2030 Strategic Community Plan identifies one of its seven future directions and themes as ‘Inclusive and engaged community’.  The Community Festival directly contributes to the strategic objective ‘We have the opportunity to participate in, contribute to and enjoy arts, cultural and recreational activities.’ 

The following Council-approved documents also intersect with this report:

·    Festival and Events Policy

·    Festivals and Events Plan 2014 17

·    Arts Development Strategy 2016 - 2020

·    Community Building Strategy

Council’s support for local Festivals also sits within a state-wide strategic context promoting arts, creativity and public engagement. Creative State is the Victorian Government's strategy to strengthen and grow the state's creative industries and the value they bring to Victorians.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Health and Wellbeing

Future Direction                   Inclusive and engaged community

Theme                                   Community connectedness

Strategic Objective              Programs, services and infrastructure encourage social connections and the development of a sense of community

 

The Community Festival provides valuable community cultural development opportunities.  Council works with local schools, local community and cultural groups and clubs to develop festival projects which are showcased on the day.  The community cultural development process undertaken prior to the festival engages young and old within diverse communities - such opportunities create legacy for the community as a whole and takes the impact of the festival beyond one day of entertainment each year.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The study of the sites provides an objective assessment with regard to the suitability of each site to host the relocated City of Whittlesea Community Festival. The study indicates that McDonalds Road is not a suitable site for hosting a public festival.  The site which most positively addresses the key requirements for a festival site is the Civic Centre South Morang.  Mill Park Recreation Reserve could be an excellent festival site but its position within a residential area causes concerns around noise and high attendance causing local disruption.   Findon Road is feasible but has the inherent challenges around negotiations with the landowner and site restrictions.

Civic Centre, South Morang is therefore proposed as the new site for the City of Whittlesea Community Festival.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to relocate the City of Whittlesea Community Festival to the Civic Centre, South Morang in 2018.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.2.2    City of Whittlesea Multiple Sports Strategy 2017

File No:                                  194952

Attachments:                        1        City of Whittlesea Multiple Sports Strategy 2017   

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Community Facility Policy Officer   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

The City of Whittlesea Multiple Sports Strategy 2017 (Attachment 1) is tabled for Council consideration.

In developing the Multiple Sports Strategy 2017, a review of 34 different sports was undertaken including assessment of local and state trends, assessment of participation and facility needs assessment. To support this research, a consultation process was undertaken that involved consultation with:

·    Governing bodies of each sport

·    Neighbouring and growth councils

·    Local clubs

·    Broader community.

The review identified ten high priority sports based on the high level of local demand, these sports were:

·    Athletics

·    Martial Arts

·    Baseball

·    Rugby League

·    Calisthenics

·    Rugby Union

·    Dance

·    Softball

·    Gymnastics

·    Touch Football

To help address the needs for these high priority sports, a plan of 14 actions has been formulated. These actions have been prioritised over a 10-year timeframe. All new works items will be referred to the New Works program and associated approval process.

The Multiple Sports Strategy will assist Council’s future planning and provide guidance on a broader range of recreational pursuits that better meet the needs of Whittlesea’s diverse community.

Introduction

With significant population growth expected in the coming years and greater community diversity, the City of Whittlesea (CoW) is actively planning to ensure appropriate levels of community infrastructure are provided that reflect the changing community sport and recreation preferences. The Multiple Sports Strategy provides evidence and direction on how Council can support less traditional or emerging sports to ensure residents have access to a range of sporting and recreational opportunities.

Background

The Multiple Sports Strategy stems from Council’s Recreation Strategy (2012-2017), which identified gaps in knowledge and strategic direction in multiple sport provision. The Recreation Strategy recommended that Council undertake planning for: rugby league, touch football, rugby union, hockey, bocce, table tennis, martial arts, motor cross, baseball and softball. Council’s Sports Participation Audit (2013-2016) also found strong local participation levels in ‘less-traditional’ sports such as gymnastics and calisthenics.

The Strategy investigates the needs and demands of 34 different sports and makes recommendations on future facility requirements and development opportunities to support the growth of these sports.

For the purposes of this Strategy, the ‘Multiple Sports’ to be investigated are listed in the table below and are defined as sports that are active recreation with a competition structure and are also considered ‘less traditional’. Traditional sports such as Australian Rules football, netball, soccer, tennis, basketball and cricket are not included in this study. Other sports not listed are being considered in either a sports specific strategy or combined strategy, e.g. water sports have been factored into the 2014 Major Leisure and Aquatic Facility Strategy.

OUTDOOR

INDOOR

Archery

Lacrosse

Badminton

Pool

Athletics

Motor Sport

Billiards

Roller Derby

Bocce/ Boules

Orienteering

Calisthenics

Snooker

Baseball

Rugby League

Dance

Squash

Croquet

Rugby Union

Darts

Table Tennis

Drone Racing

Shooting (including clay)

Fencing

Volleyball (including beach)

Gridiron

Softball

Gymnastics

Wrestling

Hockey

Touch Football

Handball

 

Kabaddi

Ultimate Disc

Martial Arts 

 

Proposal

The Multiple Sports Strategy 2017 (Attachment 1) is tabled for Council consideration.

Consultation

Key stakeholder consultation was undertaken in two parts.

1.   Part one involved broad community consultation:

·      Survey conducted at Hawkstowe Art in the Park event and the Community Festival.

·      Community survey open online and hard copy distributed across venues and groups in City of Whittlesea including Whittlesea Disability Network, Combined Probus of Doreen and Whittlesea U3A.

·      Targeted survey distribution through Council’s:

i.   Aged and Disability

ii.  Family, Children and Young People

iii.  Community Wellbeing

iv. Community Building and Planning departments.

2.   Part two involved key stakeholder consultation which included:

·      Meetings and surveys to relevant State sporting bodies.

·      Discussions and surveys to neighbouring and growth councils.

·      Follow up discussions with various clubs and multiple sports providers.

Critical Dates

All the actions have been prioritised and are outlined in the Strategy Action Plan
(Attachment 1 - page 22).

KEy Findings

General Findings

·    Over the past three years, Council has invested almost $30 million in traditional sports with forecasts indicating a similar expenditure over the next five years. In contrast, over the past three years, only one of the 34 less traditional sports (athletics) has had a capital investment of $1.2 million with forecasts indicating no capital expenditure in the next five years. The implications of the community’s growth in volume and diversity are that demand for less traditional sports will grow. Providing for only traditional sports will not reflect changes in the community or meet community need.

·    Many of the multiple sports address equity, accessibility and inclusion issues which should be supported to promote and generate positive outcomes for the community. Gymnastics, calisthenics and softball are female dominant sports, which are traditionally not provided for by Council. By providing for these sports, Council is able to achieve greater gender equity outcomes and provide for a greater portion of the community.

·    Touch football, athletics, martial arts, dance, volleyball and table tennis are some examples of the multiple sports that are gender neutral and are accessible/inclusive for people with disabilities, people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds and all age groups.

·    There are high volumes of participants that partake in multiple sports in neighbouring councils and other growth councils. These participation rates demonstrate potential demand and a shift in community sporting preferences when facilities are provided.

Sport Specific Findings

Each sport covered in this Strategy has been given a level of priority to help guide Council resources and investment into their future planning and development. Key findings for individual priority sports are presented in the table below.

Sport

Findings

Gymnastics

·      There are four gymnastics facilities in CoW, three of which are at capacity and the fourth with strong participation numbers.

·      Gymnastics Victoria reports significant growth (31% over the past two years). Across the state, 62% of the clubs have waiting lists due to limited facilities.

·      The state average participation rate is 0.92%, Whittlesea is well below at 0.41% suggesting there is significant latent demand.

·      Strong participation in the northern region.

·      Gymnastics supports gender equity and accessibility by providing alternative sporting programs tailored to include females, older adults and people with disabilities.


Athletics

·      Athletics participation has been steady over the past four years. There is one facility in CoW, the Meadowglen International Athletics Stadium (MIAS) Epping, which has heavy school use as well as use by over 400 athletics participants.

·      Athletics supports gender equity and accessibility as it has a strong interest amongst and caters for females, the CALD (culturally and linguistically diverse) community and people with disabilities.

 

Rugby League

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Touch Football

 

 

 

 

 

Rugby Union

The set of rugby sports are grouped together due to their capacity to share facilities. 

·      The Mernda Dragons Rugby League Club has 49 members and currently uses W.A Smith Reserve in Lalor.  This facility is a repurposed Australian rules ground that is not to rugby league standards (no fencing and inadequate lighting).

·      Hume has three league clubs and three different facilities, which are servicing the remaining 71 CoW registered rugby league participants.

·      Over the past ten years, rugby league state participation has increased by over 10% each year.

·      Casey (689) and Wyndham’s (413) high participation numbers demonstrate the potential for rugby league to develop in growth areas when appropriate facilities are provided.

·      Touch football is a summer sport governed by National Rugby League (NRL).  Future facility planning for this sport is aligned the NRL’s key strategic direction of building shared facilities for the two sports.

·      Touch football has a small number of participants within CoW. These participants are required to travel to central Melbourne to participate.

·      Touch football is growing in popularity. Potential growth, when a viable competition structure is provided, is demonstrated by Casey that has 620 participants.

·      Rugby union has the same facility requirements as league, although sharing is problematic given these are both winter sports.  Current demand is being met by clubs/facilities in Darebin and Nillumbik.

Baseball

·      There are 368 baseball participants in the City of Whittlesea.

·      There has been a 50% increase in baseball participation in CoW over the last three years.

·      There is one facility shared between baseball and softball (Mill Park Reserve), baseball has an allocation of one of the seven diamonds.

·      Almost 50% of CoW baseball participants are playing outside of the municipality in Darebin as participation numbers exceed facility capacity.

Softball

·      There is one facility shared between baseball and softball (Mill Park Reserve), with six out of the seven diamonds allocated to softball.

·      Softball numbers have been steady over the last two years and Softball Victoria described participation as plateauing across the State.

·      Hume is the only neighbouring LGA with a softball club and field with 170 registered participants who are catered for on two diamonds.

·      Softball supports gender equity by providing an alternative sporting program for females.

Calisthenics

·      There are four facilities that currently cater for calisthenics participants in CoW, only one is at capacity.

·      Council’s Sports Participation Audit 2013-2015 demonstrates a 44% increase in calisthenics participation in CoW over the last three years.

·      Calisthenics Victoria reports an average of 3% growth in participation numbers over the past five years and expects continued growth.

·      Calisthenics supports gender equity by providing an alternative sporting program for females.

Dance

·      Dance is provided for in 13 of Council’s facilities across the municipality, demonstrating the popularity of the sport. This does not include dance clubs / activities in private facilities which also exist in the municipality.

·      Dance is another less traditional sport that supports gender equity and accessibility as it has a strong interest amongst and caters for females, the CALD community, older adults and people with disabilities.

Martial Arts

·      Martial Arts are provided for in 17 of Council’s facilities across the municipality, demonstrating the popularity of the sport. This does not include clubs / activities in private facilities.

·      Martial Arts supports gender equity and accessibility as it has a strong interest amongst and caters for females, the CALD community and people with disabilities.

Financial Implications

The Multiple Sports Strategy is the preliminary work in understanding the needs and requirements of less traditional sports; recommendations are predominately for further infrastructure planning to meet the needs and requirements of the identified priority sports. Most of this planning will be undertaken using existing Council resources, others will require external resources and the financial implications of these are listed below. 

Recommendation

Timing

Cost

Masterplan for Mill Park Reserve to maximise use by both baseball and softball.

2018-2019

$40,000

Undertake feasibility and business planning for future athletics facilities in the growth areas. (Incorporating opportunities to share tracks with schools).

2019-2020

$20,000

TOTAL

 

$60,000

It is anticipated that these further studies will then identify the financial implications of the required capital works to provide for those identified priority sports in the City of Whittlesea.

Policy strategy and legislation

The development of the specific strategies for all the sports covered in this study was identified in the City of Whittlesea Recreation Strategy 2012-2017.  The Multiple Sports Strategy 2017 is aligned to the recommendations of this strategy.

The Multiple Sports Strategy has been developed in line with the all growth area planning document such as Precinct Structure Plans and Strategy Plans.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Health and Wellbeing

Future Direction                   Health and wellbeing

Theme                                   Healthy community

Strategic Objective              People of all ages and abilities are supported to live well with appropriate program, service and infrastructure delivery

 

City of Whittlesea is a diverse community with a diverse range of recreation needs. The Multiple Sports Strategy investigates the demand for 34 less traditional sports to gain an understanding of the changing recreational requirements of the community and ensure Council can better meet the community’s needs.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

To meet the needs of City of Whittlesea’s diverse community, Council has to plan and invest in a broader range of recreational pursuits. The Multiple Sports Strategy provides an evidence based platform that will help guide investment in recreational facilities that will help increase participation by females, people with a disability, people from CALD backgrounds and older aged residents.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to adopt the Multiple Sports Strategy 2017.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.2.3    Code of Conduct as eligibility requirement for Senior Citizens Clubs' Grant

File No:                                  195731

Attachments:                        1        Summary of Code of Conduct Presentation Presented to Clubs December 2012

2        Seniors Club Template Code of Conduct   

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Positive Ageing   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

The 2016/2017 Senior Citizens Clubs’ Grants report, presented to Council on 30 August 2016, noted that clubs are recommended to have a Code of Conduct.

This report presents the case for making a Code of Conduct an eligibility requirement for the grant. It is proposed that seniors’ clubs wishing to receive a Senior Citizens Clubs’ Grant in 2018 must have a Code of Conduct. 

Senior Citizens’ clubs play an important role in assisting older residents maintain a healthy and active lifestyle by providing a range of social, recreational and educational activities.

A Code of Conduct is a brief and simple tool to remind individuals and committees of the importance of respectful and inclusive behaviour. It does not replace the dispute clauses of the club’s constitution but acts as an accessible and easily understood complement to the constitution.

A Code of Conduct assists with the prevention and minimisation of disputes and allows individuals to maintain their social connections which are proven to have a positive effect on health and wellbeing.  A code of conduct is currently in place in 34 of the 72 clubs.

The proposal can be achieved within existing resources with Officers supporting clubs currently without a code of conduct to adopt one prior to the grant round in mid-2018.

Background

The City of Whittlesea currently recognises and supports 72 Senior Citizens’ Clubs. These clubs have a membership of 6,845 older residents and in 2016/17, average weekly attendance was 4,894 resident seniors. The clubs play an important role in assisting older residents to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle by providing a range of social, recreational and educational activities.

Recognised seniors’ clubs are eligible to receive an annual grant from Council based on the average number of Whittlesea resident seniors attending each week.

Current eligibility guidelines for a Seniors Citizens Clubs’ Grant are as follows:

·     Be incorporated with the purpose of offering a range of social, recreational and educational activities for their members

·     Have Public Liability Insurance

·     Be linked to Council support programs (i.e. participate in liaison programs)

·     Provide an annual report to Council’s Aged and Disability Department

·     Use funds for normal activities of the group, not for the payment of subsidised rental costs

·     Have 95% of members over 55 years of age

·     Club is based in the City of Whittlesea.

In addition to being eligible for a grant, recognised seniors’ clubs are also eligible for reduced room rent in Council facilities and are also provided with support from staff in Council’s Positive Ageing Team.

Historically, considerable officer effort was expended supporting clubs to resolve intra club conflicts within the terms of the particular club’s constitution. Some disputes resist resolution resulting in appeals to external agencies such as the Victorian Department of Consumer Affairs.  In an effort to reduce the number and intensity of these disputes, in 2012 the Victorian Department of Consumer Affairs promoted the concept of a Code of Conduct at a meeting of seniors clubs.

A Code of Conduct does not replace the formal grievance procedures in club constitutions, but is a more easily understood and less formal tool which can help promote positive behaviour and minimise the need for formal action under the constitution.  Many organisations possess such documents including all levels of government, services, groups and all types of clubs. 

Many of the Senior Citizens Clubs recognised by the City of Whittlesea are culturally specific and typically most club affairs are conducted in their first language. It is also common for many clubs to have members with low levels of literacy in both English and their first language. Therefore a brief and simple statement in the group’s first language is a much more accessible tool than the longer more complex club constitution, even when it is also translated into the group’s first language.

Following the consultation process described below, many clubs have subsequently adopted their own Code of Conduct.

Whilst it is difficult to be definitive, since the introduction of the code and widespread adoption, intra-club disputes appear to have declined. Club members and committee members, and where relevant, Council officers, now have a simple and easily understood tool to remind individuals and committees of the importance of respectful and inclusive behaviour.  The prevention and minimisation of disputes allows individuals to maintain their social connections which have positive effects on their health and wellbeing.

Proposal

It is proposed to amend the Senior Citizens Clubs’ Grant eligibility requirements to include that Senior Citizens’ clubs must have a Code of Conduct in order to be eligible to receive a grant, effective from the 2018 grant round.

The eligibility requirements will be amended and all recognised senior citizens clubs notified of the change during September 2017. This information will also be shared at the quarterly club liaison meetings. Those clubs without a code will be supported by officers to develop and adopt a Code of Conduct in time for the 2018 grants round. The template developed by club representatives in 2013 will be made available to clubs to adopt or adapt according to their clubs requirements.  Arrangements will be made for the document to be translated into a club’s relevant community language. 

Consultation

In December 2012 clubs received a presentation on the potential value of having a Code of Conduct (see Attachment 1). Clubs responded favourably to the idea of having a brief positive statement of expectations that were easily understood by both committees and members.

In early 2013 a joint working group of seven clubs supported by officers was formed to develop a template Code of Conduct for consideration by all clubs.

The working group resolved that the Code of Conduct:

 

·     be based on important club values of respect, honesty, trust and acceptance

·     comprise of simple statements and use words that everyone can understand

·     not be too lengthy.

The resulting document (see Attachment 2) was taken back to the August 2013 Club Liaison meeting and supported by all clubs present.

Since 2014 the grant application kit has asked clubs to confirm whether they have a Code of Conduct and currently 34 of the 72 recognised seniors clubs have one in place.

Critical Dates

August 2017:  amendment to eligibility requirements for Senior Citizens Clubs’ Grants supported

September 2017:  all recognised senior citizens clubs notified of the change, encouraged to adopt a code and informed that they will have officer assistance to develop and adopt a code for their club

July 2018:  all recognised seniors clubs have a code of conduct in place

As each Senior Citizens club is an independent incorporated entity, the decision to adopt a code rests with individual clubs and officers will only be able to encourage and support adoption.  However as future grants will be conditional upon the amended eligibility requirements being met, it is expected that the majority of clubs will choose to adopt a Code of Conduct in order to be eligible for a Senior Citizens Club’s grant.

Financial Implications

The proposal can be achieved within existing resources.

Policy strategy and legislation

The introduction of a Code of Conduct is consistent with the principles of relevant Council policy and strategy documents such as:

·    The Community Building Strategy which emphasizes  that ‘We do community building to improve outcomes for our local community’ and these outcomes include:

­  Building social cohesion: a sense of solidarity and respect for others

­  Increasing inclusive attitudes and respect

·    The Positive Ageing Strategy where the importance of supporting older people to maintain community connections is reflected in two of the Strategy’s focus areas:

­  Improve wellbeing for people as they age through social connections and an inclusive community

-     Increase opportunities for people to remain active and engaged and maintain functional health, wellbeing and independence for as long as possible

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Priority                    Health and Wellbeing

Future Direction                   Inclusive and engaged community

Theme                                   Community connectedness

Strategic Objective              Programs, services and infrastructure encourage social connections and the development of a sense of community

 

Social participation and social support are strongly connected to good health and wellbeing throughout life. Senior Citizens Clubs can provide an avenue for older people to build and maintain a social life in community so long as they are inclusive and cohesive. 

A Code of Conduct based on the values of respect, honesty, trust and acceptance assists in setting the framework for positive member interactions and strengthens good governance.

Seniors Clubs led the development of the recommended Code of Conduct and in so doing enhanced not only their own skills but the capacity of other club members and committees to ensure that all seniors can continue to fully engage and participate in community life.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Requiring Senior Citizens’ clubs to have a Code of Conduct is consistent with the principles of relevant Council strategies, policies and common organisational practice. The requirement will support clubs achieve their objective of offering a range of social, recreational and educational activities for their members in environments that are inclusive and supportive.

Altering the eligibility guidelines at this point in time will allow clubs who do not currently have a Code of Conduct sufficient time to be informed of the requirement and supported to adopt a Code of Conduct before the 2018/19 Senior Citizens Clubs’ Grants applications are due in the middle of 2018.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Amend the eligibility guidelines for the Senior Citizens Clubs’ Grants to include the requirement that seniors clubs must have a Code of Conduct effective from the 2018 grant round.

2.       Inform all recognised senior citizens’ clubs of the amendment by September 2017.

3.       Support senior citizens’ clubs to adopt a code of conduct prior to the commencement of the Senior Citizens Clubs Grants program in 2018.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.2.4    Final Progress report on the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2013-17 (integrated into the Council Plan 2013-17)

File No:                                  155041

Attachments:                        1        Health Actions - Progress

2        Priority setting criteria   

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Health Planning   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

This report provides an update on the progress and achievements of the City of Whittlesea Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan (MPHWP) 2013-17.  The report also provides an overview of findings of the monitoring and evaluation process including barriers to implementation. These insights have informed the development of the MPHWP 2017-21, which is currently being drafted.

Background

It is a requirement of the Victorian Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 that every local government develops a Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan within 12 months of the general council election.  In line with the Act, the MPHWP 2013-17 was developed through a rigorous process including examination of data about health status and health determinants contributing to local health outcomes and extensive consultation with community and health sector stakeholders.  The Act allows Council to integrate the MPHWP into the Council Plan, subject to approval from the Secretary of the Department of Health, which was done for the 2013-17 Plan.

The MPHWP 2013-17 identifies goals and strategies based on evidence for creating a local community in which people can achieve maximum health.  The Plan was based on the ‘Environments for Health’ framework and the understanding that Council action across social, built, natural and economic environments contributes to health outcomes.  This requires a cross-council approach acknowledging that “health is everyone’s business”.

Proposal

This report provides Council with an update on the progress of the MPHWP 2013-17 and highlights the key achievements arising from the Plan.  The report also provides an overview of the key themes and findings of the monitoring and evaluation process including barriers to implementation.

The MPHWP 2013-17 contains 78 separate actions contributing to achievement of objectives across four of the Council Plan Future Directions:

·     Health & Wellbeing 65% (51)

·     Inclusive & Engaged Community 15% (12)

·     Growing our Economy 12% (9)

·     Accessibility, in out and around our City 8% (6) (refer Attachment 1 A. Health Actions by Future Direction).

Progress

Monitoring and evaluation of the MPHWP has focussed on process evaluation, and intermediate outcomes.  Monitoring indicates:

·    71% (55) have been completed/ongoing

·    18% are currently in progress

·    11% have not been progressed (refer Attachment 1 B.  Health Actions: Progress to date (July 2017).

The actions that have “not progressed” are due to alternative approaches determined to be more effective.

Strengthening existing priorities

The MPHWP 2013-17 also reflected critical areas of work which were existing Council commitments such as advocacy and action to:

·    Address the social and economic harms associated with gaming; and

·    Create opportunities for social and affordable housing.

This critical work has been consolidated throughout this period and it has been noted that having the work reflected as a priority within the MPHWP has strengthened internal and external advocacy and policy and funding submissions.

ACHIEVEMENTS

The MPHWP 2013-17 outlined a rigorous rationale and clear processes towards the support and development of the City of Whittlesea’s first strategies to support Community Building, Prevention of Family Violence, Gender Equity and Positive Ageing. This report will not detail the outcomes and success of these initiatives which have their own specific monitoring and Council reporting requirements.

Significant progress has been achieved in embedding this work across Council.  This work provides ongoing opportunities to enhance health and wellbeing outcomes for the community and action will continue in relation to these key priorities into the next Plan period 2017-21.

It should be noted that the MPHWP 2013-17 addresses complex long term community issues.  Whilst these issues should not be seen as intractable, it is recognised that these priorities will require concerted effort over time and may be reflected in municipal health planning processes for the foreseeable future.  Highlights are as follows.

Community Safety and Crime Prevention

The MPHWP 2013-17 outlined the rationale for establishment of a Community Safety and Crime Prevention Committee and strengthened partnerships for collaboration on the development of a local community safety and crime prevention strategy, launched in 2017.  A range of local initiatives to enhance community safety and minimise the impact of crime have been implemented during this period.

Food insecurity and financial vulnerability

Action to monitor and respond to increasing food insecurity has included:

·    Spatial mapping highlighting ‘food deserts’ in the municipality.

·    Questions regarding financial vulnerability, food insecurity and barriers to accessing fresh fruit and vegetables included in the Annual Household Survey from 2014. 

Local pilot food security partnership projects include the:

·    Farm2Families project: a partnership with Foodbank and local community agencies. which has been evaluated by Monash University; and

 

·    Mernda Community Grocer: a ‘pop up’ style, fresh produce market servicing an identified food desert.

These initiatives have enhanced understanding of food access issues across the municipality and the contributing factors.  This has led to an increasing focus on the complex contextual factors leading to financial vulnerability for local residents.  These are valuable insights which will strengthen responsiveness of actions in the 2017-21 MPHWP.

Alcohol harm reduction

The MPHWP 2013-17 outlined actions to address harms associated with alcohol and the Alcohol Harm Reduction Policy and Action Plan was adopted by Council in August 2016.  The policy recognises the strong link between alcohol and violence, in particular family violence, and key settings for action including Council facilities and events.

Limited organisational capacity to support local sports clubs to create healthy, inclusive, family friendly environments has however meant there has been limited progress to date in these settings.  It is anticipated that the future development of the Council policy and initiatives may provide some opportunity and incentive for these positive community outcomes.

Healthy Together Whittlesea

In early 2012 Healthy Together Communities were established in twelve local government areas.  The City of Whittlesea was one of the LGAs selected based on data indicating above average rates of overweight and obesity and funding of $4M was provided between 2012 and 2016 to support the work of the Healthy Together Whittlesea (HTW) Team based at Council and Plenty Valley Community Health. 

Key achievements of HTW included:

Healthy Together Achievement Program for schools, early childhood services and workplaces supporting agencies to take a ‘whole of organisation’ approach to addressing health priority areas including healthy eating and physical activity.

With support from HTW, 53 early childhood services, 29 primary and secondary schools and 30 workplaces registered for the Achievement Program aimed at promoting physical activity and healthy eating.  Reach from these initiatives was estimated to be over 96,000 residents. 

Active Travel in Schools was introduced to promote walking and cycling to school and decrease traffic congestion.  The program provided schools with resources to support efforts in encouraging active travel to school and reducing traffic congestion during pick-up and drop-off times.  The program has contributed to building the capacity of Council and schools to work together to promote active travel as well as influencing Council’s Infrastructure improvement priorities for bus shelter installations, construction of missing footpath and cycling links and construction of pedestrian crossings.  Other achievements of HTW include:

 

·    Awarding to Council of four consecutive VicHealth Walk to School grants which supported the establishment of a municipal-wide Walk2School Competition that resulted in an additional 2,000 students walking, riding and scooting to school each year between 2013 and 2015.

·    Establishment of an Active in the Park program providing free physical activity sessions at multiple open space sites to more than 300 residents in 2015 and 2016.

·    Establishment of regular ParkRun events at the Whittlesea Public Gardens with 200 residents participating at the inaugural launch in 2016.

·    Design and implementation of a social marketing campaign promoting key healthy lifestyle messages to target communities across the municipality.  The campaign received significant exposure including more than 25 local media editorials, more than 50 media ads and more than 30 editions of an eNews resource with 900 active subscribers.  The campaign is estimated to have reached more than 8,000 residents.

Resource development

·    Active Travel Tool Kit for Schools

·    Active Story Time Manual for libraries

·    Healthy Events Toolkit

·    Sugary Free Campaign Kit

Actions not progressed

The monitoring and evaluation process highlights that of the 11 of the 78 actions have “not progressed”.  In some instances refinements to proposed actions have been required and alternative approaches were determined more effective.  This was the case for example in relation to emergency management actions:

·    2013 – 2014: Community involvement in Council emergency management training.

·    2014 – 2015: Volunteer partnerships develop.

 

Initial assessment identified significant liability issues for Council and deemed these actions to be incompatible with current council practice.

Barriers to implementation for some actions developed in 2012 related to organisational readiness.  Further work was required to build partnerships, staffing resources and capacity to progress these actions.  This was the case for many Growing Our Economy actions:

·    2013 – 2014: Undertake scoping to inform development of Employment Pathways Strategy with focus on groups who experience social and health inequalities

·    2014 – 2015: Review Council’s Recruitment Strategy to include increased focus on employment of local residents

·    2014 – 2015: Develop a work experience student placement strategy across Council and NGOs to maximise employment pathways for local students

·    2013 – 2014: Use DPCD mapping tool to identify employment gaps and forecast investment

The 2015 Council Plan review reflected a commitment to a new action:

·    2015 – 2016: Finalise Economic Development Directions Paper and utilise this to develop and Economic Development Strategy Brief.

The background scoping and evidence for the Future Direction: Growing Our Economy actions which were “not progressed” have been considered during the development of the draft Economic Development Strategy 2017-2021 “Growing Our Economy Together” (EDS 2017-21). 

The objectives of some actions in the MPHWP 2012-17 have been refined and incorporated into the draft EDS 2017-21, for example:

·    Develop social enterprise and social benefit supplier action plan, is reflected as:

·    Create a social enterprise think tank to facilitate the development of new and emerging social enterprises – with a focus on youth, CALD communities, women and people with a disability.

MPHWP Priority Setting Process

The priority setting tool, used to determine priorities for the MPHWP 2012-17, has been refined based on insights gained through the monitoring and evaluation process.  The refined MPHWP 2017-21 Priority setting criteria (refer Attachment 2.) ensures there is strong emphasis on organisational readiness and feasibility, to ensure the building blocks; partnerships, staffing resources and capacity to progress these actions are in place.

Consultation

Extensive consultation and engagement with internal stakeholders and project leads has been undertaken to monitor and evaluate the MPHWP 2013-17.  Specific objectives and actions within the Plan have evaluation processes which involve input and feedback from community and relevant stakeholders.

Critical Dates

The evaluation and monitoring of the MPHWP 2013-17 has informed the development of the MPHWP 2017-21, to be presented to Council later in 2017.

Financial Implications

The Program operated within existing department budgets. External funding supported specific initiatives.

Policy strategy and legislation

The MPHWP 2013-17 was developed to reflect requirements of the Victorian Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 and gives regard to the Victorian Public Health and Wellbeing Plan. The MPHWP 2013-17 has instigated the development of a number of key Council policies and strategies

·    Community Building Strategy – better together

·    Community Safety and Crime Prevention Strategy

·    Family Violence Strategy

·    Gender Equity Strategy

·    Alcohol Harm Prevention Policy

·    Positive Ageing Strategy.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Health and Wellbeing

Future Direction                   Health and wellbeing

Theme                                   Healthy community

Strategic Objective              There is a focus on preventative approaches to health issues and health policy

 

The report proposal reflects an ongoing commitment to rigorous evidence based planning and evaluation which will continue to refine public health approaches to ensure they are responsive to the local context.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

The MPHWP 2013-17 identifies goals and strategies based on evidence for creating a local community in which people can achieve maximum health.  There have been a range of significant outcomes from the Plan and insights to inform and refine the MPHWP 2017-21.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to endorse the Final Progress Report on the City of Whittlesea Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan (MPHWP) 2013-2017.

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.2.5    Closed Circuit Television Policy

File No:                                  195419

Attachments:                        1        CCTV Policy 2017   

Responsible Officer:           Manager Community Wellbeing

Author:                                  Community Safety Officer   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

The Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Policy (Attachment 1) outlines Council’s commitment to working in partnership to improve community perceptions of safety and support crime prevention initiatives.  The Policy provides the context for which Council owned CCTV and CCTV on Council owned land/premises can be established in the municipality.

Background

On 28 June 2016, Council resolved to develop a CCTV Policy aimed at enhancing community safety across the municipality.

Specifically, Council resolved to:

1.    Develop and implement a Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Policy aimed at enhancing community safety across the municipality;

2.    Consult with Victoria Police and the wider community on the proposed implementation of CCTV systems in relation to:

a)    areas of high crime in public spaces; and

b)    areas of potential risk to personal safety;

3.    Use established grants programs through the Federal or Victorian Governments to fund CCTV systems if Council resolve to proceed with this proposal; and

4.    Refer any CCTV project to the New Works Program for consideration in future Council budgets.

Additionally, Council’s Community Safety and Crime Prevention Strategy 2016–2020 (adopted by Council on 30 August 2016) includes an action to develop a ‘Public Safety CCTV Policy’ to cover the use of cameras in public spaces and to address the current policy gap. 

Proposal

Surveillance technology in a variety of forms is an accepted part of public life and a common crime prevention strategy used in the public sector.  Australian councils own and manage CCTV systems to varying degrees as a means of protecting community assets, monitoring high crime areas and deterring anti-social behaviour.

The purpose of this policy is to provide the context for which Council-owned CCTV and partner-owned CCTV on Council land/premises can be established in the municipality and sets the framework for the development of site-specific operating plans and procedures. 

Well designed and maintained urban environments are essential for improved safety in the community.  When individuals feel safe within their community they are more likely to experience greater levels of social connections and trust and are more likely to experience improved health and wellbeing outcomes.  A safe and secure society is an important foundation for the delivery of other key services.  Community safety and security is a prerequisite for sound economic growth through continuing business investment as well as community wellbeing and cohesion.

Local government supports community safety in many ways and is well-placed to lead and participate in crime prevention activity due to its functions and relationships to the community and other key partners.  CCTV is one example of a number of measures Council can implement to address community safety and respond to crime. 

CCTV Policy Statement

The City of Whittlesea is committed to working in partnership to improve community perceptions of safety and support crime prevention activities and acknowledges Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) as a measure to be considered, together with crime prevention through environmental design principles, to address community safety and respond to crime.

Consultation

Consultation with key stakeholders internally and externally was undertaken to explore CCTV’s effectiveness, the potential uses and community impacts.  An internal working group was established to guide and inform the development of the Policy.  Victoria Police were engaged throughout the process to develop this Policy and have informed the establishment of criteria for potential CCTV System/s.

Critical Dates

The State Government’s Public Safety Infrastructure Fund grants for the development of public safety and security infrastructure are currently open.  Councils can apply for physical elements of public place CCTV.  Applications for 2017/18 close late September 2017.  A CCTV Policy is one piece of the essential documentation required of Council in order to apply.

Financial assistance from this grant process in addition to existing budget is essential in order to fully fund a CCTV pilot.

Financial Implications

Financial assistance from the Public Safety Infrastructure Fund grants in addition to existing Council budget commitment of $50,000 is essential in order to implement a CCTV pilot in 2017/18.

Policy strategy and legislation

The Council Plan 2017-21 Year 1 Action Plan 2017/18 outlines Community Safety as a Council Priority and includes the Council Goal Our neighbourhoods are safe and have proactive programs that support and build a safe community.

The Community Safety and Crime Prevention Strategy 2016-2020 is outlined as one of the 2017/18 Major Initiatives in the Council Plan and the development of a CCTV Policy is one of the actions for the 2016-2018 Community Safety and Crime Prevention Strategy Action Plan.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Community Safety

Future Direction                   Health and wellbeing

Theme                                   Safety

Strategic Objective              There are crime reduction programs in our community

 

Well designed and maintained urban environments are essential for improved safety in the community, minimise the opportunity for crime and promote accessible and liveable places that encourage a feeling of safety and community participation.  CCTV is one example of a number of measures outlined in the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Strategy 2016-2020 that Council are taking to address community safety and respond to crime in partnership with Victoria Police and other stakeholders. 

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

Council have, through the resolution to develop a policy on 28 June 2016 and through the endorsement of the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Strategy on 30 August 2016, outlined support for the introduction of CCTV in the public realm.  This Policy outlines the criteria for determining a location of CCTV and ensures any CCTV subsequently developed by Council or by a partner on Council land supports crime prevention and improvement of community perceptions of safety.

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the CCTV Policy 2017.

2.       Explore grant opportunities to pilot a CCTV Program.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.3       City Transport and Presentation

6.3.1    FINDON ROAD / FERRES BOULEVARD / THE LAKES BOULEVARD INTERSECTION OPTIONS

File No:                                  IN / 193995

Attachments:                        1        Traffic Volumes

2        Analysis Methodology

3        Options Analysis   

Responsible Officer:           Director City Transport & Presentation

Author:                                  Unit Leader Infrastructure Projects   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

This report details intersection options evaluated, the analysis methodology, and presents a long term vision for the upgrade of the Findon Road / Ferres Boulevard / The Lakes Boulevard intersection, for consideration by Council.

The intersection is a key point of access to the Plenty Valley Town Centre and important north south routes in the arterial road network.  The intersection is highly congested and a daily source of community concern.

In order to determine the form of an upgraded intersection that most effectively addresses the long term transport needs of the community, a series of intersection upgrade options have been assessed over a 10-year and 20-year asset life horizon, in order to ensure that the expected traffic performance requirements are maintained, and all associated costs and benefits are optimised.

The options were assessed and ranked against the following criteria using a three stage evaluation process:

Stage 1: (Mandatory requirements)

·    Strategic Alignment;

·    Pedestrian / Cyclist Safety and Accessibility;

Stage 2: Technical Assessment Criteria (evaluated at year-2027 and year-2037)

·    Level of Service (Traffic flow during the AM and PM peaks);

Stage 3: Financial and Net-community Benefit Outcomes

·    Total Estimated Cost; and

·    Benefit to Cost Ratio.

The option identified to best meet the criteria evaluated, is to upgrade the current roundabout to a signalised intersection in an ultimate form.  The “Ultimate” signalised intersection proposal meets the community’s strategic intent and aligns strongly with the vision for the area, as adopted in the Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan being:

‘…an accessible town centre (that) considers the future movement network and includes sub-chapters on pedestrian and cycle networks, public transport and private vehicles”.

This option will most effectively ease traffic congestion, improve safety for vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists, and additionally accommodate the future tram route 86 infrastructure provisions.  The total estimated capital cost for the upgrade works to the ultimate signalised intersection form is $12.9 million (including a new bridge structure) to be funded through Council’s New Works Program.

Background

The existing roundabout at Findon Road / Ferres Boulevard / The Lakes Boulevard provides the only connection to the Civic Centre, Plenty Valley Shopping Centre and South Morang Transport Hub for residents of South Morang (to the north), and Epping (to the west).  The intersection is highly congested during both the morning (AM) and afternoon (PM) peaks and is a daily source of community concern.

Council at its meeting dated 9 May 2017 endorsed the Road and Public Transport Plan that identifies the top priority items for Whittlesea’s roads and public transport infrastructure. Community views on the City’s transport network were accumulated over several years and through many sources, including community requests (comments and feedback), community groups (Whittlesea Bicycle User Group, Senior Citizens, etc.), the annual household satisfaction survey and local and social media sources.

A signalised upgrade of Findon Road / Ferres Boulevard / The Lakes Boulevard intersection is listed as a high priority item for delivery under the Intersections section of the Plan.

Council officers have conducted traffic surveys and produced modelling scenarios that reinforce the ongoing concerns of residents about the performance of the roundabout in its current form.  The traffic model describes the roundabout as not performing, and requiring extra capacity; delays for each vehicle are in excess of six minutes in the AM and PM peak, which indicates that the roundabout has exceeded its capacity and requires upgrading to meet the required service levels and community expectations.

Current AM and PM traffic volumes at the intersection (year 2017), and the projected traffic volumes to the year 2027 and year 2037, are shown in Attachment 1.

An initial $200,000 was allocated under Project ID 2039 – Signalise Intersection – Ferres Boulevard / Findon Road for the investigation and development of a concept plan and detailed design in 2016/17. An additional $500,000 has been allocated this financial year (2017/18) to finalise intersection design, locate underground services, conduct geotechnical investigations and complete some preliminary service relocation.

At a Forum meeting dated 13 July 2017, Councillors’ were presented with a series of potential upgrade options, the analysis methodology, and a preferred intersection upgrade for a 10 year asset life.  Following these discussions, Councillors requested that more information be presented on the performance of the intersection over a longer asset life to ensure all costs and performance details are considered and a report be prepared for Council consideration at the next available Council meeting.

This report now includes an analysis over a 10-year and 20-year asset life to ensure the full costs and benefits are assessed over a longer-term asset life cycle approach taking into account when options may fail into the future and therefore require additional upgrade and further capital investment.

OPTIONS ANALYSIS RESULTS

The following options were assessed over a 10-year and 20-year asset life and evaluated over three key stages using the analysis methodology set out in Attachment 2:

            Options:

·          Base Case Option: Existing Conditions (no change);

·          Option A: Modified (Upgraded) Roundabout;

·          Option B: Signalised Intersection – Interim (including upgrade to ultimate); and

·          Option C: Signalised Intersection – Ultimate.

The following sections provide a summary of each option analysed.  A detailed table comparison of each option is detailed in Attachment 3.

Base Case Option: Existing Conditions (no change)

Base Case Option: Existing Conditions (no change) was used as a comparison option to determine the likely outcome in the absence of an intersection upgrade not proceeding.

The level of service data for the years 2017, 2027 and 2037 have been included in the table below for comparison purposes only, and to demonstrate this option’s performance.

Roundabout (Base case, no change)

Service Level
(AM) at year 2017

Service Level
(PM) at year 2017

Service Level
(AM) at year 2027

Service Level
(PM) at year 2027

Service Level
(AM) at year 2037

Service Level
(PM) at year 2037

Base Case Option

F

F

F

F

F

F

Stage 1 Analysis (Mandatory): Strategic Alignment and Pedestrian / Cyclist Safety & Access

This option results in a very poor outcome for the community as it fails to meet the strategic direction of Council and community, provides very poor pedestrian / cycling accessibility and safety outcomes, and would not change the known poor traffic congestion issues currently faced at this location.

This option failed to satisfy the minimum mandatory requirements as set out in Stage 1 assessment criteria, and therefore did not progress to Stage 2 for further evaluation.

Roundabout

Stage 1

Mandatory Criteria

Stage 2

Technical Assessment Criteria

(Base case, no change)

Strategic Alignment

Pedestrian  / Cycling Access and Safety

Service Level

(AM) at year 2027

Service Level

(PM) at year 2027

Service Level

(AM) at year 2037

Service Level

(PM) at year 2037

Option A

Very Poor

Very Poor

Did not progress to Stage 2 for further evaluation

 

 

 

 

Roundabout

Stage 3

Financial and community benefit Criteria

(No change)

Benefit to Cost Ratio

Total Estimated Capital Cost

Base Case Option

Did not progress to Stages 2 or 3 for further evaluation

 

Option A: Modified Roundabout (upgraded with an additional lane on all approaches)

Option A: Modified Roundabout includes the provision of an additional lane on all approaches which comprises; two lanes on the northern, western and eastern approaches, and three lanes on the southern approach.

Stage 1 Analysis (Mandatory): Strategic Alignment and Pedestrian / Cyclist Safety & Access

This option results in a poor outcome for the community as it fails to meet the strategic direction of Council and community, and provides a very poor pedestrian / cycling access and safety outcome.


 

This option failed to satisfy the minimum mandatory criteria for Stage 1, considered non-conforming and therefore did not progress to Stage 2 for further evaluation (see summary of results in the table below).

 

Roundabout

Stage 1

Mandatory Criteria

Stage 2

Technical Assessment Criteria

(upgraded with additional lanes)

Strategic Alignment

Pedestrian  / Cycling Access and Safety

Service Level

(AM) at year 2027

Service Level

(PM) at year 2027

Service Level

(AM) at year 2037

Service Level

(PM) at year 2037

Option A

Very Poor

Very Poor

Did not progress to Stage 2 for further evaluation

 

 

 

Roundabout

Stage 3

Financial and community benefit Criteria

(Modified)

Benefit to Cost Ratio

Total Estimated Capital Cost

Option A

Did not progress to Stages 2 or 3 for further evaluation

Option B: Signalised Intersection – Interim (upgraded to ultimate after 15 years)

Option B: Signalised Intersection – Interim comprises three lanes on the northern, western and eastern approaches, and four lanes on the southern approach.  Left turn slip lanes are present on the western and eastern approaches.

Stage 1 Analysis (Mandatory): Strategic Alignment and Pedestrian / Cyclist Safety & Access

The option aligns strongly with the strategic direction of the Council (and community), and provides very good pedestrian benefits to progress to Stage 2 analysis.

Stage 2 Analysis: Technical Assessment Criteria (evaluated at year-2027 and year-2037)

The Interim signalised intersection option provides adequate levels of service for the AM and PM peaks for an initial 10-year horizon, however, upon analysis over a 20-year asset life the option fails after approximately 15 years (see table below).  The interim option will therefore require to be upgraded to the ultimate condition, at year 2032, to ensure satisfactory service levels are maintained for the community under a longer term vision.

Signals

Stage 1

Mandatory Criteria

Stage 2

Technical Assessment Criteria

(Interim

form only)

 

NOTE: NO upgrade

Strategic Alignment

Pedestrian  / Cycling Access and Safety

Service Level

(AM) at year 2027

Service Level

(PM) at year 2027

Service Level

(AM) at year 2037

Service Level

(PM) at year 2037

Option B

Very Good

Very Good

C

C

D1

F1

1Option B: Signalised Intersection: Interim fails to meet a satisfactory level of service in the PM peak at approximately year 2032. Therefore, a second major upgrade of the intersection is required after 15 years to cater for the increased traffic volumes. NOTE: This major upgrade will incur additional costs for re-work, e.g. traffic management, site establishment, road and kerb civil construction works over the 20-year asset life and will be assessed accordingly in the Stage 3 analysis below.


 

A future investment upgrade from “Interim” to the intersections “Ultimate” form is required after 15 years at year-2032 so that the intersections capacity is increased and maintained to satisfactory traffic service levels at year 2037, as detailed in the table below:

Signals

Stage 1

Mandatory Criteria

Stage 2

Technical Assessment Criteria

(Interim)

 

NOTE: when upgraded to ultimate form in 15 years, at year-2032

Strategic Alignment

Pedestrian  / Cycling Access and Safety

Service Level

(AM) at year 2027

Service Level

(PM) at year 2027

Service Level

(AM) at year 2037

Service Level

(PM) at year 2037

Option B

Very Good

Very Good

C

C

C

D

 

Stage 3 Analysis: Financial and Community Benefit Outcomes

The costs associated with the required additional upgrade works from “Interim” to “Ultimate” after 15 years, at year 2032, has been accounted for in the Total Estimated Cost of the project for Stage 3 evaluation.

This option will require sufficient allowances for upgrade works to be included, such as the provision of a future bridge upgrade (including 2 additional slip lanes on the northern and southern approaches) in 15 years’ time at year 2032.  The additional work required means that this option is adjusted from its original $7.8 million estimate to $13.5 million and assessed over a 20-year asset life, thereby providing a more accurate reflection of the overall net-community benefit outcomes and total estimated project costs, as detailed in the table below.

Signals

Stage 3

Financial and Community Benefit Criteria

(over 20 year asset life)

(Interim – original cost is $7.8 million)

NOTE: upgrade to ultimate form occurs in 15 years, at year-2032

Benefit  to Cost Ratio

Total Estimated Capital Cost

Option B

$4.86 (benefits to $1 invested)

$13.5 million1

1Option B: Signalised Intersection: Interim (without upgrade - $7.8 million) fails to meet a satisfactory level of service in the PM peak at approximately year 2032. Therefore, a second major upgrade of the intersection is required after 15 years to cater for the increased traffic volumes; resulting in a Level of Service at 2037 of C and D (see results for ultimate intersection service levels at 2037 above). This major upgrade will incur additional costs for re-work, e.g. traffic management, site establishment, road and kerb civil construction works, etc., hence this option increases the initial cost estimate of $7.8 million, to  $13.5 million, over the 20-year asset life and has been assessed accordingly.

Option C: Signalised Intersection – Ultimate

Option C: Signalised Intersection – Ultimate comprises the full build out of this intersection at Day 1, including three lanes on the western and eastern approaches, four lanes on the northern and southern approaches, left turn slip lanes on all approaches, and a new bridge to allow for additional intersection capacity (note: space allowance is made for tram route 86).

Stage 1 Analysis (Mandatory): Strategic Alignment and Pedestrian / Cyclist Safety & Access

The option aligns strongly with the strategic direction of the Council (and community), and provides very good pedestrian benefits to progress to Stage 2 analysis.

 

Stage 2 Analysis: Technical Assessment Criteria (evaluated at year-2027 and year-2037)

The “Ultimate” signalised intersection provides satisfactory levels of service for the AM and PM peaks to 2037, see table below for details:

Signals

Stage 1

Mandatory Criteria

Stage 2

Technical Assessment Criteria (at 2037)

(Ultimate)

Strategic Alignment

Pedestrian  / Cycling Access and Safety

Service Level

(AM) at 2027

Service Level

(PM) at 2027

Service Level

(AM) at 2037

Service Level

(PM) at 2037

Option C

Very Good

Very Good

B

B

C

D

 

Note: for the ultimate intersection to work satisfactorily beyond 2037 (during the PM peak), Council will need to duplicate Ferres Boulevard and The Lakes Boulevard. Both projects are identified to occur late in the current 15-year New Works Program.

Stage 3 Analysis: Financial and Community Benefit Outcomes

The upgrade to “Ultimate” intersection (on Day 1) has a high initial capital cost, however, provides for a better Benefit to Cost Ratio (over a 20-year asset life) to year 2037, see table below for details.

 

Signals

Stage 3

Financial and Community Benefit Criteria

(over 20 year asset life)

(Ultimate)

Benefit  to Cost Ratio

Total Estimated Capital Cost

Option C

$7.13 (benefits to $1 invested)

$12.9 million

Proposal

The detailed evaluation of options against the assessment criteria (as detailed above, and contained in Attachment 2) over a 10-year and 20-year asset life, has identified Option C: Signalised Intersection – Ultimate as the preferred option for the upgrade of the Findon Road / Ferres Boulevard / The Lakes Boulevard intersection.

This option aligns strongly with the adopted Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan and the recently endorsed Road and Public Transport Plan, by improving traffic flow and reducing traffic congestion at the intersection in both the AM and PM peaks to the year 2037, and enhancing safety and access for vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists, see table below.

Signals

Stage 1

Mandatory Criteria

Stage 2

Technical Assessment Criteria (at 2037)

(Ultimate)

Strategic Alignment

Pedestrian  / Cycling Access and Safety

Service Level

(AM) at 2027

Service Level

(PM) at 2027

Service Level

(AM) at 2037

Service Level

(PM) at 2037

Option C

Very Good

Very Good

B

B

C

D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The project has been evaluated to benefit the community by receiving a Benefit to Cost Ratio of $7.13 worth of benefits received for every $1 spent over a 20 year asset life.

 

 

Signals

Stage 3

Financial and Community Benefit Criteria

(over 20 year asset life)

(Ultimate)

Benefit  to Cost Ratio

Total Estimated Capital Cost

Option C

$7.13 (benefits to $1 invested)

$12.9 million

Financial Implications

The total estimated capital expenditure for the preferred intersection upgrade, Option C: Signalised Intersection – Ultimate, is $12.9 million.

A $500,000 budget has been approved and allocated in the 2017/18 New Works Program (NWP) for locating existing underground services, geotechnical investigations and the relocation of underground and aboveground services in preparation for construction.

Currently there are insufficient funds assigned to this project in the current long-term New Works Program to bring forward for delivery of this intersection upgrade in 2018/2019 and / or 2019/2020.  The shortfall will be included for consideration as part of the 2018/19 New Works Program Budget approval process.

Critical Dates

PID2039 – Signalise Intersection – Ferres Boulevard / Findon Road – South Morang contains the following key components: detailed design, service proving, preliminary service relocation, and construction.

Critical dates in an accelerated timeline for this project are as follows:

·    Detailed design to be completed by 28 February 2018;

·    Some preliminary service relocation to be completed by 30 June 2018; and

·    Intersection and road upgrade to be completed by 31 December 2019.

Policy strategy and legislation

This project addresses outcomes and / or action items presented in the following Council policies and strategies:

·    Road and Public Transport Plan (2017);

·    Whittlesea Bicycle Plan 2016 – 2020;

·    Integrated Transport Strategy 2014; and

·    Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Roads, Access and Public Transport

Future Direction                   Accessibility in, out and around our City

Theme                                   Transport

Strategic Objective              The road network responds to our needs in accessing jobs, services and recreational activities

 

This project addresses the strategic outcomes presented in Shaping Our Future: Council Plan 2017 – 2021:

·    People can access and use public transport and road networks effectively in accessing jobs, services and recreational activities; and

·    Council will ensure sustainable, timely and quality development of our municipality while improving the range of recreational opportunities for residents and visitors.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

COnclusion

This report has detailed a comprehensive options analysis and prioritisation framework, which identifies and recommends Option C: Signalised Intersection – Ultimate as the preferred long term investment treatment for the intersection located at Findon Road / Ferres Boulevard / The Lakes Boulevard, estimated at a total cost of 12.9 million dollars.

This option aligns strongly with the endorsed Plenty Valley Town Centre Structure Plan and the recently adopted Road and Public Transport Plan, and aims to benefit the community with a return of $7.13 of benefits for every $1 invested.

The proposal will most effectively ease traffic congestion in both the AM and PM peaks over a 20-year asset life to year-2037, and ensure the intersection is accessible and made safe for vulnerable users such as pedestrians and cyclists.

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council resolve to:

1.       Endorse the Signalised Intersection – Ultimate as the preferred upgrade treatment for the Findon Road / Ferres Boulevard / The Lakes Boulevard intersection.

2.       Fund the construction of the intersection upgrade through the 2018/19 and 2019/20 New Works Program.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


 


 



Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                                                      Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.4       Corporate Services

6.4.1    Epping Cemetery - Abstract of Accounts and Freedom of Information Requests

File No:                                  SU147448

Attachments:                        1        Site Plan & Photo

2        Abstract of Accounts   

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Senior Property Officer   

 

Report

EXECUTIVE Summary

The City of Whittlesea was appointed Trustee of the Epping Cemetery Trust (‘Trust’) on 21 April 1994 under the Cemeteries Act 1958 (now Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2003) and all Councillors are Trust members for their term on Council.

This report requests that Councillors, as members of the Trust, appoint the Mayor and two Councillors, to be signatories of the 2016/17 Abstract of Accounts (which reports on the annual finance, maintenance and burials records).  The Department of Health and Human Services remains responsible for the collection of all ‘Abstract of Accounts’ prepared by Class A & B Cemetery Trusts, in accordance with ‘Section 52 of the Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2003.

There is also a requirement that Council officers, acting as responsible officers appointed by the Epping Cemetery Trust, advise the Freedom of Information Commissioner of any Freedom of Information (FOI) requests made in regard to the Epping Cemetery during the 2016/17 financial year.

Background

The Epping Cemetery, located at the intersection of High Street and O’Herns Road, Epping, is a closed Class B Cemetery (no longer reserved for the purposes of accepting new burials) that has been managed by Council since its appointment as Committee of Management on 12 April 1994 and remains a historic landmark that symbolises the final resting place of many of the township’s first settlers (refer to Attachment 1 – Site Plan & Photo).

The cemetery was widely used for burials through the late 1800’s and 1900’s, but has since been retained for conservation value since its formal closure in 1960.  The Cemetery was managed by an elected Cemetery Management Trust until the last known representative passed away in 1994.

Council, on behalf of the Epping Cemetery Trust, executed a conservation agreement with the former Department of Sustainability & Environment in 1995, for the management of native grasses and other flora and fauna located within the site.  All other maintenance, including the replacement and improvement of headstones, remain the responsibility of the descendants of those buried at the cemetery.

Proposal

To seek Council’s recommendation to endorse the Abstract of Accounts (2016/17 period) from the Department of Health (refer to Attachment 2 – Abstract of Accounts) and note that the Freedom of Information Commissioner has been advised that no FOI requests have been received during this period.

Consultation

Council officers held regular consultation with the Department of Health and Human Services (‘Department’) and other Cemetery Trusts to consider any suitable grant applications at the Epping Cemetery. This report acknowledges that there were no successful grant applications to undertake works at the Epping Cemetery during the financial year. 

Critical Dates

Council officers must submit a signed copy of the ‘2016/17 Abstract of Accounts’ to the Department by a date no later than 1 September 2017. 

Policy strategy and legislation

Management of Class B Cemeteries is governed by the legislation defined under the ‘Cemeteries and Crematoria Act 2003’.

 

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy                  Environmental Sustainability

Future Direction                   Living sustainably

Theme                                   Sustainable communities

Strategic Objective              We support our community to be environmentally aware and active

 

The proposal is consistent in meeting the objectives set out in Council’s ‘Shaping Our Future – Whittlesea 2030 Strategic Community Plan’ particularly those referenced under ‘We have environmental education and conservation programs’.

The Epping Cemetery has undergone significant changes to improve its amenity and overall conservation of native grasslands and other flora and fauna and flora located within the site.  Much of the work, including the monitoring of controlled burns (grasslands) and removal of hazardous trees/limbs are co-ordinated by Council’s Parks & Open Space department.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with the relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

Conclusion

That Council appoint three signatories to endorse the annual Abstract of Accounts prepared for the 2016/17 financial period and note that Council officers have advised the Freedom of Information Commissioner that no requests were made with regard to the Epping Cemetery during the same period.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT Council acting in its capacity as the Epping Cemetery Trust, resolve to:

1.   Nominate the Mayor and Cr ………………….. and Cr ……………….. to sign the Abstract of Accounts for the 2016/17 financial period.

2.    Note that the Freedom of Information Commissioner has been advised that no requests were made with regard to the Epping Cemetery, during the 2015/16 financial year.

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                               Tuesday 8 August 2017

 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.5       Partnerships & Engagement

6.5.1    Assemblies of Councillors Report - 8 August 2017

File No:                                  188199   

Responsible Officer:           Acting Director Partnership and Engagement

Author:                                  Governance Officer   

 

Report

Summary

To report to Council the records of Assemblies of Councillors in accordance with Section 80A(2) of the Local Government Act.

Background

The Local Government Act 1989 requires records of Assemblies of Councillors to be reported to an ordinary Council meeting and recorded in the minutes of that meeting.

A meeting is an assembly of Councillors if it considers matters that are likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a Council delegation and the meeting is:

·    A planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and a member of Council staff; or

·    An advisory committee of Council where one or more Councillors are present.

A record must be kept of an assembly of Councillors which lists the Councillors and members of Council staff attending, the matters discussed, disclosures of conflict of interest and whether a Councillor left the meeting after making a disclosure.

Proposal

Assemblies of Councillors records not previously reported to Council are detailed in the following table:-

Assembly Details

Councillor attendees

Officer attendees

Matters discussed

Arts Cultural and Sporting Grants Program for Young People

15 June 2017

Cr Alessi

Cr Desiato

Cr Monteleone

Cr Pavlidis

Cr Sterjova

Cr Kozmevski

MG

The Advisory Committee made a recommendation to the delegate regarding the following application via a virtual meeting:

 

1.     Marco Mitidieri – Sporting Grant – Interstate

Nil disclosures

Arts Cultural and Sporting Grants Program for Young People

16 June 2017

Cr Alessi

Cr Desiato

Cr Monteleone

Cr Pavlidis

Cr Sterjova

Cr Kozmevski

MG

The Advisory Committee made a recommendation to the delegate regarding the following application via a virtual meeting:

 

1.     Jayden Boyle – Sporting Grant – Interstate

2.     Eva Novembre – Sporting Grant – Interstate

3.     Date Novembre – Sporting Grant – Interstate

Nil disclosures

Council Forum

4 July 2017

Cr Kirkham

(Mayor)

Cr Kelly
(Deputy Mayor)

Cr Alessi

Cr Desiato

Cr Cox

Cr Kozmevski Cr Lalios

Cr Monteleone

Cr Pavlidis

Cr Sterjova

CEO-A

DCS -A

DCRS

DCTP

DPE-A

DPMP

MCS-A

MLCF

TLSP

CIPC

MCCD

FEC

1.     City of Whittlesea Sports Facilities Fees and Charges Policy.

2.     Multiple Sports Strategy 2017-2026.

3.     Event Modelling.

4.     City of Whittlesea Community Festival review and relocation.

 

Nil disclosures

Council Forum

13 July 2017

Cr Kirkham

(Mayor)

Cr Kelly
(Deputy Mayor)

Cr Cox

Cr Desiato

Cr Lalios

Cr Sterjova

CEO-A

DCS-A

DCRS

DCTP-A

DPE-A

DPMP

CSP

MLCF

ULIP

1.     Briefing from Victoria Police – Local burglary prevention pilot.

2.     Community Meeting Space Guidelines.

3.     Findon Road / Ferres Boulevard / The Lakes Boulevard intersection options.

4.     Road Management Plan.

Nil disclosures

The table below represents an Index of Officer titles:

Initials

Title of Officer

Initials

Title of Officer

CEO-A

Acting Chief Executive Officer – Liana Thompson

MLCF

Manager Leisure and Community Facilities – Paul Reading

DCS

Director Community Services – Russell Hopkins

ULIP

Unit Leader Infrastructure Projects – Anthony Kyrkou

DCS-A

Acting Director Community Services – Neville Kurth

TLSP

Team Leader Strategic Planning (Leisure & Recreation) – James Lake

DCRS

Director Corporate Services – Helen Sui

CIPC

Community Infrastructure Projects Coordinator – Karol Anfuso

DCTP

Director City Transport and Presentation– Nick Mann

MCCD

Manager Community Cultural Development – Catherine Rinaudo

DCTP - A

Acting Director City Transport and Presentation– Peter Ali

TLAHE

Team Leader Arts, Heritage and Events – Rachel Francis

DPE-A

Acting Director Partnerships and Engagement – Belgin Besim

FEC

Festival and Events Coordinator – Julie McBride

DPMP

Director Planning & Major Projects – Steve O’Brien

CSP

Community Safety Planner – Elizabeth Carroll

MG

Manager Governance – Michael Tonta

 

 

Consultation

Consultation has taken place with internal Council Officer representatives of each of the meetings and committees that qualify as an Assembly of Councillors.

Financial Implications

There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Policy Strategy and Legislation

Section 3C(2)(g) of the Local Government Act 1989 provides that one of Council’s facilitating objectives is to have regard to ensuring transparency and accountability in Council decision making.

Accordingly, section 80A of the Local Government Act 1989 requires that the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that the written record of an assembly of Councillors is, as soon as practicable:-

    (a)        reported at an ordinary meeting of the Council; and

    (b)        incorporated in the minutes of that Council meeting.

Links to the CoUNCIL Plan

Council Strategy         Good Governance

Future Direction         Continuous improvement

Theme                          Best practice models of operation are adopted by Council

Strategic Objective     Council adopts best practice models of operation

The provision of this report is in line with the Future Direction 7 – Good Governance of Council’s Community Plan by ensuring Council adopts best practice models of operation.

Declarations of Conflicts of Interest

Under section 80C of the Local Government Act 1989 officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

The Responsible Officer reviewing this report, having made enquiries with relevant members of staff, reports that no disclosable interests have been raised in relation to this report.

CONCLUSION

That Council note the record of the Assemblies of Councillors meetings in the table set out in the report.

 

Recommendation

THAT Council note the record of the Assemblies of Councillors meetings in the table set out in the report.

 

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

6.6       Executive Services

Nil Reports 

7.         Notices of Motion

Nil Reports 

8.         Questions to Officers

9.         Urgent BusineSS

10.       Reports from Delegates Appointed BY Council TO Other Bodies

11.       Questions to CouncillorS will be considered at item 5.1

12.       Confidential Business

12.1     Planning and Major Projects

Nil Reports


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

12.2     Community Services

12.2.1  Community Care Home Maintenance Services Contract

File No:                                  195663

Responsible Officer:           Director Community Services

Author:                                  Aged & Disability Special Projects Officer

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(d)           contractual matters

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

12.3     City Transport and Presentation

12.3.1  Provision of Plant Hire Services

File No:                                  193209

Responsible Officer:           Director City Transport & Presentation

Author:                                  Acting Manager City Presentation

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(d)           contractual matters

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

12.4     Corporate Services

12.4.1  Contract Variation - Contract CT0809107C

File No:                                  .

Responsible Officer:           Director Corporate Services

Author:                                  Team Leader Business Systems Support

Report

 

It is proposed that the following item be considered in closed session.

 

Recommendation

 

 

THAT Council resolve to close the meeting to members of the public for the purpose of considering details relating to the following, in accordance with Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989:

 

(d)           contractual matters

  


Ordinary Council Agenda                                                                  Tuesday 8 August 2017

 

12.5     Partnerships & Engagement

Nil Reports

12.6     Executive Services

Nil Reports 

13.       Closure